Слова на букву obtr-phyl (6389) New Collegiate Dictionary
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Слова на букву obtr-phyl (6389)

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pharyngeal
adjective Etymology: New Latin pharyngeus, from pharyng-, pharynx Date: circa 1823 relating to or located or produced in the region of the pharynx
pharyngitis
noun (plural pharyngitides) Date: circa 1844 inflammation of the pharynx
pharynx
noun (plural pharynges; also pharynxes) Etymology: New Latin pharyng-, pharynx, from Greek, throat, pharynx; akin to Old Norse barki throat and probably to Latin ferire to ...
phase
I. noun Etymology: New Latin phasis, from Greek, appearance of a star, phase of the moon, from phainein to show (middle voice, to appear) — more at fancy Date: circa 1750 1. ...
phase down
verb Date: 1970 transitive verb to reduce the size or amount of by phases intransitive verb to undergo reduction by phases
phase microscope
noun see phase-contrast microscope
phase modulation
noun Date: 1930 modulation of the phase of a radio carrier wave by voice or other signal
phase out
verb Date: 1940 transitive verb to discontinue the practice, production, or use of by phases intransitive verb to stop production or operation by phases
phase-contrast
adjective Date: 1934 of or employing the phase-contrast microscope
phase-contrast microscope
noun Date: 1947 a microscope that translates differences in phase of the light transmitted through or reflected by the object into differences of intensity in the image — ...
phasedown
noun Date: 1964 a gradual reduction (as in operations or size) ; a slowing down by phases
phaseout
noun Date: 1958 a gradual stopping (as in operations or production) ; a closing down by phases
phasic
adjective see phase I
phasmid
noun Etymology: New Latin Phasmida, group name, from Phasma, type genus, from Greek, apparition, from phainein to show — more at fancy Date: 1872 any of an order ...
phat
adjective (phatter; phattest) Etymology: probably alteration of 1fat Date: 1963 slang highly attractive or gratifying ; excellent
phatic
adjective Etymology: Greek phatos, verbal of phanai to speak Date: 1922 of, relating to, or being speech used for social or emotive purposes rather than for communicating ...
phatically
adverb see phatic
PhB
abbreviation Etymology: New Latin philosophiae baccalaureus bachelor of philosophy
PhD
abbreviation Etymology: New Latin philosophiae doctor doctor of philosophy
pheasant
noun (plural pheasant or pheasants) Etymology: Middle English fesaunt, from Anglo-French fesant, faisan, from Latin phasianus, from Greek (ornis) phasianos, from phasianos of ...
phellem
noun Etymology: Greek phellos cork + English -em (as in phloem) Date: circa 1887 a layer of usually suberized cells produced outwardly by a phellogen
phelloderm
noun Etymology: Greek phellos + International Scientific Vocabulary -derm Date: 1875 a layer of parenchyma produced inwardly by a phellogen
phellogen
noun Etymology: Greek phellos + International Scientific Vocabulary -gen Date: 1875 a secondary meristem that initiates phellem and phelloderm in the periderm of a stem — ...
phen-
or pheno- combining form Etymology: obsolete phene benzene, from French phène, from Greek phainein to show; from its occurrence in illuminating gas — more at fancy 1. ...
phen-fen
noun Date: 1984 fen-phen
phenacaine
noun Etymology: probably from phenetidine + acet- + -caine Date: 1907 a crystalline base C18H22N2O2 or its hydrochloride used as a local anesthetic
phenacetin
noun Etymology: International Scientific Vocabulary Date: circa 1887 a white crystalline compound C10H13NO2 formerly used to ease pain or fever but withdrawn because of its ...
phenacite
noun see phenakite
phenakite
or phenacite noun Etymology: German Phenakit, from Greek phenak-, phenax deceiver; from its being easily mistaken for quartz Date: circa 1834 a hard glassy mineral that ...
phenanthrene
noun Etymology: International Scientific Vocabulary phen- + anthracene Date: 1882 a crystalline tricyclic aromatic hydrocarbon C14H10 of coal tar isomeric with anthracene
phenazine
noun Etymology: International Scientific Vocabulary Date: 1893 a yellowish crystalline base C12H8N2 used especially in organic synthesis
phencyclidine
noun Etymology: phen- + cycl- + -idine Date: 1959 a piperidine derivative C17H25N used chiefly in the form of its hydrochloride especially as a veterinary anesthetic and ...
phenetic
adjective Etymology: phenotype + -etic (as in genetic) Date: 1960 of or relating to taxonomic analysis that emphasizes the overall similarities of characteristics among ...
pheneticist
noun see phenetics
phenetics
noun plural but singular in construction Date: circa 1960 a system of biological classification based on phenetic methods • pheneticist noun
Phenix City
geographical name city E Alabama population 28,265
phenmetrazine
noun Etymology: phenyl + methyl + tetra- + azine Date: 1956 a sympathomimetic stimulant C11H15NO used in the form of its hydrochloride as an appetite suppressant
pheno-
combining form see phen-
phenobarbital
noun Date: 1919 a crystalline barbiturate C12H12N2O3 used as a hypnotic, sedative, and anticonvulsant
phenobarbitone
noun Date: circa 1932 chiefly British phenobarbital
phenocopy
noun Etymology: International Scientific Vocabulary phenotype + copy Date: 1937 a phenotypic variation that is caused by unusual environmental conditions and resembles the ...
phenocryst
noun Etymology: French phénocryste, from Greek phainein to show + krystallos crystal — more at fancy Date: 1893 one of the prominent embedded crystals of a porphyry • ...
phenocrystic
adjective see phenocryst
phenol
noun Etymology: International Scientific Vocabulary phen- + 3-ol Date: circa 1852 1. a corrosive poisonous crystalline acidic compound C6H5OH present in the tars of coal and ...
phenol red
noun Date: 1916 a red crystalline compound C19H14O5S used especially as an acid-base indicator
phenolate
noun Date: 1885 phenoxide
phenolated
adjective Date: 1923 treated, mixed, or impregnated with phenol
phenolic
I. adjective Date: circa 1872 1. a. of, relating to, or having the characteristics of a phenol b. containing or derived from a phenol 2. of, relating to, or being a ...
phenolic resin
noun see phenolic II
phenological
adjective see phenology
phenologically
adverb see phenology
phenology
noun Etymology: phenomena + -logy Date: circa 1884 1. a branch of science dealing with the relations between climate and periodic biological phenomena (as bird migration or ...
phenolphthalein
noun Etymology: International Scientific Vocabulary phenol + phthalein any of various xanthene dyes, from phthalic acid Date: 1875 a white or yellowish-white crystalline ...
phenom
noun Date: circa 1890 phenomenon; especially a person of phenomenal ability or promise
phenomena
noun (plural -nas) Date: 1576 nonstandard phenomenon Usage: Phenomena has been in occasional use as a singular for more than 400 years and its plural phenomenas for more ...
phenomenal
adjective Date: 1825 relating to or being a phenomenon: as a. known through the senses rather than through thought or intuition b. concerned with phenomena rather than ...
phenomenalism
noun Date: circa 1865 1. a theory that limits knowledge to phenomena only 2. a theory that all knowledge is of phenomena and that what is construed to be perception of ...
phenomenalist
noun or adjective see phenomenalism
phenomenalistic
adjective see phenomenalism
phenomenalistically
adverb see phenomenalism
phenomenally
adverb see phenomenal
phenomenological
adjective Date: circa 1858 1. of or relating to phenomenology 2. phenomenal 3. of or relating to phenomenalism • phenomenologically adverb
phenomenologically
adverb see phenomenological
phenomenologist
noun see phenomenology
phenomenology
noun (plural -gies) Etymology: German Phänomenologie, from Phänomenon phenomenon + -logie -logy Date: circa 1797 1. the study of the development of human consciousness and ...
phenomenon
noun (plural phenomena or -nons) Etymology: Late Latin phaenomenon, from Greek phainomenon, from neuter of phainomenos, present participle of phainesthai to appear, middle voice ...
phenothiazine
noun Etymology: International Scientific Vocabulary Date: 1894 1. a greenish-yellow crystalline compound C12H9NS used as an anthelmintic and insecticide especially in ...
phenotype
noun Etymology: German Phänotypus, from Greek phainein to show + typos type Date: circa 1911 the observable properties of an organism that are produced by the interaction of ...
phenotypic
adjective see phenotype
phenotypical
adjective see phenotype
phenotypically
adverb see phenotype
phenoxide
noun Date: 1888 a salt of a phenol especially in its capacity as a weak acid
phentermine
noun Etymology: probably from phenyl + tert- (from tertiary) + amine Date: 1962 an anorectic drug C10H15N used in the form of its hydrochloride to treat obesity
phentolamine
noun Etymology: phen- + toluidine + amine Date: 1952 an adrenergic blocking agent C17H19N3O used especially in the diagnosis and treatment of hypertension due to ...
phenyl
noun Etymology: International Scientific Vocabulary Date: circa 1850 a monovalent aryl radical C6H5– derived from benzene by removal of one hydrogen atom — often used in ...
phenylalanine
noun Etymology: International Scientific Vocabulary Date: circa 1883 an essential amino acid C9H11NO2 that is converted in the normal body to tyrosine
phenylbutazone
noun Etymology: phenyl + butyric acid + pyrazalone (C3H4N2O) Date: 1952 a drug C19H20N2O2 that is used for its analgesic and anti-inflammatory properties especially in the ...
phenylephrine
noun Etymology: phenyl + epinephrine Date: circa 1947 a sympathomimetic agent C9H13NO2 that is used in the form of its hydrochloride as a vasoconstrictor, a mydriatic, a ...
phenylethylamine
noun Date: 1910 a neurotransmitter C8H11N that is an amine resembling amphetamine in structure and pharmacological properties; also any of its derivatives
phenylic
adjective see phenyl
phenylketonuria
noun Etymology: New Latin, from International Scientific Vocabulary phenyl + ketone + New Latin -uria Date: 1935 an inherited metabolic disorder caused by an enzyme ...
phenylketonuric
noun or adjective see phenylketonuria
phenylpropanolamine
noun Etymology: phenyl + propane + 1-ol + amine Date: 1947 a sympathomimetic drug C9H13NO used in the form of its hydrochloride especially as a nasal and bronchial ...
phenylthiocarbamide
noun Date: 1879 a crystalline compound C7H8N2S that is extremely bitter or tasteless depending on the presence or absence of a single dominant gene in the taster — called ...
phenylthiourea
noun Date: 1896 phenylthiocarbamide
phenytoin
noun Etymology: diphenylhydantoin Date: 1941 a crystalline anticonvulsant compound C15H12N2O2 used in the form of its sodium salt in the treatment of epilepsy — called also ...
pheochromocytoma
noun (plural -mas; also pheochromocytomata) Etymology: New Latin, from International Scientific Vocabulary pheochromocyte chromaffin cell (from pheochrome chromaffin — from ...
Pherae
geographical name ancient town SE Thessaly
pheresis
noun (plural phereses) Etymology: probably back-formation from plasmapheresis Date: 1975 apheresis
pheromonal
adjective see pheromone
pheromone
noun Etymology: International Scientific Vocabulary phero- (from Greek pherein to carry) + -mone (as in hormone) — more at bear Date: 1959 a chemical substance that is ...
phew
interjection Date: 1604 1. — used to express relief or fatigue 2. — used to express disgust at or as if at an unpleasant odor
phi
noun Etymology: Middle Greek, from Greek phei Date: 1638 the 21st letter of the Greek alphabet — see alphabet table
Phi Beta Kappa
noun Etymology: Phi Beta Kappa (Society), from phi + beta + kappa, initials of the society's Greek motto philosophia biou kybernētēs philosophy the guide of life Date: 1912 ...
phi phenomenon
noun Date: circa 1928 apparent motion resulting from an orderly sequence of stimuli (as lights flashed in rapid succession a short distance apart on a sign) without any actual ...
phial
noun Etymology: Middle English, from Latin phiala, from Greek phialē Date: 14th century vial
Phidias
biographical name flourished circa 490-430 B.C. Greek sculptor
Phil
abbreviation Philippians
phil-
or philo- combining form Etymology: Greek, from philos dear, friendly loving ; having an affinity for
Philadelphia
geographical name 1. city & port SE Pennsylvania on Delaware River population 1,517,550 2. — see alasehir 3. — see Amman • Philadelphian adjective or noun
Philadelphia lawyer
noun Etymology: Philadelphia, Pennsylvania Date: 1788 a lawyer knowledgeable in even the most minute aspects of the law
Philadelphia pepper pot
noun Date: 1929 pepper pot 2b
Philadelphian
adjective or noun see Philadelphia
philadelphus
noun Etymology: New Latin, from Greek philadelphos brotherly, from phil- + adelphos brother — more at -adelphous Date: 1783 mock orange 1
Philae
geographical name former island S Egypt in the Nile above Aswân; now submerged
philander
intransitive verb (-dered; philandering) Etymology: from obsolete philander lover, philanderer, probably from the name Philander Date: 1737 of a man to have casual or ...
philanderer
noun see philander
philanthropic
also philanthropical adjective Date: 1789 1. of, relating to, or characterized by philanthropy ; humanitarian 2. dispensing or receiving aid from funds set aside for ...
philanthropical
adjective see philanthropic
philanthropically
adverb see philanthropic
philanthropist
noun Date: circa 1736 one who practices philanthropy
philanthropoid
noun Etymology: blend of philanthropist and anthropoid Date: 1945 a person who works for a philanthropic organization
philanthropy
noun (plural -pies) Etymology: Late Latin philanthropia, from Greek philanthrōpia, from philanthrōpos loving people, from phil- + anthrōpos human being Date: circa 1623 1. ...
philatelic
adjective see philately
philatelically
adverb see philately
philatelist
noun Date: circa 1865 a specialist in philately ; one who collects or studies stamps
philately
noun Etymology: French philatélie, from phil- + Greek ateleia tax exemption, from atelēs free from tax, from a- + telos tax; perhaps akin to Greek tlēnai to bear; from the ...
Philemon
noun Etymology: Greek Philēmōn Date: 14th century 1. a friend and probable convert of the apostle Paul 2. a letter written by St. Paul to a Christian living in the area ...
philharmonic
noun Etymology: French philharmonique, literally, loving harmony, from Italian filarmonico, from fil- phil- + armonia harmony, from Latin harmonia Date: 1843 symphony ...
philhellene
or philhellenic adjective Etymology: Greek philellēn, from phil- + Hellēn Hellene Date: circa 1825 admiring Greece or the Greeks • philhellene noun • philhellenism ...
philhellenic
adjective see philhellene
philhellenism
noun see philhellene
philhellenist
noun see philhellene
Philip
I. biographical name 1639?-1676 Metacomet Wampanoag Indian chief II. biographical name name of 6 kings of France: especially II or Philip Augustus 1165-1223 (reigned ...
Philip II
biographical name 382-336 B.C. king of Macedon (359-336)
Philip III
biographical name 1396-1467 the Good Duke of Burgundy (1419-67)
Philippeville
geographical name — see Skikda
Philippi
geographical name ancient town NE Greece in N central Macedonia • Philippian adjective or noun
Philippian
adjective or noun see Philippi
Philippians
noun plural but singular in construction Etymology: short for Epistle to the Philippians Date: 1549 a hortatory letter written by St. Paul to the Christians of Philippi and ...
philippic
noun Etymology: Middle French philippique, from Latin & Greek; Latin philippica, orationes philippicae, speeches of Cicero against Mark Antony, translation of Greek philippikoi ...
Philippine
adjective see Philippines
Philippine Islands
geographical name islands of the Malay Archipelago NE of Borneo — see Philippines
Philippine mahogany
noun Etymology: Philippine Islands Date: circa 1924 any of several Philippine dipterocarp timber trees (genera Shorea, Parashorea, and Pentacme) with wood resembling that of ...
Philippine Sea
geographical name sea comprising the waters of the W Pacific E of & adjacent to the Philippine Islands
Philippines
or Spanish Filipinas or Pilipino Pilipinas geographical name country E Asia comprising the Philippine Islands; a republic; once a Spanish possession & (1898-1945) a United ...
Philippopolis
geographical name — see Plovdiv
Philips
biographical name Ambrose 1674-1749 Namby-Pamby English poet & dramatist
philistia
noun Usage: often capitalized Etymology: Philistia, ancient country of southwest Palestine Date: 1857 the class or world of cultural philistines
Philistia
geographical name country SW ancient Palestine on the coast; the land of the Philistines
Philistine
noun Date: 14th century 1. a native or inhabitant of ancient Philistia 2. often not capitalized a. a person who is guided by materialism and is usually disdainful of ...
philistine
adjective see Philistine
philistinism
noun see Philistine
Phillips
I. adjective Etymology: from Phillips, a trademark, from Henry M. Phillips died 1958 American engineer Date: 1935 of, relating to, or being a screw having a head with a cross ...
Phillpotts
biographical name Eden 1862-1960 English novelist & dramatist
phillumenist
noun Etymology: phil- + Latin lumen light — more at luminary Date: 1943 one who collects matchbooks or matchbox labels
Philo Judaeus
biographical name circa 13 b.c.-a.d. 45 to 50 Jewish philosopher of Alexandria
philo-
combining form see phil-
Philoctetes
noun Etymology: Greek Philoktētēs Date: 14th century a Greek archer who uses the bow of Hercules to slay Paris at Troy
philodendron
noun (plural -drons; also philodendra) Etymology: New Latin, from Greek, neuter of philodendros loving trees, from phil- + dendron tree — more at dendr- Date: 1877 any of ...
philological
adjective see philology
philologically
adverb see philology
philologist
noun see philology
philology
noun Etymology: French philologie, from Latin philologia love of learning and literature, from Greek, from philologos fond of learning and literature, from phil- + logos word, ...
Philomel
noun Etymology: Latin Philomela Philomela, nightingale Date: 1579 nightingale
Philomela
noun Etymology: Latin, from Greek Philomēlē Date: 14th century an Athenian princess in Greek mythology raped and deprived of her tongue by her brother-in-law Tereus, ...
philoprogenitive
adjective Etymology: phil- + Latin progenitus, past participle of progignere to beget — more at progenitor Date: 1865 1. tending to produce offspring ; prolific 2. of, ...
philoprogenitiveness
noun see philoprogenitive
philos
abbreviation philosophy
philosophe
noun Etymology: French, literally, philosopher Date: 1779 one of the deistic or materialistic writers and thinkers of the 18th century French Enlightenment
philosopher
noun Etymology: Middle English philosophe, philosophre, from Anglo-French, from Latin philosophus, from Greek philosophos, from phil- + sophia wisdom, from sophos wise Date: ...
philosopher's stone
noun Date: 14th century an imaginary stone, substance, or chemical preparation believed to have the power of transmuting baser metals into gold and sought by alchemists; ...
philosophers' stone
noun see philosopher's stone
philosophic
adjective see philosophical
philosophical
also philosophic adjective Date: 14th century 1. a. of or relating to philosophers or philosophy b. based on philosophy 2. characterized by the attitude of a ...
philosophical analysis
noun Date: 1936 analytic philosophy
philosophically
adverb see philosophical
philosophise
British variant of philosophize
philosophize
verb (-phized; -phizing) Date: 1594 intransitive verb 1. to reason in the manner of a philosopher 2. to expound a moralizing and often superficial philosophy transitive ...
philosophizer
noun see philosophize
philosophy
noun (plural -phies) Etymology: Middle English philosophie, from Anglo-French, from Latin philosophia, from Greek, from philosophos philosopher Date: 14th century 1. a. ...
philosophy of life
Date: 1760 1. an overall vision of or attitude toward life and the purpose of life 2. [translation of German Lebensphilosophie] any of various philosophies that emphasize ...
philter
noun Etymology: Middle French philtre, from Latin philtrum, from Greek philtron; akin to Greek philos dear Date: circa 1587 1. a potion credited with magical power 2. a ...
philtre
chiefly British variant of philter
phiz
noun Etymology: by shortening & alteration from physiognomy Date: 1685 face
phleb-
or phlebo- combining form Etymology: Greek phleb-, phlebo-, from phleb-, phleps; perhaps akin to Greek phlyein, phlyzein to boil over — more at fluid vein
phlebitis
noun Etymology: New Latin Date: circa 1834 inflammation of a vein
phlebo-
combining form see phleb-
phlebology
noun Etymology: International Scientific Vocabulary Date: 1893 a branch of medicine concerned with the veins
phlebotomist
noun see phlebotomy
phlebotomus fever
noun Etymology: New Latin Phlebotomus, genus of sand flies Date: circa 1923 sandfly fever
phlebotomy
noun (plural -mies) Etymology: Middle English fleobotomie, from Middle French flebothomie, from Late Latin phlebotomia, from Greek, from phleb- + -tomia -tomy Date: 14th ...
Phlegethon
noun Etymology: Latin, from Greek Phlegethōn Date: 14th century a river of fire in Hades
phlegm
noun Etymology: Middle English fleume, from Anglo-French, from Late Latin phlegmat-, phlegma, from Greek, flame, inflammation, phlegm, from phlegein to burn — more at black ...
phlegmatic
adjective Date: 14th century 1. resembling, consisting of, or producing the humor phlegm 2. having or showing a slow and stolid temperament Synonyms: see impassive • ...
phlegmatically
adverb see phlegmatic
phlegmy
adjective see phlegm
phloem
noun Etymology: German, from Greek phloios, phloos bark; perhaps akin to Greek phlein to teem, abound, phlyein, phlyzein to boil over — more at fluid Date: 1875 a complex ...
phloem necrosis
noun Date: 1923 a pathological state in a plant characterized by brown discoloration and disintegration of the phloem; especially a fatal disease of the American elm caused ...
phloem ray
noun Date: 1875 a vascular ray or part of a vascular ray that is located in phloem — compare xylem ray
phlogistic
adjective Date: 1733 1. [New Latin phlogiston] of or relating to phlogiston 2. [Greek phlogistos] of or relating to inflammations and fevers
phlogiston
noun Etymology: New Latin, from Greek, neuter of phlogistos inflammable, from phlogizein to set on fire, from phlog-, phlox flame, from phlegein Date: 1733 the hypothetical ...
phlogopite
noun Etymology: German Phlogopit, from Greek phlogōpos fiery-looking, from phlog-, phlox + ōps face — more at eye Date: 1850 a usually brown to red form of mica
phlox
noun (plural phlox or phloxes) Etymology: New Latin, from Latin, a flower, from Greek, flame, wallflower Date: circa 1706 any of a genus (Phlox of the family Polemoniaceae, ...
Phnom Penh
geographical name city capital of Cambodia on the Mekong population 800,000
phobia
noun Etymology: -phobia Date: 1786 an exaggerated usually inexplicable and illogical fear of a particular object, class of objects, or situation
phobic
adjective Date: 1897 of, relating to, affected with, or constituting phobia • phobic noun
Phocaea
geographical name ancient city of Asia Minor on Aegean Sea in N Ionia • Phocaean adjective or noun
Phocaean
adjective or noun see Phocaea
Phocian
adjective or noun see Phocis
Phocion
biographical name circa 402-318 B.C. Athenian general & statesman
Phocis
geographical name region central Greece N of Gulf of Corinth • Phocian adjective or noun
phoebe
noun Etymology: imitative Date: 1700 any of a genus (Sayornis) of the tyrant flycatcher family; especially a flycatcher (S. phoebe) of the eastern United States that has a ...
Phoebe
noun Etymology: Latin, from Greek Phoibē, from phoibē, feminine of phoibos Date: 1567 Artemis
Phoebus
noun Etymology: Latin, from Greek Phoibos, from phoibos radiant Date: 14th century 1. Apollo 2. not capitalized sun
Phoenicia
geographical name ancient country SW Asia at E end of the Mediterranean in modern Syria & Lebanon
Phoenician
noun Date: 14th century 1. a native or inhabitant of ancient Phoenicia 2. the Semitic language of ancient Phoenicia • Phoenician adjective
phoenix
noun Etymology: Middle English fenix, from Old English, from Latin phoenix, from Greek phoinix Date: before 12th century a legendary bird which according to one account lived ...
Phoenix
geographical name city capital of Arizona on Salt River population 1,321,045 • Phoenician noun
Phoenix Islands
geographical name islands W Pacific belonging to Kiribati
phoenixlike
adjective see phoenix
phon-
or phono- combining form Etymology: Latin, from Greek phōn-, phōno-, from phōnē — more at ban sound ; voice ; speech
phonate
intransitive verb (phonated; phonating) Date: 1876 to produce vocal sounds and especially speech • phonation noun
phonation
noun see phonate
phone
I. noun Etymology: Greek phōnē Date: circa 1866 a speech sound considered as a physical event without regard to its place in the sound system of a language II. noun ...
phone card
noun Date: 1982 a prepaid card used for making telephone calls
phone sex
Date: 1982 1. prerecorded sex-oriented telephone messages available to those who call a commercial service 2. sex-oriented telephone conversations (as with an operator ...
phone tag
noun Date: 1984 telephone tag
phone-in
noun Date: 1963 a call-in show (as on radio)
phonematic
adjective Date: 1936 phonemic
phoneme
noun Etymology: French phonème, from Greek phōnēmat-, phōnēma speech sound, utterance, from phōnein to sound Date: 1896 any of the abstract units of the phonetic system ...
phonemic
adjective Date: circa 1931 1. of, relating to, or having the characteristics of a phoneme 2. a. constituting members of different phonemes (as \n\ and \m\ in English) ...
phonemically
adverb see phonemic
phonemicist
noun see phonemics
phonemics
noun plural but singular in construction Date: 1936 1. a branch of linguistic analysis involving the study of phonemes 2. the structure of a language in terms of phonemes ...
phonetic
adjective Etymology: New Latin phoneticus, from Greek phōnētikos, from phōnein to sound with the voice, from phōnē voice Date: 1819 1. a. of or relating to spoken ...
phonetic alphabet
noun Date: 1848 1. a set of symbols (as the IPA) used for phonetic transcription 2. any of various systems of identifying letters of the alphabet by means of code words in ...
phonetically
adverb see phonetic
phonetician
noun Date: 1848 a specialist in phonetics
phonetics
noun plural but singular in construction Date: 1836 1. the system of speech sounds of a language or group of languages 2. a. the study and systematic classification of ...
phoney
I. adjective see phony I II. noun see phony II
phoney-baloney
adjective see phony-baloney
phonic
adjective Date: 1823 1. of, relating to, or producing sound ; acoustic 2. a. of or relating to the sounds of speech b. of or relating to phonics • phonically adverb
phonically
adverb see phonic
phonics
noun plural but singular in construction Date: circa 1684 1. the science of sound ; acoustics 2. a method of teaching beginners to read and pronounce words by learning the ...
phonily
adverb see phony I
phoniness
noun see phony I
phono
noun (plural phonos) Date: 1903 phonograph
phono-
combining form see phon-
phonocardiogram
noun Etymology: International Scientific Vocabulary Date: 1912 a graphic representation of heart sounds made by means of a microphone, amplifier, and recording equipment
phonocardiograph
noun see phonocardiography
phonocardiographic
adjective see phonocardiography
phonocardiography
noun Date: 1916 the process of producing a phonocardiogram • phonocardiograph noun • phonocardiographic adjective
phonogram
noun Etymology: International Scientific Vocabulary Date: 1860 1. a character or symbol used to represent a word, syllable, or phoneme 2. a succession of orthographic ...
phonograph
noun Date: 1877 an instrument for reproducing sounds by means of the vibration of a stylus or needle following a spiral groove on a revolving disc or cylinder
phonographer
noun Date: 1845 a specialist in phonography
phonographic
adjective Date: 1828 1. of or relating to phonography 2. of or relating to a phonograph • phonographically adverb
phonographically
adverb see phonographic
phonography
noun Date: 1701 1. spelling based on pronunciation 2. a system of shorthand writing based on sound
phonolite
noun Etymology: French, from German Phonolith, from phon- + -lith; from its ringing sound when struck Date: circa 1828 a gray or green volcanic rock consisting essentially ...
phonologic
adjective see phonology
phonological
adjective see phonology
phonologically
adverb see phonology
phonologist
noun see phonology
phonology
noun Date: 1799 1. the science of speech sounds including especially the history and theory of sound changes in a language or in two or more related languages 2. the ...
phonon
noun Etymology: phon- + 2-on Date: 1932 a quantum of vibrational energy (as in a crystal)
phonotactic
adjective see phonotactics
phonotactics
noun plural but singular in construction Date: 1956 the area of phonology concerned with the analysis and description of the permitted sound sequences of a language • ...
phony
I. adjective also phoney (phonier; -est) Etymology: perhaps alteration of fawney gilded brass ring used in the fawney rig, a confidence game, from Irish fáinne ring, from Old ...
phony-baloney
or phoney-baloney adjective Date: 1978 phony e
phooey
interjection Date: 1929 — used to express repudiation or disgust
phorate
noun Etymology: phosphorus + thioate salt of a thio acid Date: 1959 a very toxic organophosphate systemic insecticide C7H17O2PS3
phosgene
noun Etymology: Greek phōs light + -genēs born, produced — more at fancy, -gen; from its originally having been obtained by the action of sunlight Date: 1812 a colorless ...
phosph-
or phospho- combining form Etymology: phosphorus 1. phosphorus 2. phosphate
phosphatase
noun Date: 1912 an enzyme that accelerates the hydrolysis and synthesis of organic esters of phosphoric acid and the transfer of phosphate groups to other compounds: a. ...

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