Слова на букву obtr-phyl (6389) New Collegiate Dictionary
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Слова на букву obtr-phyl (6389)

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ornamentation
noun Date: 1706 1. something that ornaments ; embellishment 2. the act or process of ornamenting ; the state of being ornamented
ornate
adjective Etymology: Middle English ornat, from Latin ornatus, past participle of ornare to furnish, embellish; akin to Latin ordo order — more at order Date: 15th century ...
ornately
adverb see ornate
ornateness
noun see ornate
Orne
geographical name river 95 miles (153 kilometers) NW France flowing N into Bay of the Seine
orneriness
noun see ornery
ornery
adjective (ornerier; -est) Etymology: alteration of ordinary Date: 1816 having an irritable disposition ; cantankerous • orneriness noun
ornith-
or ornitho- combining form Etymology: Latin, from Greek, from ornith-, ornis — more at erne bird
ornithic
adjective Etymology: Greek ornithikos, from ornith-, ornis Date: 1854 of, relating to, or characteristic of birds
ornithine
noun Etymology: International Scientific Vocabulary ornith uric acid (a compound of which ornithine is a component, found in the urine of birds) + 2-ine Date: 1881 a ...
ornithischian
noun Etymology: New Latin Ornithischia, from ornith- + ischium Date: 1933 any of an order (Ornithischia) of herbivorous dinosaurs (as a stegosaurus) that have the pubis of ...
ornitho-
combining form see ornith-
ornithologic
adjective see ornithology
ornithological
adjective see ornithology
ornithologically
adverb see ornithology
ornithologist
noun see ornithology
ornithology
noun (plural -gies) Etymology: New Latin ornithologia, from ornith- + -logia -logy Date: 1676 1. a treatise on ornithology 2. a branch of zoology dealing with birds • ...
ornithopod
noun Etymology: ultimately from Greek ornith- + pod-, pous foot — more at foot Date: circa 1889 any of a suborder (Ornithopoda) of bipedal ornithischian dinosaurs (as a ...
ornithopter
noun Etymology: International Scientific Vocabulary ornith- + -pter (as in helicopter) Date: 1908 an aircraft designed to derive its chief support and propulsion from ...
ornithosis
noun (plural ornithoses) Etymology: New Latin Date: 1939 psittacosis
Oro Valley
geographical name town S Arizona N of Tucson population 29,700
oro y plata
foreign term Etymology: Spanish gold and silver — motto of Montana
oro-
I. combining form Etymology: Greek oros — more at orient mountain II. combining form Etymology: Latin or-, os — more at oral mouth
Orocovis
geographical name city central Puerto Rico population 23,844
orogenesis
noun Etymology: New Latin Date: 1886 orogeny • orogenetic adjective
orogenetic
adjective see orogenesis
orogenic
adjective see orogeny
orogeny
noun Etymology: International Scientific Vocabulary Date: 1890 the process of mountain formation especially by folding of the earth's crust • orogenic adjective
orographic
also orographical adjective Date: circa 1803 of or relating to mountains; especially associated with or induced by the presence of mountains
orographical
adjective see orographic
orography
noun Etymology: International Scientific Vocabulary Date: circa 1846 a branch of physical geography that deals with mountains
Oromo
noun (plural Oromos or Oromo) Etymology: Oromo (western dialect) oromoo, a self-designation, probably from obsolete plural of orma person, stranger Date: 1893 1. a member of ...
Orontes
geographical name river 246 miles (396 kilometers) Syria & Turkey rising in Lebanon in the Bekaa & flowing into the Mediterranean
oropharyngeal
adjective Date: 1885 1. of or relating to the oropharynx 2. of or relating to the mouth and pharynx
oropharynx
noun Date: 1887 the part of the pharynx that is below the soft palate and above the epiglottis and is continuous with the mouth
orotund
adjective Etymology: modification of Latin ore rotundo, literally, with round mouth Date: circa 1799 1. marked by fullness, strength, and clarity of sound ; sonorous 2. ...
orotundity
noun see orotund
Orozco
biographical name José Clemente 1883-1949 Mexican painter
orphan
I. noun Etymology: Middle English, from Late Latin orphanus, from Greek orphanos; akin to Old High German erbi inheritance, Latin orbus orphaned Date: 15th century 1. a child ...
orphan drug
noun Date: 1981 a drug that is not developed or marketed because its extremely limited use makes it unprofitable
orphan's court
noun Date: 1713 a probate court with jurisdiction in some states over the affairs of minors and the administration of estates
orphanage
noun Date: circa 1580 1. the state of being an orphan 2. an institution for the care of orphans
orphanhood
noun see orphan I
Orpheus
noun Etymology: Latin, from Greek Date: 14th century a poet and musician in Greek mythology who almost rescues his wife Eurydice from Hades by charming Pluto and Persephone ...
orphic
adjective Date: 1655 1. capitalized of or relating to Orpheus or the rites or doctrines ascribed to him 2. mystic, oracular 3. fascinating, entrancing • orphically ...
orphically
adverb see orphic
Orphism
noun Etymology: Orpheus, its reputed founder Date: 1880 a mystic Greek religion offering initiates purification of the soul from innate evil and release from the cycle of ...
orphrey
noun (plural orphreys) Etymology: Middle English orfrey, from Anglo-French orfreis, from Medieval Latin aurifrigium, from Latin aurum gold + Phrygius Phrygian — more at ...
orpiment
noun Etymology: Middle English, from Anglo-French, from Latin auripigmentum, from aurum + pigmentum pigment Date: 14th century a rare orange to lemon-yellow mineral ...
orpine
noun Etymology: Middle English orpin, from Anglo-French, from orpiment Date: 14th century an herb (Sedum telephium of the family Crassulaceae, the orpine family) that has ...
Orpington
I. noun Etymology: Orpington, England Date: 1897 any of an English breed of large deep-chested domestic chickens II. geographical name former urban district SE England in ...
Orr
biographical name Bobby 1948- Robert Gordon Orr American (Canadian-born) ice hockey player
Orrefors
geographical name town SE Sweden NW of Kalmar
orrery
noun (plural orreries) Etymology: Charles Boyle died 1731 4th Earl of Orrery Date: 1713 an apparatus showing the relative positions and motions of bodies in the solar system ...
orris
noun Etymology: probably alteration of Middle English ireos, from Medieval Latin, alteration of Latin iris iris Date: 1545 orrisroot
orrisroot
noun Date: 1598 the fragrant rootstock of any of three European irises (Iris florentina, I. germanica, and I. pallida) used especially in perfumery
Orsk
geographical name city SE Russia in Europe on Ural River S of Magnitogorsk population 273,000
ort
noun Etymology: Middle English, from Middle Low German orte Date: 15th century a morsel left at a meal ; scrap
Ortega y Gasset
biographical name José 1883-1955 Spanish philosopher, writer, & statesman
Ortegal, Cape
geographical name cape NW Spain
orth-
or ortho- combining form Etymology: Greek, from orthos straight, right, true; akin to Sanskrit ūrdhva high, upright 1. straight ; upright ; vertical 2. perpendicular ...
orthicon
noun Etymology: International Scientific Vocabulary orth- + iconoscope Date: 1939 a camera tube similar to but more sensitive than an iconoscope in which the charges are ...
ortho
adjective Date: 1904 orthochromatic
ortho-
combining form see orth-
orthocenter
noun Etymology: International Scientific Vocabulary Date: 1869 the common intersection of the three altitudes of a triangle or their extensions or of the several altitudes ...
orthochromatic
adjective Etymology: International Scientific Vocabulary Date: 1887 1. of, relating to, or producing tone values of light and shade in a photograph that correspond to the ...
orthoclase
noun Etymology: German Orthoklas, from orth- + Greek klasis breaking, from klan to break — more at clast Date: 1849 a monoclinic mineral of the feldspar group consisting of ...
orthodontia
noun Etymology: New Latin Date: circa 1849 orthodontics
orthodontic
adjective see orthodontics
orthodontically
adverb see orthodontics
orthodontics
noun plural but singular in construction Date: 1909 a branch of dentistry dealing with irregularities of the teeth (as malocclusion) and their correction (as by means of ...
orthodontist
noun see orthodontics
orthodox
I. adjective Etymology: Middle English orthodoxe, from Middle French or Late Latin; Middle French orthodoxe, from Late Latin orthodoxus, from Late Greek orthodoxos, from Greek ...
Orthodox Judaism
noun Date: 1904 Judaism that adheres to the Torah and Talmud as interpreted in an authoritative rabbinic law code and applies their principles and regulations to modern ...
orthodoxly
adverb see orthodox I
orthodoxy
noun (plural -doxies) Date: 1630 1. the quality or state of being orthodox 2. an orthodox belief or practice 3. capitalized a. Eastern Orthodox Christianity b. ...
orthoepic
adjective see orthoepy
orthoepically
adverb see orthoepy
orthoepist
noun see orthoepy
orthoepy
noun Etymology: New Latin orthoepia, from Greek orthoepeia, from orth- + epos word — more at voice Date: 1668 1. the customary pronunciation of a language 2. the study of ...
orthogenesis
noun Etymology: New Latin Date: 1895 variation of organisms in successive generations that in some especially former evolutionary theories takes place in some predestined ...
orthogenetic
adjective see orthogenesis
orthogenetically
adverb see orthogenesis
orthogonal
adjective Etymology: Middle French, from Latin orthogonius, from Greek orthogōnios, from orth- + gōnia angle — more at -gon Date: 1612 1. a. intersecting or lying at ...
orthogonality
noun see orthogonal
orthogonalization
noun see orthogonalize
orthogonalize
transitive verb (-ized; -izing) Date: 1930 to make orthogonal • orthogonalization noun
orthogonally
adverb see orthogonal
orthograde
adjective Date: 1902 walking with the body upright or vertical
orthographic
also orthographical adjective Date: 1706 1. of, relating to, being, or prepared by orthographic projection 2. a. of or relating to orthography b. correct in ...
orthographic projection
noun Date: 1668 1. projection of a single view of an object (as a view of the front) onto a drawing surface in which the lines of projection are perpendicular to the drawing ...
orthographical
adjective see orthographic
orthographically
adverb see orthographic
orthography
noun Etymology: Middle English ortografie, from Anglo-French, from Latin orthographia, from Greek, from orth- + graphein to write — more at carve Date: 15th century 1. a. ...
orthomolecular
adjective Date: 1968 relating to, based on, using, or being a theory according to which disease may be cured by providing the optimum amounts of substances (as vitamins) ...
orthomyxovirus
noun Etymology: New Latin, from orth- + myxovirus Date: 1973 any of a family (Orthomyxoviridae) of single-stranded RNA viruses that have their RNA divided into six to eight ...
orthonormal
adjective Date: 1932 1. of real-valued functions orthogonal with the integral of the square of each function over a specified interval equal to one 2. being or composed of ...
orthopaedic
adjective see orthopedic
orthopaedics
noun plural but singular or plural in construction see orthopedics
orthopedic
also orthopaedic adjective Etymology: French orthopédique, from orthopédie orthopedics, from orth- + Greek paid-, pais child — more at few Date: 1840 1. of, relating to, ...
orthopedically
adverb see orthopedic
orthopedics
also orthopaedics noun plural but singular or plural in construction Date: circa 1853 a branch of medicine concerned with the correction or prevention of skeletal deformities, ...
orthopedist
noun see orthopedics
orthophosphate
noun Date: 1859 a salt or ester of orthophosphoric acid
orthophosphoric acid
noun Etymology: International Scientific Vocabulary Date: 1866 phosphoric acid 1
orthopsychiatric
adjective see orthopsychiatry
orthopsychiatrist
noun see orthopsychiatry
orthopsychiatry
noun Date: circa 1927 psychiatry concerned especially with the prevention and treatment of mental and behavioral disorders in youth • orthopsychiatric adjective • ...
orthoptera
noun plural Etymology: New Latin, order name, from orth- + Greek pteron wing — more at feather Date: 1828 insects that are orthopterans
orthopteran
noun Etymology: New Latin Orthoptera Date: circa 1842 any of an order (Orthoptera) of insects (as crickets and grasshoppers) characterized by biting mouthparts, two pairs of ...
orthopterist
noun see orthopteran
orthopteroid
noun or adjective see orthopteran
orthorhombic
adjective Etymology: International Scientific Vocabulary Date: circa 1859 of, relating to, or constituting a system of crystallization characterized by three unequal axes at ...
orthoscopic
adjective Etymology: International Scientific Vocabulary orth- + -scopic (as in microscopic) Date: 1853 giving an image in correct and normal proportions
orthosis
noun (plural orthoses) Etymology: New Latin, from Greek orthōsis straightening, from orthoun to straighten, from orthos Date: 1958 orthotic
orthostatic
adjective Date: 1902 of, relating to, or caused by an upright posture
orthotic
noun Etymology: New Latin orthosis Date: 1955 a device (as a brace or splint) for supporting, immobilizing, or treating muscles, joints, or skeletal parts which are weak, ...
orthotics
noun plural but singular in construction Date: 1957 a branch of mechanical and medical science that deals with the design and fitting of orthotics • orthotic adjective • ...
orthotist
noun see orthotics
orthotropous
adjective Etymology: International Scientific Vocabulary Date: 1830 having the ovule straight and upright with the micropyle at the apex
Ortler
geographical name see Ortles
Ortles
or German Ortler geographical name mountain range of E Alps N Italy between Venezia Tridentina & Lombardy; highest peak Ortles 12,792 feet (3899 meters)
ortolan
noun Etymology: French or Italian; French, from Italian ortolano, literally, gardener, from Latin hortulanus, from hortulus, diminutive of hortus garden — more at yard Date: ...
Orūmīyeh
or formerly Rezā'īyeh geographical name 1. shallow saline lake NW Iran area 1815 square miles (4701 square kilometers) 2. city NW Iran population 300,746
Oruro
geographical name city W Bolivia population 183,194
ORV
abbreviation off-road vehicle
Orvieto
I. noun Etymology: Orvieto, Italy Date: 1846 a usually dry Italian white wine II. geographical name commune central Italy WNW of Terni population 21,302
Orwell
biographical name George 1903-1950 pseudonym of Eric Arthur Blair English author • Orwellian adjective
Orwellian
adjective see Orwell
oryx
noun (plural oryx or oryxes) Etymology: New Latin, from Latin, a gazelle, from Greek, pickax, antelope, kind of whale, from oryssein to dig; akin to Latin runcare to grub up, ...
orzo
noun Etymology: Italian, literally, barley, from Latin hordeum — more at orgeat Date: circa 1929 rice-shaped pasta
Os
symbol osmium
OS
abbreviation 1. [Latin oculus sinister] left eye 2. Old Style 3. operating system 4. out of stock
os
I. noun (plural ossa) Etymology: Latin oss-, os — more at osseous Date: 15th century bone II. noun (plural ora) Etymology: Latin or-, os — more at oral Date: 1737 ...
Osage
I. noun (plural Osages or Osage) Etymology: French, probably from an Algonquian language, from Osage wažáže, a self-designation Date: 1698 1. a member of an American ...
Osage orange
noun Date: 1817 an ornamental usually thorny United States tree (Maclura pomifera) of the mulberry family with shiny ovate leaves and hard bright orange wood; also its ...
Osaka
geographical name city & port Japan in S Honshu on Osaka Bay (inlet of the Pacific) population 2,623,831
Osborn
biographical name Henry Fairfield 1857-1935 American paleontologist
Osborne
I. biographical name John James 1929-1994 British dramatist II. biographical name Thomas Mott 1859-1926 American penologist
Oscan
noun Etymology: Latin Oscus Date: 1753 1. a member of a people of ancient Italy occupying Campania 2. the language of the Oscan people — see Indo-European languages table
Oscar
I. trademark — used especially for any of a number of golden statuettes awarded annually by a professional organization for notable achievement in motion pictures II. Date: ...
Oscar II
biographical name 1829-1907 king of Sweden (1872-1907) & of Norway (1872-1905)
Osceola
biographical name circa 1800-1838 Seminole Indian chief
oscillate
intransitive verb (-lated; -lating) Etymology: Latin oscillatus, past participle of oscillare to swing, from oscillum swing Date: 1726 1. a. to swing backward and forward ...
oscillation
noun Date: 1658 1. the action or state of oscillating 2. variation, fluctuation 3. a flow of electricity changing periodically from a maximum to a minimum; especially a ...
oscillational
adjective see oscillation
oscillator
noun Date: 1835 1. one that oscillates 2. a device for producing alternating current; especially a radio-frequency or audio-frequency generator
oscillatory
adjective see oscillate
oscillo-
combining form Etymology: International Scientific Vocabulary, from Latin oscillare wave ; oscillation
oscillogram
noun Etymology: International Scientific Vocabulary Date: 1903 a record made by an oscillograph or oscilloscope
oscillograph
noun Etymology: International Scientific Vocabulary Date: 1893 an instrument for recording alternating current wave forms or other electrical oscillations • oscillographic ...
oscillographic
adjective see oscillograph
oscillographically
adverb see oscillograph
oscillography
noun see oscillograph
oscilloscope
noun Etymology: International Scientific Vocabulary Date: 1906 an instrument in which the variations in a fluctuating electrical quantity appear temporarily as a visible ...
oscilloscopic
adjective see oscilloscope
oscine
adjective Etymology: New Latin Oscines, suborder name, from Latin, plural of oscin-, oscen songbird, bird giving omens by its cry, from obs-, ob- in front of, in the way + ...
Osco-Umbrian
noun Etymology: Latin Oscus + English Umbrian Date: 1894 a subdivision of the Italic branch of the Indo-European language family containing Oscan and Umbrian
osculate
transitive verb (-lated; -lating) Etymology: Latin osculatus, past participle of osculari, from osculum kiss, from diminutive of os mouth — more at oral Date: circa 1656 ...
osculation
noun Date: circa 1658 the act of kissing; also kiss • osculatory adjective
osculatory
adjective see osculation
osculum
noun Etymology: New Latin, from Latin, diminutive of os mouth Date: 1887 an excurrent opening of a sponge
Osee
noun Etymology: Late Latin, from Hebrew Hōshēa‘ Date: 1526 Hosea
osetra
also ossetra noun Etymology: modification of Russian osëtr sturgeon Date: 1955 a golden or brownish caviar from a sturgeon (as Acipenser gueldenstaedtii of the Caspian ...
OSHA
abbreviation Occupational Safety and Health Administration
Oshawa
geographical name city Canada in SE Ontario on Lake Ontario ENE of Toronto population 139,051
Osheroff
biographical name Douglas Dean 1945- American physicist
Oshkosh
geographical name city E Wisconsin on Lake Winnebago population 62,916
osier
noun Etymology: Middle English, from Anglo-French, from Medieval Latin auseria osier bed Date: 14th century 1. any of various willows (especially Salix viminalis) whose ...
Osijek
geographical name city E Croatia in Slavonia population 129,792
Osiris
noun Etymology: Latin, from Greek, from Egyptian Wsìr Date: 1613 the Egyptian god of the underworld and husband and brother of Isis
Osler
biographical name Sir William 1849-1919 Canadian physician
Oslo
or formerly Christiania or Kristiania geographical name city capital of Norway at N end of Oslo Fjord (inlet of the Skagerrak) population 458,364
Osman I
biographical name 1258-circa 1326 founder of the Ottoman Empire
Osmanli
noun Etymology: Turkish osmanlı, from Osman, founder of the Ottoman Empire Date: 1813 1. ottoman 1 2. Turkish
Osmeña
biographical name Sergio 1878-1961 president of Philippine Commonwealth (1944-46)
osmeterium
noun (plural osmeteria) Etymology: New Latin, irregular from Greek osmē odor Date: 1816 a protrusible glandular process of swallowtail larvae that emits a disagreeable odor ...
osmic acid
noun Date: 1842 osmium tetroxide
osmium
noun Etymology: New Latin, from Greek osmē odor Date: 1804 a blue-gray or blue-black hard brittle very heavy polyvalent metallic element with a high melting point that is ...
osmium tetroxide
noun Date: 1869 a crystalline compound OsO4 that is an oxide of osmium, has a poisonous irritating vapor, and is used as a catalyst, oxidizing agent, and biological fixative ...
osmol
or osmole noun Etymology: blend of osmosis and mol (5mole) Date: 1942 a standard unit of osmotic pressure based on a one molal concentration of an ion in a solution
osmolal
adjective see osmolality
osmolality
noun (plural -ties) Etymology: osmol + 1-al + -ity Date: circa 1944 the concentration of an osmotic solution especially when measured in osmols or milliosmols per 1000 grams ...
osmolar
adjective see osmolarity
osmolarity
noun (plural -ties) Etymology: osmol + -ar + -ity Date: 1948 the concentration of an osmotic solution especially when measured in osmols or milliosmols per liter of solution ...
osmole
noun see osmol
osmometer
noun Etymology: osmosis + -meter Date: 1854 an apparatus for measuring osmotic pressure • osmometric adjective • osmometry noun
osmometric
adjective see osmometer
osmometry
noun see osmometer
osmoregulation
noun Etymology: osmosis + regulation Date: 1927 regulation of osmotic pressure especially in the body of a living organism • osmoregulatory adjective
osmoregulatory
adjective see osmoregulation
osmosis
noun Etymology: New Latin, short for endosmosis Date: 1867 1. movement of a solvent (as water) through a semipermeable membrane (as of a living cell) into a solution of ...
osmotic
adjective Date: 1854 of, relating to, caused by, or having the properties of osmosis • osmotically adverb
osmotic pressure
noun Date: 1888 the pressure produced by or associated with osmosis and dependent on molar concentration and absolute temperature: as a. the maximum pressure that develops ...
osmotic shock
noun Date: 1950 a rapid change in the osmotic pressure (as by transfer to a medium of different concentration) affecting a living system
osmotically
adverb see osmotic
osmunda
noun Etymology: New Latin, from Medieval Latin, from Old French osmonde Date: 1789 any of a genus (Osmunda) of rather large ferns (as the cinnamon fern) with pinnate or ...
Osnabrück
geographical name city NW Germany in Lower Saxony population 165,143
Osorno
geographical name volcano 8727 feet (2644 meters) S central Chile in lake district
osprey
noun (plural ospreys) Etymology: Middle English ospray, from Anglo-French *osfraie, from Latin ossifraga, a bird of prey Date: 15th century 1. a large fish-eating hawk ...
OSS
abbreviation Office of Strategic Services
ossa
plural of os
Ossa, Mount
geographical name mountain 6490 feet (1967 meters) NE Greece in E Thessaly
ossein
noun Etymology: International Scientific Vocabulary, from Latin oss-, os Date: 1857 the collagen of bones
osseous
adjective Etymology: Latin osseus, from oss-, os bone; akin to Greek osteon bone, Sanskrit asthi Date: 1682 bony 1
Osset
noun see Ossete
Ossete
also Osset noun Etymology: Russian osetin, from Osetiya Ossetia, from Georgian Oseti, from osi Ossete Date: 1814 a member of a people of the central Caucasus • Ossetian ...
Ossetia
geographical name region SE Russia in Europe in central Caucasus — see Alania, South Ossetia
Ossetian
adjective or noun see Ossete
Ossetic
noun Date: 1841 the Iranian language of the Ossetes
ossetra
noun see osetra
Ossianic
adjective Date: 1808 of, relating to, or resembling the legendary Irish bard Ossian, the poems ascribed to him, or the rhythmic prose style used by James Macpherson in the ...
ossicle
noun Etymology: Latin ossiculum, diminutive of oss-, os Date: 1578 a small bone or bony structure (as the malleus, incus, or stapes) • ossicular adjective
ossicular
adjective see ossicle
Ossietzky
biographical name Carl von 1889-1938 German writer & pacifist
ossification
noun Date: 1697 1. a. the natural process of bone formation b. the hardening (as of muscular tissue) into a bony substance 2. a mass or particle of ossified tissue 3. ...
ossifrage
noun Etymology: Latin ossifraga, a bird of prey, from feminine of ossifragus bone-breaking, from oss-, os + frangere to break — more at break Date: 1601 lammergeier
ossify
verb (-fied; -fying) Etymology: Latin oss-, os + English -ify Date: 1713 intransitive verb 1. to change into bone 2. to become hardened or conventional and opposed to ...
Ossining
geographical name town SE New York population 36,534
osso bucco
noun see osso buco
osso buco
also osso bucco noun Etymology: Italian ossobuco veal shank, literally, pierced bone Date: 1923 a dish of veal shanks braised with vegetables, white wine, and seasoned stock
Ossoli
biographical name Marchioness — see Margaret fuller
ossuary
noun (plural -aries) Etymology: Late Latin ossuarium, from Latin, neuter of ossuarius of bones, from Old Latin ossua, plural of oss-, os Date: 1658 a depository for the bones ...
oste-
or osteo- combining form Etymology: New Latin, from Greek, from osteon — more at osseous bone
osteal
adjective Etymology: International Scientific Vocabulary Date: 1877 of, relating to, or resembling bone; also affecting or involving bone or the skeleton
osteitis
noun Etymology: New Latin Date: circa 1847 inflammation of bone
Ostend
or Flemish Oostende or French Ostende geographical name city & port NW Belgium population 68,500
Ostende
geographical name see Ostend
ostensible
adjective Etymology: French, from Latin ostensus, past participle of ostendere to show, from obs-, ob- in the way + tendere to stretch — more at ob-, thin Date: circa 1771 ...
ostensibly
adverb Date: 1765 1. in an ostensible manner 2. to all outward appearances
ostensive
adjective Date: 1782 1. ostensible 2 2. of, relating to, or constituting definition by exemplifying the thing or quality being defined • ostensively adverb
ostensively
adverb see ostensive
ostensorium
noun (plural ostensoria) Etymology: Medieval Latin, from Latin ostendere Date: circa 1772 monstrance
ostentation
noun Etymology: Middle English ostentacion, from Middle French, from Latin ostentation-, ostentatio, from ostentare to display, frequentative of ostendere Date: 15th century ...
ostentatious
adjective Date: 1673 marked by or fond of conspicuous or vainglorious and sometimes pretentious display Synonyms: see showy • ostentatiously adverb • ostentatiousness ...
ostentatiously
adverb see ostentatious
ostentatiousness
noun see ostentatious
osteo-
combining form see oste-
osteoarthritic
adjective see osteoarthritis
osteoarthritis
noun Etymology: New Latin Date: 1878 arthritis marked by degeneration of the cartilage and bone of joints • osteoarthritic adjective
osteoblast
noun Etymology: International Scientific Vocabulary Date: 1875 a bone-forming cell • osteoblastic adjective
osteoblastic
adjective see osteoblast
osteoclast
noun Etymology: International Scientific Vocabulary oste- + Greek klastos broken — more at clast Date: 1872 any of the large multinucleate cells closely associated with ...
osteoclastic
adjective see osteoclast
osteocyte
noun Date: 1942 a cell that is characteristic of adult bone and is isolated in a lacuna of the bone substance
osteogenesis
noun Etymology: New Latin Date: 1830 development and formation of bone
osteogenesis imperfecta
noun Etymology: New Latin, imperfect osteogenesis Date: circa 1901 a hereditary disease marked especially by extreme brittleness of bones and caused by defective or ...
osteogenic
adjective Date: 1867 1. producing bone 2. originating in bone
osteogenic sarcoma
noun Date: circa 1923 osteosarcoma
osteoid
I. adjective Etymology: International Scientific Vocabulary Date: 1840 resembling bone II. noun Date: 1934 uncalcified bone matrix
osteological
adjective see osteology
osteologist
noun see osteology
osteology
noun Etymology: New Latin osteologia, from Greek, description of bones, from oste- + -logia -logy Date: 1670 1. a branch of anatomy dealing with the bones 2. the bony ...
osteoma
noun (plural -mas; also osteomata) Etymology: New Latin Date: circa 1849 a benign tumor composed of bone tissue
osteomalacia
noun Etymology: New Latin, from oste- + Greek malakia softness, from malakos soft — more at mollify Date: circa 1834 a disease of adults that is characterized by softening ...
osteomyelitis
noun Etymology: New Latin Date: 1854 an infectious usually painful inflammatory disease of bone often of bacterial origin that may result in the death of bone tissue
osteopath
noun Date: 1897 a practitioner of osteopathy
osteopathic
adjective see osteopathy
osteopathically
adverb see osteopathy
osteopathy
noun Etymology: New Latin osteopathia, from oste- + Latin -pathia -pathy Date: 1899 a system of medical practice based on a theory that diseases are due chiefly to loss of ...
osteophyte
noun Date: 1846 a pathological bony outgrowth
osteoplastic
adjective see osteoplasty
osteoplasty
noun Date: circa 1860 plastic surgery on bone; especially replacement of lost bone tissue or reconstruction of defective bony parts • osteoplastic adjective
osteoporosis
noun (plural osteoporoses) Etymology: New Latin, from oste- + porosis rarefaction, from porus pore + -osis Date: 1846 a condition that affects especially older women and is ...
osteoporotic
adjective see osteoporosis

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