Слова на букву obtr-phyl (6389) New Collegiate Dictionary
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Слова на букву obtr-phyl (6389)

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overpredict
transitive verb Date: 1954 to predict by an amount that exceeds the actual value • overprediction noun
overprediction
noun see overpredict
overpressure
noun Date: 1644 pressure significantly above what is usual or normal
overprice
transitive verb Date: 1605 to price too high
overprint
I. transitive verb Date: 1863 to print over with something additional II. noun Date: 1876 something added by or as if by overprinting; especially a printed marking added ...
overproof
adjective Date: 1807 containing more alcohol than proof spirit
overproportion
transitive verb Date: 1642 to make disproportionately large
overqualified
adjective Date: 1954 having more education, training, or experience than a job calls for
overrate
transitive verb Date: 1610 to rate, value, or estimate too highly
overreach
Date: 14th century transitive verb 1. to reach above or beyond ; overtop 2. to defeat (oneself) by seeking to do or gain too much 3. to get the better of especially ...
overreacher
noun see overreach
overrepresentation
noun see overrepresented
overrepresented
adjective Date: 1900 represented excessively; especially having representatives in a proportion higher than the average • overrepresentation noun
override
I. transitive verb (overrode; overridden; overriding) Date: before 12th century 1. to ride over or across ; trample 2. to ride (as a horse) too much or too hard 3. a. ...
overriding
adjective Date: 1830 chief, principal
overripe
adjective Date: 1671 1. passed beyond maturity or ripeness toward decay 2. a. decadent b. lacking originality or vigor • over-ripeness noun
overrule
transitive verb Date: 1576 1. to rule over ; govern 2. to prevail over ; overcome 3. a. to rule against b. to set aside ; reverse
overrun
I. transitive verb (overran; -run; -running) Date: before 12th century 1. a. (1) to defeat decisively and occupy the positions of (2) to invade and occupy or ...
overscale
or overscaled adjective Date: 1953 oversize
overscaled
adjective see overscale
oversea
adjective or adverb Date: 12th century chiefly British overseas
overseas
I. adverb Date: 1533 beyond or across the sea II. adjective Date: 1892 1. of or relating to movement, transport, or communication over the sea 2. situated, ...
overseas cap
noun Date: 1920 garrison cap
oversee
transitive verb (oversaw; overseen; -seeing) Date: before 12th century 1. survey, watch 2. a. inspect, examine b. supervise
overseed
transitive verb Date: 1970 to seed (an existing stand) with another type of plant
overseer
noun Date: 1523 supervisor, superintendent
oversell
transitive verb (oversold; -selling) Date: circa 1879 1. a. to sell too much or too many to b. to sell too much or too many of 2. to make excessive claims for • ...
overset
transitive verb (-set; -setting) Date: 1583 1. a. to disturb mentally or physically ; upset b. to turn or tip over ; overturn 2. to set too much type matter for • ...
oversexed
adjective Date: 1898 exhibiting an excessive sexual drive or interest
overshadow
transitive verb Date: before 12th century 1. to cast a shadow over 2. to exceed in importance ; outweigh
overshirt
noun Date: 1805 a shirt usually worn over another shirt without being tucked in
overshoe
noun Date: 1823 an outer shoe; especially galosh
overshoot
transitive verb (overshot; -shooting) Date: 14th century 1. to pass swiftly beyond 2. to shoot or pass over or beyond so as to miss • overshoot noun
overshot
I. adjective Date: circa 1535 1. actuated by the weight of water passing over and flowing from above 2. a. having the upper jaw extending beyond the lower b. ...
oversight
noun Date: 15th century 1. a. watchful and responsible care b. regulatory supervision 2. an inadvertent omission or error
oversimple
adjective Date: 15th century too simple ; not thoroughgoing or exhaustive • oversimply adverb
oversimplification
noun see oversimplify
oversimplify
Date: 1923 transitive verb to simplify to such an extent as to bring about distortion, misunderstanding, or error intransitive verb to engage in undue or extreme ...
oversimply
adverb see oversimple
oversize
or oversized adjective Date: 1853 being of more than standard or ordinary size
oversized
adjective see oversize
overskirt
noun Date: 1869 a skirt worn over another skirt
oversleep
verb (overslept; -sleeping) Date: 14th century intransitive verb to sleep beyond the time for waking transitive verb to allow (oneself) to oversleep
overslip
transitive verb Date: 15th century obsolete escape
oversold
adjective Date: 1926 likely to show a rise in price because of prior heavy selling and accompanying decline in price
oversoul
noun Date: circa 1844 the absolute reality and basis of all existences conceived as a spiritual being in which the ideal nature imperfectly manifested in human beings is ...
overspend
verb (-spent; -spending) Date: circa 1618 transitive verb 1. to spend or use to excess ; exhaust 2. to exceed in expenditure intransitive verb to spend beyond one's ...
overspender
noun see overspend
overspill
noun Date: 1884 1. the act or an instance of spilling over 2. chiefly British the movement of excess urban population into less crowded areas
overspread
transitive verb (-spread; -spreading) Date: before 12th century to spread over or above • overspread noun
overstate
transitive verb Date: 1803 to state in too strong terms ; exaggerate • overstatement noun
overstatement
noun see overstate
overstay
transitive verb Date: 1646 to stay beyond the time or the limits of
oversteer
noun Date: 1936 the tendency of an automobile to steer into a sharper turn than the driver intends sometimes with a thrusting of the rear to the outside; also the action or ...
overstep
transitive verb Date: before 12th century exceed, transgress
overstored
adjective Date: 1967 having more stores than the market will support
overstory
noun Date: 1925 1. the layer of foliage in a forest canopy 2. the trees contributing to an overstory
overstrew
transitive verb (-strewed; -strewed or overstrewn; -strewing) Date: circa 1570 1. to strew or scatter about 2. to cover here and there
overstride
transitive verb (overstrode; overstridden; overstriding) Date: 13th century 1. a. to stride over, across, or beyond b. bestride 2. to stride faster than or beyond
overstrung
adjective Date: 1810 too highly strung ; too sensitive
overstuff
transitive verb Date: 1715 1. to stuff too full 2. to cover (as a chair or sofa) completely and deeply with upholstery
oversubscribe
transitive verb Date: 1891 to subscribe for more of than is available • oversubscription noun
oversubscription
noun see oversubscribe
overt
adjective Etymology: Middle English, from Anglo-French, from past participle of ovrir to open, from Vulgar Latin *operire, alteration of Latin aperire Date: 14th century open ...
overtake
transitive verb (overtook; overtaken; -taking) Etymology: Middle English, from 1over + taken to take Date: 13th century 1. a. to catch up with b. to catch up with and ...
overthrow
transitive verb (overthrew; overthrown; -throwing) Date: 14th century 1. overturn, upset 2. to cause the downfall of ; bring down, defeat 3. to throw a ball over or past ...
overtime
noun Date: 1536 1. time in excess of a set limit: as a. working time in excess of a standard day or week b. an extra period of play in a contest 2. the wage paid for ...
overtly
adverb see overt
overtness
noun see overt
overtone
noun Date: 1867 1. a. one of the higher tones produced simultaneously with the fundamental and that with the fundamental comprise a complex musical tone ; harmonic 1a b. ...
overtop
transitive verb Date: circa 1594 1. to rise above the top of 2. to be superior to 3. surpass
overtrade
intransitive verb Date: 1734 to trade beyond one's capital
overtrick
noun Date: 1903 a card trick won in excess of the number bid
overtrump
Date: 1746 transitive verb to trump with a higher trump card than the highest previously played on the same trick intransitive verb to play a higher trump card than ...
overture
I. noun Etymology: Middle English, literally, opening, from Anglo-French, from Vulgar Latin *opertura, alteration of Latin apertura — more at aperture Date: 15th century 1. ...
overturn
I. Date: 13th century transitive verb 1. to cause to turn over ; upset 2. a. invalidate, destroy b. reverse 2a intransitive verb upset, turn over II. ...
overvaluation
noun see overvalue
overvalue
transitive verb Date: 1597 to assign an excessive or fictitious value to • overvaluation noun
overview
noun Date: 1588 a general survey ; summary
overvoltage
noun Date: 1907 1. the excess potential required for the discharge of an ion at an electrode over and above the equilibrium potential of the electrode 2. voltage in excess ...
overwear
transitive verb (overwore; overworn; -wearing) Date: 1578 wear out, exhaust
overweening
adjective Etymology: Middle English overwening, present participle of overwenen to be arrogant, from over + wenen to ween Date: 14th century 1. arrogant, presumptuous 2. ...
overweeningly
adverb see overweening
overweigh
transitive verb Date: 13th century 1. to exceed in weight 2. oppress 2
overweight
I. noun Date: 1552 1. weight over and above what is required or allowed 2. excessive or burdensome weight II. transitive verb Date: 1603 1. to give too much weight or ...
overwhelm
transitive verb Etymology: Middle English, from 1over + whelmen to turn over, cover up Date: 14th century 1. upset, overthrow 2. a. to cover over completely ; submerge ...
overwhelming
adjective Date: 1702 tending or serving to overwhelm ; also extreme, great
overwhelmingly
adverb Date: 1667 1. a. to an overwhelming extent b. extremely 2. mostly by far
overwinter
I. intransitive verb Date: before 12th century to last through or pass the winter II. adjective Date: 1900 occurring during the period spanning the winter
overwork
Date: 1530 transitive verb 1. to cause to work too hard, too long, or to exhaustion 2. a. to work too much on b. to make excessive use of intransitive ...
overwrite
verb (overwrote; overwritten; overwriting) Date: 1658 transitive verb 1. to write over the surface of 2. to write in inflated or overly elaborate style intransitive ...
overwrought
adjective Etymology: past participle of overwork Date: 1638 1. extremely excited ; agitated 2. elaborated to excess ; overdone
ovi-
or ovo- — see ov-
ovicidal
adjective see ovicide
ovicide
noun Etymology: International Scientific Vocabulary Date: 1913 an agent that kills eggs; especially an insecticide effective against the egg stage • ovicidal adjective
Ovid
biographical name 43 B.C.-?A.D. 17 Publius Ovidius Naso Roman poet • Ovidian adjective
Ovidian
adjective see Ovid
oviduct
noun Etymology: New Latin oviductus, from ov- + ductus duct Date: 1672 a tube that allows for the passage of eggs from an ovary • oviductal adjective
oviductal
adjective see oviduct
Oviedo
I. geographical name 1. — see Asturias 2 2. city NW Spain capital of Asturias province population 194,919 II. geographical name city E central Florida NE of Orlando ...
ovine
adjective Etymology: Late Latin ovinus, from Latin ovis sheep — more at ewe Date: 1676 of, relating to, or resembling sheep • ovine noun
oviparous
adjective Etymology: Latin oviparus, from ov- + -parus -parous Date: 1646 producing eggs that develop and hatch outside the maternal body; also involving the production of ...
oviposit
intransitive verb Etymology: probably back-formation from ovipositor Date: 1816 to lay eggs — used especially of insects • oviposition noun • ovipositional adjective
oviposition
noun see oviposit
ovipositional
adjective see oviposit
ovipositor
noun Etymology: New Latin, from Latin ov- + positor one that places, from ponere to place — more at position Date: 1816 a specialized organ (as of an insect) for depositing ...
oviraptor
noun Etymology: New Latin, from ov- + Latin raptor plunderer — more at raptor Date: 1927 any of a genus (Oviraptor) of bipedal theropod dinosaurs of the late Cretaceous ...
ovo-
I. combining form see ov- II. see ovi-
ovo-lacto vegetarian
noun Date: 1977 lacto-ovo vegetarian
ovoid
also ovoidal adjective Etymology: French ovoïde, from Latin ovum egg — more at egg Date: circa 1828 resembling an egg in shape ; ovate • ovoid noun
ovoidal
adjective see ovoid
ovolo
noun (plural -los) Etymology: Italian, diminutive of uovo, ovo egg, from Latin ovum Date: circa 1639 a rounded convex molding
ovotestis
noun Etymology: New Latin Date: 1877 a hermaphrodite gonad
ovoviviparous
adjective Date: 1801 producing eggs that develop within the maternal body (as of various fishes or reptiles) and hatch within or immediately after release from the parent • ...
ovoviviparously
adverb see ovoviviparous
ovoviviparousness
noun see ovoviviparous
ovulate
adjective Date: 1861 bearing an ovule
ovulation
noun Date: 1848 the discharge of a mature ovum from the ovary • ovulate verb
ovulatory
adjective Date: 1931 of, relating to, or involving ovulation
ovule
noun Etymology: New Latin ovulum, diminutive of Latin ovum Date: 1829 1. an outgrowth of the ovary of a seed plant that is a megasporangium and encloses an embryo sac within ...
ovum
noun (plural ova) Etymology: New Latin, from Latin, egg — more at egg Date: circa 1706 a female gamete ; macrogamete — called also egg cell
ow
interjection Etymology: from ow, interjection expressing surprise, from Middle English Date: 1865 — used especially to express sudden pain
OW
abbreviation one-way
Owasco Lake
geographical name lake 11 miles (18 kilometers) long central New York; one of the Finger Lakes
owe
verb (owed; owing) Etymology: Middle English, to possess, own, owe, from Old English āgan; akin to Old High German eigun (1st & 3d plural present indicative) possess, Sanskrit ...
owe it
phrasal to have a responsibility to do something to satisfy an obligation or duty
Owen
I. biographical name Robert 1771-1858 Welsh social reformer II. biographical name Wilfred 1893-1918 British poet
Owen Falls
geographical name former waterfall E Africa in Uganda in the Nile N of Lake Victoria; now submerged in water behind Owen Falls Dam
Owen Stanley Range
geographical name mountain range E New Guinea; highest peak Mt. Victoria 13,363 feet (4073 meters)
Owens
I. biographical name Jesse 1913-1980 James Cleveland Owens American track-and-field athlete II. geographical name river E California formerly flowing into Owens Lake (now ...
Owensboro
geographical name city NW Kentucky population 54,067
owing
adjective Date: 15th century due to be paid
owing to
preposition Date: 1667 because of
owl
noun Etymology: Middle English owle, from Old English ūle; akin to Old High German uwila owl Date: before 12th century any of an order (Strigiformes) of chiefly nocturnal ...
owl monkey
noun Date: circa 1890 any of several small nocturnal monkeys (genus Aotus) of Central and South American tropical forests that have round heads, large eyes, and densely ...
owlet
noun Date: 1542 a small or young owl
owlish
adjective Date: 1611 resembling or suggesting an owl • owlishly adverb • owlishness noun
owlishly
adverb see owlish
owlishness
noun see owlish
own
I. adjective Etymology: Middle English owen, from Old English āgen; akin to Old High German eigan own, Old Norse eiginn, Old English āgan to possess — more at owe Date: ...
owner
noun see own II
ownership
noun Date: 1583 1. the state, relation, or fact of being an owner 2. a group or organization of owners
Owyhee
geographical name river 250 miles (402 kilometers) SW Idaho & SE Oregon flowing N into Snake River
ox
noun (plural oxen; also ox) Etymology: Middle English, from Old English oxa; akin to Old High German ohso ox, Sanskrit ukṣā bull, and perhaps to Sanskrit ukṣati he ...
ox-
or oxo- combining form Etymology: French, from oxygène oxygen
oxacillin
noun Etymology: ox- + azole + penicillin Date: 1962 a semisynthetic penicillin administered in the form of its hydrated sodium salt C19H18N3NaO5S•H2O to treat infections ...
oxalacetate
noun see oxaloacetate
oxalacetic acid
noun see oxaloacetic acid
oxalate
noun Date: 1788 a salt or ester of oxalic acid
oxalic acid
noun Etymology: French (acide) oxalique, from Latin oxalis Date: 1790 a poisonous strong acid (COOH)2 or H2C2O4 that occurs in various plants (as spinach) as oxalates and is ...
oxalis
noun Etymology: New Latin, genus name, from Latin, wood sorrel, from Greek, from oxys sharp — more at oxygen Date: circa 1706 wood sorrel
oxaloacetate
also oxalacetate noun Date: 1891 a salt or ester of oxaloacetic acid
oxaloacetic acid
also oxalacetic acid noun Etymology: oxalic + acetic acid Date: 1896 a crystalline acid C4H4O5 that is formed by reversible oxidation of malic acid (as in carbohydrate ...
oxalosuccinic acid
noun Etymology: oxalic + succinic acid Date: 1925 a tricarboxylic acid C6H6O7 that is formed as an intermediate in the Krebs cycle
oxazepam
noun Etymology: hydroxy- + diazepam Date: 1964 a benzodiazepine tranquilizer C15H11ClN2O2
oxblood
noun Date: 1705 a moderate reddish brown
oxbow
noun Date: 14th century 1. a U-shaped frame forming a collar about an ox's neck and holding the yoke in place 2. something (as a bend in a river) resembling an oxbow • ...
Oxbridge
adjective Etymology: Oxford + Cambridge Date: 1955 of, relating to, or characteristic of Oxford and Cambridge Universities — compare plateglass, redbrick 2
oxcart
noun Date: 1749 a cart drawn by oxen
Oxenstierna
biographical name Count Axel Gustafsson 1583-1654 Swedish statesman
oxeye
noun Date: 15th century any of several composite plants (as of the genera Chrysanthemum or Heliopsis) having heads with both disk and ray flowers; especially daisy 1b
oxeye daisy
noun Date: circa 1763 daisy 1b
Oxfam
abbreviation Oxford Committee for Famine Relief
oxford
noun Etymology: Oxford, England Date: 1886 1. a low shoe laced or tied over the instep 2. a soft durable cotton or synthetic fabric made in plain or basket weaves — ...
Oxford
I. biographical name Earl of — see Robert Harley II. geographical name or Medieval Latin Oxonia city S central England capital of Oxfordshire population 109,000 • ...
oxford cloth
noun see oxford
Oxford down
noun Usage: often capitalized D Etymology: Oxfordshire, England Date: 1859 any of a Down breed of large hornless sheep developed by crossing Cotswolds and Hampshires — ...
Oxford movement
noun Date: 1841 a High Church movement within the Church of England begun at Oxford in 1833
Oxfordian
adjective or noun see Oxford II
Oxfordshire
or Oxford geographical name county S central England capital Oxford area 1044 square miles (2704 square kilometers), population 553,800
oxheart
noun Date: 1870 any of various large sweet cherries
oxidant
noun Date: 1884 oxidizing agent • oxidant adjective
oxidase
noun Etymology: International Scientific Vocabulary Date: 1896 any of various enzymes that catalyze oxidations; especially one able to react directly with molecular oxygen ...
oxidasic
adjective see oxidase
oxidation
noun Etymology: French, from oxider, oxyder to oxidize, from oxide Date: 1791 1. the act or process of oxidizing 2. the state or result of being oxidized • oxidative ...
oxidation number
noun see oxidation state
oxidation state
noun Date: 1942 a positive or negative number that represents the effective charge of an atom or element and that indicates the extent or possibility of its oxidation — ...
oxidation-reduction
noun Date: 1909 a chemical reaction in which one or more electrons are transferred from one atom or molecule to another
oxidative
adjective see oxidation
oxidative phosphorylation
noun Date: 1945 the synthesis of ATP by phosphorylation of ADP for which energy is obtained by electron transport and which takes place in the mitochondria during aerobic ...
oxidatively
adverb see oxidation
oxide
noun Etymology: French oxide, oxyde, from ox- (from oxygène oxygen) + -ide (from acide acid) Date: 1790 a binary compound of oxygen with a more electropositive element or ...
oxidic
adjective see oxide
oxidise
chiefly British variant of oxidize
oxidiser
chiefly British variant of oxidizer
oxidizable
adjective see oxidize
oxidize
verb (-dized; -dizing) Date: 1806 transitive verb 1. to combine with oxygen 2. to dehydrogenate especially by the action of oxygen 3. to change (a compound) by ...
oxidizer
noun Date: 1875 oxidizing agent; especially one used to support the combustion of a rocket propellant
oxidizing agent
noun Date: 1830 a substance that oxidizes something especially chemically (as by accepting electrons)
oxidoreductase
noun Etymology: oxidation + -o- + reduction + -ase Date: 1922 an enzyme that catalyzes an oxidation-reduction reaction
oxime
noun Etymology: International Scientific Vocabulary ox- + -ime (from imide) Date: circa 1890 any of various compounds containing the divalent group C=NOH and obtained chiefly ...
oximeter
noun Etymology: International Scientific Vocabulary ox- + -i- + -meter Date: 1929 an instrument for measuring continuously the degree of oxygen saturation of the circulating ...
oximetry
noun see oximeter
oxlip
noun Etymology: Middle English *oxeslippe, from Old English oxanslyppe, literally, ox dung, from oxa ox + slypa, slyppe paste — more at slip Date: before 12th century a ...
Oxnard
geographical name city S California SE of Santa Barbara population 170,358
oxo
adjective Etymology: ox- Date: circa 1926 containing oxygen
oxo-
— see ox-
Oxon
abbreviation 1. [Medieval Latin Oxonia] Oxford 2. [Medieval Latin Oxoniensis] of Oxford 3. Oxfordshire
Oxonia
geographical name see Oxford II
Oxonian
noun Etymology: Medieval Latin Oxonia Oxford Date: circa 1540 a student or graduate of Oxford University • Oxonian adjective
oxpecker
noun Date: circa 1848 either of two small dull-colored African birds (Buphagus erythrorhynchus and B. africanus) of the starling family that feed on ticks which they pick ...
oxtail
noun Date: 15th century the tail of a beef animal; especially the skinned tail used for food (as in soup)
oxter
noun Etymology: Middle English (Scots), alteration of Old English ōxta; akin to Old English eax axis, axle — more at axis Date: 15th century 1. chiefly Scottish & Irish ...
oxtongue
noun Date: 14th century a European hawkweed (Picris echioides) that has yellow flowers and is now naturalized in the eastern United States
Oxus
geographical name — see Amu Dar'ya
oxy
adjective Etymology: French, from oxygène oxygen Date: 1910 containing oxygen or additional oxygen — often used in combination
oxyacetylene
adjective Etymology: International Scientific Vocabulary Date: 1909 of, relating to, or utilizing a mixture of oxygen and acetylene
oxycodone
noun Etymology: oxy + codeine + -one Date: 1966 a narcotic analgesic C18H21NO4 used especially in the form of its hydrochloride
oxygen
noun Usage: often attributive Etymology: French oxygène, from Greek oxys, adjective, acidic, literally, sharp + French -gène -gen; akin to Latin acer sharp — more at edge ...
oxygen cycle
noun Date: 1935 the cycle whereby atmospheric oxygen is converted to carbon dioxide in animal respiration and regenerated by green plants in photosynthesis
oxygen debt
noun Date: 1923 a cumulative deficit of oxygen available for oxidative metabolism that develops during periods of intense bodily activity and must be made good when the body ...
oxygen demand
noun Date: 1950 biochemical oxygen demand
oxygen mask
noun Date: 1920 a device worn over the nose and mouth through which oxygen is supplied from a storage tank
oxygen tent
noun Date: 1925 a canopy which can be placed over a bedridden person and within which a flow of oxygen can be maintained
oxygenate
I. transitive verb (-ated; -ating) Date: 1788 to impregnate, combine, or supply (as blood) with oxygen • oxygenation noun II. noun Date: 1975 an oxygen-containing ...
oxygenation
noun see oxygenate I
oxygenator
noun Date: circa 1864 one that oxygenates; specifically an apparatus that oxygenates the blood extracorporeally (as during open-heart surgery)
oxygenic
adjective Date: 1850 1. of or relating to oxygen 2. generating or producing oxygen
oxygenless
adjective see oxygen
oxyhemoglobin
noun Etymology: International Scientific Vocabulary Date: 1873 hemoglobin loosely combined with oxygen that it releases to the tissues
oxyhydrogen
adjective Date: 1827 of, relating to, or utilizing a mixture of oxygen and hydrogen
oxymoron
noun (plural oxymora) Etymology: Late Greek oxymōron, from neuter of oxymōros pointedly foolish, from Greek oxys sharp, keen + mōros foolish Date: 1657 a combination of ...
oxymoronic
adjective see oxymoron
oxymoronically
adverb see oxymoron
oxyphenbutazone
noun Etymology: oxy + phenylbutazone Date: 1961 a phenylbutazone derivative C19H20N2O3 having anti-inflammatory, analgesic, and antipyretic effects
oxyphilic
adjective Etymology: Greek oxys acidic + English -phil — more at oxygen Date: 1901 acidophilic
Oxyrhynchus
or Arabic El Bahnasa geographical name archaeological site Egypt N of El Minyā & S of El Faiyûm
oxytetracycline
noun Date: 1953 a yellow crystalline broad-spectrum antibiotic C22H24N2O9 produced by a soil actinomycete (Streptomyces rimosus)
oxytocic
adjective Etymology: International Scientific Vocabulary, from Greek oxys sharp, quick + tokos childbirth, from tiktein to bear — more at thane Date: 1873 hastening ...
oxytocin
noun Etymology: International Scientific Vocabulary, from oxytocic Date: 1928 a pituitary octapeptide hormone C43H66N12O12S2 that stimulates especially the contraction of ...
oxyuriasis
noun Etymology: New Latin, from Oxyuris, genus of worms Date: circa 1909 infestation with or disease caused by pinworms (family Oxyuridae)
oy
interjection Etymology: Yiddish Date: 1892 — used especially to express exasperation or dismay
oyer and terminer
noun Etymology: Middle English, part translation of Anglo-French oyer et terminer, literally, to hear and determine Date: 15th century 1. a commission authorizing a British ...
oyez
I. verb imperative Etymology: Middle English, from Anglo-French, hear ye, imperative plural of oir to hear, from Latin audire — more at audible Date: 15th century — used ...
Oyrot
geographical name — see Gorno-Altay
oyster
noun Usage: often attributive Etymology: Middle English oistre, from Anglo-French, from Latin ostrea, from Greek ostreon; akin to Greek ostrakon shell, osteon bone — more at ...
oyster bed
noun Date: 1591 a place where oysters grow or are cultivated
oyster crab
noun Date: 1756 a tiny crab (Pinnotheres ostreum) that lives as a commensal in the gill cavity of the oyster
oyster cracker
noun Date: 1872 a small salted usually round cracker
oyster drill
noun Date: 1925 drill 4a
oyster mushroom
noun Date: 1875 an edible mushroom (Pleurotus ostreatus) that grows especially on deciduous trees and deadwood
oyster plant
noun Date: 1821 salsify
oystercatcher
noun Date: 1731 any of a family (Haematopodidae containing a single genus Haematopus) of wading birds that have stout legs, a heavy wedge-shaped bill, and often ...
oystering
noun Date: 1662 the act or business of taking oysters for the market or for food
oysterman
noun Date: 1552 one who gathers, opens, breeds, or sells oysters
oysters Rockefeller
noun plural Etymology: probably from John D. Rockefeller died 1937 Date: 1939 a dish of oysters on the half shell cooked with various savory toppings typically including ...
oz
abbreviation Etymology: obsolete Italian onza (now onica) ounce; ounces
Oz
noun Etymology: from Oz, mythical land in a series of books by L. Frank Baum Date: 1936 an ideal or fantastical place
Ozark Mountains
geographical name see Ozark Plateau
Ozark Plateau
or Ozark Mountains geographical name eroded tableland region 1500-2500 feet (457-762 meters) high central United States N of Arkansas River in N Arkansas, S Missouri, & NE ...
Ozarker
noun see Ozark Plateau
Ozarkian
adjective or noun see Ozark Plateau
Ozarks, Lake of the
geographical name reservoir 125 miles (200 kilometers) long central Missouri formed in Osage River by Bagnell Dam
ozocerite
noun see ozokerite
ozokerite
also ozocerite noun Etymology: German Ozokerit, from Greek ozein to smell + kēros wax — more at cerumen Date: circa 1837 a waxy mineral mixture of hydrocarbons that is ...
ozonate
transitive verb see ozonation
ozonation
noun Date: 1854 the treatment or combination of a substance or compound with ozone • ozonate transitive verb
ozone
noun Etymology: German Ozon, from Greek ozōn, present participle of ozein to smell — more at odor Date: circa 1840 1. a triatomic very reactive form of oxygen that is a ...
ozone hole
noun Date: 1986 an area of the ozone layer (as near the south pole) that is seasonally depleted of ozone
ozone layer
noun Date: 1929 an atmospheric layer at heights of about 20 to 30 miles (32 to 48 kilometers) that is normally characterized by high ozone content which blocks most solar ...
ozonic
adjective see ozone
ozonide
noun Date: 1867 a compound formed by the addition of ozone to a double or triple bond of an organic compound
ozonization
noun see ozonize
ozonize
transitive verb (-ized; -izing) Date: 1850 to treat, impregnate, or combine with ozone • ozonization noun • ozonizer noun
ozonizer
noun see ozonize

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