Слова на букву phyl-quin (6389) New Collegiate Dictionary
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Слова на букву phyl-quin (6389)

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phyle
noun (plural phylae) Etymology: Greek phylē tribe, phyle Date: 1863 the largest political subdivision among the ancient Athenians
phyletic
adjective Etymology: International Scientific Vocabulary phyl- + -etic (as in genetic) Date: 1881 of or relating to evolutionary change in a single line of descent without ...
phyletically
adverb see phyletic
phyll-
or phyllo- combining form Etymology: New Latin, from Greek, from phyllon — more at blade leaf
phyllary
noun (plural -ries) Etymology: New Latin phyllarium, from Greek phyllarion, diminutive of phyllon leaf Date: 1857 one of the involucral bracts subtending the flower head of a ...
phyllo
also filo or fillo noun Etymology: Modern Greek, sheet of pastry dough, literally, leaf, from Greek phyllon Date: 1950 extremely thin dough that is layered to produce a flaky ...
phyllo-
combining form see phyll-
phylloclade
noun Etymology: New Latin phyllocladium, from phyll- + Greek klados branch — more at holt Date: 1884 a flattened stem or branch (as a joint of a cactus) that functions as a ...
phyllode
noun Etymology: New Latin phyllodium, from Greek phyllōdēs like a leaf, from phyllon leaf Date: 1848 a flat expanded petiole that replaces the blade of a foliage leaf, ...
phyllome
noun Etymology: International Scientific Vocabulary Date: 1875 a plant part that is a leaf or is phylogenetically derived from a leaf
phyllotactic
adjective Date: 1857 of or relating to phyllotaxis
phyllotaxis
also phyllotaxy noun Etymology: New Latin phyllotaxis, from phyll- + -taxis Date: 1857 1. the arrangement of leaves on a stem and in relation to one another 2. the study of ...
phyllotaxy
noun see phyllotaxis
phylloxera
noun Etymology: New Latin, from phyll- + Greek xēros dry Date: 1880 any of several plant lice (family Phylloxeridae); especially one (Daktulosphaira vitifoliae syn. Viteus ...
phylo-
combining form see phyl-
phylogenetic
adjective Etymology: International Scientific Vocabulary, from New Latin phylogenesis phylogeny, from phyl- + genesis Date: 1877 1. of or relating to phylogeny 2. based on ...
phylogenetically
adverb see phylogenetic
phylogeny
noun (plural -nies) Etymology: International Scientific Vocabulary Date: circa 1872 1. the evolutionary history of a kind of organism 2. the evolution of a genetically ...
phylum
noun (plural phyla) Etymology: New Latin, from Greek phylon tribe, race — more at phyl- Date: 1876 1. a. a direct line of descent within a group b. a group that ...
phys
abbreviation 1. physical 2. physics
phys ed
noun Date: 1955 physical education
physi-
or physio- combining form Etymology: Latin, from Greek, from physis — more at physics 1. nature 2. physical
physiatrist
noun Etymology: physiatrics physical medicine, from Greek physis + International Scientific Vocabulary -iatrics Date: circa 1947 a physician who specializes in physical ...
physic
I. noun Etymology: Middle English physik natural science, art of medicine, from Anglo-French phisique, fisik, from Latin physica, singular, natural science, from Greek physikē, ...
physical
I. adjective Etymology: Middle English phisicale medical, from Medieval Latin physicalis, from Latin physica Date: 1580 1. a. of or relating to natural science b. ...
physical anthropologist
noun see physical anthropology
physical anthropology
noun Date: 1873 anthropology concerned with the comparative study of human evolution, variation, and classification especially through measurement and observation — compare ...
physical education
noun Date: 1830 instruction in the development and care of the body ranging from simple calisthenic exercises to a course of study providing training in hygiene, gymnastics, ...
physical examination
noun Date: circa 1884 an examination of the bodily functions and condition of an individual
physical geography
noun Date: 1774 geography that deals with the exterior physical features and changes of the earth
physical medicine
noun Date: 1939 a branch of medicine concerned with the diagnosis and treatment of disease and disability by physical means (as radiation, heat, and electricity) — compare ...
physical science
noun Date: 1802 any of the natural sciences (as physics, chemistry, and astronomy) that deal primarily with nonliving materials • physical scientist noun
physical scientist
noun see physical science
physical therapist
noun see physical therapy
physical therapy
noun Date: 1922 the treatment of disease by physical and mechanical means (as massage, regulated exercise, water, light, heat, and electricity) • physical therapist noun
physicalism
noun Date: 1931 a thesis that the descriptive terms of scientific language are reducible to terms which refer to spatiotemporal things or events or to their properties • ...
physicalist
noun or adjective see physicalism
physicalistic
adjective see physicalism
physicality
noun (plural -ties) Date: 1660 1. intensely physical orientation ; predominance of the physical usually at the expense of the mental, spiritual, or social 2. a physical ...
physicalize
transitive verb (-ized; -izing) Date: 1947 to give physical form or expression to
physically
adverb see physical I
physicalness
noun see physical I
physician
noun Etymology: Middle English phisicien, fisicien, from Anglo-French, from phisique medicine Date: 13th century 1. a person skilled in the art of healing; specifically one ...
physician assistant
noun see physician's assistant
physician's assistant
noun Date: 1970 a person certified to provide basic medical services usually under the supervision of a licensed physician — called also PA, physician assistant
physician-assisted suicide
noun Date: 1987 suicide by a patient facilitated by means (as a drug prescription) or by information (as an indication of a lethal dosage) provided by a physician aware of ...
physicist
noun Date: circa 1840 1. a specialist in physics 2. archaic a person skilled in natural science
physicochemical
adjective Date: 1664 1. being physical and chemical 2. of or relating to chemistry that deals with the physicochemical properties of substances • physicochemically adverb
physicochemically
adverb see physicochemical
physics
noun plural but singular or plural in construction Etymology: Latin physica, plural, natural science, from Greek physika, from neuter plural of physikos of nature, from physis ...
physio-
combining form see physi-
physiocrat
noun Usage: often capitalized Etymology: French physiocrate, from physi- physi- + -crate -crat Date: 1798 a member of a school of political economists founded in 18th ...
physiocratic
adjective see physiocrat
physiognomic
also physiognomical adjective Date: 1588 of, relating to, or characteristic of physiognomy or the physiognomy • physiognomically adverb
physiognomical
adjective see physiognomic
physiognomically
adverb see physiognomic
physiognomy
noun (plural -mies) Etymology: Middle English phisonomie, from Anglo-French phisenomie, from Late Latin physiognomonia, physiognomia, from Greek physiognōmonia, from ...
physiographer
noun see physiography
physiographic
adjective see physiography
physiographical
adjective see physiography
physiography
noun Etymology: probably from French physiographie, from physi- + -graphie -graphy Date: circa 1828 physical geography • physiographer noun • physiographic also ...
physiol
abbreviation physiologist; physiology
physiologic
adjective see physiological
physiological
or physiologic adjective Date: 1814 1. of or relating to physiology 2. characteristic of or appropriate to an organism's healthy or normal functioning 3. differing in, ...
physiological psychology
noun Date: 1888 a branch of psychology that deals with the effects of normal and pathological physiological processes on mental life — called also psychophysiology
physiological saline
noun Date: 1896 a solution of a salt or salts that is essentially isotonic with tissue fluids or blood
physiologically
adverb see physiological
physiologist
noun see physiology
physiology
noun Etymology: Latin physiologia natural science, from Greek, from physi- + -logia -logy Date: 1615 1. a branch of biology that deals with the functions and activities of ...
physiopathologic
adjective see physiopathology
physiopathological
adjective see physiopathology
physiopathology
noun Date: circa 1889 a branch of biology or medicine that combines physiology and pathology especially in the study of altered bodily function in disease • ...
physiotherapist
noun see physiotherapy
physiotherapy
noun Etymology: New Latin physiotherapia, from physi- + therapia therapy Date: circa 1903 physical therapy • physiotherapist noun
physique
noun Etymology: French, from physique physical, bodily, from Latin physicus of nature, from Greek physikos Date: 1804 the form or structure of a person's body ; bodily makeup
physostigmine
noun Etymology: International Scientific Vocabulary, from New Latin Physostigma, genus of vines that bear the Calabar bean Date: 1864 a crystalline tasteless alkaloid ...
phyt-
or phyto- combining form Etymology: New Latin, from Greek, from phyton, from phyein to bring forth — more at be plant
phytane
noun Date: circa 1907 an isoprenoid hydrocarbon C20H42 that is found especially associated with fossilized plant remains from the Precambrian and later eras
phyto-
combining form see phyt-
phytoalexin
noun Etymology: International Scientific Vocabulary phyt- + alexin substance combating infection, from Greek alexein to ward off, protect; akin to Sanskrit rakṣati he ...
phytochemical
I. adjective Date: circa 1858 of, relating to, or being phytochemistry • phytochemically adverb II. noun Date: 1985 a chemical compound (as beta-carotene) occurring ...
phytochemically
adverb see phytochemical I
phytochemist
noun see phytochemistry
phytochemistry
noun Date: 1837 the chemistry of plants, plant processes, and plant products • phytochemist noun
phytochrome
noun Date: 1960 any of a group of proteins bound to light-absorbing pigments in many plants that play a role in initiating floral and developmental processes when activated by ...
phytoestrogen
noun Date: 1982 a chemical compound (as genistein) that occurs naturally in plants and has estrogenic properties
phytoflagellate
noun Date: 1935 any of various organisms (as dinoflagellates) that are considered a subclass (Phytomastigophora syn. Phytomastigina) usually of algae by botanists and of ...
phytogeographer
noun see phytogeography
phytogeographic
adjective see phytogeography
phytogeographical
adjective see phytogeography
phytogeographically
adverb see phytogeography
phytogeography
noun Etymology: International Scientific Vocabulary Date: circa 1847 the biogeography of plants • phytogeographer noun • phytogeographical or phytogeographic ...
phytohemagglutinin
noun Date: 1949 a proteinaceous hemagglutinin of plant origin used especially to induce mitosis (as in lymphocytes)
phytohormone
noun Etymology: International Scientific Vocabulary Date: 1933 plant hormone
phytolith
noun Date: 1958 a microscopic siliceous particle that is formed by a plant and that is highly resistant to decomposition
phyton
noun Etymology: New Latin, from Greek, plant Date: 1846 1. a structural unit of a plant consisting of a leaf and its associated portion of stem 2. the smallest part of a ...
phytonic
adjective see phyton
phytopathogen
noun Date: circa 1930 an organism parasitic on a plant host • phytopathogenic adjective
phytopathogenic
adjective see phytopathogen
phytopathological
adjective see phytopathology
phytopathology
noun Etymology: International Scientific Vocabulary Date: circa 1859 plant pathology • phytopathological adjective
phytophagous
adjective Date: 1826 feeding on plants
phytoplankter
noun Date: 1944 a planktonic plant
phytoplankton
noun Etymology: International Scientific Vocabulary Date: 1897 planktonic plant life • phytoplanktonic adjective
phytoplanktonic
adjective see phytoplankton
phytoplasma
noun Etymology: New Latin Date: 1994 any of a group of bacteria that are related to mycoplasmas, cause plant diseases (as aster yellows) by infecting phloem tissue, are ...
phytosociological
adjective see phytosociology
phytosociology
noun Date: 1928 a branch of ecology concerned especially with the structure, composition, and interrelationships of plant communities • phytosociological adjective
phytosterol
noun Etymology: International Scientific Vocabulary Date: 1898 any of various sterols derived from plants
phytotoxic
adjective Date: 1926 poisonous to plants • phytotoxicity noun
phytotoxicity
noun see phytotoxic
PI
abbreviation 1. Philippine Islands 2. private investigator 3. programmed instruction
pi
I. noun (plural pis) Etymology: Middle Greek, from Greek pei, of Semitic origin; akin to Hebrew pē pe Date: 1638 1. the 16th letter of the Greek alphabet — see alphabet ...
pi-meson
noun Etymology: 4pi Date: 1948 pion
pia mater
noun Etymology: Middle English, from Medieval Latin, from Latin, tender mother Date: 14th century the thin vascular membrane that invests the brain and spinal cord internal ...
Piacenza
or ancient Placentia geographical name commune N Italy on the Po SE of Milan population 102,252
Piaf
biographical name Edith 1915-1963 originally Edith Giovanna Gassion French singer
Piaget
biographical name Jean 1896-1980 Swiss psychologist • Piagetian adjective
Piagetian
adjective see Piaget
pial
adjective Date: 1889 of or relating to the pia mater
pianism
noun Date: 1844 1. the art or technique of piano playing 2. the composition or adaptation of music for the piano
pianissimo
I. adverb or adjective Etymology: Italian, from piano softly Date: 1724 very softly — used as a direction in music II. noun (plural pianissimi or -mos) Date: 1830 a ...
pianist
noun Date: circa 1828 a person who plays the piano; especially a skilled or professional performer on the piano
pianistic
adjective Date: 1881 1. of, relating to, or characteristic of the piano 2. skilled in or well adapted to piano playing • pianistically adverb
pianistically
adverb see pianistic
piano
I. adverb or adjective Etymology: Italian, from Late Latin planus smooth, from Latin, level — more at floor Date: 1683 at a soft volume ; soft — used as a direction in ...
piano accordion
noun Date: 1860 an accordion with a keyboard for the right hand resembling and corresponding to the middle register of a piano keyboard
piano hinge
noun Date: 1926 a hinge that has a thin pin joint and extends along the full length of the part to be moved
pianoforte
noun Etymology: Italian Date: 1767 1. fortepiano 2. piano
piassava
noun Etymology: Portuguese piassaba, from Tupi pɨasáβa Date: 1835 1. any of several stiff coarse fibers obtained from palms and used especially in cordage or brushes 2. ...
piaster
noun see piastre
piastre
also piaster noun Etymology: French piastre, from Italian piastra thin metal plate, coin, from Latin emplastra, emplastrum plaster Date: 1592 1. piece of eight 2. — see ...
Piauhy
geographical name see Piauí
Piauí
or formerly Piauhy geographical name state NE Brazil bordering on the Atlantic E of Parnaíba River capital Teresina area 97,017 square miles (251,274 square kilometers), ...
Piave
geographical name river 137 miles (220 kilometers) NE Italy flowing S & SE into the Adriatic
piazza
noun (plural piazzas or piazze) Etymology: Italian, from Latin platea broad street — more at place Date: 1563 1. plural piazze an open square especially in an Italian town ...
pibroch
noun Etymology: Scottish Gaelic pìobaireachd pipe music Date: 1719 a set of martial or mournful variations for the Scottish Highland bagpipe
pic
I. noun (plural pics or pix) Etymology: short for picture Date: 1884 1. photograph 2. motion picture II. noun Etymology: Spanish pica, from picar to prick Date: 1926 ...
Pic de Néthou
geographical name see Aneto, Pico de
pica
I. noun Etymology: New Latin, from Latin, magpie — more at pie Date: 1563 an abnormal desire to eat substances (as chalk or ashes) not normally eaten II. noun Etymology: ...
picador
noun (plural picadors or picadores) Etymology: Spanish, from picar to prick, from Vulgar Latin *piccare — more at pike Date: 1797 a horseman in a bullfight who jabs the ...
picaninny
noun see pickaninny
Picard
biographical name Jean 1620-1682 French astronomer
Picardie
geographical name see Picardy
Picardy
or French Picardie geographical name region & former province N France bordering on English Channel N of Normandy; chief town Amiens • Picard adjective or noun
picaresque
I. adjective Etymology: Spanish picaresco, from pícaro Date: 1810 of or relating to rogues or rascals; also of, relating to, suggesting, or being a type of fiction dealing ...
picaro
noun (plural -ros) Etymology: Spanish pícaro Date: 1623 rogue, Bohemian
picaroon
I. noun or pickaroon Etymology: Spanish picarón, augmentative of pícaro Date: 1624 1. pirate 2. picaro II. intransitive verb Date: 1625 to act as a pirate
Picasso
biographical name Pablo 1881-1973 Spanish painter & sculptor in France • Picassoesque adjective
Picassoesque
adjective see Picasso
picayune
I. noun Etymology: Occitan picaioun, a small coin, from picaio money, from pica to jingle, of imitative origin Date: 1804 1. a. a Spanish half real piece formerly current ...
picayunish
adjective see picayune II
piccalilli
noun Etymology: probably alteration of pickle Date: 1845 a relish of chopped vegetables and spices
Piccard
I. biographical name Auguste 1884-1962 Swiss physicist II. biographical name Jacques (-Ernest-Jean) 1922- son of preceding Swiss (Belgian-born) oceanographer
piccolo
I. adjective Etymology: Italian, small Date: circa 1854 smaller than ordinary size II. noun (plural -los) Etymology: Italian, short for piccolo flauto small flute Date: ...
piccoloist
noun see piccolo II
pice
noun (plural pice) Etymology: Hindi paisā Date: 1615 paisa
Picenum
geographical name district of ancient Italy on the Adriatic SE of Umbria
piceous
adjective Etymology: Latin piceus, from pic-, pix pitch — more at pitch Date: 1826 of, relating to, or resembling pitch; especially glossy brownish black in color
picholine
noun Etymology: French, from Occitan pichoulino Date: circa 1959 a medium-sized brine-cured green olive of French origin
pick
I. verb Etymology: Middle English piken, partly from Old English *pīcian (akin to Middle Dutch picken to prick); partly from Middle French piquer to prick — more at pike ...
pick and choose
phrasal to select with care and deliberation
pick at
phrasal to criticize repeatedly especially for minor faults ; nag
pick off
transitive verb Date: 1810 1. to shoot or bring down especially one by one 2. to put out (a base runner who is off base) with a quick throw (as from the pitcher or catcher) ...
pick on
phrasal to single out for criticism, teasing, or bullying ; also to single out for a particular purpose or for special attention
pick out
transitive verb Date: 1540 1. discern, make out 2. to play the notes of by ear or one by one
pick over
transitive verb Date: 1839 to examine in order to select the best or remove the unwanted
pick up
transitive verb Date: 14th century 1. a. to take hold of and lift up b. to gather together ; collect c. to clean up ; tidy 2. to take (passengers or freight) ...
pick up on
phrasal 1. a. understand, appreciate b. to become aware of ; notice 2. to adopt as one's own ; take up
pick-and-roll
noun Date: circa 1961 a basketball play in which a player sets a screen and then cuts toward the basket for a pass
pick-and-shovel
adjective Date: 1895 done with or as if with a pick and shovel ; laborious
pick-me-up
noun Date: 1867 something that stimulates or restores ; tonic, bracer
pickaback
variant of piggyback
pickaninny
or picaninny noun (plural -nies) Etymology: probably ultimately from Portuguese pequenino, diminutive of pequeno small Date: 1653 often offensive a black child
pickaroon
noun see picaroon I
pickax
noun Etymology: Middle English pecaxe, alteration of pikois, from Anglo-French picois, from pic pick, from Latin picus woodpecker — more at pie Date: 15th century pick ...
picked
I. adjective Etymology: Middle English, from 3pick Date: 14th century chiefly dialect pointed, peaked II. adjective Etymology: 1pick Date: circa 1548 choice, prime
pickeer
intransitive verb Etymology: probably modification of French picorer to maraud, perhaps from Middle French pecore sheep, from Old Italian pecora — more at pecorino Date: ...
picker
noun Date: 14th century one that picks: as a. a worker who picks something (as crops) b. a tool, implement, or machine used in picking something c. a musician who ...
pickerel
noun (plural -el or -els) Etymology: Middle English pikerel, diminutive of pike Date: 13th century 1. a. dialect chiefly British a young or small pike b. either of two ...
pickerelweed
noun Date: 1836 a shallow-water monocotyledonous perennial plant (Pontederia cordata) chiefly of the eastern United States and Canada with large leaves and a spike of ...
Pickering
I. biographical name Edward Charles 1846-1919 & his brother William Henry 1858-1938 American astronomer II. geographical name town Canada in SE Ontario population 87,139
picket
I. noun Etymology: French piquet, from Middle French, from piquer to prick — more at pike Date: circa 1702 1. a pointed or sharpened stake, post, or pale 2. a. a ...
picket line
noun Date: 1856 1. a position held by a line of military pickets 2. a line of people picketing a business, organization, or institution
picketboat
noun Date: 1866 a craft used (as by the coast guard) for harbor patrol
picketer
noun see picket II
Pickett
biographical name George Edward 1825-1875 American Confederate general
pickings
noun plural Date: 1642 something that is picked or picked up: as a. gleanable or eatable fragments ; scraps b. yield or return for effort expended
pickle
I. noun Etymology: Middle English pykyl, pekill sauce, gravy, from or akin to Middle Dutch peeckel brine Date: 15th century 1. a solution or bath for preserving or cleaning: ...
pickled
adjective Date: circa 1552 1. preserved in or cured with pickle 2. drunk 1a
pickleweed
noun Date: circa 1925 any of several succulent plants having leaves often reduced to scales or sheaths: as a. glasswort b. a shrub (Allenrolfea occidentalis) of the ...
picklock
noun Date: 1553 1. burglar 2. a tool for picking locks
pickoff
noun Date: 1939 a baseball play in which a base runner is picked off
pickpocket
noun Date: 1591 a thief who picks pockets
pickproof
adjective Date: 1933 designed to prevent picking
pickthank
noun Etymology: from pick a thank to seek someone's favor Date: 15th century archaic sycophant
pickup
I. noun Date: 1848 1. one that is picked up: as a. a hitchhiker who is given a ride b. a temporary chance acquaintance c. a player acquired from another team 2. the ...
pickup truck
noun see pickup I
Pickwickian
adjective Etymology: Samuel Pickwick, character in the novel Pickwick Papers (1836-37) by Charles Dickens Date: 1836 1. marked by simplicity and generosity 2. intended or ...
picky
adjective (pickier; -est) Date: 1900 fussy, choosy
picloram
noun Etymology: picolinic acid (acid obtained by oxidation of picoline) + chlor- + amine Date: 1965 a systemic herbicide C6H3Cl3N2O2 that is persistent in the soil
picnic
I. noun Usage: often attributive Etymology: German or French; German Picknick, from French pique-nique Date: 1826 1. an excursion or outing with food usually provided by ...
picnicker
noun see picnic II
picnicky
adjective see picnic I
Pico della Mirandola
biographical name Conte Giovanni 1463-1494 Italian humanist
Pico Rivera
geographical name city SW California population 63,428
pico-
combining form Etymology: International Scientific Vocabulary, probably from Spanish pico small amount, literally, peak, beak 1. one trillionth (10-12) part of 2. very ...
picogram
noun Etymology: International Scientific Vocabulary Date: 1951 one trillionth of a gram
picoline
noun Etymology: Latin pic-, pix pitch + International Scientific Vocabulary 1-ol + 2-ine — more at pitch Date: 1853 any of the three liquid isomeric pyridine derivatives ...
picomole
noun Date: 1968 one trillionth of a mole
picornavirus
noun Etymology: pico- + RNA + virus Date: 1962 any of a family (Picornaviridae) of single-stranded RNA viruses including especially the enteroviruses, the rhinoviruses, and ...
picosecond
noun Etymology: International Scientific Vocabulary Date: circa 1962 one trillionth of a second
picot
noun Etymology: French, literally, small point, from Middle French, from pic prick, from piquer to prick — more at pike Date: circa 1882 one of a series of small ornamental ...
picotee
noun Etymology: French picoté pointed, from picoter to mark with points, from picot Date: 1727 a flower (as some carnations or tulips) having one basic color with a margin ...
picr-
or picro- combining form Etymology: French, from Greek pikr-, pikro-, from pikros — more at paint bitter
picric acid
noun Etymology: International Scientific Vocabulary Date: 1852 a toxic yellow crystalline phenol derivative C6H3N3O7 structurally similar to TNT and used especially as a ...
picro-
combining form see picr-
picrotoxin
noun Etymology: International Scientific Vocabulary Date: 1815 a poisonous bitter crystalline stimulant and convulsive substance C30H34O13 obtained from the berry of a ...
Pict
noun Etymology: Middle English Pictes, plural, Picts, from Old English Pihtas, from Late Latin Picti Date: before 12th century a member of a people of the north of Scotland ...
Pictish
adjective or noun see Pict
pictogram
noun Etymology: International Scientific Vocabulary picto- (from Latin pictus) + -gram Date: 1910 pictograph
pictograph
noun Etymology: Latin pictus + English -o- + -graph Date: 1851 1. an ancient or prehistoric drawing or painting on a rock wall 2. one of the symbols belonging to a ...
pictographic
adjective see pictograph
pictography
noun Date: 1851 use of pictographs ; picture writing 1
pictorial
I. adjective Etymology: Late Latin pictorius, from Latin pictor painter — more at picturesque Date: 1646 1. of or relating to a painter, a painting, or the painting or ...
pictorialism
noun Date: 1869 1. the use or creation of pictures or visual images 2. a movement or technique in photography emphasizing artificial often romanticized pictorial qualities ...
pictorialist
adjective or noun see pictorialism
pictorialization
noun see pictorialize
pictorialize
transitive verb (-ized; -izing) Date: 1870 to represent by a picture or illustrate with pictures • pictorialization noun
pictorially
adverb see pictorial I
pictorialness
noun see pictorial I
picture
I. noun Etymology: Middle English, from Latin pictura, from pictus, past participle of pingere to paint — more at paint Date: 15th century 1. a design or representation ...
picture book
noun Date: 1847 a book that consists wholly or chiefly of pictures
picture hat
noun Date: 1887 a woman's dressy hat with a broad brim
picture puzzle
noun Date: 1898 jigsaw puzzle
picture tube
noun Date: 1937 a cathode-ray tube on which the picture appears in a television
picture window
noun Date: 1938 an outsize usually single-paned window designed to frame an exterior view
picture writing
noun Date: 1741 1. the recording of events or expression of messages by pictures representing actions or facts 2. the record or message represented by picture writing
picture-book
adjective Date: 1922 suitable for or suggestive of a picture book: as a. picturesque b. picture-perfect
picture-perfect
adjective Date: 1981 completely flawless ; perfect
picture-postcard
adjective Date: 1907 picturesque, picture-book
picturephone
noun Date: 1956 videophone
picturesque
adjective Etymology: French & Italian; French pittoresque, from Italian pittoresco, from pittore painter, from Latin pictor, from pingere Date: 1703 1. a. resembling a ...
picturesquely
adverb see picturesque
picturesqueness
noun see picturesque
picturization
noun see picturize
picturize
transitive verb (-ized; -izing) Date: circa 1846 to make a picture of ; present in pictures; especially to make into a motion picture • picturization noun
PID
abbreviation pelvic inflammatory disease
piddle
intransitive verb (piddled; piddling) Etymology: origin unknown Date: 1545 1. dawdle, putter 2. urinate
piddling
adjective Date: 1559 trivial, paltry
piddly
adjective Date: 1946 trivial, piddling
piddock
noun Etymology: origin unknown Date: 1851 a bivalve mollusk (family Pholadidae, especially genera Pholas and Barnea) that bores holes in wood, clay, and rocks
pidgin
noun Etymology: pidgin English Date: 1876 a simplified speech used for communication between people with different languages • pidginization noun • pidginize transitive ...
pidgin English
noun Usage: often capitalized P Etymology: Chinese Pidgin English pidgin business Date: 1859 an English-based pidgin; especially one originally used in parts of east Asia
pidginization
noun see pidgin
pidginize
transitive verb see pidgin
pie
I. noun Etymology: Middle English, from Anglo-French, from Latin pica; akin to Latin picus woodpecker, Old High German speh Date: 13th century magpie II. noun Etymology: ...
pie chart
noun Date: 1922 a circular chart cut by radii into segments illustrating relative magnitudes or frequencies — called also circle graph
pie in the sky
Date: 1911 an unrealistic enterprise or prospect of prosperity • pie-in-the-sky adjective
pie safe
noun Date: 1951 a cupboard whose doors have decoratively pierced tin panels for ventilation
pie-eyed
adjective Date: 1904 intoxicated
pie-faced
adjective Date: circa 1912 having a round, smooth, or blank face
pie-in-the-sky
adjective see pie in the sky
piebald
I. adjective Date: 1589 1. composed of incongruous parts 2. of different colors; especially spotted or blotched with black and white II. noun Date: 1765 a piebald ...
piece
I. noun Etymology: Middle English, from Anglo-French, from Vulgar Latin *pettia, of Gaulish origin; akin to Welsh peth thing Date: 13th century 1. a part of a whole: as a. ...

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