Слова на букву phyl-quin (6389) New Collegiate Dictionary
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Слова на букву phyl-quin (6389)

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powder room
noun Date: circa 1937 1. a restroom for women 2. a lavatory in the main living area of a house
powder-puff
adjective Date: 1939 of, relating to, or being a traditionally male activity or event done or played by women
powderer
noun see powder I
powderless
adjective see powder II
powderlike
adjective see powder II
powdery
adjective Date: 15th century 1. a. resembling or consisting of powder b. easily reduced to powder ; crumbling 2. covered with or as if with powder
powdery mildew
noun Date: 1889 1. an ascomycetous fungus (family Erysiphaceae) producing abundant powdery conidia on the host 2. a plant disease caused by a powdery mildew
Powell
I. biographical name Adam Clayton 1908-1972 American clergyman & politician II. biographical name Anthony 1905-2000 English writer III. biographical name Cecil Frank ...
Powell, Lake
geographical name — see Glen Canyon Dam
power
I. noun Usage: often attributive Etymology: Middle English, from Anglo-French poer, pouer, from poer to be able, from Vulgar Latin *potēre, alteration of Latin posse — more ...
power base
noun Date: 1959 a base of political support
power broker
noun Date: 1961 a person (as in politics) able to exert strong influence through control of votes or individuals
power chord
noun Date: 1977 a combination of two tones consisting of a root and its fifth that is often used in rock music
power dive
noun Date: 1930 a dive of an airplane accelerated by the power of the engine
power forward
noun Date: 1973 a basketball forward whose size and strength are used primarily in controlling play near the basket
power function
noun Date: 1957 1. a function of a parameter under statistical test whose value for a particular value of the parameter is the probability of rejecting the null hypothesis if ...
power mower
noun Date: 1940 a motor-driven lawn mower
power of attorney
Date: 1747 a legal instrument authorizing one to act as the attorney or agent of the grantor
power pack
noun Date: 1936 a unit for converting a power supply (as from a battery or household electrical circuit) to a voltage suitable for an electronic device
power plant
noun Date: 1890 1. an electric utility generating station 2. an engine and related parts supplying the motive power of a self-propelled object (as a rocket or automobile)
power play
noun Date: 1947 1. a military, diplomatic, political, or administrative maneuver in which power is brought to bear 2. a. a concentrated attack in football in which the ...
power politics
noun plural but singular or plural in construction Date: 1926 politics based primarily on the use of power (as military and economic strength) as a coercive force rather than ...
power series
noun Date: 1893 an infinite series whose terms are successive integral powers of a variable multiplied by constants
power shovel
noun Date: 1909 a power-operated excavating machine consisting of a boom or crane that supports a lever arm with a large bucket at the end of it
power station
noun Date: 1901 power plant 1
power steering
noun Date: 1932 an automotive steering system with engine power used to amplify the torque applied at the steering wheel by the driver
power strip
noun Date: 1980 an electrical device consisting of a cord with a plug on one end and several sockets on the other
power structure
noun Date: 1942 1. a group of persons having control of an organization ; establishment 2. the hierarchical interrelationships existing within a controlling group
power sweep
noun Date: 1964 sweep 3e
power take-off
noun Date: 1929 a supplementary mechanism (as on a tractor) enabling the engine power to be used to operate nonautomotive apparatus (as a pump or saw)
power train
noun Date: 1943 the intervening mechanism by which power is transmitted from an engine to a propeller or axle that it drives; also this mechanism plus the engine
power up
transitive verb Date: 1970 to cause to operate • power-up noun
power walk
intransitive verb Date: 1984 to walk quickly for exercise especially while carrying or wearing weights
power-dive
Date: 1937 intransitive verb to make a power dive transitive verb to cause to power-dive
power-up
noun see power up
powerboat
noun Date: 1908 motorboat • powerboater noun • powerboating adjective
powerboater
noun see powerboat
powerboating
adjective see powerboat
powerful
adjective Date: 15th century 1. having great power, prestige, or influence 2. leading to many or important deductions • powerfully adverb
powerfully
adverb see powerful
powerhouse
noun Date: circa 1889 1. a. power plant 1 b. a source of influence or inspiration 2. one having great power : as a. one having great drive, energy, or ability ...
powerless
adjective Date: 15th century 1. devoid of strength or resources 2. lacking the authority or capacity to act • powerlessly adverb • powerlessness noun
powerlessly
adverb see powerless
powerlessness
noun see powerless
Powers
biographical name Hiram 1805-1873 American sculptor
Powhatan
biographical name 1550?-1618 Wa-hun-sen-a-cawh or Wahunsonacock; father of Pocahontas American Indian chief
powwow
I. noun Etymology: Narragansett powwaw or Massachusett pauwau Date: 1624 1. an American Indian medicine man 2. a. an American Indian ceremony (as for victory in war) ...
Powys
I. biographical name John Cowper 1872-1963 & his brothers Theodore Francis 1875-1953 & Llewelyn 1884-1939 English authors II. geographical name administrative area of E ...
pox
I. noun (plural pox or poxes) Etymology: alteration of pocks, plural of pock Date: circa 1530 1. a. a virus disease (as chicken pox) characterized by pustules or ...
poxvirus
noun Etymology: New Latin Date: 1941 any of a family (Poxviridae) of brick-shaped or ovoid double-stranded DNA viruses (as the causative agents of cowpox and smallpox) having ...
poxy
adjective see pox I
Poyang
geographical name lake 90 miles (145 kilometers) long E China in N Jiangxi
Poznan
or German Posen geographical name city W central Poland on the Warta population 588,715
pozole
variant of posole
Pozsony
geographical name see Bratislava
pozzolan
noun see pozzolana
pozzolana
or pozzolan noun Etymology: Italian pozzolana Date: circa 1706 finely divided siliceous or siliceous and aluminous material that reacts chemically with slaked lime at ...
pozzolanic
adjective see pozzolana
Pozzuoli
or ancient Puteoli geographical name commune & port S Italy in Campania W of Naples population 76,121
pp
abbreviation 1. pages 2. per person 3. [Latin per procurationem] by proxy 4. pianissimo
PP
abbreviation 1. parcel post 2. postpaid 3. prepaid
ppb
abbreviation parts per billion
ppd
abbreviation 1. postpaid 2. prepaid
PPI
abbreviation plan position indicator
ppm
abbreviation 1. pages per minute 2. parts per million
PPO
noun (plural PPOs) Etymology: preferred provider organization Date: 1983 an organization providing health care that gives economic incentives to the individual purchaser of a ...
PPS
abbreviation Etymology: New Latin post postscriptum an additional postscript
ppt
abbreviation 1. parts per thousand 2. parts per trillion 3. precipitate
PPV
abbreviation pay-per-view
PQ
abbreviation Province of Quebec
pr
abbreviation 1. pair 2. price 3. printed
PR
I. noun or pr Usage: often attributive Date: 1942 public relations
Pr
I. abbreviation propyl II. symbol praseodymium
practicability
noun see practicable
practicable
adjective Date: 1648 1. capable of being put into practice or of being done or accomplished ; feasible 2. capable of being used ; usable Synonyms: see possible • ...
practicableness
noun see practicable
practicably
adverb see practicable
practical
I. adjective Etymology: Middle English, from Late Latin practicus, from Greek praktikos, from prassein to pass over, fare, do; akin to Greek peran to pass through — more at ...
practical art
noun Date: 1830 an art (as woodworking) that serves ordinary or material needs — usually used in plural
practical joke
noun Date: 1776 a prank intended to trick or embarrass someone or cause physical discomfort • practical joker noun
practical joker
noun see practical joke
practical nurse
noun Date: 1921 a nurse who cares for the sick professionally without having the training or experience required of a registered nurse; especially licensed practical nurse
practical theology
noun Date: 1828 the study of the institutional activities of religion (as preaching, church administration, pastoral care, and liturgics)
practicality
noun see practical I
practically
adverb Date: 1571 1. in a practical manner 2. almost, nearly
practicalness
noun see practical I
practice
I. verb also practise (practiced; also practised; practicing; also practising) Etymology: Middle English practisen, from Middle French practiser, from Medieval Latin practizare, ...
practice teacher
noun see practice-teach
practice teaching
noun Date: circa 1913 teaching by a student under the supervision of an experienced teacher
practice-teach
intransitive verb (practice-taught; -teaching) Etymology: back-formation from practice teaching Date: 1952 to engage in practice teaching • practice teacher noun
practiced
also practised adjective Date: 1568 1. experienced, skilled 2. learned by practice
practicer
noun see practice I
practicing
also practising adjective Date: 1625 actively engaged in a specified career or way of life
practicum
noun Etymology: German Praktikum, from Late Latin practicum, neuter of practicus practical Date: 1904 a course of study designed especially for the preparation of teachers ...
practise
I. verb see practice I II. noun see practice II
practised
adjective see practiced
practising
adjective see practicing
practitioner
noun Etymology: alteration of earlier practician, from Middle English (Scots) pratician, from Middle French practicien, from pratique practice Date: 1535 1. one who ...
Prader-Willi syndrome
noun Etymology: Andrea Prader b1919 and Heinrich Willi died 1971 Swiss pediatricians Date: 1964 a genetic disorder characterized especially by short stature, mental ...
Prado Ugarteche
biographical name Manuel 1889-1967 Peruvian banker; president of Peru (1939-45; 1956-62)
praecipe
also precipe noun Etymology: Middle English presepe, from Medieval Latin praecipe, from Latin, imperative of praecipere to instruct — more at precept Date: 15th century 1. ...
praemunire
noun Etymology: Middle English praemunire facias, from Medieval Latin, that you cause to warn; from prominent words in the writ Date: 1529 an offense against the English ...
praenomen
noun (plural -nomens or praenomina) Etymology: Latin, from prae- pre- + nomen name — more at name Date: 1706 the first of the usual three names of an ancient Roman male — ...
praesidium
variant of presidium
praetor
also pretor noun Etymology: Middle English pretor, from Latin praetor Date: 15th century an ancient Roman magistrate ranking below a consul and having chiefly judicial ...
praetorial
adjective see praetor
praetorian
also pretorian adjective Date: 15th century 1. often capitalized of, forming, or resembling the Roman imperial bodyguard 2. of or relating to a praetor • praetorian noun, ...
praetorship
noun see praetor
pragmatic
also pragmatical adjective Etymology: Latin pragmaticus skilled in law or business, from Greek pragmatikos, from pragmat-, pragma deed, from prassein to do — more at ...
pragmatic sanction
noun Date: 1643 a solemn decree of a sovereign on a matter of primary importance and with the force of fundamental law
pragmatical
adjective see pragmatic
pragmatically
adverb see pragmatic
pragmaticism
noun Date: 1905 the philosophic doctrine of C. S. Peirce • pragmaticist noun
pragmaticist
noun see pragmaticism
pragmatics
noun plural but singular or plural in construction Date: 1937 1. a branch of semiotic that deals with the relation between signs or linguistic expressions and their users 2. ...
pragmatism
noun Date: circa 1864 1. a practical approach to problems and affairs 2. an American movement in philosophy founded by C. S. Peirce and William James and marked by the ...
pragmatist
adjective or noun see pragmatism
pragmatistic
adjective see pragmatism
Prague
or Czechoslovakian Praha geographical name city capital of Czech Republic & formerly of Czechoslovakia in Bohemia on Vltava River population 1,214,772
Praha
geographical name see Prague
Praia
geographical name town capital of Cape Verde on São Tiago Island population 61,797
prairie
noun Usage: often attributive Etymology: French, from Old French praierie, from Vulgar Latin *prataria, from Latin pratum meadow Date: circa 1682 1. land in or predominantly ...
prairie chicken
noun Date: 1691 a grouse (Tympanuchus cupido) chiefly of the tallgrass prairies of the central United States with the male having yellowish-orange neck sacs which are inflated ...
prairie dog
noun Date: 1774 any of a genus (Cynomys) of gregarious burrowing rodents of the squirrel family chiefly of central and western United States plains; especially a ...
Prairie Provinces
geographical name the Canadian provinces of Manitoba, Saskatchewan, & Alberta
prairie schooner
noun Date: 1841 a covered wagon used by pioneers in cross-country travel — called also prairie wagon
prairie soil
noun Date: 1817 any of a zonal group of soils developed in a temperate relatively humid climate under tall grass
prairie wagon
noun see prairie schooner
prairie wolf
noun Date: 1804 coyote
praise
I. verb (praised; praising) Etymology: Middle English preisen, from Anglo-French preiser, priser to appraise, esteem — more at prize Date: 13th century transitive verb 1. ...
praiser
noun see praise I
praiseworthily
adverb see praiseworthy
praiseworthiness
noun see praiseworthy
praiseworthy
adjective Date: 15th century laudable • praiseworthily adverb • praiseworthiness noun
Prajadhipok
biographical name 1893-1941 king of Siam (1925-35)
Prakrit
noun Etymology: Sanskrit prākṛta, from prākṛta natural, vulgar Date: 1766 any or all of the ancient Indo-Aryan languages or dialects other than Sanskrit — see ...
praline
noun Etymology: French, from Count Plessis-Praslin died 1675 French soldier Date: 1723 a confection of nuts and sugar: as a. almonds cooked in boiling sugar until brown ...
pralltriller
noun Etymology: German, from prallen to rebound + Triller trill Date: circa 1841 a musical ornament made by a quick alternation of a principal tone with the tone above
pram
I. noun Etymology: Middle Dutch praem & Middle Low German prām Date: 1548 a small lightweight nearly flat-bottomed boat with a broad transom and usually squared-off bow II. ...
prance
I. verb (pranced; prancing) Etymology: Middle English prauncen Date: 14th century intransitive verb 1. to spring from the hind legs or move by so doing 2. to ride on a ...
prancer
noun see prance I
prandial
adjective Etymology: Latin prandium late breakfast, luncheon Date: 1820 of or relating to a meal
prang
transitive verb Etymology: origin unknown Date: 1941 chiefly British to have an accident with ; cause to crash • prang noun, chiefly British
prank
I. noun Etymology: obsolete prank to play tricks Date: circa 1529 trick: a. obsolete a malicious act b. a mildly mischievous act c. a ludicrous act II. verb ...
prankish
adjective Date: 1827 1. full of pranks 2. having the nature of a prank • prankishly adverb • prankishness noun
prankishly
adverb see prankish
prankishness
noun see prankish
prankster
noun Date: 1927 a person who plays pranks
prase
noun Etymology: French, from Middle French prasse, Latin prasius, from Greek prasios, from prasios, adjective, of the color of a leek, from prason leek; akin to Latin porrum ...
praseodymium
noun Etymology: New Latin, alteration of praseodidymium, irregular from Greek prasios, adjective + New Latin didymium didymium Date: 1885 a yellowish-white metallic element ...
prat
noun Etymology: probably from argot prat buttocks Date: circa 1961 British a stupid or foolish person
prate
intransitive verb (prated; prating) Etymology: Middle English, from Middle Dutch; akin to Middle Low German pratten to pout Date: 15th century to talk long and idly ; ...
prater
noun see prate
pratfall
noun Etymology: argot prat buttocks + fall Date: 1930 1. a fall on the buttocks 2. a humiliating mishap or blunder
pratincole
noun Etymology: ultimately from Latin pratum meadow + incola inhabitant, from in- + colere to cultivate — more at wheel Date: 1773 any of several Old World shore-inhabiting ...
pratingly
adverb see prate
pratique
noun Etymology: French, literally, practice, from Old French, from Medieval Latin practica — more at practice Date: 1609 clearance given an incoming ship by the health ...
Prato
geographical name commune central Italy in Tuscany population 165,888
Pratt
biographical name Edwin John 1883-1964 Canadian poet
prattle
I. verb (prattled; prattling) Etymology: Low German pratelen; akin to Middle Dutch praten to prate Date: 1532 intransitive verb 1. prate 2. to utter or make meaningless ...
prattler
noun see prattle I
prattlingly
adverb see prattle I
Prattville
geographical name city central Alabama NW of Montgomery population 24,303
prau
or proa noun Etymology: Malay pĕrahu Date: 1582 any of various Indonesian boats usually without a deck that are propelled especially by sails or paddles
pravastatin
noun Etymology: International Scientific Vocabulary pra- (of unknown origin) + -vastatin (as in lovastatin) Date: 1987 a drug C23H35NaO7 that inhibits the production of ...
prawn
I. noun Etymology: Middle English prane Date: 15th century any of various widely distributed edible decapod crustaceans: as a. one (as of the genera Pandalus and Penaeus) ...
prawner
noun see prawn II
praxeological
adjective see praxeology
praxeology
noun Etymology: alteration of earlier praxiology, from praxis + -o- + -logy Date: 1904 the study of human action and conduct • praxeological adjective
praxis
noun (plural praxes) Etymology: Medieval Latin, from Greek, doing, action, from prassein to do, practice — more at practical Date: 1581 1. action, practice: as a. ...
Praxitelean
adjective see Praxiteles
Praxiteles
biographical name flourished 370-330 B.C. Athenian sculptor • Praxitelean adjective
pray
verb Etymology: Middle English, from Anglo-French prier, praer, preier, from Latin precari, from prec-, prex request, prayer; akin to Old High German frāga question, frāgēn ...
prayer
I. noun Usage: often attributive Etymology: Middle English, from Anglo-French priere, praiere, preiere, from Medieval Latin precaria, from Latin, feminine of precarius obtained ...
prayer beads
noun plural Date: 1630 a string of beads by which prayers are counted; specifically rosary
prayer book
noun Date: circa 1597 a book containing prayers and often other forms and directions for worship
prayer meeting
noun Date: 1780 a usually informal gathering for worship and prayer; especially a Protestant worship service usually held on a week night — called also prayer service
prayer rug
noun Date: circa 1890 a small Oriental rug used by Muslims to kneel on when praying
prayer service
noun see prayer meeting
prayer shawl
noun Date: 1905 tallith
prayer wheel
noun Date: 1814 a cylinder of wood or metal that revolves on an axis and contains written prayers and that is used in praying by Tibetan Buddhists
prayerful
adjective Date: 1626 1. devout 2. earnest, sincere • prayerfully adverb • prayerfulness noun
prayerfully
adverb see prayerful
prayerfulness
noun see prayerful
praying mantid
noun see praying mantis
praying mantis
noun Date: circa 1890 mantis; especially a European mantis (Mantis religiosa) that has been introduced into the U.S. — called also praying mantid
PRC
abbreviation People's Republic of China
pre-
prefix Etymology: Latin prae-, from prae in front of, before — more at for 1. a. (1) earlier than ; prior to ; before (2) preparatory or prerequisite to b. ...
pre-Christian
adjective Date: 1828 of, relating to, or being a time before the beginning of the Christian era
pre-Columbian
adjective Date: 1888 preceding or belonging to the time before the arrival of Columbus in America
pre-engineered
adjective Date: 1951 constructed of or employing prefabricated modules
pre-Hispanic
adjective Date: 1919 of, relating to, or being the time prior to Spanish conquests in the western hemisphere
pre-K
noun Date: 1977 prekindergarten
pre-op
adjective Date: 1934 preoperative
pre-owned
adjective Date: 1956 secondhand, used
Pre-Raphaelite
noun Date: 1850 1. a. a member of a brotherhood of artists formed in England in 1848 to restore the artistic principles and practices regarded as characteristic of Italian ...
Pre-Raphaelitism
noun see Pre-Raphaelite
pre-Socratic
adjective Date: 1871 of or relating to Greek philosophers before Socrates • pre-Socratic noun
preach
verb Etymology: Middle English prechen, from Anglo-French precher, from Late Latin praedicare, from Latin, to proclaim, make known, from prae- pre- + dicare to proclaim — more ...
preacher
noun see preach
preachify
intransitive verb (-ified; -ifying) Date: 1775 to preach ineptly or tediously
preachily
adverb see preachy
preachiness
noun see preachy
preachingly
adverb see preach
preachment
noun Date: 14th century 1. the act or practice of preaching 2. sermon, exhortation; specifically a tedious or unwelcome one
preachy
adjective (preachier; -est) Date: 1819 marked by obvious moralizing ; didactic
preadaptation
noun Date: 1886 a character of an organism or taxonomic group that takes on a function when none previously existed or that differs from its existing function which has been ...
preadapted
adjective Date: 1758 characterized by preadaptation
preadaptive
adjective Date: 1915 of, relating to, or characterized by preadaptation
preadolescence
noun Date: 1930 the period of human development just preceding adolescence; specifically the period between the approximate ages of 9 and 12 • preadolescent adjective or ...
preadolescent
adjective or noun see preadolescence
preamble
noun Etymology: Middle English, from Middle French preambule, from Medieval Latin preambulum, from Late Latin, neuter of praeambulus walking in front of, from Latin prae- + ...
preamp
noun Date: 1949 preamplifier
preamplifier
noun Date: 1935 an amplifier designed to amplify extremely weak electrical signals before they are fed to additional amplifier circuits
preatomic
adjective Date: 1914 of or relating to a time before the use of the atomic bomb and atomic energy
preaxial
adjective Date: 1872 situated in front of an axis of the body
prebend
noun Etymology: Middle English prebende, from Anglo-French, from Medieval Latin praebenda, from Late Latin, subsistence allowance granted by the state, from Latin, feminine of ...
prebendal
adjective see prebend
prebendary
noun (plural -daries) Date: 15th century 1. a clergyman receiving a prebend for officiating and serving in the church 2. an honorary canon in a cathedral chapter
prebiologic
adjective see prebiological
prebiological
also prebiologic adjective Date: 1953 prebiotic
prebiotic
adjective Date: 1958 of, relating to, or being chemical or environmental precursors of the origin of life ; also existing or occurring before the origin of life
Preble
biographical name Edward 1761-1807 American naval officer
precalculus
adjective Date: 1964 relating to or being mathematical prerequisites for the study of calculus • precalculus noun
Precambrian
adjective Date: 1864 of, relating to, or being the earliest era of geological history or the corresponding system of rocks that is characterized especially by the appearance ...
precancel
I. transitive verb Date: 1921 to cancel (a postage stamp) in advance of use • precancellation noun II. noun Date: 1929 a precanceled postage stamp
precancellation
noun see precancel I
precancerous
adjective Etymology: International Scientific Vocabulary Date: 1882 tending to become cancerous
precarious
adjective Etymology: Latin precarius obtained by entreaty, uncertain — more at prayer Date: 1646 1. depending on the will or pleasure of another 2. dependent on uncertain ...
precariously
adverb see precarious
precariousness
noun see precarious
precast
adjective Date: 1914 being concrete that is cast in the form of a structural element (as a panel or beam) before being placed in final position
precatory
adjective Etymology: Late Latin precatorius, from Latin precari to pray — more at pray Date: 1636 expressing a wish
precaution
noun Etymology: French précaution, from Late Latin praecaution-, praecautio, from Latin praecavēre to guard against, from prae- + cavēre to be on one's guard — more at ...
precautionary
adjective see precaution
precede
verb (preceded; preceding) Etymology: Middle English, from Middle French preceder, from Latin praecedere, from prae- pre- + cedere to go Date: 15th century transitive verb ...
precedence
noun Date: 1588 1. a. obsolete antecedent b. the fact of preceding in time 2. a. the right to superior honor on a ceremonial or formal occasion b. the order of ...
precedency
noun Date: 1612 precedence
precedent
I. adjective Etymology: Middle English, from Anglo-French, from Latin praecedent-, praecedens, present participle of praecedere Date: 15th century prior in time, order, ...
preceding
adjective Date: 15th century that immediately precedes in time or place Synonyms: preceding, antecedent, foregoing, previous, prior, former, anterior mean being ...
precensor
transitive verb Date: 1942 to censor (a publication or film) before its release to the public
precentor
noun Etymology: Latin praecentor, from praecinere to lead in singing, from prae- + canere to sing — more at chant Date: 1613 a leader of the singing of a choir or ...
precentorial
adjective see precentor
precentorship
noun see precentor
precept
noun Etymology: Middle English, from Anglo-French, from Latin praeceptum, from neuter of praeceptus, past participle of praecipere to take beforehand, instruct, from prae- + ...
preceptive
adjective Date: 15th century giving precepts ; didactic
preceptor
noun Date: 15th century 1. a. teacher, tutor b. the headmaster or principal of a school 2. the head of a preceptory of Knights Templars • preceptorship noun
preceptorial
I. adjective Date: circa 1741 of, relating to, or making use of preceptors II. noun Date: circa 1952 a college course that emphasizes independent reading, discussion in ...
preceptorship
noun see preceptor
preceptory
noun (plural -ries) Date: 1540 1. a subordinate house or community of the Knights Templars; broadly commandery 1 2. commandery 2
precess
verb Etymology: back-formation from precession Date: 1892 intransitive verb to progress with a movement of precession transitive verb to cause to precess
precession
noun Etymology: New Latin praecession-, praecessio, from Medieval Latin, act of preceding, from Latin praecedere to precede Date: 1879 a comparatively slow gyration of the ...
precession of the equinoxes
Date: 1621 a slow westward motion of the equinoxes along the ecliptic caused by the gravitational action of sun and moon upon the protuberant matter about the earth's equator
precessional
adjective see precession
précieuse
adjective see précieux
précieux
or précieuse adjective Etymology: French précieux, masculine, & précieuse, feminine, literally, precious, from Middle French precios Date: 1727 precious 3
precinct
noun Etymology: Middle English, from Medieval Latin praecinctum, from Latin, neuter of praecinctus, past participle of praecingere to gird, encircle, from prae- pre- + cingere ...
preciosity
noun (plural -ties) Date: 1866 1. fastidious refinement 2. an instance of preciosity
precious
I. adjective Etymology: Middle English, from Anglo-French precios, from Latin pretiosus, from pretium price — more at price Date: 13th century 1. of great value or high ...
preciously
adverb Date: 14th century 1. in a precious manner 2. precious
preciousness
noun see precious I
precipe
variant of praecipe
precipice
noun Etymology: French, from Middle French, from Latin praecipitium, from praecipit-, praeceps headlong, from prae- + caput head — more at head Date: 1613 1. a very steep ...
precipitable
adjective Date: 1670 capable of being precipitated
precipitance
noun Date: 1667 precipitancy

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