Слова на букву phyl-quin (6389) New Collegiate Dictionary
На главную О проекте Обратная связь Поддержать проектДобавить в избранное

  
EN-DE-FR →  New Collegiate Dictionary →  acto-axio axio-buck buck-cobl cobl-deco deco-elec elec-flüg flüg-gulp gulp-innu inob-leni leni-micr micr-obtr obtr-phyl phyl-quin quin-sask sask-soma soma-tano tans-unco uncr-wool


Слова на букву phyl-quin (6389)

<< < 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 > >>
precipitancy
noun Date: 1540 undue hastiness or suddenness
precipitant
I. adjective Date: 1671 precipitate • precipitantly adverb • precipitantness noun II. noun Date: circa 1685 a precipitating agent; especially one that causes the ...
precipitantly
adverb see precipitant I
precipitantness
noun see precipitant I
precipitate
I. verb (-tated; -tating) Etymology: Latin praecipitatus, past participle of praecipitare, from praecipit-, praeceps Date: 1528 transitive verb 1. a. to throw ...
precipitately
adverb see precipitate III
precipitateness
noun see precipitate III
precipitation
noun Date: 1502 1. the quality or state of being precipitate ; hastiness 2. an act, process, or instance of precipitating; especially the process of forming a precipitate ...
precipitative
adjective see precipitate I
precipitator
noun see precipitate I
precipitin
noun Etymology: International Scientific Vocabulary, from precipitate Date: 1900 an antibody that forms a precipitate when it unites with its antigen
precipitinogen
noun Date: 1904 an antigen that stimulates the production of a specific precipitin
precipitous
adjective Etymology: French précipiteux, from Middle French, from Latin precipitium precipice Date: 1646 1. precipitate 2 2. a. very steep, perpendicular, or ...
precipitously
adverb see precipitous
precipitousness
noun see precipitous
précis
noun (plural précis) Etymology: French, from précis precise Date: 1760 a concise summary of essential points, statements, or facts
precise
adjective Etymology: Middle English, from Middle French precis, from Latin praecisus, past participle of praecidere to cut off, from prae- + caedere to cut Date: 15th century ...
precisely
adverb Date: 14th century exactly
preciseness
noun see precise
precisian
noun Date: 1571 1. a person who stresses or practices scrupulous adherence to a strict standard especially of religious observance or morality 2. puritan 1
precision
I. noun Date: 1740 1. the quality or state of being precise ; exactness 2. a. the degree of refinement with which an operation is performed or a measurement stated — ...
precisionist
noun see precision I
preclinical
adjective Date: 1926 1. of, relating to, or concerned with the period preceding clinical manifestations 2. of, relating to, or being the period in medical or dental ...
preclude
transitive verb (precluded; precluding) Etymology: Latin praecludere, from prae- + claudere to close — more at close Date: 1629 1. archaic close 2. to make impossible by ...
preclusion
noun see preclude
preclusive
adjective see preclude
preclusively
adverb see preclude
precocial
adjective Etymology: New Latin praecoces precocial birds, from Latin, plural of praecoc-, precox Date: circa 1872 capable of a high degree of independent activity from birth ...
precocious
adjective Etymology: Latin praecoc-, praecox early ripening, precocious, from prae- + coquere to cook — more at cook Date: 1650 1. exceptionally early in development or ...
precociously
adverb see precocious
precociousness
noun see precocious
precocity
noun see precocious
precognition
noun Etymology: Late Latin praecognition-, praecognitio, from Latin praecognoscere to know beforehand, from prae- + cognoscere to know — more at cognition Date: circa 1611 ...
precognitive
adjective see precognition
preconceive
transitive verb Date: 1558 to form (as an opinion) prior to actual knowledge or experience
preconception
noun Date: 1625 1. a preconceived idea 2. prejudice
precondition
I. noun Date: 1825 prerequisite II. transitive verb Date: 1922 to put in a proper or desired condition or frame of mind especially in preparation
preconscious
I. adjective Date: 1860 not present in consciousness but capable of being recalled without encountering any inner resistance or repression • preconsciously adverb II. noun ...
preconsciously
adverb see preconscious I
precontact
adjective Date: circa 1909 of or relating to the period before contact of an indigenous people with an outside culture
precook
transitive verb Date: 1926 to cook partially or entirely before final cooking or reheating
precooked
adjective Date: 1964 canned 1
precritical
adjective Date: 1881 prior to the development of critical capacity
precursor
noun Etymology: Middle English precursoure, from Latin praecursor, from praecurrere to run before, from prae- pre- + currere to run — more at current Date: 15th century 1. ...
precursory
adjective see precursor
pred
abbreviation predicate
predaceous
or predacious adjective Etymology: Latin praedari to prey upon (from praeda prey) + English -aceous or -acious (as in rapacious) — more at prey Date: 1713 1. living by ...
predaceousness
noun see predaceous
predacious
adjective see predaceous
predacity
noun see predaceous
predate
transitive verb Date: circa 1864 antedate
predation
noun Etymology: Middle English predacion, from Latin praedation-, praedatio, from praedari Date: 15th century 1. the act of preying or plundering ; depredation 2. a mode of ...
predation pressure
noun Date: 1942 the effects of predation on a natural community especially with respect to the survival of species preyed upon
predator
noun Date: 1912 1. one that preys, destroys, or devours 2. an animal that lives by predation
predatory
adjective Date: 1589 1. a. of, relating to, or practicing plunder, pillage, or rapine b. inclined or intended to injure or exploit others for personal gain or profit ...
predecease
verb (-ceased; -ceasing) Date: 1593 transitive verb to die before (another person) intransitive verb to die first • predecease noun
predecessor
noun Etymology: Middle English predecessour, from Anglo-French predecessur, from Late Latin praedecessor, from Latin prae- pre- + decessor retiring governor, from decedere to ...
predella
noun Etymology: Italian, footrest, altar step, predella, from Langobardic (Germanic language of the Lombards) *predel-, *pretel-, lath, board; akin to Old High German bret ...
predestinarian
noun Etymology: predestination + -arian Date: 1667 one who believes in predestination • predestinarian adjective • predestinarianism noun
predestinarianism
noun see predestinarian
predestinate
I. adjective Etymology: Middle English, from Latin praedestinatus, past participle of praedestinare Date: 14th century destined, fated, or determined beforehand II. ...
predestination
noun Date: 14th century 1. the act of predestinating ; the state of being predestinated 2. the doctrine that God in consequence of his foreknowledge of all events infallibly ...
predestinator
noun Date: 1579 1. archaic predestinarian 2. one that predestinates
predestine
transitive verb Etymology: Middle English, from Anglo-French or Latin; Anglo-French predestiner, from Latin praedestinare, from prae- + destinare to determine — more at ...
predetermination
noun Date: 1647 1. the act of predetermining ; the state of being predetermined: as a. the ordaining of events beforehand b. a fixing or settling in advance 2. a ...
predetermine
transitive verb Etymology: Late Latin praedeterminare, from Latin prae- + determinare to determine Date: 1622 1. a. foreordain, predestine b. to determine beforehand ...
predeterminer
noun Date: 1959 a limiting noun modifier (as both or all) characterized by occurrence before the determiner in a noun phrase
prediabetes
noun Date: 1935 an asymptomatic abnormal state that precedes the development of clinically evident diabetes • prediabetic adjective or noun
prediabetic
adjective or noun see prediabetes
predial
adjective Etymology: Middle English prediall, from Medieval Latin praedialis, from Latin praedium landed property, from praed-, praes bondsman, from prae- + vad-, vas surety ...
predicable
I. noun Etymology: Medieval Latin praedicabile, from neuter of praedicabilis Date: 1551 something that may be predicated; especially one of the five most general kinds of ...
predicament
noun Etymology: Middle English, from Late Latin praedicamentum, from praedicare Date: 14th century 1. the character, status, or classification assigned by a predication; ...
predicate
I. noun Etymology: Middle English, from Late Latin praedicatum, from neuter of praedicatus Date: 15th century 1. a. something that is affirmed or denied of the subject in ...
predicate calculus
noun Date: 1950 the branch of symbolic logic that uses symbols for quantifiers and for arguments and predicates of propositions as well as for unanalyzed propositions and ...
predicate nominative
noun Date: 1887 a noun or pronoun in the nominative or common case completing the meaning of a copula
predication
noun Etymology: Middle English predicacion, from Anglo-French predicaciun, from Latin praedication-, praedicatio, from praedicare Date: 14th century 1. archaic a. an act ...
predicative
adjective see predicate I
predicatively
adverb see predicate I
predicatory
adjective Etymology: Late Latin praedicatorius, from praedicare to preach Date: 1611 of or relating to preaching
predict
verb Etymology: Latin praedictus, past participle of praedicere, from prae- pre- + dicere to say — more at diction Date: 1609 transitive verb to declare or indicate in ...
predictability
noun see predict
predictable
adjective see predict
predictably
adverb Date: 1914 1. in a manner that can be predicted 2. as one could predict ; as one would expect
prediction
noun Date: 1561 1. an act of predicting 2. something that is predicted ; forecast
predictive
adjective see predict
predictively
adverb see predict
predictor
noun see predict
predigest
transitive verb Date: 1663 1. to subject to predigestion 2. to simplify for easy use
predigestion
noun Date: circa 1612 artificial or natural partial digestion of food
predilection
noun Etymology: French prédilection, from Medieval Latin praediligere to love more, prefer, from Latin prae- + diligere to love — more at diligent Date: 1742 an ...
predispose
Date: 1646 transitive verb 1. to dispose in advance 2. to make susceptible intransitive verb to bring about susceptibility Synonyms: see incline • ...
predisposition
noun see predispose
prednisolone
noun Etymology: blend of prednisone and 1-ol Date: 1955 a glucocorticoid C21H28O5 that is a dehydrogenated analog of cortisol and is used especially as an anti-inflammatory ...
prednisone
noun Etymology: probably from pregnane (C21H36) + diene (compound containing two double bonds) + cortisone Date: 1955 a glucocorticoid C21H26O5 that is a dehydrogenated ...
predoctoral
adjective Date: 1937 of, relating to, or engaged in academic study leading to the doctoral degree
predominance
noun Date: 1592 the quality or state of being predominant
predominancy
noun Date: circa 1598 predominance
predominant
adjective Etymology: Middle French, from Medieval Latin praedominant-, praedominans, present participle of praedominari to predominate, from Latin prae- + dominari to rule, ...
predominantly
adverb Date: 1681 for the most part ; mainly
predominate
I. adjective Etymology: alteration of predominant Date: 1591 predominant II. verb Etymology: Medieval Latin praedominatus, past participle of praedominari Date: 1594 ...
predominately
adverb Date: 1594 predominantly
predomination
noun see predominate II
pree
transitive verb (preed; preeing) Etymology: alteration of preve to prove, test, from Middle English preven, from Anglo-French prev-, stem of prover to prove Date: 1680 ...
preeclampsia
noun Etymology: New Latin Date: 1923 a serious condition developing in late pregnancy that is characterized by a sudden rise in blood pressure, excessive weight gain, ...
preeclamptic
adjective see preeclampsia
preemergence
adjective Date: 1935 used or occurring before emergence of seedlings above the ground
preemergent
adjective Date: 1959 preemergence
preemie
also premie noun Etymology: premature + -ie Date: 1927 a premature baby
preeminence
noun Date: 13th century the quality or state of being preeminent ; superiority
preeminent
adjective Etymology: Middle English, from Late Latin praeeminent-, praeeminens, from Latin, present participle of praeeminēre to be outstanding, from prae- + eminēre to stand ...
preeminently
adverb see preeminent
preempt
verb Etymology: back-formation from preemption Date: 1850 transitive verb 1. to acquire (as land) by preemption 2. to seize upon to the exclusion of others ; take for ...
preemption
noun Etymology: Medieval Latin praeemption-, praeemptio previous purchase, from praeemere to buy before, from Latin prae- pre- + emere to buy — more at redeem Date: 1602 1. ...
preemptive
adjective Date: 1855 1. a. of or relating to preemption b. having power to preempt 2. of a bid in bridge higher than necessary and intended to shut out bids by the ...
preemptively
adverb see preemptive
preemptor
noun see preempt
preen
I. noun Etymology: Middle English prene, from Old English prēon; akin to Middle High German pfrieme awl Date: before 12th century 1. dialect chiefly British pin 2. dialect ...
preener
noun see preen III
preexilic
adjective Date: 1880 previous to the exile of the Jews to Babylon in about 600 B.C.
preexist
Date: 1599 intransitive verb to exist earlier or before transitive verb antedate
preexistence
noun Date: circa 1652 existence in a former state or previous to something else; specifically existence of the soul before its union with the body • preexistent ...
preexistent
adjective see preexistence
pref
abbreviation 1. preface 2. preference; preferred 3. prefix
prefab
I. adjective Date: 1937 produced by prefabrication ; prefabricated II. noun Date: 1942 a prefabricated structure
prefabricate
transitive verb Date: 1932 1. to fabricate the parts of at a factory so that construction consists mainly of assembling and uniting standardized parts 2. to produce ...
prefabrication
noun see prefabricate
preface
I. noun Etymology: Middle English, from Anglo-French, from Medieval Latin prephatia, alteration of Latin praefation-, praefatio foreword, from praefari to say beforehand, from ...
prefacer
noun see preface II
prefatory
adjective Etymology: Latin praefari Date: 1675 1. of, relating to, or constituting a preface 2. located in front
prefect
noun Etymology: Middle English, from Anglo-French, from Latin praefectus, from past participle of praeficere to place at the head of, from prae- + facere to make — more at do ...
prefect apostolic
noun Date: circa 1888 a Roman Catholic clergyman and usually a priest with quasi-episcopal jurisdiction over a district of a missionary territory
prefectural
adjective see prefecture
prefecture
noun Date: 15th century 1. the office or term of office of a prefect 2. the official residence of a prefect 3. the district governed by a prefect • prefectural adjective
prefecture apostolic
noun Date: 1911 the district under a prefect apostolic
prefer
transitive verb (preferred; preferring) Etymology: Middle English preferren, from Anglo-French preferrer, from Latin praeferre to put before, prefer, from prae- + ferre to carry ...
preferability
noun see preferable
preferable
adjective Date: 1666 having greater value or desirability ; being preferred • preferability noun • preferably adverb
preferably
adverb see preferable
preference
noun Etymology: Middle English preferraunce, from Middle French preferance, from Medieval Latin praeferentia, from Latin praeferent-, praeferens, present participle of ...
preferential
adjective Date: 1849 1. showing preference 2. employing or creating a preference in trade relations 3. designed to permit expression of preference among candidates 4. ...
preferentially
adverb see preferential
preferment
noun Date: 15th century 1. a. advancement or promotion in dignity, office, or station b. a position or office of honor or profit 2. priority or seniority in right ...
preferred provider
noun Date: 1983 1. PPO — usually used attributively 2. a health-care provider (as a doctor or hospital) that is part of a PPO
preferred stock
noun Date: circa 1859 stock guaranteed priority by a corporation's charter over common stock in the payment of dividends and usually in the distribution of assets
preferrer
noun see prefer
prefiguration
noun Date: 14th century 1. the act of prefiguring ; the state of being prefigured 2. something that prefigures • prefigurative adjective
prefigurative
adjective see prefiguration
prefigure
transitive verb Etymology: Middle English, from Late Latin praefigurare, from Latin prae- pre- + figurare to shape, picture, from figura figure Date: 15th century 1. to show, ...
prefigurement
noun see prefigure
prefix
I. transitive verb Etymology: Middle English, from Middle French prefixer, from Latin praefixus Date: 15th century 1. to fix or appoint beforehand 2. [partly from prefix ...
prefixal
adjective see prefix II
preflight
I. adjective Date: 1942 preparing for or preliminary to flight (as of an aircraft) II. transitive verb Date: 1945 to inspect (as an aircraft) before a flight III. noun ...
prefocus
transitive verb Date: 1948 to focus beforehand (as automotive headlights before installation)
preform
transitive verb Etymology: Latin praeformare, from prae- + formare to form, from forma form Date: 1601 1. to form or shape beforehand 2. to bring to approximate preliminary ...
preformation
noun Date: 1732 1. previous formation 2. the now discredited theory that every germ cell contains the organism of its kind fully formed and that development involves merely ...
preformationist
noun or adjective see preformation
prefrontal
I. adjective Date: 1854 anterior to or involving the anterior part of a frontal structure II. noun Date: 1854 a prefrontal part (as a bone)
prefrontal cortex
noun Date: 1964 the gray matter of the anterior part of the frontal lobe that is highly developed in humans and plays a role in the regulation of complex cognitive, emotional, ...
preganglionic
adjective Date: 1895 proximal to a ganglion; specifically of, relating to, or being a usually medullated axon arising from a cell body in the central nervous system and ...
Pregl
biographical name Fritz 1869-1930 Austrian chemist
pregnability
noun see pregnable
pregnable
adjective Etymology: alteration of Middle English prenable, from Anglo-French — more at impregnable Date: 14th century vulnerable to capture • pregnability noun
pregnancy
noun (plural -cies) Date: 15th century 1. the quality of being pregnant (as in meaning) 2. the condition of being pregnant ; gestation 3. an instance of being pregnant
pregnant
adjective Etymology: Middle English, from Latin praegnant-, praegnans carrying a fetus, alteration of praegnas, from prae- pre- + -gnas (akin to gignere to give birth to) — ...
pregnantly
adverb see pregnant
pregnenolone
noun Etymology: International Scientific Vocabulary pregnene (C21H34) + 1-ol + -one Date: 1936 an unsaturated hydroxy steroid ketone C21H32O2 that is formed by the ...
preheat
transitive verb Date: 1898 to heat beforehand; especially to heat (an oven) to a designated temperature before using for cooking • preheater noun
preheater
noun see preheat
prehensile
adjective Etymology: French préhensile, from Latin prehensus, past participle of prehendere to seize — more at get Date: circa 1785 1. adapted for seizing or grasping ...
prehensility
noun see prehensile
prehension
noun Date: circa 1828 1. the act of taking hold, seizing, or grasping 2. a. mental understanding ; comprehension b. apprehension by the senses
prehistorian
noun Date: 1893 an archaeologist who specializes in prehistory
prehistoric
also prehistorical adjective Date: 1851 1. of, relating to, or existing in times antedating written history 2. of or relating to a language in a period of its development ...
prehistorical
adjective see prehistoric
prehistorically
adverb see prehistoric
prehistory
noun Date: 1871 1. the study of prehistoric humankind 2. a history of the antecedents of an event, situation, or thing 3. the prehistoric period of human evolution
prehominid
noun Etymology: ultimately from Latin pre- + homin-, homo human being — more at homage Date: 1939 any of various extinct primates resembling or ancestral to hominids • ...
prehuman
adjective Date: 1844 1. antedating the appearance of human beings 2. of, relating to, or being an extinct primate and especially an extinct hominid that resembles or is ...
preignition
noun Date: 1898 ignition in an internal combustion engine while the inlet valve is open or before compression is completed
preimplantation
adjective Date: 1945 of, involving, or being an embryo before uterine implantation
preinstall
transitive verb Date: 1983 to install (as software) on a computer prior to sale • preinstallation noun
preinstallation
noun see preinstall
prejudge
transitive verb Etymology: Middle French prejuger, from Latin praejudicare, from prae- + judicare to judge — more at judge Date: 1579 to judge before hearing or before full ...
prejudger
noun see prejudge
prejudgment
noun see prejudge
prejudice
I. noun Etymology: Middle English, from Anglo-French, from Latin praejudicium previous judgment, damage, from prae- + judicium judgment — more at judicial Date: 13th century ...
prejudiced
adjective Date: 1579 resulting from or having a prejudice or bias for or especially against
prejudicial
adjective Date: 15th century 1. tending to injure or impair ; detrimental 2. leading to premature judgment or unwarranted opinion • prejudicially adverb • ...
prejudicially
adverb see prejudicial
prejudicialness
noun see prejudicial
prekindergarten
noun Usage: often attributive Date: 1925 1. nursery school 2. a class or program preceding kindergarten for children usually from three to four years old
prelacy
noun (plural -cies) Date: 14th century 1. the office or dignity of a prelate 2. episcopal church government
prelapsarian
adjective Etymology: pre- + Latin lapsus slip, fall — more at lapse Date: 1879 characteristic of or belonging to the time or state before the fall of humankind
prelate
noun Etymology: Middle English prelat, from Anglo-French, from Medieval Latin praelatus, literally, one receiving preferment, from Latin (past participle of praeferre to ...
prelature
noun Date: 1607 1. prelacy 1 2. a body of prelates
prelect
intransitive verb Etymology: Latin praelectus, past participle of praelegere, from prae- + legere to read — more at legend Date: 1785 to discourse publicly ; lecture • ...
prelection
noun see prelect
prelim
noun or adjective Date: 1891 preliminary
preliminarily
adverb see preliminary II
preliminary
I. noun (plural -naries) Etymology: French préliminaires, plural, from Medieval Latin praeliminaris, adjective, preliminary, from Latin prae- pre- + limin-, limen threshold ...
preliterate
adjective Date: 1925 1. a. not yet employing writing as a cultural medium b. lacking the use of writing 2. antedating the use of writing • preliterate noun
preload
transitive verb Date: 1945 to load in advance and especially at a time removed from that of use
prelude
I. noun Etymology: Middle French, from Medieval Latin praeludium, from Latin praeludere to play beforehand, from prae- + ludere to play — more at ludicrous Date: 1561 1. an ...
preluder
noun see prelude II
prelusion
noun Etymology: Latin praelusion-, praelusio, from praeludere Date: 1597 prelude, introduction
prelusive
adjective Date: 1605 constituting or having the form of a prelude ; introductory • prelusively adverb
prelusively
adverb see prelusive
premalignant
adjective Date: circa 1897 precancerous
preman
noun Date: 1921 any of several extinct primates ancestral to humans and especially recent humans
premature
adjective Etymology: Latin praematurus too early, from prae- + maturus ripe, mature Date: circa 1529 happening, arriving, existing, or performed before the proper, usual, or ...
prematurely
adverb see premature
prematureness
noun see premature
prematurity
noun see premature
premaxilla
noun Etymology: New Latin Date: 1866 either of a pair of bones of the upper jaw of vertebrates between and in front of the maxillae • premaxillary adjective or noun
premaxillary
adjective or noun see premaxilla
premed
I. noun Date: circa 1928 a premedical student or course of study II. adjective Date: 1950 premedical
premedical
adjective Date: 1904 preceding and preparing for the professional study of medicine
premeditate
verb Etymology: Latin praemeditatus, past participle of praemeditari, from prae- + meditari to meditate Date: circa 1548 transitive verb to think about and revolve in the ...
premeditated
adjective Date: 1590 characterized by fully conscious willful intent and a measure of forethought and planning • premeditatedly adverb
premeditatedly
adverb see premeditated
premeditation
noun Date: 15th century an act or instance of premeditating; specifically consideration or planning of an act beforehand that shows intent to commit that act
premeditative
adjective Date: 1858 given to or characterized by premeditation
premeditator
noun see premeditate
premenstrual
adjective Date: 1885 of, relating to, occurring in, or being the period just preceding menstruation • premenstrually adverb
premenstrual syndrome
noun Date: 1944 a varying group of symptoms manifested by some women prior to menstruation that may include emotional instability, irritability, insomnia, fatigue, anxiety, ...
premenstrually
adverb see premenstrual
premie
variant of preemie
premier
I. adjective Etymology: Middle English primer, primier, from Anglo-French, first, chief, from Latin primarius of the first rank — more at primary Date: 15th century 1. ...
premier danseur
noun Etymology: French Date: 1828 the principal male dancer in a ballet company
premiere
I. adjective Etymology: alteration of 1premier Date: 1768 premier II. noun also première Etymology: French première, from feminine of premier first Date: 1889 1. a ...
première
I. noun see premiere II II. verb see premiere III
première danseuse
noun Etymology: French Date: 1828 prima ballerina
premiership
noun see premier II
premillenarian
adjective or noun see premillenarianism
premillenarianism
noun Date: 1844 premillennialism • premillenarian adjective or noun
premillennial
adjective Date: 1846 1. coming before a millennium 2. holding or relating to premillennialism • premillennially adverb
premillennialism
noun Date: 1848 the view that Christ's return will usher in a future millennium of Messianic rule mentioned in Revelation • premillennialist noun
premillennialist
noun see premillennialism
premillennially
adverb see premillennial
premise
I. noun also premiss Etymology: in sense 1, from Middle English premisse, from Anglo-French, from Medieval Latin praemissa, from Latin, feminine of praemissus, past participle ...
premiss
noun see premise I
premium
I. noun Etymology: Latin praemium booty, profit, reward, from prae- + emere to take, buy — more at redeem Date: 1601 1. a. a reward or recompense for a particular act ...
premix
I. transitive verb Date: 1927 to mix before use II. noun Date: 1937 a mixture of ingredients designed to be mixed with other ingredients before use
premolar
adjective Date: circa 1859 situated in front of or preceding the molar teeth; especially being or relating to those teeth of a mammal in front of the true molars and behind ...
premonish
Date: 1526 transitive verb archaic forewarn intransitive verb archaic to give warning in advance
premonition
noun Etymology: Middle English premunition, from Anglo-French, from Medieval Latin premunition-, premunitio, alteration of Late Latin praemonitio, from Latin praemonēre to warn ...
premonitorily
adverb see premonitory
premonitory
adjective Date: 1647 giving warning • premonitorily adverb
Premonstratensian
noun Etymology: Medieval Latin praemonstratensis, from praemonstratensis of Prémontré, from Praemonstratus Prémontré Date: 1695 a member of an order of canons regular ...
premune
adjective Etymology: back-formation from premunition Date: 1948 exhibiting premunition
premunition
noun Etymology: Latin praemunition-, praemunitio strengthening of an argument to forestall objections, from praemunire to fortify in advance, from prae- + munire to fortify — ...
prename
noun Date: 1894 forename
prenatal
adjective Date: 1826 1. occurring, existing, or performed before birth 2. providing or receiving prenatal medical care • prenatally adverb
prenatally
adverb see prenatal
prenominate
I. adjective Etymology: Late Latin praenominatus, past participle of praenominare to name before, from Latin prae- + nominare to name — more at nominate Date: 1513 obsolete ...
prenotion
noun Etymology: Latin praenotion-, praenotio preconception, from prae- + notio idea, conception — more at notion Date: 1588 1. presentiment, premonition 2. preconception
prentice
I. noun Etymology: Middle English prentis, short for apprentis Date: 14th century apprentice 1, learner • prentice adjective II. transitive verb (prenticed; prenticing) ...
prenup
noun see prenuptial agreement
prenuptial
adjective Date: 1869 made or occurring before marriage
prenuptial agreement
noun Date: 1978 an agreement made between a man and a woman before marrying in which they give up future rights to each other's property in the event of divorce or death — ...
preoccupancy
noun Date: circa 1755 1. an act or the right of taking possession before another 2. the condition of being completely busied or preoccupied
preoccupation
noun Date: 1603 1. an act of preoccupying ; the state of being preoccupied 2. a. extreme or excessive concern with something b. something that preoccupies one
preoccupied
adjective Date: 1842 1. previously applied to another group and unavailable for use in a new sense — used of a biological generic or specific name 2. a. lost in ...
preoccupy
transitive verb Etymology: Latin praeoccupare, literally, to seize in advance, from prae- + occupare to seize, occupy Date: 1567 1. to engage or engross the interest or ...

<< < 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 > >>

© en-de-fr.com.ua - EN-DE-FR 2009-2017 Информация публикуется на сайте для ознакомительного процесса.
 
Выполнено за: 0.040 c;