Слова на букву phyl-quin (6389) New Collegiate Dictionary
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Слова на букву phyl-quin (6389)

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preoperative
adjective Date: 1904 1. occurring before a surgical operation 2. having not yet undergone a surgical operation • preoperatively adverb
preoperatively
adverb see preoperative
preordain
transitive verb Date: 1533 to decree or ordain in advance ; foreordain • preordainment noun • preordination noun
preordainment
noun see preordain
preordination
noun see preordain
preovulatory
adjective Date: 1935 occurring or existing in or typical of the period immediately preceding ovulation
prep
I. noun Date: 1862 1. preparation 2. preparatory school 3. a preliminary trial for a racehorse II. verb (prepped; prepping) Date: 1915 intransitive verb 1. to attend ...
prep school
noun Date: 1895 preparatory school
prepackage
transitive verb Date: 1945 to package (as food or a manufactured article) before offering for sale to the consumer
preparation
noun Etymology: Middle English preparacion, from Middle French preparation, from Latin praeparation-, praeparatio, from praeparare to prepare Date: 14th century 1. the action ...
preparative
I. noun Date: 14th century something that prepares the way for or serves as a preliminary to something else ; preparation II. adjective Date: circa 1530 preparatory • ...
preparatively
adverb see preparative II
preparator
noun Date: 1762 one that prepares; specifically a person who prepares scientific specimens or museum displays
preparatorily
adverb see preparatory
preparatory
adjective Date: 15th century preparing or serving to prepare for something ; introductory • preparatorily adverb
preparatory school
noun Date: 1822 1. a usually private school preparing students primarily for college 2. British a private elementary school preparing students primarily for British public ...
preparatory to
preposition Date: 1649 in preparation for
prepare
verb (prepared; preparing) Etymology: Middle English, from Middle French preparer, from Latin praeparare, from prae- pre- + parare to procure, prepare — more at pare Date: ...
prepared
adjective Date: 1663 subjected to a special process or treatment • preparedly adverb
preparedly
adverb see prepared
preparedness
noun Date: 1590 the quality or state of being prepared; especially a state of adequate preparation in case of war
preparer
noun see prepare
prepay
transitive verb (prepaid; -paying) Date: 1839 to pay or pay the charge on in advance • prepayment noun
prepayment
noun see prepay
prepd
abbreviation prepared
prepense
adjective Etymology: by shortening & alteration from earlier purpensed, from Middle English, past participle of purpensen to deliberate, premeditate, from Anglo-French ...
prepensely
adverb see prepense
preplant
also preplanting adjective Date: 1961 occurring or used before planting a crop
preplanting
adjective see preplant
preponderance
noun Date: 1681 1. a superiority in weight, power, importance, or strength 2. a. a superiority or excess in number or quantity b. majority
preponderancy
noun Date: 1646 preponderance
preponderant
adjective Date: 15th century 1. having superior weight, force, or influence 2. having greater prevalence Synonyms: see dominant • preponderantly adverb
preponderantly
adverb see preponderant
preponderate
I. verb (-ated; -ating) Etymology: Latin praeponderatus, past participle of praeponderare, from prae- + ponder-, pondus weight — more at pendant Date: 1623 intransitive ...
preponderately
adverb see preponderate II
preponderation
noun see preponderate I
preposition
noun Etymology: Middle English preposicioun, from Anglo-French preposicion, from Latin praeposition-, praepositio, from praeponere to put in front, from prae- pre- + ponere to ...
prepositional
adjective see preposition
prepositionally
adverb see preposition
prepositive
adjective Etymology: Late Latin praepositivus, from Latin praepositus, past participle of praeponere Date: 1583 put before ; prefixed • prepositively adverb
prepositively
adverb see prepositive
prepossess
transitive verb Date: 1614 1. obsolete to take previous possession of 2. to cause to be preoccupied 3. to influence beforehand especially favorably
prepossessing
adjective Date: 1642 1. archaic creating prejudice 2. tending to create a favorable impression ; attractive
prepossession
noun Date: 1648 1. archaic prior possession 2. an attitude, belief, or impression formed beforehand ; prejudice 3. an exclusive concern with one idea or object ; ...
preposterous
adjective Etymology: Latin praeposterus, literally, in the wrong order, from prae- + posterus hinder, following — more at posterior Date: 1542 contrary to nature, reason, ...
preposterously
adverb see preposterous
preposterousness
noun see preposterous
prepotency
noun Date: 1646 1. the quality or state of being prepotent ; predominance 2. unusual ability of an individual or strain to transmit its characters to offspring because of ...
prepotent
adjective Etymology: Middle English, from Latin praepotent-, praepotens, from prae- + potens powerful — more at potent Date: 15th century 1. a. having exceptional power, ...
prepotently
adverb see prepotent
preppie
I. noun see preppy I II. adjective see preppy II
preppily
adverb see preppy II
preppiness
noun see preppy II
preppy
I. noun or preppie (plural preppies) Etymology: 1prep Date: 1967 1. a student at or a graduate of a preparatory school 2. a person deemed to dress or behave like a ...
preprandial
adjective Date: 1822 of, relating to, or suitable for the time just before dinner
prepreg
noun Etymology: pre- + impregnated Date: 1954 a reinforcing or molding material (as paper or glass cloth) already impregnated with a synthetic resin
preprint
I. noun Date: 1889 1. an issue of a technical paper often in preliminary form before its publication in a journal 2. something (as an advertisement) printed before the rest ...
preprocess
transitive verb Date: 1942 to do preliminary processing of (as data) • preprocessor noun
preprocessor
noun see preprocess
preprofessional
adjective Date: 1926 of or relating to the period preceding specific study for or practice of a profession
prepub
abbreviation prepublication
prepuberal
adjective Date: circa 1935 prepubertal
prepubertal
adjective Date: 1859 of, relating to, being in, or occurring in prepuberty
prepuberty
noun Date: 1922 the period of development immediately preceding puberty
prepubescence
noun Date: 1916 prepuberty
prepubescent
adjective Date: 1904 prepubertal • prepubescent noun
prepuce
noun Etymology: Middle English, from Anglo-French, from Latin praeputium Date: 15th century foreskin; also a similar fold of skin investing the clitoris • preputial ...
preputial
adjective see prepuce
prequel
noun Etymology: pre- + -quel (as in sequel) Date: 1972 a work (as a novel or a play) whose story precedes that of an earlier work
preregister
intransitive verb see preregistration
preregistration
noun Date: 1967 a special registration (as for returning students) prior to an official registration period • preregister intransitive verb
prerequisite
noun Date: 1633 something that is necessary to an end or to the carrying out of a function • prerequisite adjective
prerogative
noun Etymology: Middle English, from Anglo-French & Latin; Anglo-French, from Latin praerogativa, Roman century voting first in the comitia, privilege, from feminine of ...
prerogatived
adjective see prerogative
pres
abbreviation 1. present 2. president
presage
I. noun Etymology: Middle English, from Latin praesagium, from praesagus having a foreboding, from prae- + sagus prophetic — more at seek Date: 14th century 1. something ...
presageful
adjective see presage I
presager
noun see presage II
presanctified
adjective Date: 1758 consecrated at a previous service — used of eucharistic elements
Presb
abbreviation Presbyterian
presbyope
noun Etymology: probably from French, from New Latin presbyopia Date: circa 1857 one affected with presbyopia
presbyopia
noun Etymology: New Latin, from Greek presbys old man + New Latin -opia Date: 1793 a visual condition which becomes apparent especially in middle age and in which loss of ...
presbyopic
adjective or noun see presbyopia
presbyter
noun Etymology: Late Latin, elder, priest, from Greek presbyteros, comparative of presbys old man, elder; akin to Greek pro before and Greek bainein to go — more at for, come ...
presbyterate
noun see presbyter
presbyterial
I. adjective Date: circa 1600 of or relating to presbyters or a presbytery • presbyterially adverb II. noun Usage: often capitalized Date: 1928 an organization of ...
presbyterially
adverb see presbyterial I
Presbyterian
I. noun Date: 1640 a member of a Presbyterian church II. adjective Date: 1641 1. often not capitalized characterized by a graded system of representative ecclesiastical ...
Presbyterianism
noun see Presbyterian II
presbytery
noun (plural -teries) Etymology: Middle English & Late Latin; Middle English presbytory part of church reserved for clergy, from Late Latin presbyterium group of presbyters, ...
preschool
I. adjective Date: 1914 of, relating to, or constituting the period in a child's life that ordinarily precedes attendance at elementary school II. noun Date: circa 1925 a ...
preschooler
noun Date: 1946 1. a child not yet old enough for school 2. a child attending a preschool
prescience
noun Etymology: Middle English, from Late Latin praescientia, from Latin praescient-, praesciens, present participle of praescire to know beforehand, from prae- + scire to know ...
prescient
adjective see prescience
prescientific
adjective Date: 1858 of, relating to, or having the characteristics of a period before the rise of modern science or a state prior to the application of the scientific method
presciently
adverb see prescience
prescind
verb Etymology: Latin praescindere to cut off in front, from prae- + scindere to cut — more at shed Date: 1650 intransitive verb to withdraw one's attention transitive ...
prescore
transitive verb Date: 1937 to record (as sound) in advance for use when the corresponding scenes are photographed in making movies
Prescott
I. biographical name William Hickling 1796-1859 American historian II. geographical name city central Arizona population 33,938
Prescott Valley
geographical name town central Arizona NNW of Phoenix population 23,535
prescribe
verb (prescribed; prescribing) Etymology: Middle English, from Latin praescribere to write at the beginning, dictate, order, from prae- + scribere to write — more at scribe ...
prescriber
noun see prescribe
prescript
adjective Etymology: Middle English, from Latin praescriptus, past participle of praescribere Date: circa 1540 prescribed as a rule • prescript noun
prescription
noun Etymology: partly from Middle English prescripcion establishment of a claim, from Anglo-French, from Late Latin praescription-, praescriptio, from Latin, act of writing at ...
prescription drug
noun Date: 1951 a drug that can be obtained only by means of a physician's prescription
prescriptive
adjective Date: 1748 1. serving to prescribe 2. acquired by, founded on, or determined by prescription or by long-standing custom • prescriptively adverb
prescriptively
adverb see prescriptive
preselect
transitive verb Date: circa 1859 to choose in advance usually on the basis of a particular criterion • preselection noun
preselection
noun see preselect
presell
transitive verb (presold; -selling) Date: 1947 1. to precondition (as a customer) for subsequent purchase or create advance demand for (as a product) especially through ...
presence
noun Date: 14th century 1. the fact or condition of being present 2. a. the part of space within one's immediate vicinity b. the neighborhood of one of superior ...
presence of mind
Date: 1665 self-control so maintained in an emergency or in an embarrassing situation that one can say or do the right thing
present
I. noun Etymology: Middle English, from Anglo-French, from presenter Date: 13th century something presented ; gift II. verb Etymology: Middle English, from Anglo-French ...
present arms
noun Etymology: from the command present arms! Date: circa 1884 1. a position in the manual of arms in which the rifle is held vertically in front of the body 2. a command ...
present participle
noun Date: 1864 a participle that typically expresses present action in relation to the time expressed by the finite verb in its clause and that in English is formed with the ...
present perfect
adjective Date: 1887 of, relating to, or constituting a verb tense that is formed in English with have and that expresses action or state completed at the time of speaking ...
present tense
noun Date: 14th century the tense of a verb that expresses action or state in the present time and is used of what occurs or is true at the time of speaking and of what is ...
present value
noun Date: 1831 the sum of money which if invested now at a given rate of compound interest will accumulate exactly to a specified amount at a specified future date
present-day
adjective Date: 1887 now existing or occurring
presentability
noun see presentable
presentable
adjective Date: circa 1626 1. capable of being presented 2. being in condition to be seen or inspected especially by the critical • presentability noun • ...
presentableness
noun see presentable
presentably
adverb see presentable
presentation
noun Date: 15th century 1. a. the act of presenting b. the act, power, or privilege especially of a patron of applying to the bishop or ordinary for instituting someone ...
presentational
adjective see presentation
presentative
adjective Date: circa 1842 known, knowing, or capable of being known directly rather than through cogitation
presentee
noun Date: 15th century one who is presented or to whom something is presented
presenter
noun see present II
presentient
adjective Etymology: Latin praesentient-, praesentiens, present participle of praesentire Date: 1814 having a presentiment
presentiment
noun Etymology: French pressentiment, from Middle French, from pressentir to have a presentiment, from Latin praesentire to feel beforehand, from prae- + sentire to feel — ...
presentimental
adjective see presentiment
presentism
noun Etymology: 3present Date: 1923 an attitude toward the past dominated by present-day attitudes and experiences • presentist adjective
presentist
adjective see presentism
presently
adverb Date: 14th century 1. a. archaic at once b. without undue delay ; before long 2. at the present time ; now Usage: Both senses 1b and 2 are flourishing in ...
presentment
noun Date: 14th century 1. the act of presenting to an authority a formal statement of a matter to be dealt with; specifically the notice taken or statement made by a grand ...
presentness
noun see present III
preservability
noun see preserve I
preservable
adjective see preserve I
preservation
noun see preserve I
preservationist
noun Date: 1927 one who advocates preservation (as of a biological species or a historical landmark)
preservative
I. adjective Date: 14th century having the power of preserving II. noun Date: 15th century something that preserves or has the power of preserving; specifically an ...
preserve
I. verb (preserved; preserving) Etymology: Middle English, from Medieval Latin praeservare, from Late Latin, to observe beforehand, from Latin prae- + servare to keep, guard, ...
preserver
noun see preserve I
preset
I. transitive verb (-set; -setting) Date: 1929 to set in advance II. noun Date: 1953 something (as a radio station) preprogrammed into a device
preshrink
transitive verb (preshrank; preshrunk) Date: 1926 to shrink (as a fabric) before making into a garment so that it will not shrink much when washed
preside
intransitive verb (presided; presiding) Etymology: Latin praesidēre to guard, preside over, from prae- + sedēre to sit — more at sit Date: 1608 1. to exercise guidance, ...
presidency
noun (plural -cies) Date: 1591 1. a. the office of president b. (1) the office of president of the United States (2) the American governmental institution ...
president
noun Etymology: Middle English, from Anglo-French, from Latin praesident-, praesidens, from present participle of praesidēre Date: 14th century 1. an official chosen to ...
presidential
adjective see president
presidential government
noun Date: 1857 a system of government in which the president is constitutionally independent of the legislature
presidentially
adverb see president
Presidents' Day
noun Date: 1952 Washington's Birthday 2
presidentship
noun see president
presider
noun see preside
presidial
adjective Etymology: Late Latin praesidialis, from Latin praesidium garrison, from praesid-, praeses guard, governor, from praesidēre Date: 1611 1. [French présidial, from ...
presidiary
adjective Date: 1599 presidial 2
presidio
noun (plural -dios) Etymology: Spanish, from Latin praesidium Date: 1763 a garrisoned place; especially a military post or fortified settlement in areas currently or ...
presidium
also praesidium noun (plural presidia or -iums) Etymology: Russian prezidium, from Latin praesidium garrison Date: 1920 1. a permanent executive committee selected especially ...
presignify
transitive verb Etymology: Latin praesignificare, from prae- + significare to signify Date: 1586 to intimate or signify beforehand ; presage
presoak
I. transitive verb Date: 1919 to soak beforehand II. noun Date: 1919 1. an instance of presoaking 2. a preparation used in presoaking clothes
presort
transitive verb Date: 1951 to sort (outgoing mail) by zip code usually before delivery to a post office
Presque Isle
geographical name peninsula NW Pennsylvania in Lake Erie forming Presque Isle Bay (harbor of Erie, Pennsylvania)
press
I. noun Etymology: Middle English presse, from Anglo-French, from presser to press Date: 13th century 1. a. a crowd or crowded condition ; throng b. a thronging or ...
press agent
noun Etymology: 1press Date: 1883 an agent employed to establish and maintain good public relations through publicity • press-agent verb • press-agentry noun
press box
noun Date: 1889 a space reserved for reporters (as at a stadium)
press cloth
noun Date: 1899 a cloth used between an iron and a garment
press conference
noun Date: 1937 an interview or announcement given by a public figure to the press by appointment
press kit
noun Date: 1968 a collection of promotional materials for distribution to the press
press of canvas
see press of sail
press of sail
Date: 1794 the fullest amount of sail that a ship can crowd on — called also press of canvas
press secretary
noun Date: 1945 a person officially in charge of press relations for a usually prominent public figure
press the flesh
phrasal to greet and shake hands with people especially while campaigning for political office
press-agent
verb see press agent
press-agentry
noun see press agent
press-gang
noun Etymology: 4press Date: 1693 a detachment of men under command of an officer empowered to force men into military or naval service • press-gang transitive verb
press-up
Date: 1936 British push-up
pressboard
noun Date: 1847 1. ironing board; especially a small one for sleeves 2. a strong highly glazed composition board resembling vulcanized fiber
Pressburg
geographical name — see Bratislava
presser
noun see press II
pressing
adjective Date: 1591 1. urgently important ; critical 2. earnest, warm • pressingly adverb
pressingly
adverb see pressing
pressman
noun Date: 1598 1. an operator of a press; especially the operator of a printing press 2. British newspaperman
pressmark
noun Etymology: 1press (closet) Date: 1802 chiefly British a mark or number assigned to a book to indicate its location in a library
pressor
adjective Etymology: Late Latin, one that presses, from Latin premere to press — more at press Date: circa 1890 raising or tending to raise blood pressure; also involving ...
pressroom
noun Date: 1683 1. a room in a printing plant containing the printing presses 2. a room (as at the White House) for the use of members of the press
pressrun
noun Date: 1945 a continuous operation of a printing press producing a specified number of copies; also the number of copies printed
pressure
I. noun Etymology: Middle English, from Anglo-French, from Late Latin pressura, from Latin, action of pressing, pressure, from pressus, past participle of premere Date: 14th ...
pressure cabin
noun Date: 1935 a pressurized cabin
pressure cooker
noun Date: 1915 1. an airtight utensil for quick cooking or preserving of foods by means of high-temperature steam under pressure 2. a situation or environment that is ...
pressure gauge
noun Date: 1862 a gauge for indicating fluid pressure
pressure group
noun Date: 1928 an interest group organized to influence public and especially government policy but not to elect candidates to office
pressure point
noun Date: 1882 1. a discrete point on the body to which pressure is applied (as in acupressure or reflexology) for therapeutic purposes 2. a point where a blood vessel ...
pressure suit
noun Date: 1936 an inflatable suit for high-altitude or space flight to protect the body from low pressure
pressure wave
noun Date: 1942 a wave (as a sound wave) in which the propagated disturbance is a variation of pressure in a material medium — called also P-wave
pressure-cook
verb see pressure cooker
pressureless
adjective see pressure I
pressurise
British variant of pressurize
pressurization
noun see pressurize
pressurize
transitive verb (-ized; -izing) Date: 1938 1. to confine the contents of under a pressure greater than that of the outside atmosphere; especially to maintain near-normal ...
pressurizer
noun see pressurize
presswork
noun Date: 1771 the operation, management, or product of a printing press; especially the branch of printing concerned with the actual transfer of ink from form or plates to ...
prest
adjective Etymology: Middle English, from Anglo-French, from Latin praestus — more at presto Date: 14th century obsolete ready
prestidigitation
noun Etymology: French, from prestidigitateur prestidigitator, from preste nimble, quick (from Italian presto) + Latin digitus finger — more at digit Date: 1859 sleight of ...
prestidigitator
noun see prestidigitation
prestige
noun Usage: often attributive Etymology: French, from Middle French, conjuror's trick, illusion, from Latin praestigiae, plural, conjuror's tricks, from praestringere to graze, ...
prestigeful
adjective see prestige
prestigious
adjective Etymology: Latin praestigiosus, from praestigiae Date: 1546 1. archaic of, relating to, or marked by illusion, conjuring, or trickery 2. having prestige ; ...
prestigiously
adverb see prestigious
prestigiousness
noun see prestigious
prestissimo
adverb or adjective Etymology: Italian, from presto + -issimo, suffix denoting a high degree Date: circa 1724 faster than presto — used as a direction in music
presto
I. interjection Etymology: Italian, quick, quickly, from Latin praestus ready, from praesto adverb, on hand; akin to Latin prae before — more at for Date: circa 1599 — ...
Preston
geographical name 1. former town Ontario, Canada — see Cambridge 2. city NW England NNE of Liverpool capital of Lancashire population 126,200
prestress
I. transitive verb Date: 1934 to introduce internal stresses into (as a structural beam) to counteract the stresses that will result from applied load (as in incorporating ...
Prestwich
geographical name borough NW England in Greater Manchester NNW of Manchester population 31,198
Prestwick
geographical name burgh SW Scotland N of Ayr population 13,532
presumable
adjective Date: 1692 capable of being presumed ; acceptable as an assumption
presumably
adverb Date: 1846 by reasonable assumption
presume
verb (presumed; presuming) Etymology: Middle English, from Late Latin & Anglo-French; Anglo-French presumer, from Late Latin praesumere to dare, from Latin, to anticipate, ...
presumedly
adverb see presume
presumer
noun see presume
presuming
adjective Date: 15th century presumptuous • presumingly adverb
presumingly
adverb see presuming
presumption
noun Etymology: Middle English presumpcioun, from Anglo-French presumption, from Late Latin & Latin; Late Latin praesumption-, praesumptio presumptuous attitude, from Latin, ...
presumptive
adjective Date: 15th century 1. based on probability or presumption 2. giving grounds for reasonable opinion or belief 3. being an embryonic precursor with the potential ...
presumptively
adverb see presumptive
presumptuous
adjective Etymology: Middle English, from Anglo-French presumptious, from Late Latin praesumptuosus, irregular from praesumptio Date: 14th century overstepping due bounds (as ...
presumptuously
adverb see presumptuous
presumptuousness
noun see presumptuous
presuppose
transitive verb Etymology: Middle English, from Middle French presupposer, from Medieval Latin praesupponere (perfect indicative praesupposui), from Latin prae- + Medieval Latin ...
presupposition
noun see presuppose
presuppositional
adjective see presuppose
presynaptic
adjective Date: 1937 of, occurring in, or being a neuron by which a nerve impulse is conveyed to a synapse • presynaptically adverb
presynaptically
adverb see presynaptic
prêt-à-porter
or pret-a-porter noun Etymology: French, ready to wear Date: 1959 ready-to-wear clothes
pret-a-porter
noun see prêt-à-porter
preteen
I. noun Date: 1952 a boy or girl not yet 13 years old II. adjective Date: 1954 1. relating to or produced for children especially in the 9 to 12 year-old age group 2. ...
preteen-ager
noun Date: 1965 preteen
pretence
noun see pretense
pretend
I. verb Etymology: Middle English, from Anglo-French pretendre, from Latin praetendere to allege as an excuse, literally, to stretch out, from prae- pre- + tendere to stretch ...
pretended
adjective Date: 15th century professed or avowed but not genuine • pretendedly adverb
pretendedly
adverb see pretended
pretender
noun Date: 1609 one that pretends: as a. one who lays claim to something; specifically a claimant to a throne who is held to have no just title b. one who makes a ...
pretense
or pretence noun Etymology: Middle English, probably modification of Medieval Latin pretensio, irregular from Latin praetendere Date: 15th century 1. a claim made or implied; ...
pretension
I. noun Date: 15th century 1. an allegation of doubtful value ; pretext 2. a claim or an effort to establish a claim 3. a claim or right to attention or honor because of ...
pretensionless
adjective see pretension I
pretentious
adjective Etymology: French prétentieux, from prétention pretension, from Medieval Latin pretention-, pretentio, from Latin praetendere Date: 1832 1. characterized by ...
pretentiously
adverb see pretentious
pretentiousness
noun see pretentious
preterit
I. adjective or preterite Etymology: Middle English preterit, from Anglo-French, from Latin praeteritus, from past participle of praeterire to go by, pass, from praeter beyond, ...
preterite
I. adjective see preterit I II. noun see preterit II
preterm
adjective Date: 1928 of, relating to, being, or brought forth by premature birth
preterminal
adjective Date: 1947 occurring or being in the period prior to death
pretermission
noun Etymology: Latin praetermission-, praetermissio, from praetermittere Date: 1583 the act or an instance of pretermitting ; omission
pretermit
transitive verb (-mitted; -mitting) Etymology: Latin praetermittere, from praeter by, past + mittere to let go, send Date: 1513 1. to leave undone ; neglect 2. to let pass ...
preternatural
adjective Etymology: Medieval Latin praeternaturalis, from Latin praeter naturam beyond nature Date: 1580 1. existing outside of nature 2. exceeding what is natural or ...
preternaturally
adverb see preternatural
preternaturalness
noun see preternatural
pretest
noun Date: 1926 a preliminary test: as a. a test of the effectiveness or safety of a product prior to its sale b. a test to evaluate the preparedness of students for ...
pretext
noun Etymology: Latin praetextus, from praetexere to assign as a pretext, screen, extend in front, from prae- + texere to weave — more at technical Date: 1513 a purpose or ...
pretor
variant of praetor
Pretoria
or Tshwane geographical name city, administrative capital of Republic of South Africa & formerly capital of Transvaal population 303,684
Pretoria- Witwatersrand-Vereeniging
geographical name — see Gauteng
Pretoria-Witwatersrand-Vereeniging
geographical name see Gauteng
pretorian
variant of praetorian
Pretorius
biographical name Andries Wilhelmus Jacobus 1798-1853 & his son Marthinus Wessels 1819-1901 South African Dutch colonizers & soldiers

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