Слова на букву phyl-quin (6389) New Collegiate Dictionary
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Слова на букву phyl-quin (6389)

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privatize
transitive verb Date: 1948 to make private; especially to change (as a business or industry) from public to private control or ownership • privatization noun
privet
noun Etymology: origin unknown Date: 1542 a Eurasian deciduous shrub (Ligustrum vulgare) of the olive family with semievergreen leaves and small white flowers that is widely ...
privilege
I. noun Etymology: Middle English, from Anglo-French, from Latin privilegium law for or against a private person, from privus private + leg-, lex law Date: 12th century a ...
privileged
adjective Date: 14th century 1. having or enjoying one or more privileges 2. not subject to the usual rules or penalties because of some special circumstance; especially ...
privily
adverb see privy I
privity
noun (plural -ties) Etymology: Middle English privite privacy, secret, from Anglo-French priveté, from Medieval Latin privitat-, privatas, from Latin privus private — more at ...
privy
I. adjective Etymology: Middle English prive, from Anglo-French privé, from Latin privatus private Date: 14th century 1. a. private, withdrawn b. secret 2. belonging ...
privy council
noun Date: 14th century 1. archaic a secret or private council 2. capitalized P&C a body of officials and dignitaries chosen by the British monarch as an advisory council to ...
privy councillor
noun see privy council
privy purse
noun Date: 1667 an allowance for the private expenses of the British sovereign
prix fixe
noun Etymology: French, fixed price Date: 1881 a complete meal offered at a fixed price; also the price charged
prize
I. noun Etymology: Middle English pris prize, price — more at price Date: 14th century 1. something offered or striven for in competition or in contests of chance; also ...
prize money
noun Date: 1726 1. a part of the proceeds of a captured ship formerly divided among the officers and men making the capture 2. money offered in prizes
prizefight
noun Date: 1749 a professional boxing match • prizefighter noun
prizefighter
noun see prizefight
prizefighting
noun Date: 1706 professional boxing
prizer
noun Date: 1599 archaic one that contends for a prize
prizewinner
noun Date: 1893 a winner of a prize
prizewinning
adjective Date: 1919 having won or of a quality to win a prize
PRK
abbreviation photorefractive keratectomy
prn
abbreviation Etymology: Latin pro re nata as needed; as the circumstances require
PRO
abbreviation public relations officer
pro
I. noun (plural pros) Etymology: Middle English, from Latin, preposition, for — more at for Date: 15th century 1. an argument or evidence in affirmation 2. the ...
pro aris et focis
foreign term Etymology: Latin for altars and firesides
pro bono
adjective Etymology: Latin pro bono publico for the public good Date: 1970 being, involving, or doing professional and especially legal work donated especially for the public ...
pro bono publico
foreign term Etymology: Latin for the public good
pro forma
adjective Etymology: Latin, for form Date: circa 1580 1. made or carried out in a perfunctory manner or as a formality 2. based on financial assumptions or projections: as ...
pro forma invoice
noun Date: 1857 a document provided prior to or with a shipment of goods (as for export) that describes the items and terms of sale but does not have the function of a real ...
pro hac vice
foreign term Etymology: Latin for this occasion
pro patria
foreign term Etymology: Latin for one's country
pro rata
adverb Etymology: Latin Date: 1575 proportionately according to an exactly calculable factor (as share or liability) • pro rata adjective
pro re nata
foreign term Etymology: Latin for an occasion that has arisen ; as needed — used in medical prescriptions
pro rege, lege, et grege
foreign term Etymology: Latin for the king, the law, and the people
pro se
adjective or adverb Etymology: Latin Date: 1861 on one's own behalf ; without an attorney
pro shop
noun Date: 1932 a shop at which equipment for a particular sport (as golf) is sold typically by a professional in that sport
pro tem
adverb Date: 1828 pro tempore
pro tempore
adverb Etymology: Middle English, from Latin Date: 15th century for the time being
pro-
I. prefix Etymology: New Latin, from Latin, from Greek, before, forward, forth, for, from pro — more at for 1. a. earlier than ; prior to ; before b. rudimentary ; ...
pro-abortionist
noun see proabortion
pro-am
I. adjective Date: 1949 of, relating to, or being an event or a tournament in which professionals team with or compete against amateurs II. noun Date: 1963 a pro-am event ...
pro-choice
adjective Date: 1975 favoring the legalization of abortion • pro-choicer noun
pro-choicer
noun see pro-choice
pro-family
adjective Date: 1926 1. favoring or encouraging traditional family structures and values 2. opposing abortion and often birth control
pro-life
adjective Date: 1972 antiabortion • pro-lifer noun
pro-lifer
noun see pro-life
pro-verb
noun Date: 1907 a form of the verb do used to avoid repetition of a verb (as do in “act as I do”)
proa
variant of prau
proabortion
adjective Date: 1972 favoring the legalization of abortion • pro-abortionist noun
proactive
adjective Date: 1933 1. [pro- (I)] relating to, caused by, or being interference between previous learning and the recall or performance of later learning 2. [pro- (II) + ...
proactively
adverb see proactive
prob
abbreviation 1. probable; probably 2. probate 3. problem
probabilism
noun Etymology: French probabilisme, from Latin probabilis probable Date: circa 1843 1. a theory that in disputed moral questions any solidly probable course may be followed ...
probabilist
adjective or noun see probabilism
probabilistic
adjective Date: 1864 1. of or relating to probabilism 2. of, relating to, or based on probability • probabilistically adverb
probabilistically
adverb see probabilistic
probability
noun (plural -ties) Date: 15th century 1. the quality or state of being probable 2. something (as an event or circumstance) that is probable 3. a. (1) the ratio of ...
probability density
noun Date: 1939 probability density function; also a particular value of a probability density function
probability density function
noun Date: 1957 1. probability function 2. a function of a continuous random variable whose integral over an interval gives the probability that its value will fall within ...
probability distribution
noun Date: 1920 probability function; also probability density function 2
probability function
noun Date: 1906 a function of a discrete random variable that gives the probability that the outcome associated with that variable will occur
probable
I. adjective Etymology: Middle English, from Latin probabilis commendable, probable, from probare to test, approve, prove — more at prove Date: 1606 1. supported by ...
probable cause
noun Date: circa 1676 a reasonable ground for supposing that a charge is well-founded
probably
adverb Date: 1613 insofar as seems reasonably true, factual, or to be expected ; without much doubt
proband
noun Etymology: Latin probandus, gerundive of probare Date: circa 1929 an individual affected with a disorder who is the first subject in a study (as of a genetic character ...
probate
I. noun Etymology: Middle English probat, from Latin probatum, neuter of probatus, past participle of probare Date: 15th century 1. a. the action or process of proving ...
probate court
noun Date: 1786 a court that has jurisdiction chiefly over the probate of wills and administration of deceased persons' estates
probation
noun Etymology: Middle English probacioun, from Middle French & Latin; Middle French probation, from Latin probation-, probatio, from probare Date: 15th century 1. critical ...
probation officer
noun Date: 1880 an officer appointed to investigate, report on, and supervise the conduct of convicted offenders on probation
probational
adjective see probation
probationally
adverb see probation
probationary
adjective see probation
probationer
noun Date: 1603 1. a person (as a newly admitted student nurse) whose fitness is being tested during a trial period 2. a convicted offender on probation
probative
adjective Date: 15th century 1. serving to test or try ; exploratory 2. serving to prove ; substantiating
probatory
adjective Date: 1625 probative
probe
I. noun Etymology: Medieval Latin proba examination, from Latin probare Date: 1580 1. a slender medical instrument used especially for exploration (as of a wound or body ...
probenecid
noun Etymology: irregular from propyl + benzoic acid Date: 1950 a drug C13H19NO4S that acts on renal tubular function and is used to increase the concentration of some drugs ...
prober
noun see probe II
probiotic
noun Etymology: 2pro- + -biotic (as in antibiotic) Date: 1951 a preparation (as a dietary supplement) containing live bacteria (as lactobacilli) that is taken orally to ...
probit
noun Etymology: probability unit Date: 1934 a unit of measurement of statistical probability based on deviations from the mean of a normal distribution
probity
noun Etymology: Middle English probite, from Latin probitat-, probitas, from probus honest — more at prove Date: 15th century adherence to the highest principles and ideals ...
problem
I. noun Etymology: Middle English probleme, from Latin problema, from Greek problēma, literally, obstacle, from proballein to throw forward, from pro- forward + ballein to ...
problematic
I. adjective also problematical Date: 1609 1. a. posing a problem ; difficult to solve or decide b. not definite or settled ; uncertain c. open to question or ...
problematical
adjective see problematic I
problematically
adverb see problematic I
proboscidean
also proboscidian noun Etymology: ultimately from Latin proboscid-, proboscis Date: 1835 any of an order (Proboscidea) of large mammals comprising the elephants and extinct ...
proboscidian
noun see proboscidean
proboscis
noun (plural -boscises; also proboscides) Etymology: Latin, from Greek proboskis, from pro- + boskein to feed Date: 1609 1. a. the trunk of an elephant; also any long ...
proboscis monkey
noun Date: 1793 a large long-tailed monkey (Nasalis larvatus) of Bornean forests that has a large nose which is long and pendulous in adult males
proc
abbreviation proceedings
procaine
noun Etymology: International Scientific Vocabulary 2pro- + -caine Date: 1918 a basic ester C13H20N2O2 of para-aminobenzoic acid; also its crystalline hydrochloride used as ...
procambial
adjective see procambium
procambium
noun Etymology: New Latin Date: 1875 the part of the primary meristem of a plant that forms cambium and primary vascular tissues • procambial adjective
procarbazine
noun Etymology: propyl + carbamic acid + azine Date: 1965 an antineoplastic drug C12H19N3O that is a monoamine oxidase inhibitor used in the form of its hydrochloride ...
procaryote
variant of prokaryote
procathedral
noun Date: 1868 a parish church used as a cathedral
procedural
I. adjective Date: 1889 of or relating to procedure; especially of or relating to the procedure used by courts or other bodies administering substantive law • ...
procedural due process
noun Date: 1938 due process 1
procedurally
adverb see procedural I
procedure
noun Etymology: French procédure, from Middle French, from proceder Date: circa 1611 1. a. a particular way of accomplishing something or of acting b. a step in a ...
proceed
intransitive verb Etymology: Middle English proceden, from Anglo-French proceder, from Latin procedere, from pro- forward + cedere to go — more at pro- Date: 14th century 1. ...
proceeding
noun Date: 15th century 1. legal action 2. procedure 3. plural events, happenings 4. transaction 5. plural an official record of things said or done
proceeds
noun plural Date: 1665 1. the total amount brought in 2. the net amount received (as for a check or from an insurance settlement) after deduction of any discount or charges
procephalic
adjective Date: 1874 relating to, forming, or situated on or near the front of the head
procercoid
noun Etymology: pro- + Greek kerkos tail Date: 1918 the solid first parasitic larva of some tapeworms that develops usually in the body cavity of a copepod
procès-verbal
noun (plural procès-verbaux) Etymology: French, literally, verbal trial Date: 1635 an official written record
process
I. noun (plural processes) Etymology: Middle English proces, from Anglo-French procés, from Latin processus, from procedere Date: 14th century 1. a. progress, advance ...
process cheese
noun Date: 1926 a cheese made by blending several lots of cheese — called also processed cheese
processability
noun see processable
processable
also processible adjective Date: 1954 suitable for processing ; capable of being processed • processability also processibility noun
processed cheese
noun see process cheese
processibility
noun see processable
processible
adjective see processable
procession
I. noun Etymology: Middle English processioun, from Anglo-French processiun, from Late Latin & Latin; Late Latin procession-, processio religious procession, from Latin, act of ...
processional
I. noun Date: 15th century 1. a book containing material for a procession 2. a musical composition (as a hymn) designed for a procession 3. a ceremonial procession II. ...
processionally
adverb see processional II
processor
noun Date: 1909 1. one that processes 2. a. (1) computer (2) cpu b. a computer program (as a compiler) that puts another program into a form acceptable to ...
proclaim
transitive verb Etymology: Middle English proclamen, from Anglo-French or Latin; Anglo-French proclamer, from Latin proclamare, from pro- before + clamare to cry out — more at ...
proclaimer
noun see proclaim
proclamation
noun Etymology: Middle English proclamacion, from Anglo-French, from Latin proclamation-, proclamatio, from proclamare Date: 14th century 1. the action of proclaiming ; the ...
proclitic
noun Etymology: New Latin procliticus, from Greek pro- + Late Latin -cliticus (as in encliticus enclitic) Date: circa 1864 a clitic that is associated with a following word ...
proclivity
noun (plural -ties) Etymology: Latin proclivitas, from proclivis sloping, prone, from pro- forward + clivus slope — more at pro-, declivity Date: circa 1591 an inclination ...
Proclus
biographical name 410?-485 Greek philosopher
Procne
noun Etymology: Latin, from Greek Proknē Date: circa 1527 the wife of Tereus who is changed into a swallow while fleeing from him
proconsul
noun Etymology: Middle English, from Latin, from pro consule for a consul Date: 14th century 1. a governor or military commander of an ancient Roman province 2. an ...
proconsular
adjective see proconsul
proconsulate
noun see proconsul
proconsulship
noun see proconsul
Procopius
biographical name 6th century Byzantine historian
procrastinate
verb (-nated; -nating) Etymology: Latin procrastinatus, past participle of procrastinare, from pro- forward + crastinus of tomorrow, from cras tomorrow Date: 1588 transitive ...
procrastination
noun see procrastinate
procrastinator
noun see procrastinate
procreant
adjective Date: 1588 1. producing offspring 2. archaic of or relating to procreation
procreate
verb (-ated; -ating) Etymology: Latin procreatus, past participle of procreare, from pro- forth + creare to create — more at pro-, create Date: 1536 transitive verb to ...
procreation
noun see procreate
procreative
adjective see procreate
procreator
noun see procreate
procrustean
adjective Usage: often capitalized Date: 1832 1. of, relating to, or typical of Procrustes 2. marked by arbitrary often ruthless disregard of individual differences or ...
procrustean bed
noun Usage: often capitalized P Date: 1832 a scheme or pattern into which someone or something is arbitrarily forced
Procrustes
noun Etymology: Latin, from Greek Prokroustēs Date: 1567 a villainous son of Poseidon in Greek mythology who forces travelers to fit into his bed by stretching their bodies ...
procryptic
adjective Etymology: pro- (as in protect) + cryptic Date: 1890 of, relating to, or being a concealing pattern or shade of coloring especially in insects
proctodaeum
noun (plural proctodaea or -daeums) Etymology: New Latin, from Greek prōktos anus + hodos way Date: 1876 the embryonic posterior ectodermal part of the alimentary canal
proctologic
adjective see proctology
proctological
adjective see proctology
proctologist
noun see proctology
proctology
noun Etymology: Greek prōktos + English -logy Date: 1899 a branch of medicine dealing with the structure and diseases of the anus, rectum, and sigmoid colon • proctologic ...
proctor
noun Etymology: Middle English procutour procurator, proctor, alteration of procuratour Date: 14th century supervisor, monitor; specifically one appointed to supervise ...
proctorial
adjective see proctor
proctorship
noun see proctor
procumbent
adjective Etymology: Latin procumbent-, procumbens, present participle of procumbere to fall or lean forward, from pro- forward + -cumbere to lie down Date: 1668 1. being or ...
procurable
adjective see procure
procuration
noun Etymology: Middle English procuratioun, from Anglo-French procuration, from Latin procuration-, procuratio, from procurare Date: 15th century 1. a. the act of ...
procurator
noun Date: 14th century 1. one that manages another's affairs ; agent 2. an officer of the Roman empire entrusted with management of the financial affairs of a province and ...
procuratorial
adjective see procurator
procure
verb (procured; procuring) Etymology: Middle English, from Anglo-French procurer, from Late Latin procurare, from Latin, to take care of, from pro- for + cura care Date: 14th ...
procurement
noun Date: 14th century the act or process of procuring; especially the obtaining of military supplies by a government
procurer
noun Date: 1538 one that procures; especially pander
Procyon
noun Etymology: Latin, from Greek Prokyōn, literally, fore-dog; from its rising before Sirius Date: 1658 the brightest star in the constellation Canis Minor
Prod
noun Etymology: by shortening & alteration Date: 1942 chiefly Irish often disparaging protestant 1b
prod
I. verb (prodded; prodding) Etymology: origin unknown Date: 1535 transitive verb 1. a. to thrust a pointed instrument into ; prick b. to incite to action ; stir ...
prodder
noun see prod I
prodigal
I. adjective Etymology: Latin prodigus, from prodigere to drive away, squander, from pro-, prod- forth + agere to drive — more at pro-, agent Date: 15th century 1. ...
prodigality
noun see prodigal I
prodigally
adverb see prodigal I
prodigious
adjective Date: 15th century 1. a. obsolete being an omen ; portentous b. resembling or befitting a prodigy ; strange, unusual 2. exciting amazement or wonder 3. ...
prodigiously
adverb see prodigious
prodigiousness
noun see prodigious
prodigy
noun (plural -gies) Etymology: Middle English, from Latin prodigium omen, monster, from pro-, prod- + -igium (akin to aio I say) — more at adage Date: 15th century 1. a. ...
prodn
abbreviation production
prodromal
adjective Date: 1716 precursory; especially marked by prodromes
prodrome
noun Etymology: French, literally, precursor, from Greek prodromos, from pro- before + dromos act of running, racecourse — more at pro-, dromedary Date: circa 1834 a ...
produce
I. verb (produced; producing) Etymology: Middle English (Scots), from Latin producere, from pro- forward + ducere to lead — more at tow Date: 15th century transitive verb ...
producer
noun Date: 1513 1. one that produces; especially one that grows agricultural products or manufactures crude materials into articles of use 2. a person who supervises or ...
producer gas
noun Date: 1895 a fuel gas made by circulating air or a mixture of air and steam through a layer of incandescent fuel and consisting chiefly of carbon monoxide, hydrogen, and ...
producer goods
noun plural Date: 1948 goods (as tools and raw materials) used to produce other goods and satisfy human wants only indirectly
producible
adjective see produce I
product
noun Etymology: in sense 1, from Middle English, from Medieval Latin productum, from Latin, something produced, from neuter of productus, past participle of producere; in other ...
product placement
noun Date: 1982 the inclusion of a product in a television program or film as a form of paid advertisement
production
noun Date: 15th century 1. a. something produced ; product b. (1) a literary or artistic work (2) a work presented to the public (as on the stage or screen or ...
production control
noun Date: 1929 systematic planning, coordinating, and directing of all manufacturing activities and influences to insure having goods made on time, of adequate quality, and ...
production line
noun Date: 1935 line 6j
productional
adjective see production
productive
adjective Date: 1612 1. having the quality or power of producing especially in abundance 2. effective in bringing about 3. a. yielding results, benefits, or ...
productively
adverb see productive
productiveness
noun see productive
productivity
noun Date: circa 1810 1. the quality or state of being productive 2. the rate per unit area or per unit volume at which biomass consumable as food by other organisms is made ...
proem
noun Etymology: Middle English proheme, from Anglo-French proeme, from Latin prooemium, from Greek prooimion, from pro- + oimē song; probably akin to Hittite išamai- song, ...
proemial
adjective see proem
proenzyme
noun Etymology: International Scientific Vocabulary Date: circa 1900 zymogen
proestrus
noun Etymology: New Latin Date: 1923 a period immediately preceding estrus characterized by preparatory physiological changes
prof
I. noun Date: 1838 professor II. abbreviation professional
profanation
noun Date: 1552 the act or an instance of profaning
profanatory
adjective Date: 1853 tending to profane ; desecrating
profane
I. transitive verb (profaned; profaning) Etymology: Middle English prophanen, from Anglo-French prophaner, from Latin profanare, from profanus Date: 14th century 1. to treat ...
profanely
adverb see profane II
profaneness
noun see profane II
profaner
noun see profane I
profanity
noun (plural -ties) Date: 1607 1. a. the quality or state of being profane b. the use of profane language 2. a. profane language b. an utterance of profane ...
profess
verb Etymology: in sense 1, from Middle English, from profes, adjective, having professed one's vows, from Anglo-French, from Late Latin professus, from Latin, past participle ...
professed
adjective Date: circa 1524 1. openly and freely declared or acknowledged ; affirmed 2. professing to be qualified; also expert
professedly
adverb Date: 1570 1. by profession or declaration ; avowedly 2. with pretense ; allegedly
profession
noun Etymology: Middle English professioun, from Anglo-French profession, from Late Latin & Latin; Late Latin profession-, professio, from Latin, public declaration, from ...
professional
I. adjective Date: 1606 1. a. of, relating to, or characteristic of a profession b. engaged in one of the learned professions c. (1) characterized by or ...
professional corporation
noun Date: 1970 a corporation organized by one or more licensed individuals (as a doctor or lawyer) especially for the purpose of providing professional services and obtaining ...
professionalism
noun Date: 1856 1. the conduct, aims, or qualities that characterize or mark a profession or a professional person 2. the following of a profession (as athletics) for gain ...
professionalization
noun see professionalize
professionalize
transitive verb (-ized; -izing) Date: 1856 to give a professional character to • professionalization noun
professionally
adverb see professional I
professor
noun Date: 14th century 1. one that professes, avows, or declares 2. a. a faculty member of the highest academic rank at an institution of higher education b. a ...
professorate
noun Date: 1860 the office, term of office, or position of a professor
professorial
adjective see professor
professorially
adverb see professor
professoriat
or professoriate noun Etymology: modification of French professorat, from professeur professor, from Latin professor, from profitēri Date: 1858 1. the body of college and ...
professoriate
noun see professoriat
professorship
noun see professor
proffer
I. transitive verb (proffered; proffering) Etymology: Middle English profren, from Anglo-French profrer, proffrir, porofrir, from por- forth (from Latin pro-) + offrir to offer ...
proficiency
noun Date: 1544 1. advancement in knowledge or skill ; progress 2. the quality or state of being proficient
proficient
adjective Etymology: Latin proficient-, proficiens, present participle of proficere to go forward, accomplish, from pro- forward + facere to make — more at pro-, do Date: ...
proficiently
adverb see proficient
profile
I. noun Etymology: Italian profilo, from profilare to draw in outline, from pro- forward (from Latin) + filare to spin, from Late Latin — more at file Date: 1645 1. a ...
profiler
noun see profile II
profiling
noun Date: 1980 the act or process of extrapolating information about a person based on known traits or tendencies ; specifically the act of suspecting or targeting a person ...
profit
I. noun Usage: often attributive Etymology: Middle English, from Anglo-French, from Latin profectus advance, profit, from proficere Date: 14th century 1. a valuable return ; ...
profit and loss
noun Date: 1588 a summary account used at the end of an accounting period to collect the balances of the nominal accounts so that the net profit or loss may be shown
profit center
noun Date: 1968 a part of a corporation or its product line that is an important source of profits
profit sharing
noun Date: 1881 a system or process under which employees receive a part of the profits of an industrial or commercial enterprise
profit system
noun Date: 1945 free enterprise
profitability
noun see profitable
profitable
adjective Date: 14th century affording profits ; yielding advantageous returns or results • profitability noun • profitableness noun • profitably adverb
profitableness
noun see profitable
profitably
adverb see profitable
profiteer
noun Date: 1912 one who makes what is considered an unreasonable profit especially on the sale of essential goods during times of emergency • profiteer intransitive verb
profiterole
noun Etymology: French, perhaps from profit profit Date: 1884 a miniature cream puff with a sweet or savory filling
profitless
adjective see profit I
profitwise
adverb see profit I
profligacy
noun Date: 1738 the quality or state of being profligate
profligate
I. adjective Etymology: Latin profligatus, from past participle of profligare to strike down, from pro- forward, down + -fligare (akin to fligere to strike); akin to Greek ...
profligately
adverb see profligate I
profluent
adjective Etymology: Middle English, from Latin profluent-, profluens, present participle of profluere to flow forth, from pro- forth + fluere to flow — more at pro-, fluid ...
profound
I. adjective Etymology: Middle English, from Anglo-French parfunt, profond deep, from Latin profundus, from pro- before + fundus bottom — more at pro-, bottom Date: 14th ...
profoundly
adverb see profound I
profoundness
noun see profound I
profundity
noun (plural -ties) Etymology: Middle English profundite, from Latin profunditat-, profunditas depth, from profundus Date: 15th century 1. a. intellectual depth b. ...
profuse
adjective Etymology: Middle English, from Latin profusus, past participle of profundere to pour forth, from pro- forth + fundere to pour — more at found Date: 15th century ...
profusely
adverb see profuse
profuseness
noun see profuse
profusion
noun Date: 1545 1. lavish expenditure ; extravagance 2. the quality or state of being profuse 3. great quantity ; lavish display or supply
prog
I. intransitive verb (progged; progging) Etymology: origin unknown Date: 1624 chiefly dialect to search about; especially forage II. noun Date: 1655 chiefly dialect ...
progenitor
noun Etymology: Middle English, from Anglo-French progenitour, from Latin progenitor, from progignere to beget, from pro- forth + gignere to beget — more at kin Date: 14th ...
progeny
noun (plural -nies) Etymology: Middle English progenie, from Anglo-French, from Latin progenies, from progignere Date: 14th century 1. a. descendants, children b. ...
progeria
noun Date: 1904 a rare genetic disorder of childhood marked by slowed physical growth and characteristic signs (as baldness, wrinkled skin, and atherosclerosis) of rapid aging ...
progestational
adjective Date: 1923 preceding pregnancy or gestation; especially of, relating to, inducing, or constituting the modifications of the female mammalian system associated ...
progesterone
noun Etymology: progestin + -sterone Date: 1935 a female steroid sex hormone C21H30O2 that is secreted by the corpus luteum to prepare the endometrium for implantation and ...
progestin
noun Etymology: pro- + gestation + 1-in Date: 1930 progestogen; especially a synthetic progesterone (as levonorgestrel)
progestogen
noun Etymology: progestational + -ogen (as in estrogen) Date: circa 1941 a naturally occurring or synthetic progestational steroid • progestogenic adjective
progestogenic
adjective see progestogen
proglottid
noun Etymology: New Latin proglottis Date: 1864 a segment of a tapeworm containing both male and female reproductive organs
proglottis
noun (plural proglottides) Etymology: New Latin proglottid-, proglottis, from Greek proglōttis tip of the tongue, from pro- + glōtta tongue — more at gloss Date: 1855 ...
prognathic
adjective see prognathism
prognathism
noun Date: circa 1864 the condition marked by a prognathous jaw • prognathic adjective
prognathous
adjective Date: 1836 being or having the lower jaw projecting beyond the upper part of the face
prognosis
noun (plural prognoses) Etymology: Late Latin, from Greek prognōsis, literally, foreknowledge, from progignōskein to know before, from pro- + gignōskein to know — more at ...
prognostic
I. noun Etymology: Middle English pronostique, from Middle French, from Latin prognosticum, from Greek prognōstikon, from neuter of prognōstikos foretelling, from ...
prognosticate
transitive verb (-cated; -cating) Date: 15th century 1. to foretell from signs or symptoms ; predict 2. presage Synonyms: see foretell • prognosticative adjective • ...
prognostication
noun Date: 15th century 1. an indication in advance ; foretoken 2. a. an act, the fact, or the power of prognosticating ; forecast b. foreboding
prognosticative
adjective see prognosticate

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