Слова на букву phyl-quin (6389) New Collegiate Dictionary
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Слова на букву phyl-quin (6389)

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prognosticator
noun see prognosticate
prograde
adjective Etymology: Latin pro- forward + English -grade (as in retrograde) Date: 1967 having or being a direction of rotation or revolution that is counterclockwise as ...
program
I. noun Etymology: French programme agenda, public notice, from Greek programma, from prographein to write before, from pro- before + graphein to write — more at carve Date: ...
program director
noun Date: 1948 one in charge of planning and scheduling program material for a radio or television station or network
program music
noun Date: 1879 music intended to suggest a sequence of images or incidents
program trading
noun Date: 1984 computerized trading of large blocks of stocks in one market and stock index futures in another so as to take advantage of price differentials between the ...
programer
noun see programmer
programing
noun see programming
programmability
noun see program II
programmable
adjective or noun see program II
programmatic
adjective Date: 1896 1. relating to program music 2. of, relating to, resembling, or having a program • programmatically adverb
programmatically
adverb see programmatic
programme
chiefly British variant of program
programmed cell death
noun Date: 1982 apoptosis
programmed instruction
noun Date: 1961 instruction through information given in small steps with each requiring a correct response by the learner before going on to the next step
programmer
also programer noun Date: circa 1889 one that programs: as a. a person who prepares and tests programs for devices (as computers) b. one that programs a mechanism c. ...
programming
also programing noun Date: 1940 1. the planning, scheduling, or performing of a program 2. a. the process of instructing or learning by means of an instructional program ...
Progreso
geographical name city SE Mexico on Yucatán Peninsula; port for Mérida population 37,806
progress
I. noun Etymology: Middle English, from Anglo-French progrés, from Latin progressus advance, from progredi to go forth, from pro- forward + gradi to go — more at pro-, grade ...
progression
noun Date: 15th century 1. a sequence of numbers in which each term is related to its predecessor by a uniform law 2. a. the action or process of progressing ; advance ...
progressional
adjective see progression
progressive
I. adjective Date: circa 1612 1. a. of, relating to, or characterized by progress b. making use of or interested in new ideas, findings, or opportunities c. of, ...
Progressive Conservative
adjective Date: 1944 of or relating to a major political party in Canada traditionally advocating economic nationalism and close ties with the United Kingdom and the ...
progressively
adverb see progressive I
progressiveness
noun see progressive I
progressivism
noun Date: 1892 1. the principles, beliefs, or practices of progressives 2. capitalized the political and economic doctrines advocated by the Progressives 3. the theories ...
progressivistic
adjective see progressivism
progressivity
noun Date: 1883 the quality or state of being a progressive tax
prohibit
transitive verb Etymology: Middle English, from Latin prohibitus, past participle of prohibēre to keep off, from pro- forward + habēre to hold — more at pro-, give Date: ...
prohibition
noun Date: 14th century 1. the act of prohibiting by authority 2. an order to restrain or stop 3. often capitalized the forbidding by law of the manufacture, ...
prohibitionist
noun Date: circa 1846 one who favors prohibition; especially capitalized a member of a minor United States political party advocating prohibition
prohibitive
adjective Date: 15th century 1. tending to prohibit or restrain 2. tending to preclude use or purchase 3. almost certain to perform as predicted • prohibitively ...
prohibitively
adverb see prohibitive
prohibitiveness
noun see prohibitive
prohibitory
adjective Date: circa 1591 prohibitive
proinsulin
noun Date: 1916 a single-chain pancreatic polypeptide precursor of insulin that gives rise to the double chain of insulin by cleavage and loss of the middle part of the ...
proj
abbreviation 1. project 2. projector
project
I. noun Etymology: Middle English projecte, from Medieval Latin projectum, from Latin, neuter of projectus, past participle of proicere to throw forward, from pro- + jacere to ...
projectable
adjective see project II
projectile
I. noun Date: 1665 1. a body projected by external force and continuing in motion by its own inertia; especially a missile for a weapon (as a firearm) 2. a self-propelling ...
projectile vomiting
noun Date: 1862 vomiting that is sudden and so sufficiently vigorous that the vomitus is forcefully projected to a distance
projection
noun Date: 1557 1. a. a systematic presentation of intersecting coordinate lines on a flat surface upon which features from a curved surface (as of the earth or the ...
projection booth
noun Date: circa 1928 a booth in a theater or hall for housing and operating a projector and especially a motion-picture projector
projectional
adjective see projection
projectionist
noun Date: 1922 one that makes projections: as a. cartographer b. a person who operates a motion-picture projector or television equipment
projective
adjective Date: 1682 1. relating to, produced by, or involving geometric projection 2. of or relating to something that indicates the psychodynamic constitution of an ...
projective geometry
noun Date: 1885 a branch of geometry that deals with the properties of configurations that are unaltered by projection
projectively
adverb see projective
projector
noun Date: 1596 1. one that plans a project; specifically promoter 2. one that projects: as a. a device for projecting a beam of light b. an optical instrument for ...
projet
noun (plural projets) Etymology: French, from Middle French pourget, from pourjeter, projeter, literally, to throw forward, from por- (from Latin porro forward; akin to Greek ...
prokaryote
also procaryote noun Etymology: New Latin Prokaryotes, proposed subdivision of protists, from 1pro- + kary- + -otes, plural noun suffix, from Greek -ōtos — more at -otic ...
prokaryotic
adjective see prokaryote
Prokofiev
biographical name Sergey Sergeyevich 1891-1953 Russian composer • Prokofievian adjective
Prokofievian
adjective see Prokofiev
Prokopyevsk
geographical name city S Russia in Asia at S end of Kuznetsk Basin NW of Novokuznetsk population 272,000
prolactin
noun Etymology: 2pro- + lact- + 1-in Date: 1932 a protein hormone of the anterior lobe of the pituitary that induces lactation
prolamin
or prolamine noun Etymology: International Scientific Vocabulary proline + ammonia + 1-in, 2-ine Date: 1908 any of various simple proteins (as zein) that are found especially ...
prolamine
noun see prolamin
prolapse
I. noun Etymology: New Latin prolapsus, from Late Latin, fall, from Latin prolabi to fall or slide forward, from pro- forward + labi to slide — more at pro-, sleep Date: ...
prolate
adjective Etymology: Latin prolatus (past participle of proferre to bring forward, extend) from pro- forward + latus, past participle of ferre to carry — more at bear, ...
prole
noun or adjective Date: 1887 proletarian
proleg
noun Date: 1816 a fleshy leg that occurs on an abdominal segment of some insect larvae but not in the adult
prolegomenon
noun (plural prolegomena) Etymology: Greek, neuter present passive participle of prolegein to say beforehand, from pro- before + legein to say — more at legend Date: circa ...
prolegomenous
adjective see prolegomenon
prolepsis
noun (plural prolepses) Etymology: Greek prolēpsis, from prolambanein to take beforehand, from pro- before + lambanein to take — more at latch Date: 1578 anticipation: as ...
proleptic
adjective see prolepsis
proleptically
adverb see prolepsis
proletarian
noun Etymology: Latin proletarius, from proles progeny, from pro- forth + -oles (akin to alere to nourish) — more at old Date: 1658 a member of the proletariat • ...
proletarianise
British variant of proletarianize
proletarianization
noun see proletarianize
proletarianize
transitive verb (-ized; -izing) Date: 1887 to reduce to a proletarian status or level • proletarianization noun
proletariat
noun Etymology: French prolétariat, from Latin proletarius Date: 1852 1. the laboring class; especially the class of industrial workers who lack their own means of ...
proliferate
verb (-ated; -ating) Etymology: back-formation from proliferation, from French prolifération, from proliférer to proliferate, from prolifère reproducing freely, from Latin ...
proliferation
noun see proliferate
proliferative
adjective see proliferate
prolific
adjective Etymology: French prolifique, from Middle French, from Latin proles + Middle French -figue -fic Date: 1650 1. producing young or fruit especially freely ; fruitful ...
prolificacy
noun see prolific
prolifically
adverb see prolific
prolificity
noun Date: 1725 prolific power or character
prolificness
noun see prolific
proline
noun Etymology: German Prolin, contraction of Pyrrolidin pyrrolidine (C4H9N), from International Scientific Vocabulary pyrrole + -idine Date: 1904 an amino acid C5H9NO2 that ...
prolix
adjective Etymology: Middle English, from Anglo-French & Latin; Anglo-French prolix, from Latin prolixus extended, from pro- forward + liquēre to be fluid — more at liquid ...
prolixity
noun see prolix
prolixly
adverb see prolix
prolocutor
noun Etymology: Middle English, from Latin, from pro- for + locutor speaker, from loqui to speak Date: 15th century 1. one who speaks for another ; spokesman 2. presiding ...
prolog
noun see prologue
prologize
or prologuize intransitive verb (-logized or -loguized; -logizing or -loguizing) Date: 1608 to write or speak a prologue
prologue
also prolog noun Etymology: Middle English prolog, from Anglo-French prologue, from Latin prologus preface to a play, from Greek prologos part of a Greek play preceding the ...
prologuize
intransitive verb see prologize
prolong
transitive verb Etymology: Middle English, from Middle French prolonguer, from Late Latin prolongare, from Latin pro- forward + longus long Date: 15th century 1. to lengthen ...
prolongation
noun see prolong
prolonger
noun see prolong
prolusion
noun Etymology: Latin prolusion-, prolusio, from proludere to play beforehand, from pro- before + ludere to play — more at ludicrous Date: 1601 1. a preliminary trial or ...
prolusory
adjective see prolusion
prom
I. noun Etymology: short for promenade Date: 1894 1. a formal dance given by a high school or college class 2. British promenade 2 II. abbreviation promontory
promenade
I. verb (-naded; -nading) Etymology: 2promenade Date: 1588 intransitive verb 1. to take or go on a promenade 2. to perform a promenade in a dance transitive verb to ...
promenade deck
noun Date: 1829 an upper deck or an area on a deck of a passenger ship where passengers stroll
promenader
noun see promenade I
Promethean
adjective Date: 1594 of, relating to, or resembling Prometheus, his experiences, or his art; especially daringly original or creative
Prometheus
noun Etymology: Latin, from Greek Promētheus Date: 14th century a Titan who is chained and tortured by Zeus for stealing fire from heaven and giving it to humankind
promethium
noun Etymology: New Latin, from Latin Prometheus Date: 1948 a radioactive metallic element of the rare-earth group obtained as a fission product of uranium or from ...
prominence
noun Date: 1598 1. something prominent ; projection 2. the quality, state, or fact of being prominent or conspicuous 3. a mass of gas resembling a cloud that arises from ...
prominent
adjective Etymology: Middle English promynent, from Latin prominent-, prominens, from present participle of prominēre to jut forward, from pro- forward + -minēre (akin to ...
prominently
adverb see prominent
promiscuity
noun (plural -ties) Date: circa 1849 1. miscellaneous mingling or selection of persons or things ; indiscriminateness 2. promiscuous sexual behavior
promiscuous
adjective Etymology: Latin promiscuus, from pro- forth + miscēre to mix — more at pro-, mix Date: 1601 1. composed of all sorts of persons or things 2. not restricted to ...
promiscuously
adverb see promiscuous
promiscuousness
noun see promiscuous
promise
I. noun Etymology: Middle English promis, from Latin promissum, from neuter of promissus, past participle of promittere to send forth, promise, from pro- forth + mittere to ...
promised land
noun Date: 1604 something and especially a place or condition believed to promise final satisfaction or realization of hopes
promisee
noun see promise II
promiser
noun see promise II
promising
adjective Date: 1597 full of promise ; likely to succeed or to yield good results • promisingly adverb
promisingly
adverb see promising
promisor
noun see promise II
promissory
adjective Etymology: Middle English promissorye, from Medieval Latin promissorius, from Latin promittere Date: 15th century containing or conveying a promise or assurance
promissory note
noun Date: 1710 a written promise to pay at a fixed or determinable future time a sum of money to a specified individual or to bearer
promo
noun (plural promos) Usage: often attributive Etymology: short for promotional Date: 1946 a promotional announcement, blurb, or appearance
promontory
noun (plural -ries) Etymology: Latin promunturium, promonturium; probably akin to prominēre to jut forth — more at prominent Date: 1548 1. a. a high point of land or ...
promotability
noun see promote
promotable
adjective see promote
promote
transitive verb (promoted; promoting) Etymology: Middle English, from Latin promotus, past participle of promovēre, literally, to move forward, from pro- forward + movēre to ...
promoter
noun Date: 14th century 1. one that promotes; especially one who assumes the financial responsibilities of a sporting event (as a boxing match) including contracting with ...
promotion
noun Date: 15th century 1. the act or fact of being raised in position or rank ; preferment 2. the act of furthering the growth or development of something; especially the ...
promotional
adjective see promotion
promotive
adjective Date: 1644 tending or serving to promote • promotiveness noun
promotiveness
noun see promotive
prompt
I. transitive verb Etymology: Middle English, from Medieval Latin promptare, from Latin promptus prompt Date: 14th century 1. to move to action ; incite 2. to assist (one ...
prompt side
noun Date: 1824 1. the side of the stage adjacent to the prompter's corner 2. the side of the stage to the right of an actor facing the audience
promptbook
noun Date: 1809 a copy of a play with directions for performance used by a theater prompter
prompter
noun see prompt I
promptitude
noun Etymology: Middle English, from Late Latin promptitudo, from Latin promptus Date: 15th century the quality or habit of being prompt ; promptness
promptly
adverb see prompt III
promptness
noun see prompt III
promulgate
transitive verb (-gated; -gating) Etymology: Latin promulgatus, past participle of promulgare, from pro- forward + -mulgare (probably akin to mulgēre to milk, extract) — more ...
promulgation
noun see promulgate
promulgator
noun see promulgate
pronate
verb see pronation
pronation
noun Etymology: pronate, from Late Latin pronatus, past participle of pronare to bend forward, from Latin pronus Date: 1666 1. rotation of the hand and forearm so that the ...
pronator
noun Date: circa 1741 a muscle that produces pronation
prone
adjective Etymology: Middle English, from Latin pronus bent forward, tending; akin to Latin pro forward — more at for Date: 14th century 1. having a tendency or inclination ...
pronely
adverb see prone
proneness
noun see prone
pronephric
adjective see pronephros
pronephros
noun Etymology: New Latin, from Greek pro- + nephros kidney — more at nephritis Date: 1881 either member of the first and most anterior pair of the three successive paired ...
prong
I. noun Etymology: Middle English pronge Date: 15th century 1. fork 2. a tine of a fork 3. a slender pointed or projecting part: as a. a fang of a tooth b. a point ...
pronged
adjective Date: 1767 1. having a usually specified number of prongs — usually used in combination 2. having a usually specified number of parts or approaches
pronghorn
noun (plural pronghorn or pronghorns) Date: 1823 a swift horned ruminant mammal (Antilocapra americana) chiefly of grasslands and deserts of western North America that ...
pronghorn antelope
noun see pronghorn
pronominal
adjective Etymology: Late Latin pronominalis, from Latin pronomin-, pronomen Date: 1680 1. of, relating to, or constituting a pronoun 2. resembling a pronoun in identifying ...
pronominally
adverb see pronominal
pronoun
noun Etymology: Middle English, from Anglo-French, from Latin pronomin-, pronomen, from pro- for + nomin-, nomen name — more at pro-, name Date: 1530 any of a small set of ...
pronounce
verb (pronounced; pronouncing) Etymology: Middle English, from Anglo-French pronuncier, from Latin pronuntiare, from pro- forth + nuntiare to report, from nuntius messenger — ...
pronounceability
noun see pronounce
pronounceable
adjective see pronounce
pronounced
adjective Date: circa 1741 strongly marked ; decided • pronouncedly adverb
pronouncedly
adverb see pronounced
pronouncement
noun Date: 1593 1. a usually formal declaration of opinion 2. an authoritative announcement
pronouncer
noun see pronounce
pronouncing
adjective Date: 1764 relating to or indicating pronunciation
pronto
adverb Etymology: Spanish, from Latin promptus prompt Date: 1911 without delay
pronuclear
I. adjective Etymology: pronucleus Date: circa 1889 of, relating to, or resembling a pronucleus II. adjective Etymology: 2pro- + nuclear Date: 1971 advocating the use of ...
pronucleus
noun Etymology: New Latin Date: 1880 the haploid nucleus of a male or female gamete (as an egg or sperm) up to the time of fusion with that of another gamete in fertilization
pronunciamento
noun (plural -tos or -toes) Etymology: modification of Spanish pronunciamiento, from pronunciar to pronounce, from Latin pronuntiare Date: 1835 proclamation, pronouncement
pronunciation
noun Etymology: Middle English pronunciacion, from Anglo-French pronunciation, from Latin pronuntiation-, pronuntiatio, from pronuntiare Date: 15th century the act or manner ...
pronunciational
adjective see pronunciation
proof
I. noun Etymology: Middle English prof, prove, alteration of preve, from Anglo-French preove, from Late Latin proba, from Latin probare to prove — more at prove Date: 13th ...
proof spirit
noun Date: 1712 an alcoholic liquor or mixture of ethanol and water that contains 50 percent ethanol by volume at 60°F (16°C)
proofer
noun see proof III
proofread
transitive verb (proofread; -reading) Etymology: back-formation from proofreader Date: 1920 to read and mark corrections in (as a proof)
proofreader
noun Date: 1832 a person who proofreads
prop
I. noun Etymology: Middle English proppe, from Middle Dutch, stopper; akin to Middle Low German proppe stopper Date: 15th century something that props or sustains ; ...
prop root
noun Date: 1905 a root that serves as a prop or support to the plant
prop-
combining form Etymology: International Scientific Vocabulary, from propionic (acid) related to propionic acid
propaedeutic
noun Etymology: Greek propaideuein to teach beforehand, from pro- before + paideuein to teach, from paid-, pais child — more at pro-, few Date: 1798 preparatory study or ...
propaganda
noun Etymology: New Latin, from Congregatio de propaganda fide Congregation for propagating the faith, organization established by Pope Gregory XV died 1623 Date: 1718 1. ...
propagandist
noun or adjective see propaganda
propagandistic
adjective see propaganda
propagandistically
adverb see propaganda
propagandize
verb (-dized; -dizing) Date: 1844 transitive verb to subject to propaganda; also to carry on propaganda for intransitive verb to carry on propaganda • propagandizer ...
propagandizer
noun see propagandize
propagate
verb (-gated; -gating) Etymology: Latin propagatus, past participle of propagare to set slips, propagate, from propages slip, offspring, from pro- before + pangere to fasten — ...
propagation
noun Date: 15th century the act or action of propagating: as a. increase (as of a kind of organism) in numbers b. the spreading of something (as a belief) abroad or into ...
propagative
adjective see propagate
propagator
noun see propagate
propagule
noun Etymology: New Latin propagulum, from Latin propages slip Date: 1858 a structure (as a cutting, a seed, or a spore) that propagates a plant
propane
noun Etymology: International Scientific Vocabulary prop- + -ane Date: 1866 a heavy flammable gaseous alkane C3H8 found in crude petroleum and natural gas and used especially ...
propel
transitive verb (propelled; propelling) Etymology: Middle English propellen, from Latin propellere, from pro- before + pellere to drive — more at felt Date: 15th century to ...
propellant
I. adjective also propellent Date: 1644 capable of propelling II. noun also propellent Date: 1814 something that propels: as a. an explosive for propelling projectiles ...
propellent
I. adjective see propellant I II. noun see propellant II
propeller
also propellor noun Date: 1780 one that propels; especially a device that consists of a central hub with radiating blades placed and twisted so that each forms part of a ...
propeller-head
noun Etymology: from cartoon images of science fiction fans wearing caps with a propeller protruding from the top Date: 1982 often disparaging an enthusiast of technology ...
propellor
noun see propeller
propend
intransitive verb Etymology: Latin propendēre, from pro- before + pendēre to hang — more at pendant Date: 1545 obsolete incline
propense
adjective Etymology: Latin propensus, past participle of propendēre Date: 1528 archaic leaning or inclining toward ; disposed
propensity
noun (plural -ties) Date: 1570 an often intense natural inclination or preference Synonyms: see leaning
proper
I. adjective Etymology: Middle English propre proper, own, from Anglo-French, from Latin proprius own Date: 14th century 1. a. referring to one individual only b. ...
proper adjective
noun Date: 1905 an adjective that is formed from a proper noun and that is usually capitalized in English
proper fraction
noun Date: 1674 a fraction in which the numerator is less or of lower degree than the denominator
proper name
noun see proper noun
proper noun
noun Date: circa 1890 a noun that designates a particular being or thing, does not take a limiting modifier, and is usually capitalized in English — called also proper name
properdin
noun Etymology: probably from 1pro- + Latin perdere to destroy + English 1-in — more at perdition Date: 1954 a blood serum protein that participates in the activation of ...
properly
adverb see proper I
properness
noun see proper I
propertied
adjective Date: circa 1772 possessing property
Propertius
biographical name Sextus circa 50-circa 15 B.C. Roman poet
property
noun (plural -ties) Etymology: Middle English proprete, from Anglo-French propreté, from Latin proprietat-, proprietas, from proprius own Date: 14th century 1. a. a ...
property damage insurance
noun Date: circa 1946 insurance protecting against all or part of an individual's legal liability for damage done (as by his or her automobile) to the property of another
property right
noun Date: 1848 a legal right or interest in or against specific property
property tax
noun Date: 1808 a tax levied on real or personal property
propertyless
adjective see property
propertylessness
noun see property
prophage
noun Date: 1951 an intracellular form of a bacteriophage in which it is harmless to the host, is usually integrated into the hereditary material of the host, and reproduces ...
prophase
noun Etymology: International Scientific Vocabulary Date: 1884 1. the initial stage of mitosis and of the mitotic division of meiosis characterized by the condensation of ...
prophasic
adjective see prophase
prophecy
also prophesy noun (plural -cies; also -sies) Etymology: Middle English prophecie, from Anglo-French, from Late Latin prophetia, from Greek prophēteia, from prophētēs ...
prophesier
noun see prophesy
prophesy
verb (-sied; -sying) Etymology: Middle English prophesien, from Anglo-French *prophecier, from Old French, from prophecie Date: 14th century transitive verb 1. to utter by ...
prophet
noun Etymology: Middle English prophete, from Anglo-French, from Latin propheta, from Greek prophētēs, from pro for + phanai to speak — more at for, ban Date: 12th century ...
prophetess
noun Date: 14th century a woman who is a prophet
prophethood
noun see prophet
prophetic
also prophetical adjective Date: 15th century 1. of, relating to, or characteristic of a prophet or prophecy 2. foretelling events ; predictive • prophetically adverb
prophetical
adjective see prophetic
prophetically
adverb see prophetic
Prophets
noun plural the second part of the Hebrew Bible — see bible table
prophylactic
I. adjective Etymology: Greek prophylaktikos, from prophylassein to be on guard, from pro- before + phylassein to guard, from phylak-, phylax guard Date: 1574 1. guarding ...
prophylactically
adverb see prophylactic I
prophylaxis
noun (plural prophylaxes) Etymology: New Latin, from Greek prophylaktikos Date: circa 1842 measures designed to preserve health (as of an individual or of society) and ...
propine
I. transitive verb (propined; propining) Etymology: Middle English, from Middle French propiner, from Latin propinare to present, drink to someone's health, from Greek propinein ...
propinquity
noun Etymology: Middle English propinquite, from Latin propinquitat-, propinquitas kinship, proximity, from propinquus near, akin, from prope near — more at approach Date: ...
propionate
noun Etymology: International Scientific Vocabulary Date: 1862 a salt or ester of propionic acid
propionic acid
noun Etymology: International Scientific Vocabulary 1pro- + Greek piōn fat; akin to Sanskrit pīvan swelling, fat Date: 1850 a liquid sharp-odored fatty acid C3H6O2 found ...
propitiate
transitive verb (-ated; -ating) Etymology: Latin propitiatus, past participle of propitiare, from propitius propitious Date: 1583 to gain or regain the favor or goodwill of ; ...
propitiation
noun Date: 14th century 1. the act of propitiating 2. something that propitiates; specifically an atoning sacrifice
propitiator
noun see propitiate
propitiatory
adjective Date: 1551 1. intended to propitiate ; expiatory 2. of or relating to propitiation
propitious
adjective Etymology: Middle English propycyous, from Anglo-French propicius, from Latin propitius, probably from pro- for + petere to seek — more at pro-, feather Date: 15th ...
propitiously
adverb see propitious
propitiousness
noun see propitious
proplastid
noun Etymology: International Scientific Vocabulary Date: 1922 a minute cytoplasmic body from which a plastid is formed
propman
noun Date: circa 1937 a man in charge of stage properties
propolis
noun Etymology: Middle English propoleos, from Medieval Latin, alteration of Latin propolis, from Greek, from pro- for + polis city — more at pro-, police Date: 15th century ...
propone
transitive verb (proponed; proponing) Etymology: Middle English (Scots), from Latin proponere — more at propound Date: 14th century 1. Scottish propose, propound 2. ...
proponent
noun Etymology: Latin proponent-, proponens, present participle of proponere Date: 1588 one who argues in favor of something ; advocate
Propontis
geographical name — see marmara (Sea of)
proportion
I. noun Etymology: Middle English proporcion, from Anglo-French, from Latin proportion-, proportio, from pro for + portion-, portio portion — more at for Date: 14th century ...
proportionable
adjective Date: 14th century proportional, proportionate • proportionably adverb, archaic
proportionably
adverb see proportionable
proportional
I. noun Date: 14th century a number or quantity in a proportion II. adjective Date: 15th century 1. a. corresponding in size, degree, or intensity b. having the same ...
proportional parts
noun plural Date: 1728 fractional parts of the difference between successive entries in a table for use in linear interpolation
proportional representation
noun Date: 1870 an electoral system designed to represent in a legislative body each political group or party in proportion to its actual voting strength in the electorate
proportional tax
noun Date: circa 1943 a tax in which the tax rate remains constant regardless of the amount of the tax base
proportionality
noun see proportional II
proportionally
adverb see proportional II
proportionate
I. adjective Date: 14th century proportional 1 • proportionately adverb II. transitive verb (-ated; -ating) Date: 1570 to make proportionate ; proportion
proportionately
adverb see proportionate I
proposal
noun Date: circa 1640 1. an act of putting forward or stating something for consideration 2. a. something proposed ; suggestion b. offer; specifically an offer of ...
propose
verb (proposed; proposing) Etymology: Middle English, from Anglo-French purposer, proposer, from Latin proponere (perfect indicative proposui) — more at propound Date: 14th ...
proposer
noun see propose
proposition
I. noun Date: 14th century 1. a. (1) something offered for consideration or acceptance ; proposal (2) a request for sexual intercourse b. the point to be ...
propositional
adjective see proposition I
propositional calculus
noun Date: 1903 the branch of symbolic logic that uses symbols for unanalyzed propositions and logical connectives only — called also sentential calculus — compare ...
propositional function
noun Date: 1903 1. sentential function 2. something that is designated or expressed by a sentential function
propositus
noun (plural propositi) Etymology: New Latin, from Latin, past participle of proponere Date: 1899 the person immediately concerned ; subject

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