Слова на букву phyl-quin (6389) New Collegiate Dictionary
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Слова на букву phyl-quin (6389)

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propound
transitive verb Etymology: alteration of earlier propone, from Middle English (Scots) proponen, from Latin proponere to display, propound, from pro- before + ponere to put, ...
propounder
noun see propound
propoxyphene
noun Etymology: prop- + oxy + -phene (alteration of phenyl) Date: 1955 a narcotic analgesic C22H29NO2 structurally related to methadone but less addicting that is ...
propraetor
or propretor noun Etymology: Latin propraetor, from pro- (as in proconsul) + praetor Date: circa 1580 a praetor of ancient Rome sent out to govern a province
propranolol
noun Etymology: propyl + propanol + 1-ol Date: 1964 a beta-blocker C16H21NO2 used in the form of its hydrochloride in the treatment of abnormal heart rhythms and angina ...
propretor
noun see propraetor
proprietary
I. noun (plural -taries) Etymology: Middle English propietarie, from Anglo-French, from Medieval Latin propietarius, from Late Latin, adjective Date: 15th century 1. one that ...
proprietor
noun Etymology: alteration of 1proprietary Date: 1637 1. one granted ownership of a colony (as one of the original American colonies) and full prerogatives of establishing a ...
proprietorial
adjective Date: 1851 proprietary 1
proprietorship
noun see proprietor
proprietress
noun Date: 1692 a woman who is a proprietor
propriety
noun (plural -ties) Etymology: Middle English propriete, from Anglo-French proprieté, propreté property, quality of a person or thing — more at property Date: 14th century ...
proprioception
noun Etymology: proprioceptive + -ion Date: 1906 the reception of stimuli produced within the organism
proprioceptive
adjective Etymology: Latin proprius own + English -ceptive (as in receptive) Date: 1906 of, relating to, or being stimuli arising within the organism
proprioceptor
noun Etymology: New Latin, from Latin proprius + New Latin -ceptor (as in receptor) Date: 1906 a sensory receptor (as a muscle spindle) excited by proprioceptive stimuli (as ...
props
noun plural but usually singular in construction Etymology: short for proper dues Date: 1992 1. slang due a 2. slang respect 3. slang credit 6b
proptosis
noun Etymology: New Latin, from Late Latin, falling forward, from Greek proptōsis, from propiptein to fall forward, from pro- forward + piptein to fall — more at pro-, ...
propulsion
noun Etymology: Latin propellere to propel Date: 1626 1. the action or process of propelling 2. something that propels
propulsive
adjective Etymology: Latin propulsus, past participle of propellere Date: 1758 tending or having power to propel
propyl
noun Usage: often attributive Etymology: International Scientific Vocabulary prop- + -yl Date: 1850 either of two isomeric alkyl radicals C3H7 derived from propane — often ...
propylaeum
noun (plural propylaea) Etymology: Latin, from Greek propylaion, from pro- before + pylē gate — more at pro- Date: circa 1706 a vestibule or entrance of architectural ...
propylene
noun Date: 1850 a flammable gaseous hydrocarbon C3H6 obtained by cracking petroleum hydrocarbons and used chiefly in organic synthesis
propylene glycol
noun Date: 1885 a sweet hygroscopic viscous liquid C3H8O2 made especially from propylene and used especially as an antifreeze and solvent, in brake fluids, and as a food ...
prorate
verb (prorated; prorating) Etymology: pro rata Date: 1860 transitive verb to divide, distribute, or assess proportionately intransitive verb to make a pro rata ...
proration
noun see prorate
prorogate
transitive verb (-gated; -gating) Date: 1534 prorogue • prorogation noun
prorogation
noun see prorogate
prorogue
verb (prorogued; proroguing) Etymology: Middle English prorogen, from Anglo-French proroger, from Latin prorogare, from pro- before + rogare to ask — more at pro-, right ...
pros
plural of pro
pros-
prefix Etymology: Late Latin, from Greek, from proti, pros face to face with, toward, in addition to, near; akin to Sanskrit prati- near, toward, against, in return, Greek pro ...
prosaic
adjective Etymology: Late Latin prosaicus, from Latin prosa prose Date: circa 1656 1. a. characteristic of prose as distinguished from poetry ; factual b. dull, ...
prosaically
adverb see prosaic
prosaism
noun Date: 1787 1. a prosaic manner, style, or quality 2. a prosaic expression
prosaist
noun Etymology: Latin prosa prose Date: 1803 1. a prose writer 2. a prosaic person
prosateur
noun Etymology: French, from Italian prosatore, from Medieval Latin prosator, from Latin prosa Date: 1880 a writer of prose
prosauropod
noun Etymology: New Latin Prosauropoda, from 1pro- + Sauropoda — more at sauropod Date: 1941 any of a group (Prosauropoda) of chiefly herbivorous Triassic dinosaurs that ...
proscenium
noun Etymology: Latin, from Greek proskēnion front of the building forming the background for a dramatic performance, stage, from pro- + skēnē building forming the background ...
prosciutto
noun (plural prosciutti or -tos) Etymology: Italian, alteration of presciutto, from pre- (from Latin prae- pre-) + asciutto dried out, from Latin exsuctus, from past participle ...
proscribe
transitive verb (proscribed; proscribing) Etymology: Latin proscribere to publish, proscribe, from pro- before + scribere to write — more at scribe Date: 1560 1. to publish ...
proscriber
noun see proscribe
proscription
noun Etymology: Middle English proscripcion, from Latin proscription-, proscriptio, from proscribere Date: 14th century 1. the act of proscribing ; the state of being ...
proscriptive
adjective see proscription
proscriptively
adverb see proscription
prose
I. noun Etymology: Middle English, from Anglo-French, from Latin prosa, from feminine of prorsus, prosus, straightforward, being in prose, contraction of proversus, past ...
prose poem
noun Date: 1842 a composition in prose that has some of the qualities of a poem • prose poet noun
prose poet
noun see prose poem
prosector
noun Etymology: probably from French prosecteur, from Late Latin prosector anatomist, from Latin prosecare to cut away, from pro- forth + secare to cut — more at pro-, saw ...
prosecutable
adjective see prosecute
prosecute
verb (-cuted; -cuting) Etymology: Middle English, from Latin prosecutus, past participle of prosequi to pursue — more at pursue Date: 15th century transitive verb 1. to ...
prosecuting attorney
noun Date: 1832 an attorney who conducts proceedings in a court on behalf of the government ; district attorney
prosecution
noun Date: 1567 1. the act or process of prosecuting; specifically the institution and continuance of a criminal suit involving the process of pursuing formal charges against ...
prosecutor
noun Date: circa 1670 1. a person who institutes an official prosecution before a court 2. prosecuting attorney
prosecutorial
adjective Date: 1968 of, relating to, or being a prosecutor or prosecution
proselyte
I. noun Etymology: Middle English proselite, from Anglo-French prosilite, from Late Latin proselytus proselyte, alien resident, from Greek prosēlytos, from pros near + -ēlytos ...
proselytise
British variant of proselytize
proselytism
noun Date: circa 1660 1. the act of becoming or condition of being a proselyte ; conversion 2. the act or process of proselytizing
proselytization
noun see proselytize
proselytize
verb (-tized; -tizing) Date: 1679 intransitive verb 1. to induce someone to convert to one's faith 2. to recruit someone to join one's party, institution, or cause ...
proselytizer
noun see proselytize
proseminar
noun Date: circa 1922 a course of study like a graduate seminar but often open to advanced undergraduates
prosencephalic
adjective see prosencephalon
prosencephalon
noun Etymology: New Latin Date: 1846 forebrain • prosencephalic adjective
proser
noun Date: 1627 1. a writer of prose 2. one who talks or writes tediously
Proserpina
or Proserpine noun Etymology: Latin Date: 14th century Persephone
Proserpine
noun see Proserpina
prosily
adverb see prosy
prosimian
noun Etymology: New Latin Prosimii, from 1pro- + Latin simia ape — more at simian Date: circa 1890 any of a suborder (Prosimii) of lower primates (as lemurs and tarsiers) ...
prosiness
noun see prosy
prosit
or prost interjection Etymology: German, from Latin prosit may it be beneficial, from prodesse to be useful — more at proud Date: 1846 — used to wish good health ...
proso
noun Etymology: Russian Date: 1917 millet 1a
prosobranch
noun (plural -branchs) Etymology: New Latin Prosobranchia, from proso- in front (from Greek prosō forward) + branchia gills (from Greek) Date: 1851 any of a subclass ...
prosodic
or prosodical adjective Date: 1774 of or relating to prosody • prosodically adverb
prosodical
adjective see prosodic
prosodically
adverb see prosodic
prosodist
noun see prosody
prosody
noun (plural -dies) Etymology: Middle English, from Latin prosodia accent of a syllable, from Greek prosōidia song sung to instrumental music, accent, from pros in addition to ...
prosoma
noun Etymology: New Latin, from Greek pro- + sōma body Date: 1872 the anterior region of the body of an invertebrate (as an arachnid) especially when the segmentation is ...
prosopographical
adjective see prosopography
prosopography
noun Etymology: New Latin prosopographia, from Greek prosōpon person + -graphia -graphy Date: 1929 a study that identifies and relates a group of persons or characters ...
prosopopoeia
noun Etymology: Latin, from Greek prosōpopoiia, from prosōpon mask, person (from pros- + ōps face) + poiein to make — more at eye, poet Date: circa 1555 1. a figure of ...
prospect
I. noun Etymology: Middle English, from Latin prospectus view, prospect, from prospicere to look forward, exercise foresight, from pro- forward + specere to look — more at ...
prospective
adjective Date: circa 1699 1. relating to or effective in the future 2. a. likely to come about ; expected b. likely to be or become • prospectively adverb
prospectively
adverb see prospective
prospector
noun see prospect II
prospectus
noun (plural -tuses) Etymology: Latin, prospect Date: 1765 1. a preliminary printed statement that describes an enterprise (as a business or publication) and that is ...
prosper
verb (prospered; prospering) Etymology: Middle English, from Anglo-French prosperer, from Latin prosperare to cause to succeed, from prosperus favorable Date: 14th century ...
prosperity
noun Date: 13th century the condition of being successful or thriving; especially economic well-being
Prospero
noun Date: 1610 the rightful duke of Milan in Shakespeare's The Tempest
prosperous
adjective Etymology: Middle English, from Medieval Latin prosperosus, from Latin prosperus Date: 15th century 1. auspicious, favorable 2. a. marked by success or ...
prosperously
adverb see prosperous
prosperousness
noun see prosperous
pross
or prossie or prostie noun Date: circa 1902 slang prostitute 1a
prossie
noun see pross
prost
interjection see prosit
prostacyclin
noun Etymology: prosta- (as in prostaglandin) + cycl- + 1-in Date: 1976 a prostaglandin that is a metabolite of arachidonic acid, inhibits platelet aggregation, and dilates ...
prostaglandin
noun Etymology: prostate gland + 1-in; from its occurrence in the seminal fluid of animals Date: 1936 any of various oxygenated unsaturated cyclic fatty acids of animals ...
prostate
noun Etymology: New Latin prostata prostate gland, from Greek prostatēs, from proïstanai to put in front, from pro- before + histanai to cause to stand — more at pro-, ...
prostate gland
noun Date: circa 1764 a firm partly muscular partly glandular body that is situated about the base of the mammalian male urethra and secretes an alkaline viscid fluid which ...
prostate-specific antigen
noun Date: 1981 a protease secreted by epithelial cells of the prostate gland that is used in the diagnosis of prostate cancer since its concentration in blood serum tends to ...
prostatectomy
noun (plural -mies) Date: circa 1890 surgical removal or resection of the prostate gland
prostatic
adjective see prostate
prostatism
noun Date: circa 1900 disease of the prostate; especially a disorder resulting from obstruction of the bladder neck by an enlarged prostate gland
prostatitis
noun Etymology: New Latin Date: circa 1844 inflammation of the prostate gland
prosthesis
noun (plural prostheses) Etymology: New Latin, from Greek, addition, from prostithenai to add to, from pros- in addition to + tithenai to put — more at pros-, do Date: circa ...
prosthetic
adjective Date: circa 1890 1. of or relating to a prosthesis or prosthetics 2. of, relating to, or constituting a nonprotein group of a conjugated protein • ...
prosthetically
adverb see prosthetic
prosthetics
noun plural but singular or plural in construction Date: circa 1894 the surgical or dental specialty concerned with the design, construction, and fitting of prostheses
prosthetist
noun Date: 1902 a specialist in prosthetics
prosthodontics
noun plural but singular or plural in construction Etymology: New Latin prosthodontia, from prosthesis + -odontia Date: 1947 prosthetic dentistry
prosthodontist
noun Date: 1917 a specialist in prosthodontics
prostie
noun see pross
prostitute
I. transitive verb (-tuted; -tuting) Etymology: Latin prostitutus, past participle of prostituere, from pro- before + statuere to station — more at pro-, statute Date: 1530 ...
prostitution
noun Date: 1553 1. the act or practice of engaging in promiscuous sexual relations especially for money 2. the state of being prostituted ; debasement
prostitutor
noun see prostitute I
prostomial
adjective see prostomium
prostomium
noun (plural prostomia) Etymology: New Latin, from Greek pro- + stoma mouth — more at stomach Date: 1870 the portion of the head of an annelid worm (as an earthworm) that ...
prostrate
I. adjective Etymology: Middle English prostrat, from Anglo-French, from Latin prostratus, past participle of prosternere, from pro- before + sternere to spread out, throw down ...
prostration
noun Date: 14th century 1. a. the act of assuming a prostrate position b. the state of being in a prostrate position ; abasement 2. a. complete physical or mental ...
prosy
adjective (prosier; -est) Etymology: 1prose Date: 1814 lacking in qualities that seize the attention or strike the imagination ; commonplace; especially tediously dull in ...
Prot
abbreviation Protestant
prot-
or proto- combining form Etymology: Greek prōt-, prōto-, from prōtos; akin to Greek pro before — more at for 1. a. first in time b. beginning ; giving rise to ...
protactinium
noun Etymology: New Latin Date: 1918 a shiny radioactive metallic element of relatively short life — see element table
protagonist
noun Etymology: Greek prōtagōnistēs, from prōt- prot- + agōnistēs competitor at games, actor, from agōnizesthai to compete, from agōn contest, competition at games — ...
Protagoras
biographical name circa 485-410 B.C. Greek philosopher • Protagorean adjective
Protagorean
adjective see Protagoras
protamine
noun Etymology: International Scientific Vocabulary prot- + amine Date: 1874 any of various strongly basic proteins of relatively low molecular weight that are rich in ...
protasis
noun (plural protases) Etymology: Late Latin, from Greek, premise of a syllogism, conditional clause, from proteinein to stretch out before, put forward, from pro- + teinein to ...
protatic
adjective see protasis
prote-
or proteo- combining form Etymology: International Scientific Vocabulary, from French protéine protein
protea
noun Etymology: New Latin, from Latin Proteus Proteus Date: 1770 any of a genus (Protea of the family Proteaceae, the protea family) of African evergreen shrubs often grown ...
protean
adjective Date: 1598 1. of or resembling Proteus in having a varied nature or ability to assume different forms 2. displaying great diversity or variety ; versatile
protease
noun Etymology: International Scientific Vocabulary Date: 1903 any of numerous enzymes that hydrolyze proteins and are classified according to the most prominent functional ...
protease inhibitor
noun Date: 1976 a substance that inhibits the action of a protease; specifically any of various drugs (as indinavir) that inhibit the action of the protease of HIV so that ...
protect
verb Etymology: Middle English, from Latin protectus, past participle of protegere, from pro- in front + tegere to cover — more at pro-, thatch Date: 15th century transitive ...
protectable
adjective see protect
protectant
noun Date: 1935 a protecting agent
protection
noun Date: 14th century 1. the act of protecting ; the state of being protected 2. a. one that protects b. supervision or support of one that is smaller and weaker ...
protectionism
noun see protectionist
protectionist
noun Date: 1844 an advocate of government economic protection for domestic producers through restrictions on foreign competitors • protectionism noun • protectionist ...
protective
adjective see protect
protective tariff
noun Date: 1838 a tariff intended primarily to protect domestic producers rather than to yield revenue
protectively
adverb see protect
protectiveness
noun see protect
protector
noun Date: 14th century 1. a. one that protects ; guardian b. a device used to prevent injury ; guard 2. a. one having the care of a kingdom during the king's ...
protectoral
adjective Date: 1657 of or relating to a protector or protectorate
protectorate
noun Date: 1692 1. a. government by a protector b. capitalized the government of England (1653-59) under the Cromwells c. the rank, office, or period of rule of a ...
protectorship
noun see protector
protectory
noun (plural -ries) Date: 1885 an institution for the protection and care of usually homeless or delinquent children
protectress
noun Date: 1570 a woman who is a protector
protégé
noun Etymology: French, from past participle of protéger to protect, from Middle French, from Latin protegere Date: 1787 one who is protected or trained or whose career is ...
protégée
noun Etymology: French, feminine of protégé Date: 1778 a girl or woman who is a protégé
protein
noun Usage: often attributive Etymology: French protéine, from Late Greek prōteios primary, from Greek prōtos first — more at prot- Date: circa 1844 1. any of various ...
protein kinase
noun Date: 1966 any of a class of enzymes that catalyze the transfer of a phosphate group from ATP to one or more amino acids in the side chain of a protein resulting in a ...
protein kinase C
noun Date: 1981 a protein kinase that catalyzes the phosphorylation of specific serine or threonine amino acid residues
proteinaceous
adjective Date: circa 1844 of, relating to, containing, resembling, or being protein
proteinase
noun Etymology: International Scientific Vocabulary Date: 1929 protease
proteinuria
noun Etymology: New Latin, from International Scientific Vocabulary protein + New Latin -uria Date: 1911 the presence of excess protein in the urine
protend
verb Etymology: Middle English, from Latin protendere, from pro- + tendere to stretch — more at thin Date: 15th century transitive verb 1. archaic to stretch forth 2. ...
protensive
adjective Etymology: Latin protensus, past participle of protendere Date: 1671 1. archaic having continuance in time 2. archaic having lengthwise extent or extensiveness ...
protensively
adverb see protensive
proteo-
combining form see prote-
proteoglycan
noun Etymology: International Scientific Vocabulary Date: 1968 any of a class of glycoproteins of high molecular weight that are found especially in the extracellular matrix ...
proteolysis
noun Etymology: New Latin Date: 1880 the hydrolysis of proteins or peptides with formation of simpler and soluble products
proteolytic
adjective Date: 1877 of, relating to, or producing proteolysis • proteolytically adverb
proteolytically
adverb see proteolytic
proteome
noun Etymology: prote- + -ome (as in genome) Date: 1995 the complement of proteins expressed in a cell, tissue, or organism by a genome
proteomic
adjective see proteomics
proteomics
noun plural but singular in construction Date: 1997 a branch of biotechnology concerned with applying the techniques of molecular biology, biochemistry, and genetics to ...
proteose
noun Etymology: International Scientific Vocabulary Date: circa 1890 any of various water-soluble protein derivatives formed by partial hydrolysis of proteins
Proterozoic
adjective Etymology: Greek proteros former, earlier (from pro before) + International Scientific Vocabulary -zoic — more at for Date: 1899 of, relating to, or being the eon ...
protest
I. noun Etymology: Middle English, from protester Date: 15th century 1. a solemn declaration of opinion and usually of dissent: as a. a sworn declaration that payment of ...
protestant
I. noun Etymology: Middle French, from Latin protestant-, protestans, present participle of protestari Date: 1539 1. capitalized a. any of a group of German princes and ...
Protestant ethic
noun Date: 1926 an ethic that stresses the virtue of hard work, thrift, and self-discipline
Protestantism
noun see protestant I
protestation
noun Date: 14th century the act of protesting ; a solemn declaration or avowal
protester
noun see protest II
protestor
noun see protest II
proteus
noun (plural protei) Etymology: New Latin, from Latin, Proteus Date: 1896 any of a genus (Proteus) of aerobic usually motile enterobacteria that include saprophytes in ...
Proteus
noun Etymology: Latin, from Greek Prōteus Date: 15th century a Greek sea god capable of assuming different forms
prothalamion
or prothalamium noun (plural prothalamia) Etymology: New Latin, from Greek pro- + -thalamion (as in epithalamion) Date: 1597 a song in celebration of a marriage
prothalamium
noun see prothalamion
prothallium
noun (plural prothallia) Etymology: New Latin, from pro- + thallus Date: 1858 prothallus
prothallus
noun Etymology: New Latin Date: 1854 1. the gametophyte of a pteridophyte (as a fern) that is typically a small flat green thallus attached to the soil by rhizoids 2. a ...
prothesis
noun (plural protheses) Etymology: Late Latin, alteration of prosthesis, from Greek, literally, addition — more at prosthesis Date: circa 1550 the addition of a sound to ...
prothetic
adjective see prothesis
prothonotarial
adjective see prothonotary
prothonotary
or protonotary noun (plural -ries) Etymology: Middle English prothonotarie, from Late Latin protonotarius, from prot- + Latin notarius stenographer — more at notary public ...
prothonotary apostolic
noun see protonotary apostolic
prothonotary warbler
noun Date: 1783 a large eastern North American warbler (Protonotaria citrea of the family Parulidae) of wooded swamps that has a golden-yellow head and breast and ...
prothoracic
adjective Date: 1826 of or relating to the prothorax
prothoracic gland
noun Date: 1887 one of a pair of thoracic endocrine organs in some insects that control molting
prothorax
noun Etymology: New Latin prothorac-, prothorax, from 1pro- + thorax Date: 1826 the anterior segment of the thorax of an insect — see insect illustration
prothrombin
noun Etymology: International Scientific Vocabulary Date: 1898 a plasma protein produced in the liver in the presence of vitamin K and converted into thrombin in the ...
protist
noun Etymology: New Latin Protista, from Greek, neuter plural of prōtistos very first, primal, from superlative of prōtos first — more at prot- Date: 1889 any of a ...
protistan
adjective or noun see protist
protium
noun Etymology: New Latin, from Greek prōtos first Date: 1933 the ordinary light hydrogen isotope of atomic mass 1
proto-
— see prot-
protoceratops
noun Etymology: New Latin, from prot- + Ceratops, a genus — more at ceratopsian Date: 1979 any of a genus (Protoceratops) of small herbivorous ceratopsian dinosaurs of the ...
protocol
noun Etymology: Middle French prothocole, from Medieval Latin protocollum, from Late Greek prōtokollon first sheet of a papyrus roll bearing date of manufacture, from Greek ...
protoderm
noun Etymology: International Scientific Vocabulary Date: circa 1932 the outer primary meristem of a plant or plant part
protogalaxy
noun Date: 1950 a cloud of gas believed to be the precursor to a galaxy
protohistorian
noun see protohistory
protohistoric
adjective see protohistory
protohistory
noun Etymology: International Scientific Vocabulary Date: 1903 the study of human beings in the times that immediately antedate recorded history • protohistorian noun • ...
protohuman
adjective Date: circa 1909 of, relating to, or resembling an early hominid (as an australopithecine) • protohuman noun
protolanguage
noun Date: 1948 an assumed or recorded ancestral language
protomartyr
noun Etymology: Middle English prothomartir, from Middle French, from Late Latin protomartyr, from Late Greek prōtomartyr-, prōtomartys, from Greek prōt- + martyr-, martys ...
proton
noun Etymology: Greek prōton, neuter of prōtos first — more at prot- Date: 1920 an elementary particle that is identical with the nucleus of the hydrogen atom, that along ...
proton pump inhibitor
noun Date: 1983 any of a group of drugs that inhibit the activity of pumps transporting hydrogen ions across cell membranes and are used to inhibit gastric acid secretion
proton synchrotron
noun Date: 1947 a synchrotron in which protons are accelerated by means of frequency modulation of the radio-frequency accelerating voltage so that they have energies of ...
protonate
verb (-ated; -ating) Date: 1946 transitive verb to add a proton to intransitive verb to acquire an additional proton • protonation noun
protonation
noun see protonate
protonema
noun (plural protonemata) Etymology: New Latin protonemat-, protonema, from prot- + Greek nēma thread — more at nemat- Date: 1857 the primary usually filamentous thalloid ...
protonemal
adjective see protonema
protonematal
adjective see protonema
protonic
adjective see proton
protonotary
noun see prothonotary
protonotary apostolic
or prothonotary apostolic noun (plural protonotaries apostolic or prothonotaries apostolic) Date: 1682 a priest of the chief college of the papal curia who keeps records of ...
protopathic
adjective Etymology: International Scientific Vocabulary, from Middle Greek prōtopathēs affected first, from Greek prōt- prot- + pathos experience, suffering — more at ...
protophloem
noun Date: 1884 the first-formed phloem that develops from procambium, consists of narrow thin-walled cells, and is usually associated with a region of rapid growth
protoplanet
noun Date: 1949 a hypothetical whirling gaseous mass within a giant cloud of gas and dust that rotates around a sun and is believed to give rise to a planet • ...
protoplanetary
adjective see protoplanet
protoplasm
noun Etymology: German Protoplasma, from prot- + New Latin plasma Date: 1848 1. the organized colloidal complex of organic and inorganic substances (as proteins and water) ...
protoplasmic
adjective see protoplasm
protoplast
noun Etymology: Middle French protoplaste, from Late Latin protoplastus first human, from Greek prōtoplastos first formed, from prōt- prot- + plastos formed, from plassein to ...
protoporphyrin
noun Etymology: International Scientific Vocabulary Date: 1925 a purple porphyrin acid C34H34N4O4 obtained from hemin or heme by removal of bound iron
protostar
noun Date: 1947 a cloud of gas and dust in space believed to develop into a star
protostele
noun Date: 1901 a stele forming a solid rod with the phloem surrounding the xylem • protostelic adjective
protostelic
adjective see protostele
protostome
noun Etymology: New Latin Protostomia, from prot- + Greek stoma mouth — more at stomach Date: 1959 any of a major group (Protostomia) of bilateral metazoan animals (as ...
prototroph
noun Etymology: back-formation from prototrophic Date: 1946 a prototrophic individual
prototrophic
adjective Etymology: International Scientific Vocabulary Date: 1900 having the nutritional requirements of the normal or wild type • prototrophy noun
prototrophy
noun see prototrophic
prototypal
adjective Date: circa 1693 prototypical
prototype
noun Etymology: French, from Greek prōtotypon, from neuter of prōtotypos archetypal, from prōt- + typos type Date: 1552 1. an original model on which something is ...
prototypic
adjective see prototypical
prototypical
also prototypic adjective Date: 1650 of, relating to, or being a prototype • prototypically adverb
prototypically
adverb see prototypical
protoxylem
noun Date: 1887 the first-formed xylem developing from procambium and consisting of narrow cells with annular, spiral, or scalariform wall thickenings
protozoal
adjective Date: 1890 of or relating to protozoans
protozoan
noun Etymology: New Latin Protozoa, from prot- + -zoa Date: circa 1864 any of a phylum or subkingdom (Protozoa) of chiefly motile and heterotrophic unicellular protists (as ...
protozoologist
noun see protozoology
protozoology
noun Etymology: New Latin Protozoa + International Scientific Vocabulary -logy Date: 1904 a branch of zoology dealing with protozoans • protozoologist noun
protozoon
noun (plural protozoa) Etymology: New Latin, from singular of Protozoa Date: circa 1853 protozoan
protract
transitive verb Etymology: Latin protractus, past participle of protrahere, literally, to draw forward, from pro- forward + trahere to draw — more at pro- Date: 1540 1. ...
protracted meeting
noun Date: 1832 a protracted revival meeting
protractile
adjective Etymology: Latin protractus Date: 1828 capable of being thrust out
protraction
noun Etymology: Late Latin protraction-, protractio act of drawing out, from protrahere Date: 1535 1. the act of protracting ; the state of being protracted 2. the drawing ...
protractive
adjective see protract
protractor
noun Date: circa 1611 1. a. one that protracts b. a muscle that extends a part 2. an instrument for laying down and measuring angles in drawing and plotting
protreptic
noun Etymology: Late Latin protrepticus hortatory, encouraging, from Greek protreptikos, from protrepein to turn forward, urge on, from pro- + trepein to turn Date: 1678 an ...
protrude
verb (protruded; protruding) Etymology: Latin protrudere, from pro- + trudere to thrust — more at threat Date: 1620 transitive verb 1. archaic to thrust forward 2. to ...
protrusible
adjective see protrude
protrusion
noun Etymology: Latin protrudere Date: 1646 1. the act of protruding ; the state of being protruded 2. something (as an anatomical part or excrescence) that protrudes ...
protrusive
adjective Date: 1676 1. archaic thrusting forward 2. prominent, protuberant 3. obtrusive, pushing • protrusively adverb • protrusiveness noun
protrusively
adverb see protrusive
protrusiveness
noun see protrusive
protuberance
noun Date: 1646 1. something that is protuberant 2. the quality or state of being protuberant Synonyms: see projection
protuberant
adjective Etymology: Late Latin protuberant-, protuberans, present participle of protuberare to bulge out, from Latin pro- forward + tuber excrescence, swelling; perhaps akin ...
protuberantly
adverb see protuberant
proud
adjective Etymology: Middle English, from Old English prūd, probably from Old French prod, prud, prou advantageous, just, wise, bold, from Late Latin prode advantage, ...
proud flesh
noun Date: 14th century an excessive growth of granulation tissue
proudful
adjective Date: 14th century chiefly dialect marked by or full of pride
proudhearted
adjective Date: 14th century proud in spirit ; haughty
Proudhon
biographical name Pierre-Joseph 1809-1865 French journalist

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