Слова на букву phyl-quin (6389) New Collegiate Dictionary
На главную О проекте Обратная связь Поддержать проектДобавить в избранное

  
EN-DE-FR →  New Collegiate Dictionary →  acto-axio axio-buck buck-cobl cobl-deco deco-elec elec-flüg flüg-gulp gulp-innu inob-leni leni-micr micr-obtr obtr-phyl phyl-quin quin-sask sask-soma soma-tano tans-unco uncr-wool


Слова на букву phyl-quin (6389)

<< < 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 > >>
proudly
adverb see proud
Proulx
biographical name (Edna) Annie 1935- American writer
Proust
biographical name Marcel 1871-1922 French novelist • Proustian adjective
Proustian
adjective see Proust
proustite
noun Etymology: French, from Joseph L. Proust died 1826 French chemist Date: 1835 a mineral that consists of a red sulfide of silver and arsenic and occurs in crystals or ...
prov
abbreviation 1. province; provincial 2. provisional
Prov
abbreviation Proverbs
provable
adjective see prove
provableness
noun see prove
provably
adverb see prove
provascular
adjective Date: circa 1948 of, relating to, or being procambium
prove
verb (proved; proved or proven; proving) Etymology: Middle English, from Anglo-French prover, pruver, from Latin probare to test, prove, from probus good, honest, from pro- for, ...
prove out
intransitive verb Date: 1941 to turn out to be satisfactory or as expected
provenance
noun Etymology: French, from provenir to come forth, originate, from Latin provenire, from pro- forth + venire to come — more at pro-, come Date: 1785 1. origin, source 2. ...
Provençal
I. adjective Etymology: Middle French, from Provence Provence Date: 1589 1. of, relating to, or characteristic of Provence or the people of Provence 2. (or Provençale) ...
Provençale
adjective see Provençal I, 2
Provence
geographical name region & former province SE France bordering on the Mediterranean capital Aix-en-Provence
provender
noun Etymology: Middle English, from Anglo-French provende, provendre, from Medieval Latin provenda, alteration of praebenda prebend Date: 14th century 1. dry food for ...
provenience
noun Etymology: alteration of provenance Date: 1882 origin, source
provenly
adverb Date: 1887 demonstrably as stated ; without doubt or uncertainty
proventriculus
noun (plural proventriculi) Etymology: New Latin Date: circa 1836 1. the glandular or true stomach of a bird that is situated between the crop and gizzard 2. a muscular ...
prover
noun see prove
proverb
I. noun Etymology: Middle English proverbe, from Anglo-French, from Latin proverbium, from pro- + verbum word — more at word Date: 14th century 1. a brief popular epigram ...
proverbial
adjective Date: 1548 1. of, relating to, or resembling a proverb 2. that has become a proverb or byword ; commonly spoken of • proverbially adverb
proverbially
adverb see proverbial
Proverbs
noun plural but singular in construction a collection of moral sayings and counsels forming a book of canonical Jewish and Christian Scripture — see bible table
provide
verb (provided; providing) Etymology: Middle English, from Latin providēre, literally, to see ahead, from pro- forward + vidēre to see — more at pro-, wit Date: 15th ...
provided
conjunction Etymology: Middle English, past participle of providen to provide Date: 15th century on condition that ; with the understanding ; if Usage: see providing
providence
noun Etymology: Middle English, from Anglo-French, from Latin providentia, from provident-, providens Date: 14th century 1. a. often capitalized divine guidance or care ...
Providence
geographical name city & port N Rhode Island, its capital population 173,618
provident
adjective Etymology: Middle English, from Latin provident-, providens, from present participle of providēre Date: 15th century 1. making provision for the future ; prudent ...
providential
adjective Date: 1648 1. of, relating to, or determined by Providence 2. archaic marked by foresight ; prudent 3. occurring by or as if by an intervention of Providence ...
providentially
adverb see providential
providently
adverb see provident
provider
noun Date: 1523 one that provides ; especially breadwinner
providing
conjunction Etymology: Middle English, present participle of providen Date: 15th century on condition that ; in case Usage: Although occasionally still disapproved, ...
province
noun Etymology: Middle English, from Anglo-French, from Latin provincia Date: 14th century 1. a. a country or region brought under the control of the ancient Roman ...
provincial
I. noun Etymology: in sense 1, from Middle English, from Anglo-French or Medieval Latin; Anglo-French, from Medieval Latin provincialis, from provincia ecclesiastical province; ...
provincialism
noun Date: 1770 1. a dialectal or local word, phrase, or idiom 2. the quality or state of being provincial
provincialist
noun Date: 1656 a native or inhabitant of a province
provinciality
noun (plural -ties) Date: 1782 1. provincialism 2 2. an act or instance of provincialism
provincialization
noun see provincialize
provincialize
transitive verb (-ized; -izing) Date: 1829 to make provincial • provincialization noun
provincially
adverb see provincial II
proving ground
noun Date: circa 1890 1. a place for scientific experimentation or testing (as of vehicles or weapons) 2. a place where something is developed or tried out
proviral
adjective see provirus
provirus
noun Etymology: New Latin Date: 1949 a form of a virus that is integrated into the genetic material of a host cell and by replicating with it can be transmitted from one cell ...
provision
I. noun Etymology: Middle English, from Anglo-French, from Late Latin & Latin; Late Latin provision-, provisio act of providing, from Latin, foresight, from providēre to see ...
provisional
I. adjective Date: 1601 serving for the time being ; temporary • provisionally adverb II. noun Date: 1886 a postage stamp for use until a regular issue appears — ...
provisionally
adverb see provisional I
provisionary
adjective Date: 1617 provisional
provisioner
noun Date: 1866 a furnisher of provisions
proviso
noun (plural -sos; also -soes) Etymology: Middle English, from Medieval Latin proviso quod provided that Date: 15th century 1. an article or clause (as in a contract) that ...
provisory
adjective Date: circa 1611 1. containing or subject to a proviso ; conditional 2. provisional
provitamin
noun Date: 1927 a precursor of a vitamin convertible into the vitamin in an organism
Provo
I. noun (plural Provos) Etymology: Provisional I.R.A., name of the faction + 1-o Date: 1971 a member of the extremist faction of the Irish Republican Army II. geographical ...
provocateur
noun Date: 1919 1. agent provocateur 2. one who provokes
provocation
noun Etymology: Middle English provocacioun, from Anglo-French provocacion, from Latin provocation-, provocatio, from provocare Date: 14th century 1. the act of provoking ; ...
provocative
adjective Date: 15th century serving or tending to provoke, excite, or stimulate • provocative noun • provocatively adverb • provocativeness noun
provocatively
adverb see provocative
provocativeness
noun see provocative
provoke
transitive verb (provoked; provoking) Etymology: Middle English, from Anglo-French *provoker, provocher, from Latin provocare, from pro- forth + vocare to call, from voc-, vox ...
provoker
noun see provoke
provoking
adjective Date: 1642 causing mild anger ; annoying • provokingly adverb
provokingly
adverb see provoking
provolone
noun Etymology: Italian, augmentative of provola, a kind of cheese Date: 1912 a usually firm pliant often smoked cheese of Italian origin
provost
noun Etymology: Middle English, from Old English profost & Anglo-French provost, from Medieval Latin propositus, alteration of praepositus, from Latin, one in charge, director, ...
provost court
noun Date: 1864 a military court usually for the trial of minor offenses within an occupied hostile territory
provost guard
noun Date: 1862 a police detail of soldiers under the authority of the provost marshal
provost marshal
noun Date: 1535 an officer who supervises the military police of a command
prow
I. adjective Etymology: Middle English, from Anglo-French pru, prou — more at proud Date: 14th century archaic valiant, gallant II. noun Etymology: Middle French proue, ...
prowess
noun Etymology: Middle English prouesse, from Anglo-French pruesse, prowesse, from prou Date: 13th century 1. distinguished bravery; especially military valor and skill 2. ...
prowl
I. verb Etymology: Middle English prollen Date: 14th century intransitive verb to move about or wander stealthily in or as if in search of prey transitive verb to ...
prowl car
noun Date: 1937 squad car
prowler
noun see prowl I
prox
abbreviation proximo
proxemic
adjective see proxemics
proxemics
noun plural but singular or plural in construction Etymology: proximity + -emics (as in phonemics) Date: 1963 the study of the nature, degree, and effect of the spatial ...
proximal
adjective Etymology: Latin proximus Date: 1727 1. situated close to ; proximate 2. next to or nearest the point of attachment or origin, a central point, or the point of ...
proximal convoluted tubule
noun Date: circa 1899 the convoluted portion of the vertebrate nephron that lies between Bowman's capsule and the loop of Henle and functions especially in the resorption of ...
proximal tubule
noun see proximal convoluted tubule
proximally
adverb see proximal
proximate
adjective Etymology: Latin proximatus, past participle of proximare to approach, from proximus nearest, next, superlative of prope near — more at approach Date: 1661 1. ...
proximately
adverb see proximate
proximateness
noun see proximate
proximity
noun Etymology: Middle French proximité, from Latin proximitat-, proximitas, from proximus Date: 15th century the quality or state of being proximate ; closeness
proximity fuse
noun Date: 1945 a fuse for a projectile that uses the principle of radar to detect the presence of a target within the projectile's effective range
proximo
adjective Etymology: Latin proximo mense in the next month Date: 1855 of or occurring in the next month after the present
proxy
noun (plural proxies) Etymology: Middle English proxi, procucie, contraction of procuracie, from Anglo-French, from Medieval Latin procuratia, alteration of Latin procuratio ...
proxy marriage
noun Date: 1900 a marriage celebrated in the absence of one of the contracting parties who is represented at the ceremony by a proxy
Prozac
trademark — used for a preparation of fluoxetine
PrP
abbreviation prion protein
prude
noun Etymology: French, good woman, prudish woman, short for prudefemme good woman, from Old French prode femme Date: 1704 a person who is excessively or priggishly attentive ...
prudence
noun Etymology: Middle English, from Anglo-French, from Latin prudentia, alteration of providentia — more at providence Date: 14th century 1. the ability to govern and ...
prudent
adjective Etymology: Middle English, from Middle French, from Latin prudent-, prudens, contraction of provident-, providens — more at provident Date: 14th century ...
prudential
adjective Date: 15th century 1. of, relating to, or proceeding from prudence 2. exercising prudence especially in business matters • prudentially adverb
prudentially
adverb see prudential
prudently
adverb see prudent
prudery
noun (plural -eries) Date: 1709 1. the characteristic quality or state of a prude 2. a prudish act or remark
Prudhoe Bay
geographical name inlet of Beaufort Sea N Alaska
prudish
adjective Date: 1717 marked by prudery ; priggish • prudishly adverb • prudishness noun
prudishly
adverb see prudish
prudishness
noun see prudish
pruinose
adjective Etymology: Latin pruinosus covered with hoarfrost, from pruina hoarfrost — more at freeze Date: circa 1826 covered with whitish dust or bloom
prune
I. noun Etymology: Middle English, from Anglo-French, plum, from Latin prunum — more at plum Date: 14th century a plum dried or capable of drying without fermentation II. ...
prunella
also prunelle noun Etymology: French prunelle, literally, sloe, from diminutive of prune plum Date: 1670 1. a twilled woolen dress fabric 2. a heavy woolen fabric used for ...
prunelle
noun see prunella
pruner
noun see prune II
pruning hook
noun Date: 1611 a pole bearing a curved blade for pruning plants
prunus
noun Etymology: New Latin, from Latin, plum tree, from Greek proumnē Date: 1839 any of a genus (Prunus) of drupaceous trees or shrubs of the rose family that have showy ...
prurience
noun Date: 1781 the quality or state of being prurient
pruriency
noun Date: 1795 prurience
prurient
adjective Etymology: Latin prurient-, pruriens, present participle of prurire to itch, crave; akin to Latin pruna glowing coal, Sanskrit ploṣati he singes, and probably to ...
pruriently
adverb see prurient
prurigo
noun Etymology: New Latin, from Latin, itch, from prurire Date: circa 1646 a chronic inflammatory skin disease marked by itching papules
pruritic
adjective Date: 1899 of, relating to, or marked by itching
pruritus
noun Etymology: Latin, from prurire Date: 1653 itch 1a
Prusiner
biographical name Stanley Ben 1942- American neurologist
Prussia
or German Preussen geographical name 1. historical region N Germany bordering on Baltic Sea 2. former kingdom & state of Germany capital Berlin — see East Prussia, West ...
Prussian
adjective or noun see Prussia
Prussian blue
noun Etymology: Prussia, Germany Date: 1724 1. any of numerous blue iron pigments formerly regarded as ferric ferrocyanide 2. a dark blue crystalline hydrated ferric ...
prussianise
British variant of prussianize
Prussianism
noun Date: 1856 the practices or policies (as the advocacy of militarism) held to be typically Prussian
prussianization
noun see prussianize
prussianize
transitive verb (-ized; -izing) Usage: often capitalized Date: 1861 to make Prussian in character or principle (as in authoritarian control or rigid discipline) • ...
prussic acid
noun Etymology: French prussique, from (bleu de) Prusse Prussian blue Date: 1790 hydrocyanic acid
Prut
geographical name river 565 miles (909 kilometers) E Europe flowing from the Carpathians SSE into the Danube; forming the Romanian boundary with Moldova & Ukraine
pruta
noun see prutah
prutah
or pruta noun (plural prutoth or prutot) Etymology: Modern Hebrew pĕrūṭāh, from Late Hebrew, a small coin Date: 1949 1. a former monetary unit of Israel equivalent to ...
pry
I. intransitive verb (pried; prying) Etymology: Middle English prien Date: 14th century to look closely or inquisitively; also to make a nosy or presumptuous inquiry II. ...
pryer
variant of prier
prying
adjective Date: 1552 inquisitive in an annoying, officious, or meddlesome way Synonyms: see curious • pryingly adverb
pryingly
adverb see prying
Prynne
biographical name William 1600-1669 English Puritan pamphleteer
Pryp'yat'
geographical name see Pripet
Prypyats'
geographical name see Pripet
Przewalski horse
noun see Przewalski's horse
Przewalski's horse
noun Etymology: Nikolaĭ M. Przhevalskiĭ died 1888 Russian soldier & explorer Date: 1881 a small stocky bay- or dun-colored wild horse (Equus caballus przewalskii syn. E. ...
Przhevalsky
biographical name Nikolay Mikhaylovich 1839-1888 Russian explorer
ps
abbreviation picosecond
Ps
or Psa abbreviation Psalms
PS
abbreviation 1. [New Latin postscriptum] postscript 2. power steering 3. public school
PSA
abbreviation 1. prostate-specific antigen 2. public service announcement
Psa
abbreviation see Ps
psalm
noun Usage: often capitalized Etymology: Middle English, from Old English psealm, from Late Latin psalmus, from Greek psalmos, literally, twanging of a harp, from psallein to ...
psalmbook
noun Date: 12th century archaic Psalter
psalmist
noun Date: 15th century a writer or composer of especially biblical psalms
psalmody
noun Etymology: Middle English psalmodie, from Anglo-French, from Late Latin psalmodia, from Late Greek psalmōidia, literally, singing to the harp, from Greek psalmos + aidein ...
Psalms
noun plural but singular in construction a collection of sacred poems forming a book of canonical Jewish and Christian Scripture — see bible table
Psalter
noun Etymology: Middle English, from Old English psalter & Anglo-French psaltier, from Late Latin psalterium, from Late Greek psaltērion, from Greek, psaltery Date: before ...
psalterium
noun (plural psalteria) Etymology: New Latin, from Late Latin, psalter; from the resemblance of the folds to the pages of a book Date: circa 1846 omasum
psaltery
also psaltry noun (plural -teries; also -tries) Etymology: Middle English psalterie, from Anglo-French, from Latin psalterium, from Greek psaltērion, from psallein to play on a ...
psaltry
noun see psaltery
Psappho
biographical name see Sappho
psec
abbreviation picosecond
psephological
adjective see psephology
psephologist
noun see psephology
psephology
noun Etymology: Greek psēphos pebble, ballot, vote; from the use of pebbles by the ancient Greeks in voting Date: 1952 the scientific study of elections • psephological ...
pseud
I. noun Etymology: short for pseudo-intellectual Date: 1964 British a person who pretends to be an intellectual II. abbreviation pseudonym; pseudonymous
pseud-
or pseudo- combining form Etymology: Greek, from pseudēs, from pseudesthai to lie; akin to Armenian sut lie and probably to Greek psychein to breathe — more at psych- 1. ...
pseudepigraph
noun Date: 1884 pseudepigraphon 2
pseudepigraphon
noun (plural pseudepigrapha) Etymology: New Latin, singular of pseudepigrapha, from Greek, neuter plural of pseudepigraphos falsely inscribed, from pseud- + epigraphein to ...
pseudepigraphy
noun Etymology: Greek pseudepigraphos Date: circa 1842 the ascription of false names of authors to works
pseudo
adjective Etymology: Middle English, from Late Latin pseudo- Date: 15th century being apparently rather than actually as stated ; sham, spurious
pseudo-
combining form see pseud-
pseudocholinesterase
noun Date: 1943 cholinesterase 2
pseudoclassic
adjective Date: 1899 pretending to be or erroneously regarded as classic • pseudoclassic noun
pseudoclassicism
noun Date: 1871 imitative representation of classicism in literature and art
pseudocoel
noun Date: 1887 a body cavity that is not a product of gastrulation and is not lined with a well-defined mesodermal membrane
pseudocoelomate
noun Date: 1940 an invertebrate (as a nematode or rotifer) having a body cavity that is a pseudocoel • pseudocoelomate adjective
pseudocyesis
noun Etymology: New Latin, from pseud- + cyesis pregnancy, from Greek kyēsis, from kyein to be pregnant — more at cyme Date: circa 1817 a psychosomatic state that occurs ...
pseudoephedrine
noun Date: 1974 an isomer of ephedrine used in the form of its hydrochloride or sulfate especially to relieve nasal congestion
pseudomonad
noun Etymology: New Latin Pseudomonad-, Pseudomonas Date: 1921 any of a genus (Pseudomonas) of gram-negative rod-shaped motile bacteria including some that produce a greenish ...
pseudomonas
noun (plural pseudomonades) Etymology: New Latin, from pseud- + monad-, monas monad Date: 1903 pseudomonad
pseudomorph
noun Etymology: probably from French pseudomorphe, from pseud- + -morphe -morph Date: 1849 1. a mineral having the characteristic outward form of another species 2. a ...
pseudomorphic
adjective see pseudomorph
pseudomorphism
noun see pseudomorph
pseudomorphous
adjective see pseudomorph
pseudonym
noun Etymology: French pseudonyme, from Greek pseudōnymos bearing a false name, from pseud- + onyma name — more at name Date: 1833 a fictitious name; especially pen name
pseudonymity
noun Date: 1877 the use of a pseudonym; also the fact or state of being signed with a pseudonym
pseudonymous
adjective Etymology: Greek pseudōnymos Date: circa 1706 bearing or using a fictitious name ; also being a pseudonym • pseudonymously adverb • pseudonymousness noun
pseudonymously
adverb see pseudonymous
pseudonymousness
noun see pseudonymous
pseudoparenchyma
noun Etymology: New Latin Date: 1875 compactly interwoven short-celled filaments especially in fungi that resemble parenchyma of higher plants • pseudoparenchymatous ...
pseudoparenchymatous
adjective see pseudoparenchyma
pseudopod
noun Etymology: New Latin pseudopodium Date: 1874 pseudopodium • pseudopodal or pseudopodial adjective
pseudopodal
adjective see pseudopod
pseudopodial
adjective see pseudopod
pseudopodium
noun (plural pseudopodia) Etymology: New Latin Date: 1854 1. a temporary protrusion or retractile process of the cytoplasm of a cell that functions (as in an amoeba) ...
pseudopregnancy
noun Date: 1860 1. pseudocyesis 2. an anestrous state resembling pregnancy that occurs in various mammals usually after an infertile copulation • pseudopregnant adjective
pseudopregnant
adjective see pseudopregnancy
pseudorandom
adjective Date: 1949 being or involving entities (as numbers) that are selected by a definite computational process but that satisfy one or more standard tests for statistical ...
pseudoscience
noun Date: 1844 a system of theories, assumptions, and methods erroneously regarded as scientific • pseudoscientific adjective • pseudoscientist noun
pseudoscientific
adjective see pseudoscience
pseudoscientist
noun see pseudoscience
pseudoscorpion
noun Etymology: New Latin Pseudoscorpiones, from pseud- + Latin scorpion-, scorpio scorpion Date: 1835 any of a widely distributed order (Pseudoscorpionida syn. ...
pseudosophisticated
adjective see pseudosophistication
pseudosophistication
noun Date: 1965 false or feigned sophistication • pseudosophisticated adjective
pseudotuberculosis
noun Etymology: New Latin Date: 1900 any of several diseases that are marked by the formation of granulomas resembling tubercular nodules and are caused by a bacterium (as ...
psf
abbreviation pounds per square foot
PSG
abbreviation platoon sergeant
pshaw
interjection Date: 1656 — used to express irritation, disapproval, contempt, or disbelief
psi
I. noun Etymology: Middle English, from Medieval Latin, from Late Greek, from Greek psei Date: 15th century the 23d letter of the Greek alphabet — see alphabet table II. ...
psi particle
noun Date: 1974 J/psi particle
psilocybin
noun Etymology: New Latin Psilocybe, fungus genus + 1-in Date: 1958 a hallucinogenic indole C12H17N2O4P obtained from a fungus (as Psilocybe mexicana or P. cubensis syn. ...
psilophyte
noun Etymology: New Latin Psilophyton, genus of plants, from Greek psilos bare, mere (probably akin to Greek psēn to rub) + phyton plant — more at phyt- Date: circa 1911 ...
psilophytic
adjective see psilophyte
psittacine
adjective Etymology: Latin psittacinus, from psittacus parrot, from Greek psittakos Date: 1874 of or relating to the parrots • psittacine noun
psittacosis
noun Etymology: New Latin, from Latin psittacus Date: 1897 an infectious disease of birds caused by a bacterium (Chlamydia psittaci), marked by diarrhea and wasting, and ...
psittacotic
adjective see psittacosis
Pskov
geographical name city W Russia in Europe near Lake Pskov (S arm of Peipus Lake) population 209,000
psocid
noun Etymology: ultimately from New Latin Psocus, genus of lice Date: 1891 any of an order (Psocoptera syn. Corrodentia) of minute usually winged primitive insects (as a ...
psoralen
noun Etymology: New Latin Psoralea, genus of plants from which it is isolated + English -en, alteration of -ene Date: 1933 a substance C11H6O3 found in some plants that ...
psoriasis
noun Etymology: New Latin, from Greek psōriasis, from psōrian to have the itch, from psōra itch; akin to Greek psēn to rub Date: circa 1684 a chronic skin disease ...
psoriatic
adjective or noun see psoriasis
PST
abbreviation Pacific standard time
psych
I. transitive verb or psyche (psyched; psyching) Etymology: by shortening Date: 1917 1. psychoanalyze 2. a. to anticipate correctly the intentions or actions of ; ...
psych-
or psycho- combining form Etymology: Greek, from psychē breath, principle of life, life, soul, from psychein to breathe; akin to Sanskrit babhasti he blows 1. mind ; mental ...
psych-out
noun Date: 1971 an act or an instance of psyching someone out
psychasthenia
noun Etymology: New Latin Date: 1900 a neurotic state characterized especially by phobias, obsessions, or compulsions that one knows are irrational • psychasthenic ...
psychasthenic
adjective or noun see psychasthenia
psyche
noun Etymology: Latin, from Greek psychē soul Date: 1590 1. capitalized a princess loved by Cupid 2. [Greek psychē] a. soul, personality
psychedelia
noun Etymology: New Latin, from English psychedelic Date: 1967 1. the world of people, phenomena, or items associated with psychedelic drugs 2. psychedelic music
psychedelic
I. noun Etymology: irregular from psych- + Greek dēloun to show, from dēlos evident; akin to Sanskrit dīdeti it shines, Latin dies day — more at deity Date: 1956 a ...
psychedelically
adverb see psychedelic II
psychiatric
adjective see psychiatry
psychiatrically
adverb see psychiatry
psychiatrist
noun see psychiatry
psychiatry
noun Etymology: probably from French psychiatrie, from psychiatre psychiatrist, from psych- psych- + Greek iatros physician — more at -iatry Date: 1828 a branch of medicine ...
psychic
I. adjective also psychical Etymology: Greek psychikos of the soul, from psychē soul Date: 1642 1. of or relating to the psyche ; psychogenic 2. lying outside the sphere ...
psychical
adjective see psychic I
psychically
adverb see psychic I
psycho
noun (plural psychos) Etymology: short for psychopath Date: 1942 a deranged or psychopathic person — not used technically • psycho adjective
psycho-
combining form see psych-
psychoacoustic
adjective see psychoacoustics
psychoacoustics
noun plural but singular in construction Date: 1948 a branch of science dealing with the perception of sound, the sensations produced by sounds, and the problems of ...
psychoactive
adjective Date: 1961 affecting the mind or behavior
psychoanalysis
noun Etymology: New Latin Date: 1906 a method of analyzing psychic phenomena and treating emotional disorders that involves treatment sessions during which the patient is ...
psychoanalyst
noun see psychoanalysis
psychoanalytic
also psychoanalytical adjective Date: 1906 of, relating to, or employing psychoanalysis or its principles and techniques • psychoanalytically adverb
psychoanalytical
adjective see psychoanalytic
psychoanalytically
adverb see psychoanalytic
psychoanalyze
transitive verb Date: 1911 to treat by means of psychoanalysis
psychobabble
noun Date: 1975 1. a predominantly metaphorical language for expressing one's feelings 2. a. psychological jargon b. trite or simplistic language derived from ...
psychobabbler
noun see psychobabble
psychobiographer
noun see psychobiography
psychobiographical
adjective see psychobiography
psychobiography
noun Date: 1931 a biography written from a psychodynamic or psychoanalytic point of view; also the application of such a point of view to the writing of a biography • ...
psychobiologic
adjective see psychobiology
psychobiological
adjective see psychobiology
psychobiologist
noun see psychobiology
psychobiology
noun Etymology: International Scientific Vocabulary Date: 1902 the study of mental functioning and behavior in relation to other biological processes • psychobiological ...
psychochemical
noun Date: 1956 a psychoactive chemical • psychochemical adjective
psychodrama
noun Date: 1937 1. an extemporized dramatization designed to afford catharsis and social relearning for one or more of the participants from whose life history the plot is ...
psychodramatic
adjective see psychodrama
psychodynamic
adjective see psychodynamics
psychodynamically
adverb see psychodynamics
psychodynamics
noun plural but singular or plural in construction Date: 1874 1. the psychology of mental or emotional forces or processes developing especially in early childhood and their ...
psychogenesis
noun Etymology: New Latin Date: 1838 1. the origin and development of mental functions, traits, or states 2. development from mental as distinguished from physical origins ...
psychogenetic
adjective see psychogenesis
psychogenic
adjective Date: 1902 originating in the mind or in mental or emotional conflict • psychogenically adverb
psychogenically
adverb see psychogenic
psychograph
noun Date: 1916 psychobiography
psychographic
adjective see psychographics
psychographically
adverb see psychographics

<< < 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 > >>

© en-de-fr.com.ua - EN-DE-FR 2009-2017 Информация публикуется на сайте для ознакомительного процесса.
 
Выполнено за: 0.053 c;