Слова на букву phyl-quin (6389) New Collegiate Dictionary
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Слова на букву phyl-quin (6389)

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psychographics
noun plural but singular or plural in construction Etymology: psych- + -graphics (as in demographics) Date: 1968 market research or statistics classifying population groups ...
psychohistorian
noun see psychohistory
psychohistorical
adjective see psychohistory
psychohistory
noun Date: 1934 historical analysis or interpretation using psychological and psychoanalytic methods; also a work of history using such methods • psychohistorian noun • ...
psychokinesis
noun Etymology: New Latin Date: 1914 movement of physical objects by the mind without use of physical means — compare precognition, telekinesis • psychokinetic adjective
psychokinetic
adjective see psychokinesis
psychol
abbreviation psychological
psycholinguist
noun see psycholinguistics
psycholinguistic
adjective see psycholinguistics
psycholinguistics
noun plural but singular in construction Date: 1936 the study of the mental faculties involved in the perception, production, and acquisition of language • psycholinguist ...
psychologic
adjective see psychological
psychological
also psychologic adjective Date: circa 1688 1. a. of or relating to psychology b. mental 2. directed toward the will or toward the mind specifically in its conative ...
psychological moment
noun Date: 1871 the occasion when the mental atmosphere is most certain to be favorable to the full effect of an action or event
psychologically
adverb see psychological
psychologise
British variant of psychologize
psychologism
noun Date: 1858 a theory that applies psychological conceptions to the interpretation of historical events or logical thought
psychologist
noun see psychology
psychologize
verb (-gized; -gizing) Date: 1810 intransitive verb to speculate in psychological terms or on psychological motivations transitive verb to explain or interpret in ...
psychology
noun (plural -gies) Etymology: New Latin psychologia, from psych- + -logia -logy Date: 1653 1. the science of mind and behavior 2. a. the mental or behavioral ...
psychometric
adjective Date: 1854 of or relating to psychometrics or psychometry • psychometrically adverb
psychometrically
adverb see psychometric
psychometrician
noun Date: circa 1939 1. a person (as a clinical psychologist) who is skilled in the administration and interpretation of objective psychological tests 2. a psychologist who ...
psychometrics
noun plural but singular in construction Date: circa 1924 the psychological theory or technique of mental measurement
psychometry
noun Date: circa 1842 1. divination of facts concerning an object or its owner through contact with or proximity to the object 2. psychometrics
psychomotor
adjective Etymology: International Scientific Vocabulary Date: 1878 of or relating to motor action directly proceeding from mental activity
psychoneuroimmunology
noun Date: 1982 a branch of medicine that deals with the influence of emotional states (as stress) and nervous system activities on immune function especially in relation to ...
psychoneurosis
noun Etymology: New Latin Date: 1883 neurosis; especially a neurosis based on emotional conflict in which an impulse that has been blocked seeks expression in a disguised ...
psychoneurotic
adjective or noun see psychoneurosis
psychopath
noun Etymology: International Scientific Vocabulary Date: 1885 a mentally ill or unstable person; especially a person affected with antisocial personality disorder
psychopathic
I. adjective Date: 1847 of, relating to, or characterized by psychopathy or antisocial personality disorder • psychopathically adverb II. noun Date: circa 1890 psychopath
psychopathic personality disorder
noun Date: circa 1923 antisocial personality disorder
psychopathically
adverb see psychopathic I
psychopathologic
adjective see psychopathology
psychopathological
adjective see psychopathology
psychopathologically
adverb see psychopathology
psychopathologist
noun see psychopathology
psychopathology
noun Etymology: International Scientific Vocabulary Date: 1847 the study of psychological and behavioral dysfunction occurring in mental disorder or in social ...
psychopathy
noun (plural -thies) Etymology: International Scientific Vocabulary Date: 1847 mental disorder especially when marked by egocentric and antisocial activity
psychopharmacologic
adjective see psychopharmacology
psychopharmacological
adjective see psychopharmacology
psychopharmacologist
noun see psychopharmacology
psychopharmacology
noun Date: 1920 the study of the effect of drugs on the mind and behavior • psychopharmacological also psychopharmacologic adjective • psychopharmacologist noun
psychophysical
adjective Date: 1847 of or relating to psychophysics; also sharing mental and physical qualities • psychophysically adverb
psychophysical parallelism
noun Date: 1894 parallelism 4
psychophysically
adverb see psychophysical
psychophysicist
noun see psychophysics
psychophysics
noun plural but singular in construction Etymology: International Scientific Vocabulary Date: 1878 a branch of psychology concerned with the effect of physical processes (as ...
psychophysiologic
adjective see psychophysiological
psychophysiological
also psychophysiologic adjective Date: 1839 1. of or relating to physiological psychology 2. combining or involving mental and bodily processes • psychophysiologically ...
psychophysiologically
adverb see psychophysiological
psychophysiologist
noun see psychophysiology
psychophysiology
noun Etymology: International Scientific Vocabulary Date: 1839 physiological psychology • psychophysiologist noun
psychosexual
adjective Date: 1897 1. of or relating to the mental, emotional, and behavioral aspects of sexual development 2. of or relating to mental or emotional attitudes concerning ...
psychosexuality
noun Date: 1910 the psychic factors of sex
psychosexually
adverb see psychosexual
psychosis
noun (plural psychoses) Etymology: New Latin Date: 1847 fundamental derangement of the mind (as in schizophrenia) characterized by defective or lost contact with reality ...
psychosocial
adjective Date: 1899 1. involving both psychological and social aspects 2. relating social conditions to mental health • psychosocially adverb
psychosocially
adverb see psychosocial
psychosomatic
adjective Etymology: International Scientific Vocabulary Date: 1863 1. of, relating to, concerned with, or involving both mind and body 2. of, relating to, involving, or ...
psychosomatically
adverb see psychosomatic
psychosurgeon
noun see psychosurgery
psychosurgery
noun Date: 1936 cerebral surgery employed in treating psychic symptoms • psychosurgeon noun • psychosurgical adjective
psychosurgical
adjective see psychosurgery
psychosynthesis
noun Date: 1919 a form of psychotherapy combining psychoanalytic techniques with meditation and exercise
psychotherapeutic
adjective Etymology: International Scientific Vocabulary Date: circa 1888 of, relating to, or used in psychotherapy • psychotherapeutically adverb
psychotherapeutically
adverb see psychotherapeutic
psychotherapist
noun see psychotherapy
psychotherapy
noun Etymology: International Scientific Vocabulary Date: circa 1890 treatment of mental or emotional disorder or of related bodily ills by psychological means • ...
psychotic
adjective Date: circa 1890 of, relating to, marked by, or affected with psychosis • psychotic noun • psychotically adverb
psychotically
adverb see psychotic
psychotomimetic
adjective Etymology: psychotic + -o- + mimetic Date: 1956 of, relating to, involving, or inducing psychotic alteration of behavior and personality • psychotomimetic ...
psychotomimetically
adverb see psychotomimetic
psychotropic
adjective Date: 1948 acting on the mind • psychotropic noun
psychro-
combining form Etymology: Greek, from psychros, from psychein to cool cold
psychrometer
noun Etymology: International Scientific Vocabulary Date: circa 1741 a hygrometer consisting essentially of two similar thermometers with the bulb of one being kept wet so ...
psychrometric
adjective see psychrometer
psychrometry
noun see psychrometer
psychrophilic
adjective Date: 1897 thriving at a relatively low temperature
psylla
noun Etymology: New Latin, genus name, from Greek, flea; akin to Latin pulex flea, Sanskrit pluṣi Date: 1852 any of various plant lice (family Psyllidae) including ...
psyllid
noun Etymology: ultimately from New Latin Psylla Date: 1899 psylla • psyllid adjective
psyllium
noun Etymology: New Latin psyllium, from Greek psyllion fleawort, from psylla Date: 1598 the seed of a fleawort (especially Plantago psyllium) that has the property of ...
psyllium seed
noun see psyllium
psyops
noun plural Usage: often attributive Etymology: psychological operations Date: 1966 military operations usually aimed at influencing the enemy's state of mind through ...
psywar
noun Date: 1951 psychological warfare
pt
abbreviation 1. part 2. patient 3. payment 4. pint 5. point 6. port
Pt
symbol platinum
PT
abbreviation 1. Pacific time 2. part-time 3. physical therapist; physical therapy 4. physical training
PT boat
noun Etymology: patrol torpedo Date: 1941 a small fast patrol craft usually armed with torpedoes, machine guns, and depth charges — called also PT
pta
abbreviation peseta
PTA
abbreviation Parent-Teacher Association
ptarmigan
noun (plural -gan or -gans) Etymology: modification of Scottish Gaelic tarmachan Date: 1599 any of various grouses (genus Lagopus) of northern regions with completely ...
PTC
noun Date: 1932 phenylthiocarbamide
pte
abbreviation British private
pteranodon
noun Etymology: New Latin, from Greek pteron wing + anodōn toothless from an- + odōn, odous tooth — more at feather, tooth Date: 1881 any of a genus (Pteranodon) of ...
pterid-
or pterido- combining form Etymology: Greek pterid-, pteris; akin to Greek pteron wing, feather fern
pteridine
noun Etymology: International Scientific Vocabulary pterin + -idine Date: 1943 a yellow crystalline bicyclic base C6H4N4; broadly any of a class of compounds (as the ...
pterido-
combining form see pterid-
pteridological
adjective see pteridology
pteridologist
noun see pteridology
pteridology
noun Date: 1855 the study of ferns • pteridological adjective • pteridologist noun
pteridophyte
noun Etymology: New Latin Pteridophyta, from Greek pterid- + phyton plant — more at phyt- Date: 1880 any of a division (Pteridophyta) of vascular plants (as a fern) that ...
pteridosperm
noun Etymology: International Scientific Vocabulary Date: 1904 seed fern
pterin
noun Etymology: International Scientific Vocabulary pter- (from Greek pteron wing) + 1-in; from its being a factor in the pigments of butterfly wings Date: 1934 any of ...
pterodactyl
noun Etymology: New Latin Pterodactylus, genus of reptiles, from Greek pteron wing + daktylos finger — more at feather Date: 1830 any of various pterosaurs (suborder ...
pteropod
noun Etymology: New Latin Pteropoda, group name, from Greek pteron wing + New Latin -poda Date: 1835 any of the opisthobranch mollusks comprising two orders (Thecosomata and ...
pterosaur
noun Etymology: New Latin Pterosauria, from Greek pteron wing + sauros lizard Date: 1862 any of an order (Pterosauria) of extinct flying reptiles existing from the Late ...
pteroylglutamic acid
noun Etymology: International Scientific Vocabulary pteroyl, the radical (C13H11N6O)CO + glutamic acid Date: 1943 folic acid
pterygium
noun (plural pterygia; also -iums) Etymology: New Latin, from Greek pterygion little wing, from pteryx Date: 1657 a fleshy mass of thickened conjunctiva that grows over part ...
pterygoid
I. adjective Etymology: New Latin pterygoides, from Greek pterygoeidēs, literally, shaped like a wing, from pteryg-, pteryx wing; akin to Greek pteron wing — more at feather ...
pterygoid process
noun Date: 1741 a process extending downward from each side of the sphenoid bone in humans and other mammals
pteryla
noun (plural pterylae) Etymology: New Latin, from Greek pteron + hylē wood, forest Date: 1867 one of the definite areas of the skin of a bird on which feathers grow
ptg
abbreviation printing
PTO
abbreviation 1. Parent-Teacher Organization 2. please turn over 3. power takeoff
Ptolemaic
adjective Etymology: Greek Ptolemaikos, from Ptolemaios Ptolemy Date: 1674 1. of or relating to the second century geographer and astronomer Ptolemy of Alexandria and ...
Ptolemaïs
geographical name 1. ancient town in upper Egypt on left bank of the Nile NW of Thebes 2. ancient town in Cyrenaica NW of Barka; site at modern village of Tolmeta 3. — ...
Ptolemy
I. biographical name name of 15 kings of Egypt 323-30 B.C. II. biographical name 2d century A.D. Claudius Ptolemaeus Alexandrian astronomer
ptomaine
noun Etymology: Italian ptomaina, from Greek ptōma fall, fallen body, corpse, from piptein to fall — more at feather Date: 1880 any of various organic bases which are ...
ptomaine poisoning
noun Date: 1893 food poisoning caused by bacteria or bacterial products
ptosis
noun (plural ptoses) Etymology: New Latin, from Greek ptōsis act of falling, from piptein Date: 1743 a sagging or prolapse of an organ or part; especially a drooping of the ...
PTSD
abbreviation post-traumatic stress disorder
PTV
abbreviation public television
Pty
abbreviation British proprietary
ptyalin
noun Etymology: Greek ptyalon saliva, from ptyein to spit — more at spew Date: 1845 an amylase found in the saliva of many animals that converts starch into sugar
ptyalism
noun Etymology: New Latin ptyalismus, from Greek ptyalismos, from ptyalizein to salivate, from ptyalon Date: 1676 an excessive flow of saliva
Pu
symbol plutonium
PU
abbreviation pickup
pub
I. noun Date: circa 1859 1. chiefly British public house 2 2. an establishment where alcoholic beverages are sold and consumed II. abbreviation 1. public 2. publication ...
pub crawl
noun Date: 1915 a round of visits to a number of bars in succession • pub-crawl intransitive verb • pub crawler noun
pub crawler
noun see pub crawl
pub-crawl
intransitive verb see pub crawl
puberal
adjective see pubertal
pubertal
or puberal adjective Etymology: pubertal from puberty; puberal from Medieval Latin puberalis, from Latin puber Date: circa 1837 of or relating to puberty
puberty
noun Etymology: Middle English puberte, from Latin pubertas, from puber pubescent Date: 14th century 1. the condition of being or the period of becoming first capable of ...
puberulent
adjective Etymology: Latin puber pubescent + English -ulent (as in pulverulent) Date: 1847 covered with fine pubescence
pubes
noun (plural pubes) Etymology: New Latin, from Latin, manhood, body hair, pubic region; akin to Latin puber pubescent Date: circa 1570 1. the hair that appears on the lower ...
pubescence
noun Date: 15th century 1. the quality or state of being pubescent 2. a pubescent covering or surface
pubescent
adjective Etymology: Latin pubescent-, pubescens, present participle of pubescere to reach puberty, become covered as with hair, from pubes Date: 1646 1. a. arriving at or ...
pubic
adjective Date: 1831 of, relating to, or situated in or near the region of the pubes or the pubis
pubic bone
noun see pubis
pubis
noun (plural pubes) Etymology: New Latin os pubis, literally, bone of the pubic region Date: 1597 the ventral and anterior of the three principal bones composing either half ...
publ
abbreviation 1. publication 2. published; publisher; publishing
public
I. adjective Etymology: Middle English publique, from Anglo-French, from Latin publicus; akin to Latin populus people Date: 14th century 1. a. exposed to general view ; ...
public assistance
noun Date: 1884 government aid to needy, aged, or disabled persons and to dependent children
public defender
noun Date: 1918 a lawyer usually holding public office whose duty is to defend accused persons unable to pay for legal assistance
public domain
noun Date: 1832 1. land owned directly by the government 2. the realm embracing property rights that belong to the community at large, are unprotected by copyright or ...
public health
noun Date: 1617 the art and science dealing with the protection and improvement of community health by organized community effort and including preventive medicine and ...
public house
noun Date: 1658 1. inn, hostelry 2. chiefly British a licensed saloon or bar
public land
noun Date: 1789 land owned by a government; specifically that part of the United States public domain subject to sale or disposal under the homestead laws
public law
noun Date: 1761 1. a legislative enactment affecting the public at large 2. a branch of law concerned with regulating the relations of individuals with the government and ...
public officer
noun Date: 1606 a person who has been legally elected or appointed to office and who exercises governmental functions
public relations
noun plural but usually singular in construction Usage: often attributive Date: 1807 the business of inducing the public to have understanding for and goodwill toward a ...
public sale
noun Date: 1641 auction 1
public school
noun Date: 1580 1. an endowed secondary boarding school in Great Britain offering a classical curriculum and preparation for the universities or public service 2. a free ...
public servant
noun Date: 1671 a government official or employee
public service
noun Date: circa 1576 1. the business of supplying a commodity (as electricity or gas) or service (as transportation) to any or all members of a community 2. a service ...
public speaking
noun Date: 1762 1. the act or process of making speeches in public 2. the art of effective oral communication with an audience
public utility
noun Date: 1903 a business organization (as an electric company) performing a public service and subject to special governmental regulation
public works
noun plural Date: 1606 works (as schools, highways, docks) constructed for public use or enjoyment especially when financed and owned by the government
public-address system
noun Date: 1923 an apparatus including a microphone and loudspeakers used for broadcasting (as to an audience in an auditorium)
public-key
noun Usage: often attributive Date: 1977 a cryptographic element that is the publicly shared half of an encryption code and that can be used only to encode messages
public-service corporation
noun Date: 1904 a quasi-public corporation
public-spirited
adjective Date: 1677 motivated by devotion to the general welfare • public-spiritedness noun
public-spiritedness
noun see public-spirited
publically
adverb see publicly
publican
noun Etymology: Middle English, from Anglo-French, from Latin publicanus tax farmer, from publicum public revenue, from neuter of publicus Date: 13th century 1. a. a ...
publication
noun Etymology: Middle English publicacioun, from Middle French publication, from Latin publication-, publicatio, from publicare, from publicus public Date: 14th century 1. ...
publicise
British variant of publicize
publicist
noun Date: 1792 1. a. an expert in international law b. an expert or commentator on public affairs 2. one that publicizes; specifically press agent
publicity
noun Date: 1788 1. the quality or state of being public 2. a. an act or device designed to attract public interest; specifically information with news value issued as a ...
publicize
transitive verb (-cized; -cizing) Date: 1844 to bring to the attention of the public ; advertise
publicly
also publically adverb Date: 1563 1. in a manner observable by or in a place accessible to the public ; openly 2. a. by the people generally b. by a government
publicness
noun see public I
publish
verb Etymology: Middle English, modification of Anglo-French publier, from Latin publicare, from publicus public Date: 14th century transitive verb 1. a. to make ...
publishable
adjective see publish
publisher
noun Date: 15th century one that publishes something; especially a person or corporation whose business is publishing
publishing
noun Date: 1580 the business or profession of the commercial production and issuance of literature, information, musical scores or sometimes recordings, or art
Puccini
biographical name Giacomo 1858-1924 Italian composer • Puccinian adjective
Puccinian
adjective see Puccini
puccoon
noun Etymology: Virginia Algonquian poughkone Date: 1612 1. any of several American plants (as bloodroot) yielding a red or yellow pigment 2. a pigment from a puccoon
puce
noun Etymology: French, literally, flea, from Old French pulce, from Latin pulic-, pulex — more at psylla Date: 1833 a dark red
Puchon
geographical name city NW South Korea population 456,292
puck
I. noun Etymology: Middle English puke, from Old English pūca; akin to Old Norse pūki devil Date: before 12th century 1. archaic an evil spirit ; demon 2. a mischievous ...
pucka
variant of pukka
pucker
I. verb (puckered; puckering) Etymology: probably irregular from 1poke Date: 1598 intransitive verb to become wrinkled or constricted transitive verb to contract into ...
puckery
adjective Date: 1830 that puckers or causes puckering
puckish
adjective Etymology: 1puck Date: 1874 impish, whimsical • puckishly adverb • puckishness noun
puckishly
adverb see puckish
puckishness
noun see puckish
pud
noun Date: 1706 British pudding
PUD
abbreviation pickup and delivery
pudding
noun Etymology: Middle English Date: 13th century 1. blood sausage 2. a. (1) a boiled or baked soft food usually with a cereal base (2) a dessert of a soft, ...
pudding stone
noun Date: 1753 conglomerate 1
puddle
I. noun Etymology: Middle English podel; akin to Low German pudel puddle, Old English pudd ditch Date: 14th century 1. a very small pool of usually dirty or muddy water 2. ...
puddle duck
noun Date: 1877 dabbler b
puddle jumper
noun Date: 1942 slang lightplane
puddler
noun see puddle II
puddling
noun Date: 1839 the process of converting pig iron into wrought iron or rarely steel by subjecting it to heat and frequent stirring in a furnace in the presence of oxidizing ...
pudency
noun Etymology: Latin pudentia, from pudent-, pudens, present participle of pudēre to be ashamed, make ashamed Date: 1611 modesty
pudendal
adjective see pudendum
pudendum
noun (plural pudenda) Etymology: New Latin, singular of Latin pudenda, from neuter plural of pudendus, gerundive of pudēre to be ashamed Date: 1634 the external genital ...
pudginess
noun see pudgy
pudgy
adjective (pudgier; -est) Etymology: origin unknown Date: 1836 being short and plump ; chubby • pudginess noun
pudibund
adjective Etymology: Latin pudibundus, from pudēre to be ashamed + -bundus (as in moribundus moribund) Date: circa 1656 prudish
Puebla
geographical name 1. state SE central Mexico area 13,096 square miles (33,919 square kilometers), population 4,126,101 2. (or Puebla de Zaragoza) city, its capital, SE of ...
Puebla de Zaragoza
geographical name see Puebla 2
pueblo
noun (plural -los) Etymology: Spanish, village, literally, people, from Latin populus Date: 1808 1. a. the communal dwelling of an American Indian village of Arizona, New ...
Pueblo
geographical name city SE central Colorado on the Arkansas population 102,121
puerile
adjective Etymology: French or Latin; French puéril, from Latin puerilis, from puer boy, child; akin to Sanskrit putra son, child and perhaps to Greek pais boy, child — more ...
puerilely
adverb see puerile
puerilism
noun Date: 1924 childish behavior especially as a symptom of mental disorder
puerility
noun see puerile
puerperal
adjective Etymology: Latin puerpera woman in childbirth, from puer child + parere to give birth to — more at pare Date: 1768 of, relating to, or occurring during childbirth ...
puerperal fever
noun Date: 1768 an abnormal condition that results from infection of the placental site following delivery or abortion and is characterized in mild form by fever but in ...
puerperal sepsis
noun see puerperal fever
puerperium
noun (plural puerperia) Etymology: Latin, from puerpera Date: circa 1890 the period between childbirth and the return of the uterus to its normal size
Puerto Barrios
geographical name city & port E Guatemala on Gulf of Honduras population 39,088
Puerto La Cruz
geographical name city NE Venezuela NE of Barcelona population 60,546
Puerto Limón
geographical name — see limon
Puerto Montt
geographical name city & port S central Chile population 84,410
Puerto Rican
adjective or noun see Puerto Rico
Puerto Rico
or formerly Porto Rico geographical name island West Indies E of Hispaniola; a self-governing commonwealth in union with the United States capital San Juan area 3435 square ...
puff
I. verb Etymology: Middle English, from Old English pyffan, of imitative origin Date: before 12th century intransitive verb 1. a. (1) to blow in short gusts ...
puff adder
noun Date: 1789 1. a large thick-bodied extremely venomous African viper (Bitis arietans) 2. hognose snake
puff paste
noun see puff pastry
puff pastry
noun Date: 1788 a pastry dough containing many alternating layers of butter and dough or the light flaky pastry made from it — called also puff paste
puffball
noun Date: 1649 any of various globose and often edible fungi (especially family Lycoperdaceae) that discharge mature spores in a smokelike cloud when pressed or struck
puffer
noun Date: 1629 1. one that puffs 2. puffer fish
puffer fish
noun Date: 1927 1. any of a family (Tetraodontidae) of chiefly tropical scaleless marine bony fishes which can distend themselves to a globular form and most of which are ...
puffery
noun Date: 1782 exaggerated commendation especially for promotional purposes ; hype
puffin
noun Etymology: Middle English pophyn Date: 14th century any of several seabirds (genera Fratercula and Lunda) of the northern hemisphere having a short neck and a deep ...
puffiness
noun see puff II
puffy
adjective see puff II
pug
I. noun Etymology: obsolete pug hobgoblin, monkey Date: 1751 1. any of a breed of small sturdy compact dogs of Asian origin with a smooth, short coat, tightly curled tail, ...
pug mill
noun Etymology: 2pug Date: 1824 a machine in which materials (as clay and water) are mixed, blended, or kneaded into a desired consistency
pug nose
noun Etymology: 1pug Date: 1777 a nose having a slightly concave bridge and flattened nostrils • pug-nosed adjective
pug-nosed
adjective see pug nose
pugaree
noun see puggaree
Puget Sound
geographical name arm of the Pacific extending 80 miles (129 kilometers) S into W Washington from E end of Strait of Juan de Fuca
puggaree
also pugaree or puggree noun Etymology: Hindi & Urdu pagṛī turban Date: 1665 a light scarf wrapped around a sun helmet or used as a hatband
puggree
noun see puggaree
pugilism
noun Etymology: Latin pugil boxer; akin to Latin pugnus fist — more at pungent Date: 1791 boxing I • pugilistic adjective
pugilist
noun Date: 1790 fighter; especially a professional boxer
pugilistic
adjective see pugilism
Puglia
or Apulia or Le Puglie geographical name region SE Italy on the Adriatic & Gulf of Taranto capital Bari population 4,069,359
pugmark
noun Date: 1922 pug IV
pugnacious
adjective Etymology: Latin pugnac-, pugnax, from pugnare to fight — more at pungent Date: 1642 having a quarrelsome or combative nature ; truculent Synonyms: see ...
pugnaciously
adverb see pugnacious
pugnaciousness
noun see pugnacious
pugnacity
noun see pugnacious
puisne
adjective Etymology: Anglo-French puisné younger — more at puny Date: 1688 chiefly British inferior in rank • puisne noun
puissance
noun Etymology: Middle English, from Anglo-French pussance, puissance, from pussant able, powerful, from poer to be able, be powerful — more at power Date: 15th century ...
puissant
adjective Date: 15th century having puissance ; powerful
Pukapuka
or Danger Islands geographical name group of coral islands central Pacific N of Cook Islands; administered with Cook Islands by New Zealand
Pukaskwa National Park
geographical name reservation Canada in Ontario bordering on Lake Superior
puke
verb (puked; puking) Etymology: origin unknown Date: circa 1600 vomit • puke noun
pukka
also pucka adjective Etymology: Hindi & Urdu pakkā cooked, ripe, solid, from Sanskrit pakva; akin to Greek pessein to cook — more at cook Date: 1776 genuine, authentic; ...
pul
noun (plural puls or pul) Etymology: Persian pūl Date: 1927 — see afghani at money table
pula
noun (plural pula) Etymology: Tswana, literally, rain (used as a greeting) Date: 1976 — see money table
Pula
geographical name city & port W Croatia at tip of Istria population 62,690
Pulaski
noun Etymology: Edward C. Pulaski, died 1931 American forest ranger Date: 1924 a single-bit ax with an adze-shaped hoe extending from the back
pulchritude
noun Etymology: Middle English, from Latin pulchritudin-, pulchritudo, from pulchr-, pulcher beautiful Date: 15th century physical comeliness • pulchritudinous adjective
pulchritudinous
adjective see pulchritude
pule
intransitive verb (puled; puling) Etymology: probably imitative Date: 1534 whine, whimper
puli
noun (plural pulik or pulis) Etymology: Hungarian Date: 1936 any of a breed of medium-sized agile Hungarian sheepdogs with a thick woolly coat hanging in long thin cords
Pulitzer
biographical name Joseph 1847-1911 American (Hungarian-born) journalist

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