Слова на букву phyl-quin (6389) New Collegiate Dictionary
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Слова на букву phyl-quin (6389)

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Pyramus
noun Etymology: Latin, from Greek Pyramos Date: 14th century a legendary youth of Babylon who dies for love of Thisbe
pyran
noun Etymology: International Scientific Vocabulary Date: 1904 either of two cyclic compounds C5H6O that contain five carbon atoms and one oxygen atom in the ring
pyranose
noun Etymology: International Scientific Vocabulary Date: 1927 a monosaccharide in the form of a cyclic hemiacetal containing a pyran ring
pyranoside
noun Date: 1932 a glycoside containing the pyran ring
pyre
noun Etymology: Latin pyra, from Greek, from pyr fire — more at fire Date: 1587 a combustible heap for burning a dead body as a funeral rite; broadly a pile of material to ...
Pyrenean
adjective or noun see Pyrenees
Pyrenees
or French Pyrénées or Spanish Pirineos geographical name mountains along French-Spanish border from Bay of Biscay to Gulf of Lion — see aneto (Pico de) • Pyrenean ...
Pyrénées
geographical name see Pyrenees
pyrenoid
noun Etymology: International Scientific Vocabulary, from New Latin pyrena stone of a fruit, from Greek pyrēn; akin to Greek pyros wheat grain, wheat — more at furze Date: ...
pyrethrin
noun Etymology: International Scientific Vocabulary, from Latin pyrethrum Date: 1871 either of two oily liquid esters C21H28O3 and C22H28O5 having insecticidal properties and ...
pyrethroid
noun Etymology: pyrethrin + -oid Date: 1949 any of various synthetic compounds that are related to the pyrethrins and resemble them in insecticidal properties • pyrethroid ...
pyrethrum
noun Etymology: Latin, pellitory, from Greek pyrethron, from pyr fire Date: circa 1543 1. any of several chrysanthemums with finely divided often aromatic leaves including ...
pyretic
adjective Etymology: New Latin pyreticus, from Greek pyretikos, from pyretos fever, from pyr Date: circa 1858 of or relating to fever ; febrile
Pyrex
trademark — used for borosilicate glass and glassware resistant to heat, chemicals, and electricity
pyrexia
noun Etymology: New Latin, from Greek pyressein to be feverish, from pyretos Date: 1769 abnormal elevation of body temperature ; fever • pyrexial adjective • pyrexic ...
pyrexial
adjective see pyrexia
pyrexic
adjective see pyrexia
pyrheliometer
noun Etymology: International Scientific Vocabulary Date: 1863 an instrument for measuring the sun's radiant energy as received at the earth • pyrheliometric adjective
pyrheliometric
adjective see pyrheliometer
pyridine
noun Etymology: pyr- + -ide + 2-ine Date: 1851 a toxic water-soluble flammable liquid base C5H5N of pungent odor that is the parent of many naturally occurring organic ...
pyridostigmine
noun see pyridostigmine bromide
pyridostigmine bromide
noun Etymology: International Scientific Vocabulary pyridine + neostigmine Date: 1961 a cholinergic drug C9H13BrN2O2 used especially in the treatment of myasthenia gravis and ...
pyridoxal
noun Etymology: International Scientific Vocabulary, from pyridoxine Date: 1944 a crystalline aldehyde C8H9NO3 of the vitamin B6 group that occurs as a phosphate and is ...
pyridoxamine
noun Etymology: International Scientific Vocabulary pyridoxine + amine Date: 1944 a crystalline amine C8H12N2O2 of the vitamin B6 group that occurs as a phosphate and is ...
pyridoxine
noun Etymology: pyridine + ox- + 2-ine Date: 1939 a crystalline phenolic alcohol C8H11NO3 of the vitamin B6 group found especially in cereals and convertible in the organism ...
pyriform
adjective Etymology: New Latin pyriformis, from Medieval Latin pyrum pear (alteration of Latin pirum) + Latin -iformis -iform Date: 1741 having the form of a pear
pyrimethamine
noun Etymology: pyrimidine + ethyl + amine Date: 1952 a folic acid antagonist C12H13ClN4 used in the chemoprophylaxis or treatment of malaria and in the treatment of ...
pyrimidine
noun Etymology: International Scientific Vocabulary, alteration of pyridine Date: 1885 1. a feeble organic base C4H4N2 of penetrating odor 2. a derivative of pyrimidine; ...
pyrite
noun Etymology: Latin pyrites Date: 1756 a common mineral that consists of iron disulfide, has a pale brass-yellow color and metallic luster, and is burned in making sulfur ...
pyrites
noun (plural pyrites) Etymology: Latin, flint, from Greek pyritēs of or in fire, from pyr fire Date: 1543 any of various metallic-looking sulfides of which pyrite is the ...
pyritic
adjective see pyrites
pyro-
combining form see pyr-
pyrocatechol
noun Etymology: International Scientific Vocabulary Date: 1890 catechol 2
pyroclastic
adjective Date: 1887 formed by or involving fragmentation as a result of volcanic or igneous action
pyroelectric
adjective see pyroelectricity
pyroelectricity
noun Etymology: International Scientific Vocabulary Date: circa 1834 a state of electrical polarization produced (as in a crystal) by a change of temperature • ...
pyrogallol
noun Etymology: International Scientific Vocabulary pyro- + gallic (acid) + 1-ol Date: 1869 a poisonous bitter crystalline phenol C6H6O3 with weak acid properties that is ...
pyrogen
noun Etymology: International Scientific Vocabulary Date: circa 1889 a fever-producing substance
pyrogenic
adjective Etymology: International Scientific Vocabulary Date: 1852 1. of or relating to igneous origin 2. producing or produced by heat or fever • pyrogenicity noun
pyrogenicity
noun see pyrogenic
pyrola
noun Etymology: New Latin, probably from Latin pirum pear Date: 1548 wintergreen 1
pyroligneous acid
noun Etymology: French pyroligneux, from pyr- + ligneux woody, from Latin lignosus, from lignum wood — more at ligneous Date: 1788 an acid reddish-brown aqueous liquid ...
pyrolize
transitive verb see pyrolyze
pyrolusite
noun Etymology: German Pyrolusit, from Greek pyr- + lousis washing, from louein to wash — more at lye Date: 1828 a soft black or steel-gray mineral of metallic luster ...
pyrolysate
or pyrolyzate noun Date: 1944 a product of pyrolysis
pyrolysis
noun Etymology: New Latin Date: circa 1890 chemical change brought about by the action of heat • pyrolytic adjective • pyrolytically adverb
pyrolytic
adjective see pyrolysis
pyrolytically
adverb see pyrolysis
pyrolyzable
adjective see pyrolyze
pyrolyzate
noun see pyrolysate
pyrolyze
also pyrolize transitive verb (-lyzed; also -lized; -lyzing; also -lizing) Date: 1932 to subject to pyrolysis • pyrolyzable adjective • pyrolyzer noun
pyrolyzer
noun see pyrolyze
pyromancy
noun Etymology: Middle English piromancie, from Middle French, from Late Latin pyromantia, from Greek pyromanteia, from pyr fire + manteia divination — more at -mancy Date: ...
pyromania
noun Etymology: New Latin Date: circa 1842 an irresistible impulse to start fires • pyromaniac noun • pyromaniacal adjective
pyromaniac
noun see pyromania
pyromaniacal
adjective see pyromania
pyrometallurgical
adjective see pyrometallurgy
pyrometallurgy
noun Etymology: International Scientific Vocabulary Date: 1908 chemical metallurgy depending on heat action (as roasting and smelting) • pyrometallurgical adjective
pyrometer
noun Etymology: International Scientific Vocabulary Date: 1796 an instrument for measuring temperatures especially when beyond the range of mercurial thermometers • ...
pyrometric
adjective see pyrometer
pyrometrically
adverb see pyrometer
pyrometry
noun see pyrometer
pyromorphite
noun Etymology: German Pyromorphit, from Greek pyr- + morphē form Date: circa 1814 a mineral consisting essentially of a chloride and phosphate of lead
pyronine
noun Etymology: International Scientific Vocabulary, irregular from pyr- + 2-ine Date: 1895 any of several basic xanthene dyes used chiefly as biological stains
pyrope
noun Etymology: Middle English pirope, a red gem, from Middle French, from Latin pyropus, a red bronze, from Greek pyrōpos, literally, fiery-eyed, from pyr- + ōp-, ōps eye ...
pyrophoric
adjective Etymology: New Latin pyrophorus, from Greek pyrophoros fire-bearing, from pyr- + -phoros carrying — more at -phore Date: 1836 1. igniting spontaneously 2. ...
pyrophosphate
noun Date: 1833 a salt or ester of pyrophosphoric acid
pyrophosphoric acid
noun Etymology: International Scientific Vocabulary Date: 1832 a crystalline acid H4P2O7 formed when orthophosphoric acid is heated or prepared in the form of salts by ...
pyrophyllite
noun Etymology: German Pyrophyllit, from Greek pyr- + phyllon leaf — more at blade Date: 1830 a soft usually white or greenish mineral that is a hydrous aluminum silicate, ...
pyrosis
noun Etymology: New Latin, from Greek pyrōsis burning, from pyroun to burn, from pyr fire — more at fire Date: 1789 heartburn
pyrotechnic
I. adjective also pyrotechnical Etymology: French pyrotechnique, from Greek pyr fire + technē art — more at technical Date: 1755 of or relating to pyrotechnics • ...
pyrotechnical
adjective see pyrotechnic I
pyrotechnically
adverb see pyrotechnic I
pyrotechnician
noun see pyrotechnics
pyrotechnics
noun plural Date: 1729 1. singular or plural in construction the art of making or the manufacture and use of fireworks 2. a. a display of fireworks b. a spectacular ...
pyrotechnist
noun see pyrotechnics
pyroxene
noun Etymology: French pyroxène, from Greek pyr- + xenos stranger Date: 1800 any of a group of igneous-rock-forming silicate minerals that contain calcium, sodium, ...
pyroxenic
adjective see pyroxene
pyroxenite
noun Date: 1850 an igneous rock that is free from olivine and is composed essentially of pyroxene • pyroxenitic adjective
pyroxenitic
adjective see pyroxenite
pyroxenoid
adjective or noun see pyroxene
pyroxylin
noun Etymology: International Scientific Vocabulary pyr- + Greek xylon wood Date: circa 1847 1. a flammable mixture of nitrocelluloses used especially in making plastics and ...
Pyrrha
noun Etymology: Latin, from Greek Date: 1560 the wife of Deucalion
pyrrhic
noun Etymology: Latin pyrrhichius, from Greek (pous) pyrrhichios, from pyrrhichē, a kind of dance Date: 1626 a metrical foot consisting of two short or unaccented syllables
Pyrrhic
adjective Etymology: Pyrrhus, king of Epirus who sustained heavy losses in defeating the Romans Date: 1885 achieved at excessive cost ; also costly to the point of ...
Pyrrhonism
noun Etymology: French pyrrhonisme, from Pyrrhon Pyrrho, 4th century B.C. Greek philosopher, from Greek Pyrrhōn Date: circa 1670 1. the doctrines of a school of ancient ...
Pyrrhonist
noun see Pyrrhonism
pyrrhotite
noun Etymology: modification of German Pyrrhotin, from Greek pyrrhotēs redness, from pyrrhos red, from pyr fire — more at fire Date: 1868 a bronze-colored mineral of ...
Pyrrhus
I. noun Etymology: Latin, from Greek Pyrrhos Date: 14th century a son of Achilles and slayer of Priam at the taking of Troy II. biographical name 319-272 B.C. king of Epirus ...
pyrrole
noun Etymology: Greek pyrrhos Date: 1835 a toxic liquid heterocyclic compound C4H5N that has a ring consisting of four carbon atoms and one nitrogen atom, polymerizes readily ...
pyrrolic
adjective see pyrrole
pyruvate
noun Date: 1855 a salt or ester of pyruvic acid
pyruvic acid
noun Etymology: International Scientific Vocabulary pyr- + Latin uva grapes; from its importance in fermentation — more at uvula Date: 1838 a 3-carbon acid C3H4O3 that in ...
Pythagoras
biographical name circa 580-circa 500 B.C. Greek philosopher & mathematician
Pythagorean
I. noun Date: 1550 any of a group professing to be followers of the Greek philosopher Pythagoras II. adjective Date: circa 1580 of, relating to, or associated with the ...
Pythagorean theorem
noun Date: 1743 a theorem in geometry: the square of the length of the hypotenuse of a right triangle equals the sum of the squares of the lengths of the other two sides
Pythagoreanism
noun Date: circa 1727 the doctrines and theories of Pythagoras and the Pythagoreans who developed some basic principles of mathematics and astronomy, originated the doctrine ...
Pythiad
noun Etymology: Greek Pythia, the Pythian games, from neuter plural of pythios Date: 1842 the 4-year period between celebrations of the Pythian games in ancient Greece
Pythian
I. adjective Etymology: Latin pythius of Delphi, from Greek pythios, from Pythō Pytho, name for Delphi, Greece Date: 1603 1. of or relating to games celebrated at Delphi ...
Pythias
noun Etymology: Greek Date: 1557 a friend of Damon condemned to death by Dionysius of Syracuse
python
noun Etymology: Latin, monstrous serpent killed by Apollo, from Greek Pythōn, from Pythō Delphi Date: 1836 any of various large constricting snakes (as a boa); especially ...
pythoness
noun Etymology: Middle English Phitonesse, from Middle French pithonisse, from Late Latin pythonissa, from Greek Pythōn, spirit of divination, perhaps from Pythō, seat of the ...
pythonic
adjective see pythoness
pyuria
noun Etymology: New Latin Date: circa 1811 pus in the urine; also a condition characterized by pus in the urine
pyx
noun Etymology: Middle English, from Medieval Latin pyxis, from Latin, box, from Greek, from pyxos box (shrub) Date: 15th century 1. a container for the reserved host; ...
pyxie
noun Etymology: by shortening & alteration from New Latin Pyxidanthera Date: 1882 a creeping evergreen dicotyledonous shrub (Pyxidanthera barbulata of the family ...
pyxis
noun (plural pyxides) Etymology: New Latin, from Latin, box Date: 1845 a capsular fruit that dehisces so that the upper part falls off like a cap
q
I. noun (plural q's or qs) Usage: often capitalized, often attributive Date: before 12th century 1. a. the 17th letter of the English alphabet b. a graphic ...
Q fever
noun Etymology: query Date: 1937 a disease that is characterized by high fever, chills, muscular pains, headache, and sometimes pneumonia, that is caused by a rickettsia ...
Q rating
noun Etymology: quotient Date: 1977 a scale measuring the popularity of a person or thing typically based on dividing an assessment of familiarity or recognition by an ...
Q-boat
noun Date: 1918 Q-ship
Q-ship
noun Date: 1919 an armed ship disguised as a merchant or fishing ship to decoy enemy submarines into gun range
q.t.
noun Usage: often capitalized Q&T Etymology: abbreviation Date: 1884 quiet — usually used in the phrase on the q.t.
QA
abbreviation quality assurance
Qaanaaq
geographical name — see Thule
Qaddafi
biographical name variant of Gadhafi
Qandahar
geographical name — see Kandahar
Qaraghandy
geographical name — see Karaganda
qat
variant of khat
Qatar
geographical name country E Arabia on peninsula projecting into Persian Gulf; an independent emirate capital Doha area 4400 square miles (11,395 square kilometers), population ...
Qatari
adjective or noun see Qatar
Qattara Depression
geographical name region NW Egypt, a low area 40 miles (64 kilometers) from coast; lowest point 440 feet (134 meters) below sea level
Qazvin
or Kazvin geographical name city NW Iran S of Elburz Mountains & NW of Tehran population 248,591
QB
abbreviation 1. quarterback 2. Queen's Bench
QC
abbreviation 1. quality control 2. Queen's Counsel
QCD
abbreviation quantum chromodynamics
qd
abbreviation Etymology: Latin quaque die every day
QED
abbreviation 1. quantum electrodynamics 2. [Latin quod erat demonstrandum] which was to be demonstrated
Qena
geographical name city S Egypt N of Luxor population 137,000
Qeqertarsuaq
or Disko geographical name island W Greenland in Davis Strait
Qeshm
geographical name island S Iran in Strait of Hormuz population 15,000
QF
abbreviation quick-firing
qi
variant of chi II
qid
abbreviation Etymology: Latin quater in die four times a day
Qingdao
or Tsingtao geographical name city & port E China in E Shandong on Jiaozhou Bay population 1,459,195
Qinghai
geographical name 1. (or Koko Nor) (or Ch'ing-hai) low saline lake W central China in NE Qinghai province at altitude of 10,515 feet (3205 meters) 2. (or Tsinghai) province W ...
Qinhuangdao
or Ch'in-huang-tao or Chinwangtao geographical name city & port NE China in NE Hebei population 210,000
qintar
noun (plural qindarka; also qintars or qindars) Etymology: Albanian Date: circa 1929 — see lek at money table
Qiqihar
or Ch'i-ch'i-ha-erh or Tsitsihar geographical name city NE China in W Heilongjiang population 1,500,000
Qishon
geographical name river 45 miles (72 kilometers) N Israel flowing NW through Plain of Esdraelon to the Mediterranean
qiviut
noun Etymology: Inuit Date: 1958 the wool of the undercoat of the musk ox
Qld
abbreviation Queensland
QM
abbreviation 1. quantum mechanics 2. quartermaster
QMC
abbreviation quartermaster corps
QMG
abbreviation quartermaster general
Qom
geographical name city NW central Iran population 543,139
qoph
or koph noun Etymology: Hebrew qōph Date: circa 1567 the 19th letter of the Hebrew alphabet — see alphabet table
qp
abbreviation Etymology: Latin quantum placet as much as you please
qq v
abbreviation Etymology: Latin quae vide which (pl) see
qr
abbreviation quarter
qs
abbreviation Etymology: Latin quantum sufficit as much as suffices
qt
abbreviation 1. quantity 2. quart
qtd
abbreviation quartered
qty
abbreviation quantity
qu
or ques abbreviation question
Qu'Appelle
geographical name river 270 miles (434 kilometers) Canada in S Saskatchewan flowing E into the Assiniboine
qua
preposition Etymology: Latin, which way, as, from ablative singular feminine of qui who — more at who Date: 1647 in the capacity or character of ; as
quaalude
noun Etymology: from Quaalude, a trademark Date: 1966 a tablet or capsule of methaqualone
quack
I. intransitive verb Etymology: alteration of queck to quack, from Middle English queken, from queke, interjection, of imitative origin Date: 14th century to make the ...
quack grass
noun Etymology: alteration of quick (grass), alteration of quitch (grass) Date: circa 1818 a European grass (Elytrigia repens syn. Agropyron repens) that is naturalized ...
quackery
noun Date: circa 1711 the practices or pretensions of a quack
quackish
adjective see quack IV
quacksalver
noun Etymology: obsolete Dutch (now kwakzalver) Date: 1579 charlatan, quack
quad
I. noun Date: 1820 quadrangle II. noun Etymology: short for quadrat Date: circa 1879 a type-metal space that is one en or more in width III. transitive verb (quadded; ...
Quad Cities
geographical name the cities of Davenport, Iowa, East Moline, Moline, & Rock Island, Illinois — sometimes considered to include Bettendorf, Iowa, instead of East Moline
quadr-
combining form see quadri-
quadrangle
noun Etymology: Middle English, from Middle French, from Late Latin quadriangulum, from Latin, neuter of quadriangulus quadrangular, from quadri- + angulus angle Date: 15th ...
quadrangular
adjective see quadrangle
quadrant
noun Etymology: Middle English, from Latin quadrant-, quadrans fourth part; akin to Latin quattuor four — more at four Date: 15th century 1. a. an instrument for ...
quadrantal
adjective see quadrant
Quadrantid
noun Etymology: New Latin Quadrant-, Quadrans (Muralis) mural quadrant, a group of stars in the constellation Draco from which the shower appears to radiate Date: 1876 any of ...
quadraphonic
also quadriphonic adjective Etymology: irregular from quadri- + -phonic (as in stereophonic) Date: 1969 of, relating to, or using four channels for the transmission, ...
quadraphonics
noun plural but singular in construction see quadraphonic
quadrat
noun Etymology: alteration of 2quadrate Date: 1683 1. quad II 2. a usually rectangular plot used for ecological or population studies
quadrate
I. adjective Etymology: Middle English, from Latin quadratus, past participle of quadrare to make square, fit, from quadrum square; akin to Latin quattuor four Date: 14th ...
quadratic
adjective Date: 1668 involving terms of the second degree at most • quadratic noun • quadratically adverb
quadratic form
noun Date: 1853 a homogeneous polynomial (as x2 + 5xy + y2) of the second degree
quadratically
adverb see quadratic
quadrature
noun Date: 1591 1. a configuration in which two celestial bodies (as the moon and the sun) have an angular separation of 90 degrees as seen from the earth 2. the process of ...
quadrennial
adjective Date: circa 1656 1. consisting of or lasting for four years 2. occurring or being done every four years • quadrennial noun • quadrennially adverb
quadrennially
adverb see quadrennial
quadrennium
noun (plural -niums or quadrennia) Etymology: Latin quadriennium, from quadri- + annus year — more at annual Date: 1754 a period of four years
quadri-
or quadr- or quadru- combining form Etymology: Latin; akin to Latin quattuor four 1. a. four b. square 2. fourth
quadric
adjective Etymology: International Scientific Vocabulary Date: 1856 quadratic — used where there are more than two variables • quadric noun
quadricentennial
noun Date: 1882 a 400th anniversary or its celebration
quadriceps
noun (plural quadriceps; also quadricepses) Etymology: New Latin quadricipit-, quadriceps, from quadri- + -cipit-, -ceps (as in bicipit-, biceps biceps) Date: 1840 the ...
quadriga
noun (plural quadrigae) Etymology: Latin, singular of quadrigae team of four, contraction of quadrijugae, feminine plural of quadrijugus yoked four abreast, from quadri- + ...
quadrilateral
I. noun Etymology: Latin quadrilaterus four-sided, from quadri- + later-, latus side Date: 1650 a polygon of four sides II. adjective Date: 1656 having four sides
quadrille
I. noun Etymology: French, group of knights engaged in a carousel, from Spanish cuadrilla troop, from diminutive of cuadra square, from Latin quadra, quadrum Date: 1726 1. a ...
quadrillion
noun Etymology: French, from Middle French, from quadri- + -illion (as in million) Date: 1674 — see number table • quadrillion adjective • quadrillionth adjective or ...
quadrillionth
adjective or noun see quadrillion
quadripartite
adjective Etymology: Middle English, from Latin quadripartitus, from quadri- + partitus, past participle of partire to divide, from part-, pars part Date: 15th century 1. ...
quadriphonic
adjective see quadraphonic
quadriphonics
noun plural but singular in construction see quadraphonic
quadriplegia
noun see quadriplegic
quadriplegic
noun Etymology: quadriplegia, from New Latin Date: 1921 one affected with paralysis of both arms and both legs • quadriplegia noun
quadrivalent
I. adjective Etymology: International Scientific Vocabulary Date: 1865 1. tetravalent 2. composed of four homologous chromosomes synapsed in meiotic prophase II. noun ...
quadrivial
adjective Date: 15th century 1. of or relating to the quadrivium 2. having four ways or roads meeting in a point
quadrivium
noun Etymology: Late Latin, from Latin, crossroads, from quadri- + via way — more at way Date: 1804 a group of studies consisting of arithmetic, music, geometry, and ...
quadroon
noun Etymology: modification of Spanish cuarterón, from cuarto fourth, from Latin quartus — more at quart Date: 1707 a person of one-quarter black ancestry
quadru-
combining form see quadri-
quadrumanous
adjective Etymology: ultimately from Latin quadri- + manus hand — more at manual Date: 1819 having feet adapted for grasping
quadrumvir
noun Etymology: back-formation from quadrumvirate Date: 1790 a member of a quadrumvirate
quadrumvirate
noun Etymology: quadri- + -umvirate (as in triumvirate) Date: 1752 a group or association of four
quadruped
noun Etymology: Latin quadruped-, quadrupes, from quadruped-, quadrupes, adjective, having four feet, from quadri- + ped-, pes foot — more at foot Date: 1646 an animal ...
quadrupedal
adjective see quadruped
quadruple
I. verb (quadrupled; quadrupling) Etymology: Middle English (Scots), from Latin quadruplare, from quadruplus Date: 14th century transitive verb to make four times as great ...
quadruplet
noun Date: 1709 1. a combination of four of a kind 2. one of four offspring born at one birth 3. a group of four musical notes to be performed in the time ordinarily given ...
quadruplicate
I. adjective Etymology: Latin quadruplicatus, past participle of quadruplicare to quadruple, from quadruplic-, quadruplex fourfold, from quadri- + -plic-, -plex fold — more at ...
quadruplication
noun see quadruplicate II
quadruplicity
noun see quadruple III
quadruply
adverb see quadruple III
quadrupole
noun Etymology: International Scientific Vocabulary quadri- + pole Date: 1922 a system composed of two dipoles of equal but oppositely directed moment
quaere
noun Etymology: Latin, imperative of quaerere to seek, question Date: 1589 archaic query
quaestor
also questor noun Etymology: Middle English questor, from Latin quaestor, from quaerere Date: 14th century one of numerous ancient Roman officials concerned chiefly with ...
quaff
verb Etymology: origin unknown Date: 1523 intransitive verb to drink deeply transitive verb to drink (a beverage) deeply • quaff noun • quaffer noun
quaffer
noun see quaff
quag
noun Etymology: origin unknown Date: 1589 marsh, bog
quagga
noun Etymology: obsolete Afrikaans (now kwagga), from Khoikhoi quácha Date: 1785 an extinct mammal (Equus quagga) of southern Africa that resembled and was related to the ...
quaggy
adjective Date: 1610 1. marshy 2. flabby
quagmire
noun Date: circa 1580 1. soft miry land that shakes or yields under the foot 2. a difficult, precarious, or entrapping position ; predicament
quahaug
noun see quahog
quahog
also quahaug noun Etymology: modification of Narragansett poquaûhock Date: 1753 a thick-shelled edible clam (Mercenaria mercenaria) of the United States
quai
noun Etymology: French, from Middle French cai — more at quay Date: 1862 quay
quaich
or quaigh noun Etymology: Scottish Gaelic cuach Date: 1546 chiefly Scottish a small shallow drinking vessel with ears for use as handles
quaigh
noun see quaich
quail
I. noun (plural quail or quails) Etymology: Middle English quaile, from Anglo-French, from Medieval Latin quaccula, of imitative origin Date: 14th century any of numerous ...
quaint
adjective Etymology: Middle English queinte, cointe, from Anglo-French, clever, expert, from Latin cognitus, past participle of cognoscere to know — more at cognition Date: ...
quaintly
adverb see quaint
quaintness
noun see quaint
quake
I. intransitive verb (quaked; quaking) Etymology: Middle English, from Old English cwacian Date: before 12th century 1. to shake or vibrate usually from shock or ...
quaker
noun Date: 1597 1. one that quakes 2. capitalized friend 5 • Quakerish adjective • Quakerism noun • Quakerly adjective
Quaker
noun see friend I
Quaker gun
noun Etymology: from opposition to war as a basic Quaker tenet Date: 1809 a dummy piece of artillery usually made of wood
quaker-ladies
noun plural Date: 1871 bluets
Quakerish
adjective see quaker
Quakerism
noun see quaker
Quakerly
adjective see quaker
quaking aspen
noun Date: 1812 an aspen (Populus tremuloides) chiefly of the United States and Canada with small nearly circular leaves that have flattened petioles and finely serrate ...
qual
abbreviation quality
quale
noun (plural qualia) Etymology: Latin, neuter of qualis of what kind Date: 1675 1. a property (as redness) considered apart from things having the property ; universal 2. a ...
qualifiable
adjective Date: 1611 capable of qualifying or being qualified
qualification
noun Date: 1538 1. a restriction in meaning or application ; a limiting modification 2. a. obsolete nature b. archaic characteristic 3. a. a quality or skill ...
qualified
adjective Date: 1558 1. a. fitted (as by training or experience) for a given purpose ; competent b. having complied with the specific requirements or precedent ...
qualifiedly
adverb see qualified
qualifier
noun Date: 1561 one that qualifies: as a. one that satisfies requirements or meets a specified standard b. a word (as an adjective) or word group that limits or modifies ...
qualify
verb (-fied; -fying) Etymology: Middle French qualifier, from Medieval Latin qualificare, from Latin qualis Date: 1533 transitive verb 1. a. to reduce from a general to ...
qualitative
adjective Date: 1607 of, relating to, or involving quality or kind • qualitatively adverb
qualitative analysis
noun Date: 1842 chemical analysis designed to identify the components of a substance or mixture
qualitatively
adverb see qualitative
quality
I. noun (plural -ties) Etymology: Middle English qualite, from Anglo-French qualité, from Latin qualitat-, qualitas, from qualis of what kind; akin to Latin qui who — more at ...
quality assurance
noun Date: 1973 a program for the systematic monitoring and evaluation of the various aspects of a project, service, or facility to ensure that standards of quality are being ...
quality circle
noun Date: 1979 a group of employees who volunteer to meet regularly to discuss and propose solutions to problems (as of quality or productivity) in the workplace
quality control
noun Date: 1935 an aggregate of activities (as design analysis and inspection for defects) designed to ensure adequate quality especially in manufactured products • quality ...
quality controller
noun see quality control
quality point
noun Date: 1948 grade point
quality point average
noun Date: circa 1972 grade point average
qualm
noun Etymology: origin unknown Date: circa 1530 1. a sudden attack of illness, faintness, or nausea 2. a sudden access of usually disturbing emotion (as doubt or fear) 3. ...
qualmish
adjective Date: 1548 1. a. feeling qualms ; nauseated b. overly scrupulous ; squeamish 2. of, relating to, or producing qualms • qualmishly adverb • qualmishness ...
qualmishly
adverb see qualmish
qualmishness
noun see qualmish
qualmy
adjective see qualm
quamash
variant of camas
quand même
foreign term Etymology: French even so ; all the same
quandary
noun (plural -ries) Etymology: origin unknown Date: 1579 a state of perplexity or doubt

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