Слова на букву phyl-quin (6389) New Collegiate Dictionary
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Слова на букву phyl-quin (6389)

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pitch-perfect
adjective Date: 1981 sensitive to or having exactly the right tone or style
pitchblende
noun Etymology: part translation of German Pechblende, from Pech pitch + Blende blende Date: 1770 a brown to black mineral that consists of massive uraninite, has a ...
pitched
adjective see pitch IV
pitched battle
noun Date: 1596 an intensely fought battle in which the opposing forces are locked in close combat
pitcher
I. noun Etymology: Middle English picher, from Anglo-French, from Medieval Latin bicarius drinking cup Date: 13th century 1. a container for holding and pouring liquids that ...
pitcher plant
noun Date: 1819 a plant (especially family Sarraceniaceae, the pitcher-plant family) with leaves modified into pitchers in which insects are trapped and digested by means of ...
pitcherful
noun see pitcher I
pitchfork
noun Date: 13th century a long-handled fork that has two or three long somewhat curved prongs and is used especially in pitching hay • pitchfork transitive verb
pitchman
noun Date: circa 1926 a man who makes a sales pitch: as a. one who sells merchandise on the streets or from a concession b. one who does radio or TV commercials
pitchout
noun Date: 1912 1. a pitch in baseball deliberately out of reach of the batter to enable the catcher to put out a base runner especially with a throw 2. a lateral pass in ...
pitchpole
verb Etymology: pitchpole somersault, from 3pitch + pole, poll head Date: 1851 intransitive verb to turn end over end transitive verb to cause to turn end over end
pitchwoman
noun Date: 1957 a woman who makes a sales pitch
pitchy
adjective Date: 15th century 1. a. full of pitch ; tarry b. of, relating to, or having the qualities of pitch 2. pitch-black
piteous
adjective Date: 14th century of a kind to move to pity or compassion • piteously adverb • piteousness noun
piteously
adverb see piteous
piteousness
noun see piteous
Pitesti
geographical name city S central Romania population 162,395
pitfall
noun Date: 14th century 1. trap, snare; specifically a pit flimsily covered or camouflaged and used to capture and hold animals or men 2. a hidden or not easily recognized ...
pith
I. noun Etymology: Middle English, from Old English pitha; akin to Middle Dutch & Middle Low German pit pith, pit Date: before 12th century 1. a. a usually continuous ...
pith helmet
noun Date: 1889 topee
pith ray
noun Date: 1902 medullary ray
pithead
noun Date: 1839 chiefly British the top of a mining pit or coal shaft; also the immediately adjacent ground and buildings
pithily
adverb see pithy
pithiness
noun see pithy
pithy
adjective (pithier; -est) Date: 1562 1. consisting of or abounding in pith 2. having substance and point ; tersely cogent Synonyms: see concise • pithily adverb • ...
pitiable
adjective Date: 15th century 1. deserving or exciting pity ; lamentable 2. of a kind to evoke mingled pity and contempt especially because of inadequacy Synonyms: see ...
pitiableness
noun see pitiable
pitiably
adverb see pitiable
pitier
noun Date: 1601 one that pities
pitiful
adjective Date: 14th century 1. archaic full of pity ; compassionate 2. a. deserving or arousing pity or commiseration b. exciting pitying contempt (as by meanness or ...
pitifully
adverb see pitiful
pitifulness
noun see pitiful
pitiless
adjective Date: 15th century devoid of pity ; harsh, cruel • pitilessly adverb • pitilessness noun
pitilessly
adverb see pitiless
pitilessness
noun see pitiless
pitman
noun Date: 1703 1. plural pitmen a man who works in or near a pit: as a. British miner b. a sawyer who stands below the timber 2. plural pitmans connecting rod
Pitman
biographical name Sir Isaac 1813-1897 English phonographer
piton
noun Etymology: French Date: 1893 a spike, wedge, or peg that is driven into a rock or ice surface as a support (as for a mountain climber)
pitot tube
noun Usage: often capitalized P Etymology: French (tube de) Pitot, from Henri Pitot died 1771 French physicist Date: circa 1859 1. a device that consists of a tube having a ...
pitot-static tube
noun Usage: often capitalized P Date: 1926 a device that consists of a pitot tube and a static tube and that measures pressures in such a way that the relative speed of a ...
Pitt
I. biographical name William 1708-1778 Earl of Chatham; the Elder Pitt British statesman II. biographical name William 1759-1806 the Younger Pitt; son of preceding British ...
Pitt-Rivers
biographical name Augustus Henry 1827-1900 English archaeologist
pittance
noun Etymology: Middle English pitance, from Anglo-French, piety, pity, dole, portion, from Medieval Latin pietantia, from pietant-, pietans, present participle of pietari to be ...
pitted
adjective Date: before 12th century marked with pits
pitter-patter
noun Etymology: reduplication of 4patter Date: 15th century a rapid succession of light sounds or beats ; patter • pitter-patter adverb or adjective • pitter-patter ...
pitting
noun Date: 1665 1. an arrangement of pits 2. the action or process of forming pits 3. the bringing of gamecocks together to fight
pittosporum
noun Etymology: New Latin, from Greek pitta, pissa pitch + spora seed — more at pitch, spore Date: 1789 any of various Old World shrubs or trees (genus Pittosporum of the ...
Pittsburg
geographical name city W California NE of Oakland on San Joaquin River population 56,769
Pittsburgh
geographical name city SW Pennsylvania at confluence of the Allegheny & the Monongahela where they form the Ohio population 334,563 • Pittsburgher noun
Pittsburgher
noun see Pittsburgh
Pittsfield
geographical name city W Massachusetts population 45,793
pituitary
I. adjective Etymology: Latin pituita phlegm; from the former belief that the pituitary gland secreted phlegm — more at pip Date: 1615 1. of or relating to the pituitary ...
pituitary body
noun see pituitary gland
pituitary gland
noun Date: 1825 a small oval endocrine organ that is attached to the infundibulum of the brain, consists of an epithelial anterior lobe joined by an intermediate part to a ...
pity
I. noun (plural pities) Etymology: Middle English pite, from Anglo-French pité, from Latin pietat-, pietas piety, pity, from pius pious Date: 13th century 1. a. ...
pitying
adjective Date: 1589 expressing or feeling pity • pityingly adverb
pityingly
adverb see pitying
pityriasis
noun Etymology: New Latin, from Greek, from pityron scurf Date: circa 1693 any of various skin conditions of humans or domestic animals marked by dry scaling patches of skin
più
adverb Etymology: Italian, from Latin plus Date: 1724 more — used to qualify an adverb or adjective used as a direction in music
Pius
biographical name name of 12 popes: especially II (Enea Silvio Piccolomini or Aeneas Silvius or Sylvius ) 1405-1464 (pope 1458-64); VII 1742-1823 (pope 1800-23); IX ...
Piute
variant of Paiute
pivot
I. noun Etymology: French Date: 1611 1. a shaft or pin on which something turns 2. a. a person, thing, or factor having a major or central role, function, or effect b. ...
pivot crown
noun see pivot tooth
pivot tooth
noun Date: 1842 an artificial crown attached to the root of a tooth by a usually metallic pin — called also pivot crown
pivotable
adjective see pivot III
pivotal
adjective Date: 1844 1. of, relating to, or constituting a pivot 2. vitally important ; critical • pivotally adverb
pivotally
adverb see pivotal
pivotman
noun Date: circa 1814 one who plays the pivot; specifically a center on a basketball team
pix
plural of pic
pixel
noun Etymology: pix + element Date: 1969 1. any of the small discrete elements that together constitute an image (as on a television or computer screen) 2. any of the ...
pixie
I. noun also pixy (plural pixies) Etymology: origin unknown Date: circa 1630 1. fairy; specifically a cheerful mischievous sprite 2. a usually petite vivacious woman or ...
pixieish
adjective see pixie I
pixilated
also pixillated adjective Etymology: irregular from pixie Date: 1848 1. somewhat unbalanced mentally; also bemused 2. whimsical • pixilation noun
pixilation
noun see pixilated
pixillated
adjective see pixilated
pixiness
noun see pixie II
pixy
I. noun see pixie I II. adjective see pixie II
Piz Bernina
geographical name — see Bernina
Pizarro
biographical name Francisco circa 1475-1541 Spanish conquistador
pizazz
noun see pizzazz
pizazzy
adjective see pizzazz
pizz
abbreviation pizzicato
pizza
noun Etymology: Italian, perhaps of Germanic origin; akin to Old High German bizzo, pizzo bite, bit, bīzan to bite — more at bite Date: 1845 a dish made typically of ...
pizza pie
noun see pizza
pizzalike
adjective see pizza
pizzazz
or pizazz noun Etymology: origin unknown Date: 1937 the quality of being exciting or attractive: as a. glamour b. vitality • pizzazzy or pizazzy adjective
pizzazzy
adjective see pizzazz
pizzeria
noun Etymology: Italian, from pizza Date: circa 1912 an establishment where pizzas are made or sold
pizzicato
I. noun (plural pizzicati) Date: 1845 a note or passage played by plucking strings II. adverb or adjective Etymology: Italian, past participle of pizzicare to pluck Date: ...
pizzle
noun Etymology: probably from Dutch dialect pezel; akin to Low German pesel pizzle Date: 1523 1. the penis of an animal 2. a whip made of a bull's pizzle
Piłsudski
biographical name Józef Klemens 1867-1935 Polish general & statesman
pj's
noun plural Etymology: pajamas Date: 1951 pajamas
pk
abbreviation 1. park 2. peak 3. peck 4. pike
PK
I. noun Date: 1943 psychokinesis II. abbreviation preacher's kid
pkg
abbreviation package
pkt
abbreviation packet
PKU
abbreviation phenylketonuria
pkwy
abbreviation parkway
pl
abbreviation 1. place 2. plate
PL
abbreviation 1. private line 2. public law 3. public library
placability
noun see placable
placable
adjective Date: 1586 easily placated ; tolerant, tractable • placability noun • placably adverb
placably
adverb see placable
placard
I. noun Etymology: Middle English placquart formal document, from Middle French placard, from plaquer to make adhere, plate — more at plaque Date: 1560 1. a notice posted ...
placate
transitive verb (placated; placating) Etymology: Latin placatus, past participle of placare — more at please Date: 1678 to soothe or mollify especially by concessions ; ...
placater
noun see placate
placatingly
adverb see placate
placation
noun see placate
placative
adjective see placate
placatory
adjective see placate
place
I. noun Etymology: Middle English, from Anglo-French, open space, from Latin platea broad street, from Greek plateia (hodos), from feminine of platys broad, flat; akin to ...
place aux dames
foreign term Etymology: French (make) room for the ladies
place mat
noun Date: 1928 a small often rectangular table mat on which a place setting is laid
place setting
noun Date: 1944 a set of dishes and flatware constituting a table service for one person
place value
noun Date: 1911 the value of the place of a digit in a numeral
place-name
noun Date: 1868 the name of a geographic locality
placeable
adjective see place II
placebo
noun (plural -bos) Etymology: Latin, I shall please Date: 1785 1. a. a usually pharmacologically inert preparation prescribed more for the mental relief of the patient ...
placebo effect
noun Date: 1950 improvement in the condition of a patient that occurs in response to treatment but cannot be considered due to the specific treatment used
placeholder
noun Date: 1958 a symbol in a mathematical or logical expression that may be replaced by the name of any element of a set
placekick
I. noun Date: 1856 the kicking of a ball (as a football) placed or held in a stationary position on the ground II. transitive verb Date: 1856 1. to kick (a ball) from a ...
placekicker
noun see placekick II
placeless
adjective Date: 14th century 1. lacking a fixed location 2. indistinguishable from other such places in appearance or character • placelessly adverb • placelessness ...
placelessly
adverb see placeless
placelessness
noun see placeless
placeman
noun Date: 1741 a political appointee to a public office especially in 18th century Britain
placement
noun Date: 1844 1. an act or instance of placing: as a. an accurately hit ball (as in tennis) that an opponent cannot return b. the assignment of a person to a suitable ...
placement test
noun Date: 1928 a test usually given to a student entering an educational institution to determine specific knowledge or proficiency in various subjects for the purpose of ...
placenta
noun (plural -centas or placentae) Etymology: New Latin, from Latin, flat cake, from Greek plakoenta, accusative of plakoeis, from plak-, plax flat surface — more at fluke ...
placental
I. adjective Date: 1791 1. of, relating to, having, or occurring by means of a placenta 2. eutherian II. noun Date: 1839 a placental mammal ; eutherian
placentation
noun Date: 1760 1. the arrangement of placentas and ovules in a plant ovary 2. a. the development of the placenta and attachment of the fetus to the uterus during ...
Placentia
geographical name city SW California population 46,488
Placentia Bay
geographical name inlet of the Atlantic E Canada in SE Newfoundland
placer
I. noun Date: 1579 one that places: as a. one that deposits or arranges b. one of the winners in a competition II. noun Usage: often attributive Etymology: Spanish, ...
placid
adjective Etymology: Latin placidus, from placēre to please — more at please Date: 1626 serenely free of interruption or disturbance ; also complacent 1 Synonyms: see ...
Placid, Lake
geographical name lake 5 miles (8 kilometers) long NE New York in the Adirondacks
placidity
noun see placid
placidly
adverb see placid
placidness
noun see placid
placket
noun Etymology: origin unknown Date: 1605 1. a. a slit in a garment (as a skirt) often forming the closure b. archaic a pocket especially in a woman's skirt 2. archaic ...
placoderm
noun Etymology: New Latin Placodermi, ultimately from Greek plak-, plax + derma skin — more at derm- Date: circa 1865 any of a class (Placodermi) of extinct chiefly ...
placoid
adjective Etymology: Greek plak-, plax flat surface Date: 1842 of, relating to, or being a scale of dermal origin with an enamel-tipped spine characteristic of the ...
plagal
adjective Etymology: Medieval Latin plagalis, ultimately from Greek plagios oblique, sideways, from plagos side; akin to Latin plaga net, region, Greek pelagos sea Date: 1597 ...
plage
noun Etymology: French, beach, luminous surface, from Italian piaggia beach, from Late Latin plagia, from Greek plagios oblique Date: 1888 1. the beach of a seaside resort ...
plagiarise
British variant of plagiarize
plagiarism
noun Date: 1621 1. an act or instance of plagiarizing 2. something plagiarized • plagiarist noun • plagiaristic adjective
plagiarist
noun see plagiarism
plagiaristic
adjective see plagiarism
plagiarize
verb (-rized; -rizing) Etymology: plagiary Date: 1716 transitive verb to steal and pass off (the ideas or words of another) as one's own ; use (another's production) ...
plagiarizer
noun see plagiarize
plagiary
noun (plural -ries) Etymology: Latin plagiarius, literally, kidnapper, from plagium netting of game, kidnapping, from plaga net, trap Date: 1601 1. archaic one that ...
plagioclase
noun Etymology: Greek plagios oblique + klasis breaking, from klan to break — more at clast Date: circa 1868 a triclinic feldspar; especially one having calcium or sodium ...
plagiotropic
adjective Etymology: Greek plagios + International Scientific Vocabulary -tropic Date: 1898 having the longer axis inclined away from the vertical
plague
I. noun Etymology: Middle English plage, from Late Latin plaga, from Latin, blow; akin to Latin plangere to strike — more at plaint Date: 14th century 1. a. a disastrous ...
plaguer
noun see plague II
plaguey
also plaguy adjective Date: 1615 causing irritation or annoyance ; troublesome • plaguey adverb • plaguily adverb
plaguily
adverb see plaguey
plaguy
adjective see plaguey
plaice
noun (plural plaice) Etymology: Middle English, from Anglo-French plais, from Late Latin platessa Date: 14th century any of various flatfishes; especially a large European ...
plaid
noun Etymology: Scottish Gaelic plaide Date: 1512 1. a rectangular length of tartan worn over the left shoulder as part of the Scottish national costume 2. a. a ...
plaided
adjective see plaid
plain
I. intransitive verb Etymology: Middle English, from Anglo-French pleindre, plaindre, from Latin plangere to lament — more at plaint Date: 14th century archaic ...
plain Jane
noun Date: 1912 one that is plain
Plain People
noun Date: 1904 members of any of various Protestant groups (as Mennonites) especially in the United States who wear distinctively plain clothes and adhere to a simple and ...
plain sailing
noun Date: 1756 easy progress over an unobstructed course
plain weave
noun Date: 1888 a weave in which the threads interlace alternately
plain-Jane
adjective Etymology: from the name Jane Date: 1936 not fancy or glamorous ; ordinary
plain-laid
adjective Date: 1881 of a rope consisting of three strands laid right-handed — compare cable-laid
plain-vanilla
adjective Date: 1975 lacking special features or qualities ; basic
plain-woven
adjective Date: 1879 made in plain weave
plainchant
noun Etymology: French plain-chant, literally, plain song Date: circa 1741 plainsong
plainclothes
adjective Date: 1866 dressed in civilian clothes while on duty — used especially of a police officer
plainclothesman
noun Date: 1899 a plainclothes police officer
Plainfield
geographical name city NE New Jersey population 47,829
plainly
adverb see plain III
plainness
noun see plain III
Plains
adjective Date: 1844 of or relating to North American Indians of the Great Plains or to their culture
Plains of Abraham
geographical name plateau Canada in W part of city of Quebec
plainsman
noun Etymology: Great Plains + man Date: 1870 an inhabitant of the plains
plainsong
noun Date: 1513 a monophonic rhythmically free liturgical chant of any of various Christian rites; especially Gregorian chant
plainspoken
adjective Date: 1678 candid, frank • plainspokenness noun
plainspokenness
noun see plainspoken
plaint
noun Etymology: Middle English, from Anglo-French, from Latin planctus, from plangere to strike, beat one's breast, lament; akin to Old High German fluokhōn to curse, Greek ...
plaintext
noun Date: 1918 the intelligible form of an encrypted text or of its elements — compare ciphertext
plaintiff
noun Etymology: Middle English plaintif, from Anglo-French, from pleintif, adjective Date: 14th century a person who brings a legal action — compare defendant
plaintive
adjective Etymology: Middle English plaintif grieving, from Anglo-French pleintif, plaintif, from plaint Date: 1579 expressive of suffering or woe ; melancholy • ...
plaintively
adverb see plaintive
plaintiveness
noun see plaintive
plait
I. noun Etymology: Middle English pleit, from Anglo-French pleit, plei, pli, from Vulgar Latin *plicitum, from neuter of Latin plicitus, past participle of plicare to fold — ...
plaiter
noun see plait II
plaiting
noun Date: 15th century the interlacing of strands ; braiding
plan
I. noun Etymology: French, plane, foundation, ground plan; partly from Latin planum level ground, from neuter of planus level; partly from French planter to plant, fix in place, ...
plan position indicator
noun Date: 1932 a radarscope having a sweep synchronized with a usually rotating antenna so that the radar return can be used to find range and bearing
plan-
or plano- combining form Etymology: Latin planus 1. flat 2. flat and
planar
adjective Date: 1850 1. of, relating to, or lying in a plane 2. two-dimensional in quality • planarity noun
planaria
noun (plural -ia; also -ias) Etymology: New Latin, from feminine of Late Latin planarius lying on a plane, from Latin planum plane Date: 1855 any of a genus (Planaria) of ...
planarian
noun Etymology: New Latin Planaria Date: circa 1858 triclad; especially any of various dark-colored freshwater triclad flatworms (family Planariidae) with two eyespots and ...
planarity
noun see planar
planation
noun Date: 1877 the condition or process of becoming flattened
planchet
noun Etymology: diminutive of planch flat plate, from Middle French planche Date: 1611 1. a metal disk to be stamped as a coin 2. a small metal or plastic disk
planchette
noun Etymology: French, from Old French, diminutive of planche plank, from Latin planca Date: 1860 a small triangular or heart-shaped board supported on casters at two ...
Planck
biographical name Max Karl Ernst Ludwig 1858-1947 German physicist
Planck's constant
noun Etymology: Max K. E. L. Planck Date: 1910 a constant that gives the unvarying ratio of the energy of a quantum of radiation to its frequency and that has an approximate ...
plane
I. verb (planed; planing) Etymology: Middle English, from Anglo-French planer, from Late Latin planare, from Latin planus level — more at floor Date: 14th century transitive ...
plane angle
noun Date: 1570 an angle that for a given dihedral angle is formed by two intersecting lines each of which lies on a face of the dihedral angle and is perpendicular to the ...
plane geometry
noun Date: 1747 a branch of elementary geometry that deals with plane figures
plane of polarization
Date: 1831 the plane in which the magnetic-vibration component of plane-polarized electromagnetic radiation lies
plane table
noun Date: 1607 an instrument consisting essentially of a drawing board on a tripod with a ruler pointed at the object observed and used for plotting the lines of a survey ...
plane tree
noun see plane II
plane-polarized
adjective Date: circa 1853 vibrating in a single plane
planeload
noun Date: 1941 a load that fills an airplane
planer
noun see plane I
planer tree
noun Etymology: J. J. Planer died 1789 German botanist Date: circa 1810 a deciduous tree (Planera aquatica) of the elm family growing chiefly in wet southeastern United ...
planet
noun Etymology: Middle English planete, from Anglo-French, from Late Latin planeta, modification of Greek planēt-, planēs, literally, wanderer, from planasthai to wander — ...
planet wheel
noun Date: 1827 a gear wheel that revolves around the wheel with which it meshes in an epicyclic train
planet-stricken
or planet-struck adjective Date: 1599 1. archaic affected by the influence of a planet 2. archaic panic-stricken
planet-struck
adjective see planet-stricken
planetarium
noun (plural -iums or planetaria) Date: 1734 1. a model or representation of the solar system 2. a. an optical device for projecting various celestial images and ...
planetary
adjective Date: 1607 1. a. of, relating to, being, or resembling a planet b. erratic, wandering c. having a motion like that of a planet d. immense 2. a. ...
planetary nebula
noun Date: 1785 a usually compact luminous ring-shaped nebula that is composed of matter which has been ejected from a hot star at its center
planetary science
noun Date: 1969 planetology • planetary scientist noun
planetary scientist
noun see planetary science
planetesimal
noun Etymology: planet + -esimal (as in infinitesimal) Date: 1903 any of numerous small solid celestial bodies that may have existed at an early stage of the development of ...
planetesimal hypothesis
noun Date: 1904 a hypothesis in astronomy: the planets have evolved by aggregation from planetesimals
planetlike
adjective see planet
planetoid
noun Date: 1803 a small body resembling a planet; especially asteroid • planetoidal adjective
planetoidal
adjective see planetoid
planetological
adjective see planetology
planetologist
noun see planetology
planetology
noun (plural -gies) Date: 1907 a branch of astronomy that deals with the condensed matter of the solar system and especially with the planets and their moons • ...
planetwide
adjective Date: 1969 extending throughout or involving an entire planet
planform
noun Date: 1908 the contour of an object (as an airplane) or mass as viewed from above
plangency
noun Date: 1858 the quality or state of being plangent
plangent
adjective Etymology: Latin plangent-, plangens, present participle of plangere to strike, lament — more at plaint Date: 1858 1. having a loud reverberating sound 2. ...
plangently
adverb see plangent
planimeter
noun Etymology: French planimètre, from Latin planum plane + French -mètre -meter Date: circa 1858 an instrument for measuring the area of a plane figure by tracing its ...
planimetric
adjective Date: circa 1828 1. of, relating to, or made by means of a planimeter 2. of a map having no indications of relief • planimetrically adverb
planimetrically
adverb see planimetric
planing
adjective Date: 1919 having or being a hull designed to lift partially from the water's surface at high speeds
planish
transitive verb Etymology: Middle English planysshen, from Anglo-French planiss-, stem of planir to make smooth, from plain, plan level, from Latin planus — more at floor ...
planisher
noun see planish
planisphere
noun Etymology: alteration of Middle English planisperie, from Medieval Latin planisphaerium, from Latin planum plane + sphaera sphere Date: 1571 a representation of the ...
planispheric
adjective see planisphere
plank
I. noun Etymology: Middle English, from Anglo-French plaunke, planche, from Latin planca Date: 13th century 1. a. a heavy thick board; especially one 2 to 4 inches (5 to ...
planking
noun Date: 15th century 1. the act or process of covering or fitting with planks 2. a quantity of planks
plankter
noun Etymology: Greek planktēr wanderer, from plazesthai Date: 1935 a planktonic organism
plankton
noun Etymology: German, from Greek, neuter of planktos drifting, from plazesthai to wander, drift, middle voice of plazein to drive astray; akin to Latin plangere to strike — ...
planktonic
adjective see plankton
planless
adjective see plan I
planlessly
adverb see plan I
planlessness
noun see plan I
planner
noun see plan II
planning
noun Date: 1748 the act or process of making or carrying out plans; specifically the establishment of goals, policies, and procedures for a social or economic unit
Plano
geographical name city NE Texas N of Dallas population 222,030
plano-
— see plan-
plano-concave
adjective Date: 1693 flat on one side and concave on the other
plano-convex
adjective Date: 1665 flat on one side and convex on the other
planographic
adjective see planography
planography
noun Date: circa 1909 a process (as lithography) for printing from a plane surface • planographic adjective
plant
I. verb Etymology: Middle English, from Old English plantian, from Late Latin plantare to plant, fix in place, from Latin, to plant, from planta plant Date: before 12th ...
Plant City
geographical name city W central Florida E of Tampa population 29,915
plant food
noun Date: 1853 1. food 1b 2. fertilizer
plant hormone
noun Date: 1935 an organic substance other than a nutrient that in minute amounts modifies a plant physiological process; especially one produced by a plant and active ...
plant kingdom
noun Date: 1884 a basic group of natural objects that includes all living and extinct plants — compare animal kingdom, mineral kingdom
plant louse
noun Date: 1805 aphid; also any of various small insects (as a jumping plant louse) of similar habits

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