Слова на букву phyl-quin (6389) New Collegiate Dictionary
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Слова на букву phyl-quin (6389)

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pledger
noun see pledge II
pledget
noun Etymology: origin unknown Date: circa 1540 a compress or pad used to apply medication to or absorb discharges (as from a wound)
pledgor
noun see pledge II
pleiad
noun Etymology: French Pléiade, group of seven 16th century French poets, from Middle French, group of seven tragic poets of ancient Alexandria, from Greek Pleiad-, Pleias, ...
Pleiad
noun Date: 14th century any of the Pleiades
Pleiades
noun plural Etymology: Latin, from Greek Date: 14th century 1. the seven daughters of Atlas turned into a group of stars in Greek mythology 2. a conspicuous cluster of ...
plein air
adjective Etymology: French, open air Date: 1894 1. of or relating to painting in outdoor daylight 2. of or relating to a branch of impressionism that attempts to represent ...
pleinairism
noun see plein air
pleinairist
noun see plein air
pleio-
or pleo- or plio- combining form Etymology: Greek pleiōn, pleōn — more at plus more
pleiotropic
adjective Date: 1938 producing more than one effect; especially having multiple phenotypic expressions • pleiotropy noun
pleiotropy
noun see pleiotropic
Pleistocene
adjective Etymology: Greek pleistos most + International Scientific Vocabulary -cene; akin to Greek pleiōn more Date: 1839 of, relating to, or being the earlier epoch of the ...
Plekhanov
biographical name Georgy Valentinovich 1857-1918 Russian Marxist philosopher
plenary
adjective Etymology: Middle English, from Late Latin plenarius, from Latin plenus full — more at full Date: 15th century 1. complete in every respect ; absolute, ...
plenary indulgence
noun Date: 1648 a remission of the entire temporal punishment for sin
plenipotent
adjective Etymology: Late Latin plenipotent-, plenipotens, from Latin plenus + potent-, potens powerful — more at potent Date: 1658 plenipotentiary
plenipotentiary
I. adjective Etymology: Medieval Latin plenipotentiarius, adjective & noun, from Late Latin plenipotent-, plenipotens Date: circa 1645 1. invested with full power 2. of or ...
plenish
transitive verb Etymology: Middle English (Scots) plenyssen to fill up, from Anglo-French pleniss-, stem of plenir, from plein full, from Latin plenus Date: 1513 chiefly ...
plenitude
noun Etymology: Middle English plenitude, from Anglo-French or Latin; Anglo-French, from Latin plenitudo, from plenus Date: 15th century 1. the quality or state of being full ...
plenitudinous
adjective Etymology: Latin plenitudin-, plenitudo Date: 1895 characterized by plenitude
pleno jure
foreign term Etymology: Latin with full right
plenteous
adjective Etymology: Middle English plentevous, plenteous, from Anglo-French plentivus, from plentif abundant, from plenté plenty Date: 14th century 1. fruitful, productive ...
plenteously
adverb see plenteous
plenteousness
noun see plenteous
plentiful
adjective Date: 15th century 1. containing or yielding plenty 2. characterized by, constituting, or existing in plenty • plentifully adverb • plentifulness noun ...
plentifully
adverb see plentiful
plentifulness
noun see plentiful
plentitude
noun Etymology: by alteration (influenced by plenty) Date: 1615 plenitude
plenty
I. noun Etymology: Middle English plente, from Anglo-French plenté, from Late Latin plenitat-, plenitas, from Latin, fullness, from plenus full — more at full Date: 13th ...
Plenty, Bay of
geographical name inlet of the South Pacific N New Zealand on NE coast of North Island
plenum
noun Etymology: New Latin, from Latin, neuter of plenus Date: 1678 1. a. a space or all space every part of which is full of matter b. an air-filled space in a ...
pleo-
combining form see pleio-
pleochroic
adjective see pleochroism
pleochroism
noun Etymology: International Scientific Vocabulary pleochroic, from pleio- + Greek chrōs skin, color Date: 1857 the property of a crystal of showing different colors when ...
pleomorphic
adjective Date: 1886 able to assume different forms ; polymorphic • pleomorphism noun
pleomorphism
noun see pleomorphic
pleonasm
noun Etymology: Late Latin pleonasmus, from Greek pleonasmos, from pleonazein to be excessive, from pleiōn, pleōn more — more at plus Date: 1610 1. the use of more words ...
pleonastic
adjective see pleonasm
pleonastically
adverb see pleonasm
pleopod
noun Etymology: Greek plein to sail + English -o- + -pod; from its use in swimming — more at flow Date: 1888 an abdominal limb of a crustacean
plerocercoid
noun Etymology: Greek plērēs full + kerkos tail — more at full Date: 1906 the solid elongate infective larva of some tapeworms usually occurring in the muscles of fishes
plesiosaur
noun Etymology: ultimately from Greek plēsios close (akin to Greek pelas near) + sauros lizard Date: 1839 any of an order or suborder (Plesiosauria) of large carnivorous ...
plethora
noun Etymology: Medieval Latin, from Greek plēthōra, literally, fullness, from plēthein to be full — more at full Date: 1541 1. a bodily condition characterized by an ...
plethoric
adjective see plethora
plethysmogram
noun Date: 1894 a tracing made by a plethysmograph
plethysmograph
noun Etymology: International Scientific Vocabulary, from Greek plēthysmos increase, from plēthynein to increase, from plēthys mass, quantity, from plēthein Date: 1872 an ...
plethysmographic
adjective see plethysmograph
plethysmographically
adverb see plethysmograph
plethysmography
noun see plethysmograph
pleura
noun (plural pleurae or pleuras) Etymology: Middle English, from Medieval Latin, from Greek, rib, side Date: 15th century the delicate serous membrane that lines each half of ...
pleural
adjective see pleura
pleurisy
noun Etymology: Middle English pleuresi, from Anglo-French pleuresie, from Late Latin pleurisis, alteration of Latin pleuritis, from Greek, from pleura side Date: 14th century ...
pleuritic
adjective see pleurisy
pleuropneumonia
noun Etymology: New Latin Date: circa 1725 1. combined inflammation of the pleura and lungs 2. an acute febrile and often fatal respiratory disorder of cattle, goats, ...
pleuropneumonia-like organism
noun Date: 1935 mycoplasma
pleuston
noun Etymology: International Scientific Vocabulary pleus- (irregular from Greek plein to sail, float) + -on (as in plankton) Date: 1943 organisms living in the thin surface ...
pleustonic
adjective see pleuston
Pleven
I. biographical name René 1901-1993 French politician II. geographical name city NW Bulgaria population 138,323
plex
or 'plex noun Date: 1985 multiplex
plexiform
adjective Etymology: New Latin plexus + English -iform Date: circa 1828 of, relating to, or having the form or characteristics of a plexus
Plexiglas
trademark — used for acrylic plastic sheets
plexus
noun (plural plexuses) Etymology: New Latin, from Latin plectere to braid — more at ply Date: 1682 1. a network of anastomosing or interlacing blood vessels or nerves 2. ...
plf
abbreviation plaintiff
pliability
noun see pliable
pliable
adjective Etymology: Middle English, from Anglo-French, from plier to bend, fold — more at ply Date: 14th century 1. a. supple enough to bend freely or repeatedly ...
pliableness
noun see pliable
pliably
adverb see pliable
pliancy
noun Date: 1632 the quality or state of being pliant
pliant
adjective Date: 14th century 1. pliable 1a 2. easily influenced ; yielding 3. suitable for varied uses Synonyms: see plastic • pliantly adverb • pliantness noun
pliantly
adverb see pliant
pliantness
noun see pliant
plica
noun (plural plicae) Etymology: Medieval Latin, from Latin plicare to fold — more at ply Date: circa 1660 a fold or folded part; especially a groove or fold of skin
plicate
adjective Etymology: Latin plicatus, past participle of plicare Date: circa 1760 1. folded lengthwise like a fan 2. having the surface thrown up into or marked with ...
plication
noun Date: 14th century 1. the act or process of folding ; the state of being folded 2. fold
plié
noun Etymology: French, from past participle of plier to bend Date: 1892 a bending of the knees outward by a ballet dancer with the back held straight
pliers
noun plural but singular or plural in construction Etymology: 2ply Date: circa 1569 a small pincers for holding small objects or for bending and cutting wire
plight
I. transitive verb Etymology: Middle English, from Old English plihtan to endanger, from pliht danger; akin to Old English plēon to expose to danger, Old High German pflegan to ...
plighter
noun see plight I
plimsoll
noun Etymology: probably from the supposed resemblance of the upper edge of the shoe's mudguard to the Plimsoll mark on a ship Date: 1907 British sneaker 2
Plimsoll line
noun see Plimsoll mark
Plimsoll mark
noun Etymology: Samuel Plimsoll died 1898 English shipping reformer Date: 1884 a load line or a set of load-line markings on an oceangoing cargo ship — called also Plimsoll ...
plink
I. verb Etymology: imitative Date: 1941 intransitive verb 1. to make a tinkling sound 2. to shoot at random targets in an informal and noncompetitive manner transitive ...
plinker
noun see plink I
plinth
noun Etymology: Latin plinthus, from Greek plinthos Date: 1601 1. a. the lowest member of a base ; subbase b. a block upon which the moldings of an architrave or trim ...
Pliny
I. biographical name A.D. 23-79 Gaius Plinius Secundus; the Elder Roman scholar II. biographical name A.D. 61(or 62)-circa 113 Gaius Plinius Caecilius Secundus; the Younger; ...
plio-
— see pleio-
Pliocene
adjective Date: 1831 of, relating to, or being the latest epoch of the Tertiary or the corresponding series of rocks — see geologic time table • Pliocene noun
plique-à-jour
noun Etymology: French, literally, braid letting in daylight Date: 1878 a style of enameling in which usually transparent enamels are fused into the openings of a metal ...
pliskie
or plisky noun (plural pliskies) Etymology: origin unknown Date: 1706 chiefly Scottish practical joke, trick
plisky
noun see pliskie
plissé
or plisse noun Etymology: French plissé, from past participle of plisser to pleat, from Middle French, from pli fold, from plier to fold — more at ply Date: 1859 1. a ...
plisse
noun see plissé
PLO
abbreviation Palestine Liberation Organization
Plock
geographical name commune NE central Poland population 121,996
plod
verb (plodded; plodding) Etymology: origin unknown Date: 1562 intransitive verb 1. to work laboriously and monotonously ; drudge 2. a. to walk heavily or slowly ; ...
plodder
noun see plod
ploddingly
adverb see plod
Ploesti
geographical name see Ploiesti
ploidy
noun Etymology: from such words as diploidy, hexaploidy Date: 1939 degree of repetition of the basic number of chromosomes
Ploiesti
or Ploesti geographical name city SE central Romania population 247,502
plonk
I. variant of plunk II. noun Etymology: short for earlier plink-plonk, perhaps modification of French vin blanc white wine Date: 1930 chiefly British cheap or inferior ...
plop
verb (plopped; plopping) Etymology: imitative Date: 1821 intransitive verb 1. to fall, drop, or move suddenly with a sound like that of something dropping into water 2. ...
plosion
noun Date: 1899 explosion 3
plosive
noun Etymology: short for explosive Date: 1899 stop 9 • plosive adjective
plot
I. noun Etymology: Middle English, from Old English Date: before 12th century 1. a. a small area of planted ground b. a small piece of land in a cemetery c. a ...
Plotinian
adjective see Plotinus
Plotinus
biographical name A.D. 205-270 Roman (Egyptian-born) philosopher • Plotinian adjective
plotless
adjective see plot I
plotlessness
noun see plot I
plotline
noun Date: 1952 plot 3
plottage
noun Date: 1936 the area included in a plot of land
plotter
noun Date: 1588 one that plots: as a. a person who schemes or conspires b. a contriver of a literary plot c. a device for plotting; specifically an instrument that ...
plottiness
noun see plotty
plotty
adjective (plottier; -est) Date: 1897 marked by intricacy of plot or intrigue • plottiness noun
plough
chiefly British variant of plow
ploughman's lunch
noun Date: 1944 a cold lunch served especially in an English pub typically including bread, cheese, and pickled onions
Plovdiv
or Greek Philippopolis geographical name city S Bulgaria on the Maritsa N of the Rhodope Mountains population 379,083
plover
noun (plural plover or plovers) Etymology: Middle English, from Anglo-French plover, pluvier, from Vulgar Latin *pluviarius, from Latin pluvia rain — more at pluvial Date: ...
plow
I. noun Etymology: Middle English, from Old English plōh hide of land; akin to Old High German pfluog plow Date: 12th century 1. an implement used to cut, lift, and turn ...
plow back
transitive verb Date: 1930 to reinvest (profits) in a business • plowback noun
plow under
transitive verb Date: 1900 to cause to disappear ; bury, overwhelm
plowable
adjective see plow II
plowback
noun see plow back
plowboy
noun Date: 1569 1. a boy who leads the team drawing a plow 2. a country youth
plower
noun see plow II
plowman
noun Date: 13th century 1. a man who guides a plow 2. a farm laborer
plowshare
noun Etymology: Middle English ploughshare, from plough plow + schare plowshare — more at share Date: 14th century a part of a plow that cuts the furrow
ploy
noun Etymology: probably from employ Date: 1697 1. escapade, frolic 2. a. a tactic intended to embarrass or frustrate an opponent b. a devised or contrived move ; ...
pls
abbreviation please
PLSS
abbreviation portable life-support system
PLU
abbreviation price lookup
pluck
I. verb Etymology: Middle English, from Old English pluccian; akin to Middle High German pflücken to pluck Date: before 12th century transitive verb 1. to pull or pick off ...
plucker
noun see pluck I
pluckily
adverb see plucky
pluckiness
noun see plucky
plucky
adjective (pluckier; -est) Date: 1840 spirited, brave • pluckily adverb • pluckiness noun
plug
I. noun Etymology: Dutch, from Middle Dutch plugge; akin to Middle High German pfloc plug Date: 1606 1. a. a piece used to fill a hole ; stopper b. an obtruding or ...
plug and play
noun Date: 1993 a feature of a computer system by which peripherals are automatically detected and configured by the operating system • plug-and-play adjective
plug hat
noun Date: 1863 a man's stiff hat (as a bowler or top hat)
plug in
verb Date: 1893 intransitive verb to establish an electric circuit by inserting a plug transitive verb to attach or connect to an electric receptacle (as an outlet)
plug into
phrasal 1. to connect or become connected to by or as if by means of a plug 2. to load into as if by means of a plug
plug-and-play
adjective see plug and play
plug-in
I. adjective Date: 1922 designed to be connected to an electric circuit by plugging in II. noun Date: 1946 1. something that plugs in 2. a small piece of software ...
plug-ugly
noun Date: 1856 thug, tough; especially one hired to intimidate
plugged
adjective Date: 1694 1. of a coin altered by the insertion of a plug of base metal 2. closed by or as if by a plug ; obstructed
plugged-in
adjective Date: 1968 technologically or socially informed and connected
plugger
noun see plug II
plugola
noun Etymology: plug + -ola (as in payola) Date: 1959 incidental advertising on radio or television that is not purchased like regular advertising
plum
noun Usage: often attributive Etymology: Middle English, from Old English plūme, modification of Latin prunum plum, from Greek proumnon Date: before 12th century 1. a. ...
Plum
geographical name borough SW Pennsylvania population 26,940
plum pudding
noun Date: 1711 a rich boiled or steamed pudding containing fruits and spices
plum tomato
noun Date: circa 1900 a small oblong tomato
plumage
noun Etymology: Middle English, from Middle French, from Old French, from plume feather — more at plume Date: 14th century the feathers of a bird • plumaged adjective
plumaged
adjective see plumage
plumb
I. noun Etymology: Middle English, from Anglo-French plum, plomb, from Latin plumbum lead Date: 14th century a lead weight attached to a line and used to indicate a vertical ...
plumb bob
noun Date: circa 1840 the metal bob of a plumb line
plumb line
noun Date: 15th century 1. a line (as of cord) that has at one end a weight (as a plumb bob) and is used especially to determine verticality 2. a line directed to the ...
plumbago
noun (plural -gos) Etymology: Latin plumbagin-, plumbago galena, from plumbum Date: 1747 1. [New Latin, from Latin] any of a genus (Plumbago of the family Plumbaginaceae, the ...
plumber
noun Etymology: Middle English, from Anglo-French plummer, plomner, from Latin plumbarius, from plumbum Date: 15th century 1. a dealer or worker in lead 2. one who ...
plumber's friend
noun see plumber's helper
plumber's helper
noun Date: 1952 plunger d — called also plumber's friend
plumber's snake
noun Date: 1938 a long flexible rod or cable usually of steel that is used to free clogged pipes
plumbing
noun Date: 1666 1. the act of using a plumb 2. a plumber's occupation or trade 3. a. the apparatus (as pipes and fixtures) concerned in the distribution and use of ...
plumbism
noun Etymology: Latin plumbum lead Date: 1876 lead poisoning especially when chronic
plume
I. noun Etymology: Middle English, from Anglo-French, from Latin pluma small soft feather — more at fleece Date: 14th century 1. a feather of a bird: as a. a large ...
plumed
adjective Date: 15th century provided with or adorned with or as if with a plume — often used in combination
plumelet
noun Date: circa 1847 a small tuft or plume
plumeria
noun Etymology: New Latin, genus name, from Charles Plumier died 1704 French botanist Date: 1753 frangipani
plumlike
adjective see plum
plummet
I. noun Etymology: Middle English plomet, from Anglo-French plumet, plomet, from plum lead, lead weight — more at plumb Date: 14th century plumb; also plumb line II. ...
plummy
adjective (plummier; -est) Date: 1759 1. a. full of plums b. choice, desirable 2. a. having a plum color b. rich and mellow often to the point of ...
plumose
adjective Date: circa 1727 1. having feathers or plumes ; feathered 2. feathery
plump
I. verb Etymology: Middle English Date: 14th century intransitive verb 1. to drop, sink, or come in contact suddenly or heavily 2. to favor or decide in favor of ...
plumpen
verb Date: 1687 plump V
plumper
I. noun Etymology: 5plump Date: 1690 an object carried in the mouth to fill out the cheeks II. noun Etymology: 1plump Date: circa 1785 chiefly British a vote for only ...
plumpish
adjective see plump VI
plumply
I. adverb Date: 1611 in a plump way II. adverb Etymology: 3plump Date: 1786 in a wholehearted manner and without hesitation or circumlocution ; forthrightly
plumpness
I. noun Date: 1545 the quality or state of being plump II. noun Date: 1780 freedom from hesitation or circumlocution
plumule
noun Etymology: New Latin plumula, from Latin, diminutive of pluma small soft feather — more at fleece Date: circa 1741 1. the primary bud of a plant embryo usually ...
plumy
adjective (plumier; -est) Date: 1582 1. downy 2. having or resembling plumes
plunder
I. verb (plundered; plundering) Etymology: German plündern Date: 1632 transitive verb 1. a. to take the goods of by force (as in war) ; pillage, sack b. to take ...
plunderer
noun see plunder I
plunderous
adjective Date: 1845 given to plundering
plunge
I. verb (plunged; plunging) Etymology: Middle English, from Anglo-French plunger, from Vulgar Latin *plumbicare, from Latin plumbum lead Date: 14th century transitive verb ...
plunger
noun Date: 1611 one that plunges: as a. diver b. a reckless gambler or speculator c. (1) a sliding reciprocating piece driven by or against fluid pressure; ...
plunk
or plonk verb Etymology: imitative Date: 1805 transitive verb 1. to pluck or hit so as to produce a quick, hollow, metallic, or harsh sound 2. to set down suddenly ; ...
plunk down
verb Date: 1891 intransitive verb to drop abruptly ; settle into position transitive verb 1. a. to put down usually firmly or abruptly b. to settle (oneself) ...
plunker
noun see plunk
pluperfect
adjective Etymology: Middle English pluperfyth, modification of Late Latin plusquamperfectus, literally, more than perfect Date: 15th century 1. past perfect 2. utterly ...
plural
adjective Etymology: Middle English, from Anglo-French & Latin; Anglo-French plurel, from Latin pluralis, from plur-, plus more — more at plus Date: 14th century 1. of, ...
pluralism
noun Date: 1818 1. the holding of two or more offices or positions (as benefices) at the same time 2. the quality or state of being plural 3. a. a theory that there are ...
pluralist
adjective or noun see pluralism
pluralistic
adjective see pluralism
pluralistically
adverb see pluralism
plurality
noun (plural -ties) Date: 14th century 1. a. the state of being plural b. the state of being numerous c. a large number or quantity 2. pluralism 1; also a benefice ...
pluralization
noun see pluralize
pluralize
transitive verb (-ized; -izing) Date: 1803 to make plural or express in the plural form • pluralization noun
plurally
adverb see plural
pluripotent
adjective Etymology: Latin plur-, plus more + English potent Date: 1916 not fixed as to developmental potentialities; especially capable of differentiating into one of many ...
plus
I. adjective Etymology: Latin, adverb, more, from neuter of plur-, plus, adjective; akin to Greek pleion more, Latin plenus full — more at full Date: 1579 1. algebraically ...
plus ça change, plus c'est la même chose
foreign term Etymology: French the more that changes, the more it's the same thing — often shortened to plus ça change
plus fours
noun plural Date: 1920 loose sports knickers made four inches longer than ordinary knickers
plus or minus
I. adjective Date: 1926 indicating a quantity whose algebraically positive and negative values serve to bracket a range of values either alone or when added to and subtracted ...
plus royaliste que le roi
foreign term Etymology: French more royalist than the king
plus sign
noun Date: 1841 a sign + denoting addition or a positive quantity
plus/minus sign
noun Date: 1971 the sign ± used to indicate a quantity (as 2 in “the square root of 4 is ±2”) taking on both an algebraically positive value and its negative and to ...
plus/minus symbol
noun see plus/minus sign
plush
I. noun Etymology: Middle French peluche Date: 1594 a fabric with an even pile longer and less dense than velvet pile II. adjective Date: circa 1645 1. relating to, ...
plushiness
noun see plushy
plushly
adverb see plush II
plushness
noun see plush II
plushy
adjective (plushier; -est) Date: 1611 1. having the texture of or covered with plush 2. luxurious, showy • plushiness noun
plussage
noun Date: 1924 an amount over and above another amount
Plutarch
biographical name circa A.D. 46-after 119 Greek biographer & moralist • Plutarchan or Plutarchian adjective
Plutarchan
adjective see Plutarch
Plutarchian
adjective see Plutarch
Pluto
noun Etymology: Latin Pluton-, Pluto, from Greek Ploutōn Date: 14th century 1. the Greek god of the underworld — compare dis 2. [New Latin] the planet with the farthest ...
plutocracy
noun (plural -cies) Etymology: Greek ploutokratia, from ploutos wealth; akin to Greek plein to sail, float — more at flow Date: 1652 1. government by the wealthy 2. a ...
plutocrat
noun see plutocracy
plutocratic
adjective see plutocracy
plutocratically
adverb see plutocracy
pluton
noun Etymology: probably back-formation from plutonic Date: 1936 a typically large body of intrusive igneous rock
plutonian
adjective Usage: often capitalized Date: 1667 of, relating to, or characteristic of Pluto or the lower world ; infernal
plutonic
adjective Etymology: Latin Pluton-, Pluto Date: 1833 1. formed by solidification of magma deep within the earth and crystalline throughout 2. often capitalized ...
plutonium
noun Etymology: New Latin, from Pluton-, Pluto, the planet Pluto Date: 1942 a radioactive metallic element similar chemically to uranium that is formed as the isotope 239 by ...
pluvial
I. adjective Etymology: Latin pluvialis, from pluvia rain, from feminine of pluvius rainy, from pluere to rain — more at flow Date: circa 1656 1. a. of or relating to ...
ply
I. verb (plied; plying) Etymology: Middle English plien, short for applien to apply Date: 14th century transitive verb 1. a. to use or wield diligently b. to ...
Plymouth
geographical name 1. town SE Massachusetts population 51,701 2. city SE Minnesota NW of Minneapolis population 65,894 3. city & port SW England in Devon population 238,800
Plymouth Rock
noun Etymology: Plymouth Rock, on which the Pilgrims are supposed to have landed in 1620 Date: 1849 any of a United States breed of medium-sized single-combed domestic ...
plyometric
adjective see plyometrics
plyometrics
noun plural but singular or plural in construction Etymology: probably irregular from plio- + -metrics (as in isometrics) Date: 1981 exercise involving repeated rapid ...
plywood
noun Date: 1907 a structural material consisting of sheets of wood glued or cemented together with the grains of adjacent layers arranged at right angles or at a wide angle
Plzeň
geographical name city W Czech Republic in Bohemia WSW of Prague population 173,129
pm
abbreviation 1. phase modulation 2. premium
Pm
symbol promethium
PM
abbreviation 1. paymaster 2. permanent magnet 3. postmaster 4. post meridiem — often not cap and often punctuated 5. postmortem 6. prime minister 7. provost ...
pmk
abbreviation postmark
PMS
noun Date: 1976 premenstrual syndrome
pmt
abbreviation payment
PN
abbreviation promissory note
pneum-
or pneumo- combining form Etymology: New Latin, partly from Greek pneum- (from pneuma); partly from Greek pneumōn lung 1. air ; gas 2. lung 3. respiration 4. ...
pneuma
noun Etymology: Greek Date: 1884 soul, spirit
pneumat-
or pneumato- combining form Etymology: Greek, from pneumat-, pneuma 1. air ; vapor ; gas 2. respiration
pneumatic
adjective Etymology: Latin pneumaticus, from Greek pneumatikos, from pneumat-, pneuma air, breath, spirit, from pnein to breathe — more at sneeze Date: 1659 1. of, relating ...
pneumatically
adverb see pneumatic
pneumaticity
noun see pneumatic
pneumato-
combining form see pneumat-
pneumatology
noun Etymology: New Latin pneumatologia, from Greek pneumat-, pneuma + New Latin -logia -logy Date: 1678 the study of spiritual beings or phenomena
pneumatolytic
adjective Etymology: International Scientific Vocabulary Date: 1896 formed or forming by hot vapors or superheated liquids under pressure — used especially of minerals and ...
pneumatophore
noun Etymology: International Scientific Vocabulary Date: 1859 1. a muscular gas-containing sac that serves as a float on a siphonophore colony 2. a usually partially ...
pneumo-
combining form see pneum-
pneumococcal
adjective see pneumococcus
pneumococcus
noun (plural pneumococci) Etymology: New Latin Date: 1890 a bacterium (Streptococcus pneumoniae) that causes an acute pneumonia involving one or more lobes of the lung • ...
pneumoconiosis
noun (plural pneumoconioses) Etymology: New Latin, from pneum- + Greek konis dust — more at incinerate Date: 1881 a disease of the lungs caused by the habitual inhalation ...
Pneumocystis carinii pneumonia
noun Etymology: New Latin Pneumocystis carinii, species name Date: 1964 a pneumonia chiefly affecting immunocompromised individuals that is caused by a microorganism ...
pneumograph
noun Etymology: International Scientific Vocabulary Date: 1878 an instrument for recording thoracic movements or volume change during respiration
pneumonectomy
noun (plural -mies) Etymology: Greek pneumōn + International Scientific Vocabulary -ectomy Date: 1890 excision of an entire lung or of one or more lobes of a lung
pneumonia
noun Etymology: New Latin, from Greek, from pneumōn lung, alteration of pleumōn — more at pulmonary Date: 1603 a disease of the lungs characterized especially by ...
pneumonic
adjective Etymology: New Latin pneumonicus, from Greek pneumonikos, from pneumōn Date: 1675 1. of, relating to, or affecting the lungs ; pulmonic, pulmonary 2. of, ...
pneumonitis
noun Etymology: New Latin, from Greek pneumōn Date: circa 1834 inflammation of the lungs
pneumothorax
noun Etymology: New Latin Date: 1821 a condition in which air or other gas is present in the pleural cavity and which occurs spontaneously as a result of disease or injury ...
PnP
abbreviation plug and play
pnxt
abbreviation Etymology: Latin pinxit he painted it; she painted it
po
abbreviation Etymology: Latin per os by mouth; orally

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