Слова на букву quin-sask (6389) New Collegiate Dictionary
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Слова на букву quin-sask (6389)

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rescission
noun Etymology: Late Latin rescission-, rescissio, from Latin rescindere Date: 1651 an act of rescinding
rescissory
adjective Date: 1605 relating to, tending to, or having the effect of rescission
rescript
noun Etymology: Middle English rescripte, from Latin rescriptum, from neuter of rescriptus, past participle of rescribere to write in reply, from re- + scribere to write — ...
rescuable
adjective see rescue
rescue
transitive verb (rescued; rescuing) Etymology: Middle English rescouen, rescuen, from Anglo-French rescure, from re- + escure to shake off, from Latin excutere, from ex- + ...
rescue mission
noun Date: 1902 a city religious mission seeking to convert and rehabilitate the down-and-out
rescuer
noun see rescue
research
I. noun Etymology: Middle French recerche, from recercher to go about seeking, from Old French recerchier, from re- + cerchier, sercher to search — more at search Date: 1577 ...
researchable
adjective see research II
researcher
noun see research II
researchist
noun Date: 1923 one engaged in research
reseau
noun (plural reseaux) Etymology: French réseau, literally, network, from Old French resel, diminutive of rais net, from Latin retis, rete Date: 1578 1. a net ground or ...
resect
transitive verb Etymology: Latin resectus, past participle of resecare to cut off, from re- + secare to cut — more at saw Date: 1846 to perform resection on • ...
resectability
noun see resect
resectable
adjective see resect
resection
noun Date: 1775 the surgical removal of part of an organ or structure
reseda
noun Etymology: French réséda, from réséda, a mignonette Date: 1873 a grayish-green color
reseed
Date: 1888 transitive verb 1. to sow seed on again or anew 2. to maintain (itself) by self-sown seed intransitive verb to maintain itself by self-sown seed
resemblance
noun Date: 14th century 1. a. the quality or state of resembling; especially correspondence in appearance or superficial qualities b. a point of likeness ; similarity ...
resemblant
adjective Date: 14th century marked by or showing resemblance
resemble
transitive verb (resembled; resembling) Etymology: Middle English, from Anglo-French resembler, from re- + sembler to be like, seem, from Latin similare to copy, from similis ...
resend
transitive verb (resent; -sending) Date: 1534 to send again or back
resent
transitive verb Etymology: Middle French resentir to be emotionally sensible of, from Old French, from re- + sentir to feel, from Latin sentire — more at sense Date: 1596 ...
resentful
adjective Date: 1656 1. full of resentment ; inclined to resent 2. caused or marked by resentment • resentfully adverb • resentfulness noun
resentfully
adverb see resentful
resentfulness
noun see resentful
resentment
noun Date: 1619 a feeling of indignant displeasure or persistent ill will at something regarded as a wrong, insult, or injury Synonyms: see offense
reserpine
noun Etymology: German Reserpin, probably irregular from New Latin Rauwolfia serpentina, a species of rauwolfia Date: 1952 an alkaloid C33H40N2O9 extracted especially from ...
reservable
adjective see reserve I
reservation
noun Date: 15th century 1. an act of reserving something: as a. (1) the act or fact of a grantor's reserving some newly created thing out of the thing granted (2) ...
reservationist
noun see reservation
reserve
I. transitive verb (reserved; reserving) Etymology: Middle English, from Anglo-French reserver, from Latin reservare, literally, to keep back, from re- + servare to keep — ...
reserve bank
noun Date: 1905 a central bank holding reserves of other banks
reserve clause
noun Date: 1890 a clause formerly placed in a professional athlete's contract that reserved for the club the exclusive right automatically to renew the contract and that bound ...
reserve price
noun Date: 1919 a price announced at an auction as the lowest that will be considered
reserved
adjective Date: 1601 1. restrained in words and actions 2. kept or set apart or aside for future or special use Synonyms: see silent • reservedly adverb • ...
reserved power
noun Date: 1838 a political power reserved by a constitution to the exclusive jurisdiction of a specified political authority
reservedly
adverb see reserved
reservedness
noun see reserved
reservist
noun Date: 1876 a member of a military reserve
reservoir
noun Etymology: French réservoir, from Middle French, from reserver Date: 1690 1. a place where something is kept in store: as a. an artificial lake where water is ...
reset
transitive verb (-set; -setting) Date: 1628 1. to set again or anew 2. to change the reading of often to zero • reset noun • resettable adjective
resettable
adjective see reset
resh
noun Etymology: Hebrew rēsh Date: circa 1823 the 20th letter of the Hebrew alphabet — see alphabet table
reshape
transitive verb Date: 1827 to give a new form or orientation to ; reorganize • reshaper noun
reshaper
noun see reshape
reshuffle
transitive verb Date: 1830 1. to shuffle (as cards) again 2. to reorganize usually by the redistribution of existing elements • reshuffle noun
resid
noun Date: 1967 residual oil
reside
intransitive verb (resided; residing) Etymology: Middle English, from Middle French or Latin; Middle French resider, from Latin residēre to sit back, remain, abide, from re- + ...
residence
noun Date: 14th century 1. a. the act or fact of dwelling in a place for some time b. the act or fact of living or regularly staying at or in some place for the ...
residence time
noun Date: 1954 the duration of persistence of a mass or substance in a medium or place (as the atmosphere)
residency
noun (plural -cies) Date: 1579 1. a. a usually official place of residence b. a state or period of residence ; also residence 2c 2. a territory in a protected state ...
resident
I. adjective Etymology: Middle English, from Anglo-French, from Latin resident-, residens, present participle of residēre Date: 14th century 1. a. living in a place for ...
resident commissioner
noun Date: 1902 1. a nonvoting representative of a dependency in the United States House of Representatives 2. a resident administrator in a British colony or possession
residential
adjective Date: 1654 1. a. used as a residence or by residents b. providing living accommodations for students 2. restricted to or occupied by residences 3. of ...
residential college
noun Date: 1991 college 3a
residentially
adverb see residential
resider
noun see reside
residual
I. noun Etymology: Latin residuum residue Date: 1557 1. remainder, residuum: as a. the difference between results obtained by observation and by computation from a formula ...
residual oil
noun Date: circa 1948 fuel oil that remains after the removal of valuable distillates (as gasoline) from petroleum and that is used especially by industry — called also resid
residual power
noun Date: 1919 power held to remain at the disposal of a governmental authority after an enumeration or delegation of specified powers to other authorities
residually
adverb see residual II
residuary
adjective Date: 1726 of, relating to, or constituting a residue
residue
noun Etymology: Middle English, from Anglo-French, from Latin residuum, from neuter of residuus left over, from residēre to remain Date: 14th century something that remains ...
residue class
noun Date: 1948 the set of elements (as integers) that leave the same remainder when divided by a given modulus
residuum
noun (plural residua) Etymology: Latin Date: 1672 something residual: as a. residue a b. a residual product (as from the distillation of petroleum)
resign
verb Etymology: Middle English, from Anglo-French resigner, from Latin resignare, literally, to unseal, cancel, from re- + signare to sign, seal — more at sign Date: 14th ...
resignation
noun Date: 14th century 1. a. an act or instance of resigning something ; surrender b. a formal notification of resigning 2. the quality or state of being resigned ; ...
resignedly
adverb see resign
resignedness
noun see resign
resigner
noun see resign
resile
intransitive verb (resiled; resiling) Etymology: Late Latin & Latin; Late Latin resilire to withdraw, from Latin, to recoil Date: 1529 recoil, retract; especially to return ...
resilience
noun Date: 1824 1. the capability of a strained body to recover its size and shape after deformation caused especially by compressive stress 2. an ability to recover from or ...
resiliency
noun Date: circa 1836 resilience
resilient
adjective Etymology: Latin resilient-, resiliens, present participle of resilire to jump back, recoil, from re- + salire to leap — more at sally Date: 1674 characterized or ...
resiliently
adverb see resilient
resin
I. noun Etymology: Middle English, from Anglo-French reisine, from Latin resina; akin to Greek rhētinē pine resin Date: 14th century 1. a. any of various solid or ...
resin canal
noun Date: 1884 a tubular intercellular space in gymnosperms and some angiosperms that is lined with epithelial cells which secrete resin — called also resin duct
resin duct
noun see resin canal
resinate
transitive verb (-ated; -ating) Date: circa 1890 to impregnate or flavor with resin
resinoid
noun Date: 1880 gum resin
resinous
adjective see resin I
resist
I. verb Etymology: Middle English, from Anglo-French or Latin; Anglo-French resister, from Latin resistere, from re- + sistere to take a stand; akin to Latin stare to stand — ...
resistance
I. noun Date: 14th century 1. a. an act or instance of resisting ; opposition b. a means of resisting 2. the power or capacity to resist: as a. the inherent ability ...
resistant
I. adjective Date: 15th century giving, capable of, or exhibiting resistance — often used in combination II. noun Date: 1580 one that resists ; resister
resister
noun Date: 14th century one that resists; especially one who actively opposes the policies of a government
resistibility
noun Date: 1617 1. the quality or state of being resistible 2. ability to resist
resistible
adjective Date: 1608 capable of being resisted
resistive
adjective Date: 1603 marked by resistance — often used in combination • resistively adverb • resistiveness noun
resistively
adverb see resistive
resistiveness
noun see resistive
resistivity
noun (plural -ties) Date: 1885 1. the longitudinal electrical resistance of a uniform rod of unit length and unit cross-sectional area ; the reciprocal of conductivity 2. ...
resistless
adjective Date: 1586 1. too strong to be resisted 2. offering no resistance • resistlessly adverb • resistlessness noun
resistlessly
adverb see resistless
resistlessness
noun see resistless
resistor
noun Date: 1905 a device that has electrical resistance and that is used in an electric circuit for protection, operation, or current control
resitting
noun Date: 1661 a sitting (as of a legislature) for a second time ; another sitting
resmethrin
noun Etymology: res- (probably transposed from ester) + -methrin, blend of methyl and -ethrin (as in pyrethrin) Date: 1971 a nonpersistent synthetic insecticide C22H26O3 that ...
resoluble
adjective Etymology: Late Latin resolubilis, from Latin resolvere to resolve, unloose Date: 1602 capable of being resolved
resolute
I. adjective Etymology: Latin resolutus, past participle of resolvere Date: 1533 1. marked by firm determination ; resolved 2. bold, steady Synonyms: see faithful • ...
resolutely
adverb see resolute I
resoluteness
noun see resolute I
resolution
noun Etymology: Middle English resolucioun, from Anglo-French or Latin; Anglo-French resolucion, from Latin resolution-, resolutio, from resolvere Date: 14th century 1. the ...
resolvable
adjective see resolve I
resolve
I. verb (resolved; resolving) Etymology: Middle English, from Latin resolvere to unloose, dissolve, from re- + solvere to loosen, release — more at solve Date: 14th century ...
resolvent
noun Date: 1845 a means of solving something (as an equation) • resolvent adjective
resolver
noun see resolve I
resolving power
noun Date: 1879 1. the ability of an optical system to form distinguishable images of objects separated by small angular distances 2. the ability of a photographic film or ...
resonance
noun Etymology: Middle English resonaunce, from Middle French resonance, from resoner to resound — more at resound Date: 15th century 1. a. the quality or state of being ...
resonant
adjective Date: 1592 1. continuing to sound ; echoing 2. a. capable of inducing resonance b. relating to or exhibiting resonance 3. a. intensified and enriched by ...
resonantly
adverb see resonant
resonate
verb (-nated; -nating) Date: 1873 intransitive verb 1. to produce or exhibit resonance 2. to respond as if by resonance ; also to have a repetitive pattern that ...
resonator
noun Date: circa 1869 something that resounds or resonates: as a. a hollow metallic container for producing microwaves or a piezoelectric crystal put into oscillation by ...
resorb
verb Etymology: Latin resorbēre, from re- + sorbēre to suck up — more at absorb Date: 1640 transitive verb 1. to swallow or suck in again 2. to break down and ...
resorcin
noun Etymology: International Scientific Vocabulary res- (from Latin resina resin) + orcin, a phenol (C7H8O2) Date: circa 1868 resorcinol
resorcinol
noun Date: 1880 a crystalline phenol C6H6O2 obtained from various resins or artificially and used especially in making dyes, pharmaceuticals, and resins
resorption
noun Etymology: Latin resorbēre Date: circa 1820 the action or process of resorbing something • resorptive adjective
resorptive
adjective see resorption
resort
I. noun Etymology: Middle English, return, source of aid, from Anglo-French, from resortir to rebound, resort, from re- + Old French sortir to go out, leave Date: 14th century ...
resorter
noun Date: 1917 a frequenter of resorts
resound
verb Etymology: Middle English resounen, from Middle French resoner, from Latin resonare, from re- + sonare to sound — more at sound Date: 14th century intransitive verb ...
resounding
adjective Date: 15th century 1. producing or characterized by resonant sound ; resonating 2. a. impressively sonorous b. emphatic, unequivocal • resoundingly ...
resoundingly
adverb see resounding
resource
noun Etymology: French ressource, from Old French ressourse relief, resource, from resourdre to relieve, literally, to rise again, from Latin resurgere — more at resurrection ...
resourceful
adjective Date: 1851 able to meet situations ; capable of devising ways and means • resourcefully adverb • resourcefulness noun
resourcefully
adverb see resourceful
resourcefulness
noun see resourceful
respect
I. noun Etymology: Middle English, from Latin respectus, literally, act of looking back, from respicere to look back, regard, from re- + specere to look — more at spy Date: ...
respectability
noun see respectable I
respectable
I. adjective Date: 1599 1. worthy of respect ; estimable 2. decent or correct in character or behavior ; proper 3. a. fair in size or quantity b. moderately good ; ...
respectableness
noun see respectable I
respectably
adverb see respectable I
respecter
noun see respect II
respectful
adjective Date: 1687 marked by or showing respect or deference • respectfully adverb • respectfulness noun
respectfully
adverb see respectful
respectfulness
noun see respectful
respecting
preposition Date: circa 1611 1. in view of ; considering 2. with respect to ; concerning
respective
adjective Date: circa 1595 1. obsolete partial, discriminative 2. particular, separate • respectiveness noun
respectively
adverb Date: 1602 1. in particular ; separately 2. in the order given
respectiveness
noun see respective
respell
transitive verb Date: 1806 to spell again or in another way; especially to spell out according to a phonetic system • respelling noun
respelling
noun see respell
respice finem
foreign term Etymology: Latin look to the end ; consider the outcome
Respighi
biographical name Ottorino 1879-1936 Italian composer
respirable
adjective Date: 1779 fit for breathing; also capable of being taken in by breathing
respiration
noun Etymology: Middle English respiracioun, from Latin respiration-, respiratio, from respirare Date: 15th century 1. a. the placing of air or dissolved gases in intimate ...
respirator
noun Date: 1836 1. a device worn over the mouth and nose to protect the respiratory tract by filtering out dangerous substances (as dusts or fumes) from inhaled air 2. a ...
respiratory
adjective see respiration
respiratory distress syndrome
noun Date: 1964 a respiratory disorder chiefly of newborn premature infants that is characterized by deficiency of the surfactant coating the inner surface of the lungs ...
respiratory pigment
noun Date: 1888 any of various permanently or intermittently colored conjugated proteins and especially hemoglobin that function in the transfer of oxygen in cellular ...
respiratory quotient
noun Date: circa 1890 a ratio indicating the relation of the volume of carbon dioxide given off in respiration to that of the oxygen consumed
respiratory syncytial virus
noun Date: 1961 a paramyxovirus (species Human respiratory syncytial virus of the genus Pneumovirus) that is responsible for severe respiratory diseases (as bronchopneumonia ...
respiratory system
noun Date: 1888 a system of organs functioning in respiration and in humans consisting especially of the nose, nasal passages, pharynx, larynx, trachea, bronchi, and lungs
respire
verb (respired; respiring) Etymology: Middle English, from Latin respirare, from re- + spirare to blow, breathe Date: 15th century intransitive verb 1. breathe; ...
respirometer
noun Date: circa 1883 an instrument for studying the character and extent of respiration • respirometric adjective • respirometry noun
respirometric
adjective see respirometer
respirometry
noun see respirometer
respite
I. noun Etymology: Middle English respit, from Anglo-French, from Medieval Latin respectus, from Latin, act of looking back — more at respect Date: 13th century 1. a period ...
resplendence
noun Date: 15th century the quality or state of being resplendent ; splendor
resplendency
noun Date: circa 1611 resplendence
resplendent
adjective Etymology: Middle English, from Latin resplendent-, resplendens, present participle of resplendēre to shine back, from re- + splendēre to shine — more at splendid ...
resplendently
adverb see resplendent
respond
I. noun Etymology: Middle English respounde, literally, reply, from Anglo-French respuns, respunt response Date: 15th century an engaged pillar supporting an arch or closing ...
respondent
I. noun Etymology: Latin respondent-, respondens, present participle of respondēre Date: 1528 1. one who responds: as a. one who maintains a thesis in reply b. (1) ...
responder
noun see respond II
response
noun Etymology: Middle English & Latin; Middle English respounce, from Anglo-French respuns, respounce, from Latin responsum reply, from neuter of responsus, past participle of ...
responsibility
noun (plural -ties) Date: 1771 1. the quality or state of being responsible: as a. moral, legal, or mental accountability b. reliability, trustworthiness 2. something ...
responsible
adjective Etymology: Anglo-French responsable, from respuns Date: 1643 1. a. liable to be called on to answer b. (1) liable to be called to account as the primary ...
responsibleness
noun see responsible
responsibly
adverb see responsible
responsions
noun plural Etymology: Middle English responcioun response, sum to be paid, from Anglo-French or Medieval Latin; Anglo-French responsion, from Medieval Latin responsion-, ...
responsive
adjective Date: 15th century 1. giving response ; constituting a response ; answering 2. quick to respond or react appropriately or sympathetically ; sensitive 3. ...
responsively
adverb see responsive
responsiveness
noun see responsive
responsory
noun (plural -ries) Etymology: Middle English, from Medieval Latin responsorium, from Latin respondēre Date: 15th century a set of versicles and responses sung or said ...
responsum
noun (plural responsa) Etymology: New Latin, from Latin, reply, response Date: 1896 a written decision from a rabbinic authority in response to a submitted question or problem
ressentiment
noun Etymology: French, resentment, from ressentir to resent, from Middle French resentir — more at resent Date: 1941 deep-seated resentment, frustration, and hostility ...
rest
I. noun Etymology: Middle English, from Old English; akin to Old High German rasta rest and perhaps to Old High German ruowa calm Date: before 12th century 1. repose, sleep; ...
rest area
noun Date: 1971 an area adjacent to a highway at which restrooms and refreshments are usually available
rest home
noun Date: 1925 an establishment that provides housing and general care for the aged or the convalescent
rest house
noun Date: 1807 a building used for shelter by travelers
rest mass
noun Date: 1914 the mass of a body exclusive of additional mass the body acquires by its motion according to the theory of relativity
restart
Date: 1749 transitive verb 1. to start anew 2. to resume (as an activity) after interruption intransitive verb to resume operation • restart noun • restartable ...
restartable
adjective see restart
restate
transitive verb Date: circa 1713 to state again or in another way
restatement
noun Date: 1803 1. something that is restated 2. the act of restating
restaurant
noun Etymology: French, from present participle of restaurer to restore, from Latin restaurare Date: circa 1766 a business establishment where meals or refreshments may be ...
restauranteur
noun see restaurateur
restaurateur
also restauranteur noun Etymology: French restaurateur, from Late Latin restaurator restorer, from Latin restaurare Date: 1796 the operator or proprietor of a restaurant
rested
adjective Date: 15th century having had sufficient rest or sleep
restenosis
noun Etymology: New Latin Date: 1954 the reoccurrence of stenosis in a blood vessel or heart valve after it has been treated with apparent success
rester
noun see rest II
restful
adjective Date: 14th century 1. marked by, affording, or suggesting rest and repose 2. being at rest ; quiet Synonyms: see comfortable • restfully adverb • ...
restfully
adverb see restful
restfulness
noun see restful
resting
adjective Date: 14th century 1. being or characterized by dormancy ; quiescent 2. not undergoing or marked by division ; vegetative
restitute
verb (-tuted; -tuting) Etymology: Latin restitutus, past participle of restituere Date: circa 1500 transitive verb 1. to restore to a former state or position 2. give ...
restitution
noun Etymology: Middle English restitucioun, from Anglo-French, from Latin restitution-, restitutio, from restituere to restore, from re- + statuere to set up — more at ...
restive
adjective Etymology: Middle English restyf, from Anglo-French restif, from rester to stop, resist, remain Date: 15th century 1. stubbornly resisting control ; balky 2. ...
restively
adverb see restive
restiveness
noun see restive
restless
adjective Date: before 12th century 1. lacking or denying rest ; uneasy 2. continuously moving ; unquiet 3. characterized by or manifesting unrest especially of mind ...
restless leg syndrome
noun see restless legs syndrome
restless legs
noun see restless legs syndrome
restless legs syndrome
noun Date: 1976 a nervous disorder characterized by aching, crawling, or creeping sensations of the legs that occur especially at night usually when lying down (as before ...
restlessly
adverb see restless
restlessness
noun see restless
Reston
biographical name James Barrett 1909-1995 American journalist
restorable
adjective Date: circa 1611 fit for restoring or reclaiming
restoral
noun Date: circa 1611 restoration
restoration
noun Date: 14th century 1. an act of restoring or the condition of being restored: as a. a bringing back to a former position or condition ; reinstatement b. ...
restorative
I. adjective Date: 14th century of or relating to restoration; especially having power to restore II. noun Date: 15th century something that serves to restore to ...
restore
transitive verb (restored; restoring) Etymology: Middle English, from Anglo-French restorer, from Latin restaurare to renew, rebuild, alteration of instaurare to renew Date: ...
restorer
noun see restore
restrain
transitive verb Etymology: Middle English restraynen, from Anglo-French restreindre, from Latin restringere to restrain, restrict, from re- + stringere to bind tight — more at ...
restrainable
adjective see restrain
restrained
adjective Date: 14th century marked by restraint ; not excessive or extravagant • restrainedly adverb
restrainedly
adverb see restrained
restrainer
noun see restrain
restraining order
noun Date: circa 1876 1. a preliminary legal order sometimes issued to keep a situation unchanged pending decision upon an application for an injunction 2. a legal order ...
restraint
noun Etymology: Middle English, from Anglo-French restreinte, from restreindre Date: 15th century 1. a. an act of restraining ; the state of being restrained b. (1) ...
restrict
transitive verb Etymology: Latin restrictus, past participle of restringere Date: 1535 1. to confine within bounds ; restrain 2. to place under restrictions as to use or ...
restricted
adjective Date: 1585 subject or subjected to restriction: as a. not general ; limited b. available to the use of particular groups or specifically excluding others ...
restrictedly
adverb see restricted
restriction
noun Etymology: Middle English restriccioun, from Anglo-French restriction, from Late Latin restriction-, restrictio, from Latin restringere Date: 15th century 1. something ...
restriction endonuclease
noun see restriction enzyme
restriction enzyme
noun Date: 1965 any of various enzymes that cleave DNA into fragments at specific sites in the interior of the molecule — called also restriction endonuclease
restriction fragment length polymorphism
noun Date: 1982 variation in the length of a DNA fragment produced by a specific restriction enzyme acting on DNA from different individuals that usually results from a ...
restrictionism
noun Date: 1937 a policy or philosophy favoring restriction (as of trade or immigration) • restrictionist adjective or noun
restrictionist
adjective or noun see restrictionism
restrictive
adjective Date: 1579 1. a. of or relating to restriction b. serving or tending to restrict 2. limiting the reference of a modified word or phrase 3. prohibiting ...
restrictive clause
noun Date: circa 1895 a descriptive clause that is essential to the definiteness of the word it modifies (as that you ordered in “the book that you ordered is out of ...
restrictively
adverb see restrictive
restrictiveness
noun see restrictive
restrike
noun Date: 1868 a coin or medal struck from an original die at some time after the original issue
restroom
noun Date: 1899 a room or suite of rooms providing toilets and lavatories
restructure
Date: 1942 transitive verb to change the makeup, organization, or pattern of intransitive verb to restructure something
result
I. intransitive verb Etymology: Middle English, from Medieval Latin resultare, from Latin, to rebound, from re- + saltare to leap — more at saltation Date: 15th century 1. ...
resultant
I. adjective Date: 1639 derived from or resulting from something else • resultantly adverb II. noun Date: 1815 something that results ; outcome; specifically the ...
resultantly
adverb see resultant I
resultful
adjective see result II
resultless
adjective see result II
resume
verb (resumed; resuming) Etymology: Middle English, from Anglo-French or Latin; Anglo-French resumer, from Latin resumere, from re- + sumere to take up, take — more at ...
résumé
or resume; also resumé noun Etymology: French résumé, from past participle of résumer to resume, summarize, from Middle French resumer Date: 1804 1. summary 2. ...
resumé
noun see résumé
resumption
noun Etymology: Middle English, from Anglo-French or Late Latin; Anglo-French, from Late Latin resumption-, resumptio, from Latin resumere Date: 15th century 1. an act or ...
resupinate
adjective Etymology: Latin resupinatus, past participle of resupinare to bend back to a supine position, from re- + supinus supine Date: circa 1776 1. inverted in position ...
resurface
Date: 1889 transitive verb to provide with a new or fresh surface intransitive verb to come again to the surface (as of the water); broadly reappear • resurfacer ...
resurfacer
noun see resurface
resurgam
foreign term Etymology: Latin I shall rise again
resurge
intransitive verb (resurged; resurging) Etymology: Latin resurgere Date: 1575 to undergo a resurgence
resurgence
noun Date: circa 1834 a rising again into life, activity, or prominence ; renascence
resurgent
adjective Etymology: Latin resurgent-, resurgens, present participle of resurgere Date: 1805 undergoing or tending to produce resurgence
resurrect
transitive verb Etymology: back-formation from resurrection Date: 1772 1. to raise from the dead 2. to bring to view, attention, or use again
resurrection
noun Etymology: Middle English resurreccioun, from Anglo-French, from Late Latin resurrection-, resurrectio act of rising from the dead, from resurgere to rise from the dead, ...
resurrectional
adjective see resurrection
resurrectionist
noun Date: 1776 1. body snatcher 2. one who resurrects
resuscitate
verb (-tated; -tating) Etymology: Latin resuscitatus, past participle of resuscitare to reawaken, from re- + suscitare to rouse, from sub-, sus- up + citare to put in motion, ...
resuscitation
noun see resuscitate
resuscitative
adjective see resuscitate
resuscitator
noun Date: 1808 one that resuscitates; specifically an apparatus used to restore respiration (as to a partially asphyxiated person)
resveratrol
noun Etymology: origin unknown Date: 1991 a trihydroxy stilbene derivative C10H12O3 that is found in some plants, fruits, seeds, and grape-derived products (as red wine) ...
ret
I. verb (retted; retting) Etymology: Middle English, from Middle Dutch Date: 14th century transitive verb to soak (as flax) to loosen the fiber from the woody tissue ...
retable
noun Etymology: French, from Middle French, modification of Old Occitan retaule, alteration of reretaule, ultimately from Latin retro- + tabula board, tablet Date: circa 1823 ...
retail
I. verb Date: 15th century transitive verb 1. to sell in small quantities directly to the ultimate consumer 2. tell, retell intransitive verb to sell at retail • ...

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