Слова на букву quin-sask (6389) New Collegiate Dictionary
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Слова на букву quin-sask (6389)

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retailer
noun see retail I
retailing
noun Date: 14th century the activities involved in the selling of goods to ultimate consumers for personal or household consumption
retain
transitive verb Etymology: Middle English reteinen, retainen, from Anglo-French retenir, reteigner, from Latin retinēre to hold back, restrain, from re- + tenēre to hold — ...
retained object
noun Date: circa 1904 an object of a verb in the predicate of a passive construction (as me in “a book was given me” and book in “I was given a book”)
retainer
I. noun Date: 1540 1. a. a person attached or owing service to a household; especially servant b. employee 2. one that retains 3. a device or structure that holds ...
retake
I. transitive verb (retook; retaken; -taking) Date: 15th century 1. to take or receive again 2. recapture 3. to photograph again II. noun Date: 1916 a subsequent ...
retaliate
verb (-ated; -ating) Etymology: Late Latin retaliatus, past participle of retaliare, from Latin re- + talio legal retaliation Date: 1611 transitive verb to repay (as an ...
retaliation
noun see retaliate
retaliative
adjective see retaliate
retaliatory
adjective see retaliate
retard
I. verb Etymology: Middle English, from Anglo-French or Latin; Anglo-French retarder, from Latin retardare, from re- + tardus slow Date: 15th century transitive verb 1. to ...
retardant
adjective Date: 1642 serving or tending to retard • retardant noun
retardate
noun Date: 1915 often offensive a mentally retarded person
retardation
noun Date: 15th century 1. an act or instance of retarding 2. the extent to which something is retarded 3. a musical suspension; specifically one that resolves upward ...
retarded
adjective Date: 1895 sometimes offensive slow or limited in intellectual or emotional development or academic progress
retarder
noun see retard I
retch
verb Etymology: Middle English *rechen to spit, retch, from Old English hrǣcan to spit, hawk; akin to Old Norse hrækja to spit Date: circa 1798 transitive verb vomit 1 ...
retd
abbreviation 1. retired 2. returned
rete
noun (plural retia) Etymology: New Latin, from Latin, net Date: 1541 1. a network especially of blood vessels or nerves ; plexus 2. an anatomical part resembling or ...
retell
transitive verb (retold; -telling) Date: 1593 1. to tell again or in another form 2. to count again
retelling
noun Date: 1883 a new version of a story
retention
noun Etymology: Middle English retencioun, from Anglo-French, from Latin retention-, retentio, from retinēre to retain — more at retain Date: 14th century 1. a. the act ...
retentive
adjective Etymology: Middle English retentif, from Anglo-French & Medieval Latin; Anglo-French, from Medieval Latin retentivus, from Latin retentus, past participle of ...
retentively
adverb see retentive
retentiveness
noun see retentive
retentivity
noun Date: 1881 the power of retaining; specifically the capacity for retaining magnetism after the action of the magnetizing force has ceased
retenue
foreign term Etymology: French self-restraint ; reserve
rethink
verb (rethought; -thinking) Date: 1656 transitive verb to think about again ; reconsider intransitive verb to engage in reconsideration • rethink noun • rethinker ...
rethinker
noun see rethink
Rethondes
geographical name village N France E of Compiègne
reticence
noun Date: 1603 1. the quality or state of being reticent ; reserve, restraint 2. an instance of being reticent 3. reluctance 1
reticency
noun (plural -cies) Date: circa 1617 reticence
reticent
adjective Etymology: Latin reticent-, reticens, present participle of reticēre to keep silent, from re- + tacēre to be silent — more at tacit Date: circa 1834 1. inclined ...
reticently
adverb see reticent
reticle
noun Etymology: Latin reticulum small net Date: circa 1731 a scale on transparent material (as in an optical instrument) used especially for measuring or aiming
reticular
adjective Date: 1597 1. reticulate 1 2. intricate
reticular formation
noun Date: 1887 a mass of nerve cells and fibers situated primarily in the brain stem and functioning upon stimulation especially in arousal of the organism
reticulate
I. adjective Etymology: Latin reticulatus, from reticulum Date: 1658 1. resembling a net or network; especially having veins, fibers, or lines crossing 2. being or ...
reticulated giraffe
noun Date: 1953 a giraffe of a subspecies (Giraffa camelopardalis reticulata) found in northeast Africa, Somalia, and northern Kenya that has a deep chestnut-colored coat ...
reticulately
adverb see reticulate I
reticulation
noun Date: 1671 a reticulated formation ; network; also something reticulated
reticule
noun Etymology: French réticule, from Latin reticulum small net, mesh bag, from diminutive of rete net Date: circa 1738 1. reticle 2. a woman's drawstring bag used ...
reticulocyte
noun Etymology: New Latin reticulum + International Scientific Vocabulary -cyte Date: 1922 an immature red blood cell that appears especially during regeneration of lost ...
reticuloendothelial
adjective Etymology: New Latin reticulum + endothelium Date: circa 1923 of, relating to, or being the reticuloendothelial system
reticuloendothelial system
noun Date: circa 1923 mononuclear phagocyte system; broadly the mononuclear phagocyte system plus certain other cells now known to be pinocytic or only weakly phagocytic
reticulum
noun Etymology: New Latin, from Latin, small net Date: circa 1658 1. the second compartment of the stomach of a ruminant in which folds of the mucous membrane form hexagonal ...
retin-
or retino- combining form Etymology: retina 1. retina 2. retinol
retina
noun (plural retinas or retinae) Etymology: Middle English rethina, from Medieval Latin retina, probably from Latin rete net Date: 14th century the sensory membrane that ...
retinaculum
noun (plural retinacula) Etymology: New Latin, from Latin, halter, cable, from retinēre to hold back — more at retain Date: circa 1825 any of several fibrous bands of ...
retinal
I. adjective Date: 1838 of, relating to, involving, or being a retina II. noun Etymology: retin- + 3-al Date: 1944 a yellowish to orange aldehyde C20H28O derived from ...
retinene
noun Date: 1934 retinal
retinitis
noun Etymology: New Latin Date: 1861 inflammation of the retina
retinitis pigmentosa
noun Etymology: New Latin, pigmented retinitis Date: 1861 any of several hereditary progressive degenerative diseases of the eye marked by night blindness in the early ...
retino-
combining form see retin-
retinoblastoma
noun (plural -mas; also retinoblastomata) Etymology: New Latin, from retin- + blast- + -oma Date: 1924 a malignant tumor of the retina that develops during childhood, is ...
retinoic acid
noun Date: 1960 either of two isomers of an acid C20H28O2 derived from vitamin A and used in the treatment of acne: a. tretinoin b. isotretinoin
retinoid
noun Date: 1976 any of various synthetic or naturally occurring analogs of vitamin A
retinol
noun Etymology: retin- + 1-ol; from its being the source of retinal Date: 1960 the chief and typical vitamin A C20H29OH that is a highly unsaturated alicyclic alcohol used ...
retinopathy
noun (plural -thies) Date: 1932 any of various noninflammatory disorders of the retina including some that cause blindness
retinoscopy
noun (plural pies) Date: 1884 observation of the retina of the eye especially to determine the state of refraction
retinotectal
adjective Etymology: retin- + tectum + 1-al Date: 1951 of, relating to, or being the nerve fibers connecting the retina and the tectum of the midbrain
retinue
noun Etymology: Middle English retenue, from Anglo-French, from feminine of retenu, past participle of retenir to retain Date: 14th century a group of retainers or attendants
retinula
noun (plural retinulae; also -las) Etymology: New Latin, diminutive of Medieval Latin retina Date: 1878 the neural receptor of a single facet of an arthropod compound eye ...
retinular
adjective see retinula
retire
verb (retired; retiring) Etymology: Middle French retirer, from re- + tirer to draw Date: 1533 intransitive verb 1. to withdraw from action or danger ; retreat 2. to ...
retired
adjective Date: 1590 1. secluded 2. withdrawn from one's position or occupation ; having concluded one's working or professional career 3. received by or due to one in ...
retiredly
adverb see retired
retiredness
noun see retired
retiree
noun Date: 1945 a person who has retired from a working or professional career
retirement
I. noun Date: 1596 1. a. an act of retiring ; the state of being retired b. withdrawal from one's position or occupation or from active working life c. the age at ...
retiring
adjective Date: 1766 reserved, shy • retiringly adverb • retiringness noun
retiringly
adverb see retiring
retiringness
noun see retiring
retool
verb Date: 1927 transitive verb 1. to reequip with tools 2. reorganize 3. revise, modify intransitive verb to make especially minor changes or improvements
retort
I. verb Etymology: Latin retortus, past participle of retorquēre, literally, to twist back, hurl back, from re- + torquēre to twist — more at torture Date: circa 1557 ...
retort pouch
noun Date: 1977 a flexible package in which prepared food is hermetically sealed for long-term unrefrigerated storage
retouch
I. verb Etymology: French retoucher, from Middle French, from re- + toucher to touch Date: 1685 transitive verb 1. to rework in order to improve ; touch up 2. to alter ...
retoucher
noun see retouch I
retract
verb Etymology: Middle English, from Latin retractus, past participle of retrahere — more at retreat Date: 15th century transitive verb 1. to draw back or in 2. ...
retractable
adjective see retract
retractile
adjective Date: 1777 capable of being drawn back or in • retractility noun
retractility
noun see retractile
retraction
noun Date: 14th century 1. an act of recanting; specifically a statement made by one retracting 2. an act of retracting ; the state of being retracted 3. the ability to ...
retractor
noun Date: 1837 one that retracts: as a. a surgical instrument for holding open the edges of a wound b. a muscle that draws in an organ or part
retrain
Date: 1898 transitive verb to train again or anew intransitive verb to become trained again • retrainable adjective
retrainable
adjective see retrain
retranslate
Date: 1750 transitive verb to translate (a translation) into another language; also to give a new form to intransitive verb to retranslate something • retranslation ...
retranslation
noun see retranslate
retread
I. transitive verb (retreaded; retreading) Date: 1907 1. to bond or vulcanize a new tread to the prepared surface of (a worn tire) 2. to make over as if new II. noun ...
retreat
I. noun Etymology: Middle English retret, from Anglo-French retrait, from past participle of retraire to withdraw, from Latin retrahere, from re- + trahere to draw Date: 14th ...
retreatant
noun Date: 1880 a person on a religious retreat
retreater
noun see retreat II
retrench
verb Etymology: obsolete French retrencher (now retrancher), from Middle French retrenchier, from re- + trenchier to cut Date: 1596 transitive verb 1. a. cut down, ...
retrenchment
noun Date: circa 1600 reduction, curtailment; specifically a cutting of expenses
retrial
noun Date: 1852 a second trial, experiment, or test; specifically a second judicial trial
retribalization
noun Date: 1964 the act of forming or returning to a tribal group or division
retribution
noun Etymology: Middle English retribucioun, from Anglo-French, from Late Latin retribution-, retributio, from Latin retribuere to pay back, from re- + tribuere to pay — more ...
retributive
adjective Date: 1678 of, relating to, or marked by retribution • retributively adverb
retributively
adverb see retributive
retributory
adjective Date: circa 1615 retributive
retrievability
noun see retrieve I
retrievable
adjective see retrieve I
retrieval
noun Date: circa 1643 1. an act or process of retrieving 2. possibility of being retrieved or of recovering
retrieve
I. verb (retrieved; retrieving) Etymology: Middle English retreven, from Anglo-French retrueve-, present stem of retrover to find again, from re- + trover to compose, invent, ...
retriever
noun Date: 15th century one that retrieves; especially a dog of any of several breeds having a heavy water-resistant coat and used especially for retrieving game
retro
adjective Etymology: French rétro, short for rétrospectif retrospective Date: 1974 relating to, reviving, or being the styles and especially the fashions of the past ; ...
retro-
prefix Etymology: Latin, from retro, from re- + -tro (as in intro within) — more at intro- 1. backward ; back 2. situated behind
retro-rocket
noun Date: 1957 an auxiliary rocket engine (as on a spacecraft) used in decelerating
retroaction
noun Date: circa 1738 1. [retroactive] retroactive operation (as of a law or tax) 2. [retro- + action] a reciprocal action ; reaction
retroactive
adjective Etymology: French rétroactif, from Latin retroactus, past participle of retroagere to drive back, reverse, from retro- + agere to drive — more at agent Date: 1611 ...
retroactively
adverb see retroactive
retroactivity
noun see retroactive
retrocede
verb (-ceded; -ceding) Etymology: Latin retrocedere, from retro- + cedere to go, cede Date: 1654 intransitive verb to go back ; recede transitive verb [French ...
retrocession
noun see retrocede
retrodict
transitive verb Etymology: retro- + predict Date: 1949 to utilize present information or ideas to infer or explain (a past event or state of affairs) • retrodiction ...
retrodiction
noun see retrodict
retrodictive
adjective see retrodict
retrofire
Date: 1961 transitive verb to cause (a retro-rocket) to become ignited intransitive verb of a retro-rocket to become ignited • retrofire noun
retrofit
transitive verb Date: 1953 1. to furnish (as a computer, airplane, or building) with new or modified parts or equipment not available or considered necessary at the time of ...
retroflection
noun see retroflexion
retroflex
adjective Etymology: New Latin retroflexus, from Latin retro- + flexus, past participle of flectere to bend Date: 1776 1. turned or bent abruptly backward 2. articulated ...
retroflexion
or retroflection noun Date: 1845 1. the state of being bent back; especially the bending back of an organ (as a uterus) upon itself 2. the act or process of bending back ...
retrogradation
noun Date: circa 1545 the action or process of retrograding
retrograde
I. adjective Etymology: Middle English, from Latin retrogradus, from retrogradi Date: 14th century 1. a. (1) having or being motion in a direction contrary to that of ...
retrogradely
adverb see retrograde I
retrogress
intransitive verb Etymology: Latin retrogressus, past participle of retrogradi Date: 1819 to move backward ; revert
retrogression
noun Date: 1604 1. regression 3 2. return to a former and less complex level of development or organization
retrogressive
adjective Date: 1802 characterized by retrogression: as a. going or directed backward b. declining from a better to a worse state c. passing from a higher to a lower ...
retrogressively
adverb see retrogressive
retropack
noun Date: 1962 a system of retro-rockets on a spacecraft
retroperitoneal
adjective Date: 1874 situated behind the peritoneum • retroperitoneally adverb
retroperitoneally
adverb see retroperitoneal
retroreflection
noun Date: circa 1965 the action or use of a retroreflector • retroreflective adjective
retroreflective
adjective see retroreflection
retroreflector
noun Date: 1946 a device that reflects radiation (as light) so that the paths of the reflected rays are parallel to those of the incident rays
retrorse
adjective Etymology: Latin retrorsus, contraction of retroversus Date: circa 1825 bent backward or downward
retrospect
I. noun Etymology: probably from retro- + prospect Date: 1602 1. archaic reference to or regard of a precedent or authority 2. a review of or meditation on past events II. ...
retrospection
noun Date: 1674 the act or process or an instance of surveying the past
retrospective
I. adjective Date: 1664 1. a. (1) of, relating to, or given to retrospection (2) based on memory b. being a retrospective 2. affecting things past ; ...
retrospectively
adverb see retrospective I
retroussé
adjective Etymology: French, from past participle of retrousser to tuck up, from Middle French, from re- + trousser to truss, tuck up — more at truss Date: 1837 turned ...
retroversion
noun Etymology: Latin retroversus turned backward, from retro- + versus, past participle of vertere to turn — more at worth Date: 1776 1. the bending backward of the ...
retroviral
adjective see retrovirus
retrovirologist
noun see retrovirology
retrovirology
noun Date: 1982 virology concerned with the study of retroviruses • retrovirologist noun
retrovirus
noun Etymology: New Latin Date: 1975 any of a family (Retroviridae) of single-stranded RNA viruses (as HIV) that produce reverse transcriptase by means of which DNA is ...
retsina
noun Etymology: New Greek, perhaps from Italian resina resin, from Latin — more at resin Date: 1940 a resin-flavored Greek wine
return
I. verb Etymology: Middle English, from Anglo-French returner, from re- + turner, tourner to turn — more at turn Date: 14th century intransitive verb 1. a. to go back ...
returnable
I. adjective Date: 15th century 1. legally required to be returned, delivered, or argued at a specified time or place 2. a. capable of returning or of being returned ...
returnee
noun Date: 1944 one who returns; especially one returning to the United States after military service overseas
returner
noun see return I
retuse
adjective Etymology: Latin retusus blunted, from past participle of retundere to pound back, blunt, from re- + tundere to beat, pound — more at contusion Date: circa 1753 ...
Retz
biographical name Cardinal de 1613-1679 Jean-François-Paul de Gondi French ecclesiastic & politician
Reuben
I. noun Etymology: Hebrew Rĕ'ūbhēn a son of Jacob and the traditional eponymous ancestor of one of the tribes of Israel II. noun Etymology: probably from Reuben Kulakofsky ...
Reuchlin
biographical name Johannes 1455-1522 Capnio German humanist
reunion
noun Date: 1610 1. an act of reuniting ; the state of being reunited 2. a reuniting of persons after separation
Réunion
geographical name island W Indian Ocean in the W Mascarene Islands capital St.-Denis; an overseas department of France area 970 square miles (2522 square kilometers), ...
reunionist
noun Date: 1866 an advocate of reunion (as of sects or parties) • reunionistic adjective
reunionistic
adjective see reunionist
reunite
verb Etymology: Middle English, from Medieval Latin reunitus, past participle of reunire, from Latin re- + Late Latin unire to unite — more at unite Date: 15th century ...
reuptake
noun Date: 1968 the reabsorption by a neuron of a neurotransmitter following the transmission of a nerve impulse across a synapse
reusability
noun see reusable
reusable
adjective Date: 1943 capable of being used again or repeatedly • reusability noun
reuse
I. transitive verb Date: 1843 to use again especially in a different way or after reclaiming or reprocessing II. noun Date: 1866 further, different, or repeated use
Reuter
biographical name Baron Paul Julius von 1816-1899 originally Israel Beer Josaphat British (German-born) journalist
Reuther
biographical name Walter Philip 1907-1970 American labor leader
Reutlingen
geographical name city S Germany in Baden-Württemberg S of Stuttgart population 105,835
Rev
abbreviation 1. Revelation 2. reverend
rev
I. noun Etymology: short for revolution Date: circa 1890 1. a revolution of a motor 2. revolution per minute — usually used in plural II. verb (revved; revving) Date: ...
revaluate
transitive verb Etymology: back-formation from revaluation Date: 1921 revalue; specifically to increase the value of (as currency) • revaluation noun
revaluation
noun see revaluate
revalue
transitive verb Date: 1592 1. to value (as currency) anew 2. to make a new valuation of ; reappraise
revamp
transitive verb Date: 1850 1. remake, revise 2. renovate, reconstruct • revamp noun
revanche
noun Etymology: French, from Middle French, alteration of revenche — more at revenge Date: 1853 revenge; especially a usually political policy designed to recover lost ...
revanchism
noun see revanche
revanchist
I. noun Date: 1926 one who advocates a policy of revanche II. adjective Date: 1948 of or relating to a policy of revanche
revascularization
noun Date: 1951 a surgical procedure for the provision of a new, additional, or augmented blood supply to a body part or organ
Revd
abbreviation British reverend
reveal
I. transitive verb Etymology: Middle English revelen, from Anglo-French reveler, from Latin revelare to uncover, reveal, from re- + velare to cover, veil, from velum veil ...
revealable
adjective see reveal I
revealer
noun see reveal I
revealing
adjective Date: circa 1925 allowing a look at or an understanding of something inner or hidden ; also tending to expose more typically hidden parts of the body • ...
revealingly
adverb see revealing
revealment
noun Date: 1584 an act of revealing
revegetate
transitive verb Date: 1804 to provide (barren or denuded land) with a new vegetative cover • revegetation noun
revegetation
noun see revegetate
reveille
noun Etymology: modification of French réveillez, imperative plural of réveiller to awaken, from Middle French reveiller, from re- + eveiller to awaken, from Vulgar Latin ...
Revel
geographical name — see Tallinn
revel
I. intransitive verb (-eled or -elled; -eling or revelling) Etymology: Middle English, from Anglo-French reveler, literally, to rebel, from Latin rebellare Date: 14th century ...
revelation
noun Etymology: Middle English revelacioun, from Anglo-French, from Late Latin revelation-, revelatio, from Latin revelare to reveal Date: 14th century 1. a. an act of ...
Revelations
noun plural but singular in construction Date: 1729 revelation 3
revelator
noun Date: 1764 one that reveals; especially one that reveals the will of God
revelatory
adjective Date: 1882 of or relating to revelation ; serving to reveal something
reveler
or reveller noun Date: 14th century one who engages in revelry
reveller
noun see reveler
revelry
noun Date: 15th century noisy partying or merrymaking
revenant
noun Etymology: French, from present participle of revenir to return Date: 1818 one that returns after death or a long absence • revenant adjective
revenge
I. transitive verb (revenged; revenging) Etymology: Middle English, from Anglo-French revenger, revengier, from re- + venger to avenge — more at vengeance Date: 14th century ...
revengeful
adjective Date: 1570 full of or prone to revenge ; determined to get even • revengefully adverb • revengefulness noun
revengefully
adverb see revengeful
revengefulness
noun see revengeful
revenger
noun see revenge I
revenons à nos moutons
foreign term Etymology: French let us return to our sheep ; let us get back to the subject
revenue
noun Usage: often attributive Etymology: Middle English, return, revenue, from Anglo-French, from revenir to return, from Latin revenire, from re- + venire to come — more at ...
revenue bond
noun Date: 1856 a bond issued by a public agency authorized to build, acquire, or improve a revenue-producing property (as a toll road) and payable out of revenue derived ...
revenue cutter
noun Date: 1790 an armed government vessel employed especially to enforce revenue laws
revenue stamp
noun Date: 1862 a stamp (as on a cigar box) for use as evidence of payment of a tax
revenue tariff
noun Date: 1820 a tariff intended wholly or primarily to produce public revenue — compare protective tariff
revenuer
noun Date: 1880 a revenue department officer
reverb
noun Etymology: short for reverberation Date: 1953 an electronically produced echo effect in recorded music; also a device for producing reverb
reverberant
adjective Date: 1781 1. tending to reverberate 2. marked by reverberation ; resonant • reverberantly adverb
reverberantly
adverb see reverberant
reverberate
I. verb (-ated; -ating) Etymology: Latin reverberatus, past participle of reverberare, from re- + verberare to lash, from verber rod — more at vervain Date: 15th century ...
reverberation
noun Date: 14th century 1. an act of reverberating ; the state of being reverberated 2. a. something that is reverberated b. an effect or impact that resembles an echo
reverberative
adjective Date: 1716 1. constituting reverberation 2. tending to reverberate ; reverberant
reverberatory
adjective Date: 1605 acting by reverberation
reverberatory furnace
noun Date: 1672 a furnace in which heat is radiated from the roof onto the material treated
Revere
I. biographical name Paul 1735-1818 American patriot & silversmith II. geographical name city E Massachusetts NE of Boston population 47,283
revere
I. transitive verb (revered; revering) Etymology: Latin revereri, from re- + vereri to fear, respect — more at wary Date: 1615 to show devoted deferential honor to ; regard ...
reverence
I. noun Etymology: Middle English, from Anglo-French, from Latin reverentia, from reverent-, reverens respectful, reverent Date: 14th century 1. honor or respect felt or ...
reverencer
noun see reverence II
reverend
I. adjective Etymology: Middle English, from Anglo-French, from Latin reverendus, gerundive of revereri Date: 15th century 1. worthy of reverence ; revered 2. a. of or ...
reverent
adjective Etymology: Middle English, from Anglo-French, from Latin reverent-, reverens, present participle of revereri Date: 14th century expressing or characterized by ...
reverential
adjective Date: circa 1555 1. expressing or having a quality of reverence 2. inspiring reverence • reverentially adverb
reverentially
adverb see reverential
reverently
adverb see reverent
reverie
also revery noun (plural reveries) Etymology: French rêverie, from Middle French, delirium, from resver, rever to wander, be delirious Date: 1654 1. daydream 2. the ...
revers
noun (plural revers) Etymology: French, literally, reverse, from Middle French, from revers, adjective Date: 1831 a lapel especially on a woman's garment
reversal
noun Date: 15th century 1. an act or the process of reversing 2. a conversion of a photographic positive into a negative or vice versa 3. a change (as of fortune) often ...
reverse
I. adjective Etymology: Middle English revers, from Anglo-French, from Latin reversus, past participle of revertere to turn back — more at revert Date: 14th century 1. ...
reverse discrimination
noun Date: 1964 discrimination against whites or males (as in employment or education)
reverse engineer
transitive verb Date: 1973 to disassemble and examine or analyze in detail (as a product or device) to discover the concepts involved in manufacture usually in order to ...
reverse engineering
noun see reverse engineer
reverse field
or reverse one's field phrasal to make a sudden reversal in direction or opinion
reverse mortgage
noun Date: 1977 a mortgage that allows especially an elderly person to convert home equity into available funds through a line of credit, cash advance, or periodic ...
reverse one's field
phrasal see reverse field
reverse osmosis
noun Date: 1955 the movement of freshwater through a semipermeable membrane when pressure is applied to a solution (as seawater) on one side of it
reverse Polish notation
noun Date: 1975 a system of representing mathematical and logical operations in which the operands precede the operator and which does not require the use of parentheses — ...
reverse transcriptase
noun Date: 1971 a polymerase especially of retroviruses that catalyzes the formation of DNA using RNA as a template
reverse transcription
noun Date: 1971 the process of synthesizing DNA using RNA as a template and reverse transcriptase as a catalyst
reversely
adverb see reverse I
reverser
noun see reverse II
reversibility
noun see reversible I
reversible
I. adjective Date: 1648 capable of being reversed or of reversing: as a. capable of going through a series of actions (as changes) either backward or forward b. having ...
reversibly
adverb see reversible I
reversion
noun Etymology: Middle English, from Anglo-French, from Latin reversion-, reversio act of returning, from revertere Date: 15th century 1. a. the part of a simple estate ...
reversional
adjective Date: 1675 reversionary
reversionary
adjective Date: 1720 of, relating to, constituting, or involving especially a legal reversion
reversioner
noun Date: 1614 one that has or is entitled to a reversion; broadly one having a vested right to a future estate
revert
intransitive verb Etymology: Middle English, from Anglo-French revertir, from Latin revertere, verbt., to turn back & reverti, verbi., to return, come back, from re- + vertere, ...
revertant
noun Date: 1955 a mutant gene, individual, or strain that regains a former capability (as the production of a particular protein) by undergoing further mutation • ...
reverter
noun see revert
revertible
adjective see revert
revery
noun see reverie
revest
transitive verb Date: 1561 reinstate, reinvest
revet
transitive verb (revetted; revetting) Etymology: French revêtir, literally, to clothe, put on, from Old French revestir, from Latin revestire, from re- + vestire to clothe — ...
revetment
noun Date: 1779 1. a facing (as of stone or concrete) to sustain an embankment 2. embankment; especially a barricade to provide shelter (as against bomb fragments or ...
review
I. noun Etymology: Middle English reveue, from Middle French, from feminine past participle of revoir to see again, reexamine, from Old French reveoir, from re- + veoir, veeir ...
reviewable
adjective see review II
reviewer
noun Date: 1651 one that reviews; especially a writer of critical reviews
revile
verb (reviled; reviling) Etymology: Middle English, from Anglo-French reviler to despise, from re- + vil vile Date: 14th century transitive verb to subject to verbal abuse ...
revilement
noun see revile
reviler
noun see revile
Revillagigedo
geographical name islands Mexico in the Pacific SW of S end of Baja California
Revillagigedo Island
geographical name island SE Alaska in SE Alexander Archipelago E of Prince of Wales Island

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