Слова на букву quin-sask (6389) New Collegiate Dictionary
На главную О проекте Обратная связь Поддержать проектДобавить в избранное

  
EN-DE-FR →  New Collegiate Dictionary →  acto-axio axio-buck buck-cobl cobl-deco deco-elec elec-flüg flüg-gulp gulp-innu inob-leni leni-micr micr-obtr obtr-phyl phyl-quin quin-sask sask-soma soma-tano tans-unco uncr-wool


Слова на букву quin-sask (6389)

<< < 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 > >>
revisable
adjective see revise II
revisal
noun Date: 1608 an act of revising ; revision
revise
I. noun Date: 1591 1. an act of revising ; revision 2. a printing proof that incorporates changes marked in a previous proof II. verb (revised; revising) Etymology: Middle ...
Revised Standard Version
noun Date: 1946 a revision of the American Standard Version of the Bible published in 1946 and 1952
Revised Version
noun Date: 1837 a British revision of the Authorized Version of the Bible published in 1881 and 1885
reviser
noun see revise II
revision
noun Date: 1611 1. a. an act of revising b. a result of revising ; alteration 2. a revised version • revisionary adjective
revisionary
adjective see revision
revisionism
noun Date: 1903 1. a movement in revolutionary Marxian socialism favoring an evolutionary rather than a revolutionary spirit 2. advocacy of revision (as of a doctrine or ...
revisionist
noun or adjective see revisionism
revisit
I. transitive verb Date: 15th century to visit again ; return to ; also to consider or take up again II. noun Date: 1623 a second or subsequent visit
revisor
noun see revise II
revisory
adjective Date: circa 1841 having the power or purpose to revise
revitalise
British variant of revitalize
revitalization
noun see revitalize
revitalize
transitive verb (-ized; -izing) Date: 1869 to give new life or vigor to • revitalization noun
revivable
adjective see revive
revival
noun Date: 1651 1. an act or instance of reviving ; the state of being revived: as a. renewed attention to or interest in something b. a new presentation or publication ...
revivalism
noun Date: 1815 1. the spirit or methods characteristic of religious revivals 2. a tendency or desire to revive or restore
revivalist
noun Date: 1820 1. one who conducts religious revivals; specifically a member of the clergy who travels about to conduct revivals 2. one who revives or restores something ...
revivalistic
adjective see revivalist
revive
verb (revived; reviving) Etymology: Middle English, from Anglo-French revivre, from Latin revivere to live again, from re- + vivere to live — more at quick Date: 15th ...
reviver
noun see revive
revivification
noun see revivify
revivify
transitive verb Etymology: French révivifier, from Late Latin revivificare, from Latin re- + Late Latin vivificare to vivify Date: 1675 to give new life to ; revive • ...
reviviscence
noun Etymology: Latin reviviscere to come to life again, from re- + viviscere to come to life, from vivus alive, living — more at quick Date: 1626 an act of reviving ; the ...
reviviscent
adjective see reviviscence
revocable
also revokable adjective Etymology: Middle English, from Anglo-French, from Latin revocabilis, from revocare Date: 15th century capable of being revoked
revocation
noun Etymology: Middle English, from Anglo-French, from Latin revocation-, revocatio, from revocare Date: 15th century an act or instance of revoking
revokable
adjective see revocable
revoke
I. verb (revoked; revoking) Etymology: Middle English, from Anglo-French revocer, revoquer, from Latin revocare, from re- + vocare to call, from voc-, vox voice — more at ...
revoker
noun see revoke I
revolt
I. verb Etymology: Middle French revolter, from Old Italian rivoltare to overthrow, from Vulgar Latin *revolvitare, frequentative of Latin revolvere to revolve, roll back Date: ...
revolter
noun see revolt I
revolting
adjective Date: 1806 extremely offensive • revoltingly adverb
revoltingly
adverb see revolting
revolute
adjective Etymology: Latin revolutus, past participle of revolvere Date: circa 1753 rolled backward or downward
revolution
noun Etymology: Middle English revolucioun, from Middle French revolution, from Late Latin revolution-, revolutio, from Latin revolvere to revolve Date: 14th century 1. a. ...
revolutionarily
adverb see revolutionary I
revolutionariness
noun see revolutionary I
revolutionary
I. adjective Date: 1774 1. a. of, relating to, or constituting a revolution b. tending to or promoting revolution c. constituting or bringing about a major or ...
revolutionise
British variant of revolutionize
revolutionist
noun Date: 1710 revolutionary • revolutionist adjective
revolutionize
verb (-ized; -izing) Date: 1797 transitive verb 1. to overthrow the established government of 2. to imbue with revolutionary doctrines 3. to change fundamentally or ...
revolutionizer
noun see revolutionize
revolvable
adjective see revolve
revolve
verb (revolved; revolving) Etymology: Middle English, from Latin revolvere to roll back, cause to return, from re- + volvere to roll — more at voluble Date: 15th century ...
revolver
noun Date: circa 1835 1. one that revolves 2. a handgun with a cylinder of several chambers brought successively into line with the barrel and discharged with the same ...
revolving
adjective Date: 1599 1. a. tending to revolve or recur; especially recurrently available b. of, relating to, or being credit that may be used repeatedly up to the ...
revolving door
noun Date: 1973 a revolving-door system or process
revolving fund
noun Date: 1920 a fund set up for specified purposes with the proviso that repayments to the fund may be used again for these purposes
revolving-door
adjective Date: 1973 characterized by a frequent succession (as of personnel) or a cycle of leaving and returning
revue
noun Etymology: French, from Middle French reveue review — more at review Date: 1872 a theatrical production consisting typically of brief loosely connected often ...
revulsed
adjective Etymology: Latin revulsus, past participle of revellere + English -ed Date: circa 1934 affected with or having undergone revulsion
revulsion
noun Etymology: Latin revulsion-, revulsio act of tearing away, from revellere to pluck away, from re- + vellere to pluck — more at vulnerable Date: 1609 1. a strong ...
revulsive
adjective see revulsion
revved
past and past participle of rev
revving
present part of rev
rewake
verb (-waked or rewoke; -waked or rewoken or -woke; -waking) Date: 1593 transitive verb to waken again or anew intransitive verb to become awake again
rewaken
verb Date: 1638 rewake
reward
I. transitive verb Etymology: Middle English, from Anglo-French regarder, rewarder to look back at, regard, care for, recompense — more at regard Date: 14th century 1. to ...
rewardable
adjective see reward I
rewarder
noun see reward I
rewarding
adjective Date: 1697 1. yielding or likely to yield a reward ; valuable, satisfying 2. serving as a reward • rewardingly adverb
rewardingly
adverb see rewarding
rewind
I. transitive verb (rewound; -winding) Date: 1717 to wind again; especially to reverse the winding of (as film) II. noun Date: 1926 1. something that rewinds or is ...
reword
transitive verb Date: 1602 1. to repeat in the same words 2. to alter the wording of; also to restate in other words
rework
transitive verb Date: 1842 to work again or anew: as a. revise b. to reprocess (as used material) for further use
rewrite
I. verb (rewrote; rewritten; rewriting) Date: 1567 transitive verb 1. to write in reply 2. to make a revision of (as a story) ; cause to be revised: as a. to put ...
rewrite man
noun Date: 1901 a newspaperman who specializes in rewriting
rewrite rule
noun Date: 1960 a rule in a grammar which specifies the constituents of a single symbol
rewriter
noun see rewrite I
rex
noun (plural rexes or rex) Etymology: modification of French castorrex, castorex, a variety of rabbit, perhaps from Latin castor beaver + rex king — more at castor, royal ...
rex sole
noun Etymology: probably modification of New Latin Errex genus name Date: circa 1954 a flounder (Errex zachirus syn. Glyptocephalus zachirus) with both eyes on the right side ...
Rexroth
biographical name Kenneth 1905-1982 American writer
Reye syndrome
noun see Reye's syndrome
Reye's syndrome
noun Etymology: R.D.K. Reye died 1977 Australian pathologist Date: 1965 an often fatal encephalopathy especially of childhood characterized by fever, vomiting, fatty ...
Reyes, Point
geographical name cape W California at S extremity of peninsula extending into the Pacific NW of Golden Gate
Reykjavík
geographical name city & port capital of Iceland population 97,648
Reymont
or Rejment biographical name Władysław Stanisław 1867-1925 Polish novelist
reynard
noun Usage: often capitalized Etymology: Middle English Renard, name of the fox who is hero of the French beast epic Roman de Renart, from Middle French Renart, Renard Date: ...
Reynaud
biographical name Paul 1878-1966 premier of France (1940)
Reynolds
biographical name Sir Joshua 1723-1792 English painter
Reynolds number
noun Etymology: Osborne Reynolds died 1912 English physicist Date: 1910 a number characteristic of the flow of a fluid in a pipe or past an obstruction
Reynoldsburg
geographical name village central Ohio population 32,069
Reynosa
geographical name city NE Mexico in Tamaulipas on the Rio Grande population 281,618
Reza Shah Pahlavi
biographical name 1878-1944 father of Mohammad Reza Pahlavi shah of Iran (1925-41)
Rezā'īyeh
geographical name see Orūmīyeh
Rezāīyeh
geographical name — see orūmiyeh
Rf
symbol rutherfordium
RF
abbreviation radio frequency
RFD
abbreviation rural free delivery
RFLP
abbreviation restriction fragment length polymorphism
RFP
abbreviation request for proposal
RH
abbreviation 1. relative humidity 2. right hand; right hander
Rh
I. adjective Date: 1940 of, relating to, or being an Rh factor II. symbol rhodium
Rh factor
noun Etymology: rhesus monkey (in which it was first detected) Date: 1942 any of one or more genetically determined antigens present in the red blood cells of most persons ...
Rh-negative
adjective Date: 1945 lacking Rh factor in the blood
Rh-positive
adjective Date: 1942 containing Rh factor in the red blood cells
rhabdo-
combining form Etymology: Late Greek, from Greek rhabdos rod — more at vervain rodlike structure
rhabdocoele
noun Etymology: New Latin Rhabdocoela, from rhabdo- + New Latin -coela -coele Date: 1883 a turbellarian worm (order Rhabdocoela) with an unbranched intestine
rhabdom
or rhabdome noun Etymology: New Latin, from Late Greek rhabdōma bundle of rods, from Greek rhabdos rod Date: 1878 one of the minute rodlike structures in the retinulae in ...
rhabdomancer
noun see rhabdomancy
rhabdomancy
noun Etymology: Late Greek rhabdomanteia, from Greek rhabdos rod + -manteia -mancy Date: 1646 divination by rods or wands • rhabdomancer noun
rhabdome
noun see rhabdom
rhabdomere
noun Date: 1883 a division of a rhabdom
rhabdomyolysis
noun Etymology: New Latin, from rhabdo- + my- + -lysis Date: 1956 the destruction or degeneration of muscle tissue (as from traumatic injury, excessive exertion, or stroke) ...
rhabdomyosarcoma
noun Etymology: New Latin, from rhabdo- + my- + sarcoma Date: 1898 a malignant tumor composed of striated muscle fibers
rhabdovirus
noun Etymology: New Latin Date: 1966 any of a family (Rhabdoviridae) of rod- or bullet-shaped single-stranded RNA viruses found in plants and animals and including the ...
rhadamanthine
adjective Usage: often capitalized Etymology: Rhadamanthus Date: 1840 rigorously strict or just
Rhadamanthus
noun Date: 15th century a judge of the underworld in Greek mythology
Rhaetia
or Raetia geographical name ancient Roman province central Europe S of the Danube including most of modern Tirol & Vorarlberg regions of Austria & Graubünden canton of E ...
Rhaetian
adjective or noun see Rhaetia
Rhaetian Alps
geographical name section of Alps E Switzerland in E Graubünden — see Bernina
Rhaeto-Romance
also Rhaeto-Romanic noun Etymology: Latin Rhaetus of Rhaetia, ancient Roman province Date: 1867 a group of Romance languages spoken in eastern Switzerland and northeastern ...
Rhaeto-Romanic
noun see Rhaeto-Romance
Rhagae
or Ragae or biblical Rages geographical name city of ancient Media; ruins at modern village of Rey S of Tehran, Iran
rhamnose
noun Etymology: International Scientific Vocabulary, from New Latin Rhamnus, genus of the buckthorn; from its being produced from a plant of this genus Date: 1888 a ...
rhapsode
noun Etymology: French, from Greek rhapsōidos Date: 1834 rhapsodist
rhapsodic
also rhapsodical adjective Date: 1782 1. extravagantly emotional ; rapturous 2. resembling or characteristic of a rhapsody • rhapsodically adverb
rhapsodical
adjective see rhapsodic
rhapsodically
adverb see rhapsodic
rhapsodist
noun Date: circa 1656 1. a professional reciter of epic poems 2. one who writes or speaks rhapsodically
rhapsodize
intransitive verb (-dized; -dizing) Date: 1806 to speak or write in a rhapsodic manner
rhapsody
noun (plural -dies) Etymology: Latin rhapsodia, from Greek rhapsōidia recitation of selections from epic poetry, rhapsody, from rhapsōidos rhapsodist, from rhaptein to sew, ...
rhea
noun Etymology: New Latin, genus of birds, probably from Latin Rhea, mother of Zeus, from Greek Date: 1797 either of two South American ratite birds (Rhea americana and ...
rhebok
noun Etymology: Afrikaans reebok, from Dutch, male roe deer, from ree roe + boc buck Date: 1813 a brownish-gray antelope (Pelea capreolus) of southern Africa
Rhee
biographical name Syngman 1875-1965 South Korean politician; president of South Korea (1948-60)
Rhegium
geographical name see Reggio 1
Rheims
geographical name see Reims
Rhein
geographical name see Rhine
Rheinland
geographical name see Rhineland
Rheinland-Pfalz
geographical name see Rhineland-Palatinate
Rhenish
adjective see Rhine
Rhenish Palatinate
geographical name — see palatinate
rhenium
noun Etymology: New Latin, from Latin Rhenus Rhine River Date: 1925 a rare heavy metallic element that is obtained either as a gray powder or as a silver-white hard metal, is ...
rheo-
combining form Etymology: Greek rhein to flow — more at stream flow ; current
rheologic
adjective see rheology
rheological
adjective see rheology
rheologically
adverb see rheology
rheologist
noun see rheology
rheology
noun Etymology: International Scientific Vocabulary Date: 1929 a science dealing with the deformation and flow of matter; also the ability to flow or be deformed • ...
rheometer
noun Etymology: International Scientific Vocabulary Date: circa 1859 an instrument for measuring flow (as of viscous substances)
rheostat
noun Date: 1843 a resistor for regulating a current by means of variable resistances • rheostatic adjective
rheostatic
adjective see rheostat
rhesus
noun see rhesus monkey
rhesus macaque
noun see rhesus monkey
rhesus monkey
noun Etymology: New Latin Rhesus, genus of monkeys, from Latin, a mythical king of Thrace, from Greek Rhēsos Date: 1841 a pale brown Asian macaque (Macaca mulatta) often ...
rhet
abbreviation rhetoric
rhetor
noun Etymology: Middle English rethor, from Latin rhetor, from Greek rhētōr Date: 14th century rhetorician 1
rhetoric
noun Etymology: Middle English rethorik, from Anglo-French rethorique, from Latin rhetorica, from Greek rhētorikē, literally, art of oratory, from feminine of rhētorikos of ...
rhetorical
also rhetoric adjective Date: 15th century 1. a. of, relating to, or concerned with rhetoric b. employed for rhetorical effect; especially asked merely for effect with ...
rhetorically
adverb see rhetorical
rhetorician
noun Date: 15th century 1. a. a master or teacher of rhetoric b. orator 2. an eloquent or grandiloquent writer or speaker
rheum
noun Etymology: Middle English reume, from Anglo-French, from Latin rheuma, from Greek, literally, flow, flux, from rhein to flow — more at stream Date: 14th century 1. a ...
rheumatic
I. adjective Etymology: Middle English rewmatik subject to rheum, from Anglo-French reumatike, from Latin rheumaticus, from Greek rheumatikos, from rheumat-, rheuma Date: 1711 ...
rheumatic fever
noun Date: 1782 an acute disease that occurs chiefly in children and young adults and is characterized by fever, by inflammation and pain in and around the joints, and by ...
rheumatically
adverb see rheumatic I
rheumatism
noun Etymology: Latin rheumatismus flux, rheum, from Greek rheumatismos, from rheumatizesthai to suffer from a flux, from rheumat-, rheuma flux Date: 1677 1. any of various ...
rheumatoid
adjective Etymology: International Scientific Vocabulary, from rheumatism Date: 1869 characteristic of or affected with rheumatoid arthritis
rheumatoid arthritis
noun Date: 1859 a usually chronic autoimmune disease that is characterized especially by pain, stiffness, inflammation, swelling, and sometimes destruction of joints
rheumatoid factor
noun Date: 1949 an autoantibody of high molecular weight that reacts against IgG immunoglobulins and is often present in rheumatoid arthritis
rheumatologic
adjective see rheumatology
rheumatological
adjective see rheumatology
rheumatologist
noun see rheumatology
rheumatology
noun Date: circa 1941 a medical science dealing with rheumatic diseases • rheumatologic or rheumatological adjective • rheumatologist noun
rheumy
adjective see rheum
Rheydt
geographical name city W Germany S of Mönchengladbach population 100,300
Rhin
geographical name see Rhine
rhin-
or rhino- combining form Etymology: New Latin, from Greek, from rhin-, rhis nose
rhinal
adjective Date: circa 1859 of or relating to the nose ; nasal
Rhine
or German Rhein or French Rhin or Dutch Rijn geographical name river 820 miles (1320 kilometers) W Europe flowing from SE Switzerland to North Sea in Netherlands; forms W ...
Rhine Province
geographical name former province of Prussia, Germany, bordering on Belgium capital Koblenz
Rhine wine
noun Date: 1843 1. a usually white wine produced in the Rhine valley 2. a wine similar to Rhine wine produced elsewhere
Rhineland
or German Rheinland geographical name 1. the part of Germany W of the Rhine 2. Rhine Province • Rhinelander noun
Rhineland-Palatinate
or German Rheinland-Pfalz geographical name state of Germany & formerly of West Germany chiefly W of the Rhine capital Mainz area 7654 square miles (19,900 square kilometers), ...
Rhinelander
noun see Rhineland
rhinencephalic
adjective see rhinencephalon
rhinencephalon
noun Etymology: New Latin Date: 1846 the chiefly olfactory part of the forebrain • rhinencephalic adjective
rhinestone
noun Etymology: Rhine River Date: circa 1888 a colorless imitation stone of high luster made of glass, paste, or gem quartz • rhinestoned adjective
rhinestoned
adjective see rhinestone
rhinitis
noun Etymology: New Latin Date: circa 1884 inflammation of the mucous membrane of the nose
rhino
I. noun Etymology: origin unknown Date: 1670 money, cash II. noun (plural rhinos; also rhino) Date: 1884 rhinoceros
rhino-
combining form see rhin-
rhinoceros
noun (plural -noceroses; also -noceros or rhinoceri) Etymology: Middle English rinoceros, from Anglo-French, from Latin rhinocerot-, rhinoceros, from Greek rhinokerōt-, ...
rhinoceros beetle
noun Date: 1681 any of various large chiefly tropical scarab beetles (subfamily Dynastinae) having projecting horns on thorax and head
rhinoplasty
noun (plural -ties) Date: 1842 plastic surgery on the nose usually for cosmetic purposes
rhinoscopy
noun Etymology: International Scientific Vocabulary Date: 1861 examination of the nasal passages
rhinovirus
noun Etymology: New Latin Date: 1961 any of a genus (Rhinovirus) of picornaviruses associated with disorders of the upper respiratory tract (as the common cold)
rhiz-
or rhizo- combining form Etymology: New Latin, from Greek, from rhiza — more at root root
rhizo-
combining form see rhiz-
rhizobial
adjective see rhizobium
rhizobium
noun (plural rhizobia) Etymology: New Latin, from rhiz- + Greek bios life — more at quick Date: 1921 any of a genus (Rhizobium) of small heterotrophic soil bacteria capable ...
rhizoctonia
noun Etymology: New Latin, from rhiz- + Greek -ktonos killing, from kteinein to kill; akin to Sanskrit kṣaṇoti he wounds Date: 1897 any of a form genus (Rhizoctonia) of ...
rhizoid
noun Date: 1875 a rootlike structure • rhizoidal adjective
rhizoidal
adjective see rhizoid
rhizomatous
adjective Etymology: International Scientific Vocabulary, from New Latin rhizomat-, rhizoma Date: 1847 having, resembling, or being a rhizome
rhizome
noun Etymology: New Latin rhizomat-, rhizoma, from Greek rhizōmat-, rhizōma mass of roots, from rhizoun to cause to take root, from rhiza root — more at root Date: 1845 ...
rhizomic
adjective see rhizome
rhizoplane
noun Date: 1949 the external surface of roots together with closely adhering soil particles and debris
rhizopod
noun Etymology: New Latin Rhizopoda, from rhiz- + -poda -pod Date: 1851 any of a superclass (Rhizopoda) of usually creeping protozoans (as an amoeba or a foraminifer) having ...
rhizopus
noun Etymology: New Latin, from rhiz- + Greek pous foot — more at foot Date: 1887 any of a genus (Rhizopus) of mold fungi including some economically valuable forms and ...
rhizosphere
noun Etymology: International Scientific Vocabulary Date: 1929 soil that surrounds and is influenced by the roots of a plant
rhizotomy
noun (plural -mies) Etymology: International Scientific Vocabulary Date: 1911 the operation of cutting the anterior or posterior spinal nerve roots
rho
noun Etymology: Greek rhō, of Semitic origin; akin to Hebrew rēsh resh Date: 15th century the 17th letter of the Greek alphabet — see alphabet table
rhod-
or rhodo- combining form Etymology: New Latin, from Latin, from Greek, from rhodon rose — more at rose rose ; red
rhodamine
noun Usage: often capitalized Etymology: International Scientific Vocabulary Date: 1888 any of a group of yellowish-red to blue fluorescent dyes; especially a brilliant ...
Rhode Island
geographical name 1. (or officially Rhode Island and Providence Plantations) state NE United States capital Providence area 1212 square miles (3139 square kilometers), ...
Rhode Island and Providence Plantations
geographical name see Rhode Island 1
Rhode Island Red
noun Etymology: Rhode Island, United States state Date: 1896 any of an American breed of general-purpose domestic chickens having a long heavy body, smooth yellow or reddish ...
Rhode Island White
noun Date: circa 1923 any of an American breed of domestic chickens resembling Rhode Island Reds but having pure white plumage
Rhode Islander
noun see Rhode Island
Rhodes
I. biographical name Cecil John 1853-1902 British administrator & financier in South Africa II. geographical name or Modern Greek Ródhos 1. island Greece in the SE Aegean, ...
Rhodes grass
noun Etymology: Cecil J. Rhodes Date: 1915 an African perennial grass (Chloris gayana) widely cultivated as a forage grass especially in dry regions
Rhodes scholar
noun Date: 1902 a holder of one of numerous scholarships founded under the will of Cecil J. Rhodes that can be used at Oxford University for two or three years and are open to ...
Rhodesia
geographical name 1. region central S Africa comprising Zambia & Zimbabwe; contains rich archaeological findings 2. — see Zimbabwe 2 • Rhodesian adjective or noun
Rhodesia and Nyasaland, Federation of
geographical name former country S Africa comprising South Rhodesia, North Rhodesia, & Nyasaland; a federal state within the Commonwealth; dissolved 1963
Rhodesian
adjective or noun see Rhodesia
Rhodesian man
noun Etymology: Northern Rhodesia, Africa Date: 1921 an extinct African hominid (Homo sapiens rhodesiensis) having long limb bones and a cranial capacity like those of modern ...
Rhodesian ridgeback
noun Usage: often capitalized 2d R Date: 1925 any of an African breed of powerful long-bodied hunting dogs having a dense harsh short tan coat with a characteristic crest of ...
Rhodian
adjective or noun see Rhodes II
rhodium
noun Etymology: New Latin, from Greek rhodon rose Date: 1804 a rare silvery-white hard ductile metallic element that is resistant to acids, occurs native but is usually ...
rhodo-
combining form see rhod-
rhodochrosite
noun Etymology: German Rhodocrosit, from Greek rhodochrōs rose-colored, from rhod- + chrōs color — more at chromatic Date: 1836 a rose-red mineral consisting essentially ...
rhododendron
noun Etymology: New Latin, from Latin, oleander, from Greek, from rhod- + dendron tree — more at dendr- Date: 1664 any of a genus (Rhododendron) of widely cultivated shrubs ...
rhodolite
noun Date: 1897 a pink or purple garnet used as a gem
rhodomontade
variant of rodomontade
rhodonite
noun Etymology: German Rhodonit, from Greek rhodon rose Date: 1823 a pale red triclinic mineral that consists essentially of manganese silicate and is used as an ornamental ...
Rhodope
geographical name mountains S Bulgaria & NE Greece; highest Musala 9596 feet (2925 meters)
rhodopsin
noun Etymology: International Scientific Vocabulary rhod- + Greek opsis sight, vision + International Scientific Vocabulary 1-in — more at optic Date: 1886 a red ...
rhodora
noun Etymology: New Latin, alteration of Latin rodarum, a plant Date: circa 1731 an azalea (Rhododendron canadense) of northeastern North America that has spring-flowering ...
rhomb
noun (plural rhombs) Etymology: Middle French rhombe, from Latin rhombus Date: circa 1578 1. rhombus 2. rhombohedron
rhomb-
or rhombo- combining form Etymology: New Latin, from Greek rhombos rhombus
rhombencephalon
noun Etymology: New Latin Date: 1897 hindbrain 1
rhombic
adjective Date: 1701 1. having the form of a rhombus 2. orthorhombic
rhombo-
combining form see rhomb-
rhombohedral
adjective see rhombohedron
rhombohedron
noun (plural -drons or rhombohedra) Etymology: New Latin Date: 1836 a parallelepiped whose faces are rhombuses • rhombohedral adjective
rhomboid
I. noun Etymology: Middle French rhomboïde, from Latin rhomboides, from Greek rhomboeidēs resembling a rhombus, from rhombos Date: 1570 a parallelogram with no right angles ...
rhomboidal
adjective see rhomboid II
rhomboideus
noun (plural rhomboidei) Etymology: New Latin, from Latin rhomboides rhomboid Date: circa 1836 either of two muscles that lie beneath the trapezius muscle and connect the ...
rhombus
noun (plural rhombuses or rhombi) Etymology: Latin, from Greek rhombos piece of wood whirled on a string, lozenge, from rhembein to whirl Date: circa 1567 a parallelogram ...
rhonchus
noun (plural rhonchi) Etymology: Late Greek, from rhenchein to snore, wheeze; probably akin to Old Irish sreinnid he snores Date: 1829 a whistling or snoring sound heard on ...
Rhondda
I. biographical name 1st Viscount 1856-1918 David Alfred Thomas British industrialist & administrator II. geographical name town SE Wales NW of Cardiff population 76,300
Rhondda Cynon Taff
geographical name administrative area of S Wales area 164 square miles (424 square kilometers)
Rhône
geographical name river 505 miles (813 kilometers) Switzerland & France rising in the Alps and flowing through Lake Geneva into Gulf of Lion
rhubarb
noun Etymology: Middle English rubarbe, from Anglo-French reubarbe, from Medieval Latin reubarbarum, alteration of rha barbarum, literally, barbarian rhubarb Date: 15th ...
rhumb
noun (plural rhumbs) Etymology: Spanish rumbo rhumb, rhumb line Date: 1578 1. a line or course on a single bearing 2. any of the points of the mariner's compass
rhumb line
noun Etymology: Spanish rumbo Date: 1669 a line on the surface of the earth that follows a single compass bearing and makes equal oblique angles with all meridians — called ...
rhumba
variant of rumba
rhus
noun (plural rhuses or rhus) Etymology: New Latin, from Latin, sumac, from Greek rhous Date: circa 1611 sumac 2
Rhyl
geographical name town & port NE Wales on Irish Sea population 22,714
rhyme
I. noun also rime Etymology: Middle English rime, from Anglo-French Date: 13th century 1. a. (1) rhyming verse (2) poetry b. a composition in verse that rhymes ...
rhyme or reason
noun Date: 15th century good sense or reason
rhyme royal
noun Date: circa 1841 a stanza of seven lines in iambic pentameter with a rhyme scheme of ababbcc
rhyme scheme
noun Date: 1917 the arrangement of rhymes in a stanza or a poem
rhymeless
adjective see rhyme I
rhymer
noun see rhyme II
rhymester
also rimester noun Date: 1589 an inferior poet
rhyming slang
noun Date: 1859 slang in which the word intended is replaced by a word or phrase that rhymes with it (as loaf of bread for head) or the first part of the phrase (as loaf for ...
rhynchocephalian
noun Etymology: ultimately from Greek rhynchos beak, snout + kephalē head — more at cephalic Date: 1886 any of an order (Rhynchocephalia) of reptiles resembling lizards ...
rhyolite
noun Etymology: German Rhyolith, from Greek rhyax stream, stream of lava (from rhein) + German -lith -lite Date: 1868 a very acid volcanic rock that is the lava form of ...
rhyolitic
adjective see rhyolite
rhythm
noun Etymology: Middle French & Latin; Middle French rhythme, from Latin rhythmus, from Greek rhythmos, probably from rhein to flow — more at stream Date: 1560 1. a. an ...
rhythm and blues
noun Date: 1949 popular music typically including elements of blues and African-American folk music and marked by a strong beat and simple chord structure

<< < 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 > >>

© en-de-fr.com.ua - EN-DE-FR 2009-2017 Информация публикуется на сайте для ознакомительного процесса.
 
Выполнено за: 0.049 c;