Слова на букву quin-sask (6389) New Collegiate Dictionary
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Слова на букву quin-sask (6389)

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running time
noun Date: 1939 the duration of a motion picture, a theatrical performance, or a recording
running title
noun Date: 1668 the title or abbreviated title of a volume printed at the top of left-hand text pages or sometimes of all text pages
running water
noun Date: 1872 water distributed through pipes and fixtures
runny
adjective Date: 1817 having a tendency to run: as a. extremely or excessively soft and liquid b. secreting a thin flow of mucus
Runnymede
geographical name meadow S England in Surrey on S bank of the Thames
runoff
noun Date: 1873 1. a final race, contest, or election to decide an earlier one that has not resulted in a decision in favor of any one competitor 2. the portion of ...
runover
noun Date: 1927 matter for publication that exceeds the space allotted
runt
noun Etymology: origin unknown Date: 1501 1. chiefly Scottish a hardened stalk or stem of a plant 2. an animal unusually small of its kind; especially the smallest of a ...
runtiness
noun see runt
runtish
adjective see runt
runty
adjective see runt
runway
noun Date: 1833 1. a. a beaten path made by animals b. a passageway for animals 2. a paved strip of ground on a landing field for the landing and takeoff of aircraft ...
Runyon
biographical name (Alfred) Damon 1884-1946 American author • Runyonesque adjective
Runyonesque
adjective see Runyon
rupee
noun Etymology: Hindi & Urdu rūpaiyā, from Sanskrit rūpya coined silver Date: 1610 — see money table
Rupert
I. biographical name Prince 1619-1682 Count Palatine of Rhine & Duke of Bavaria English (German-born) Royalist general & admiral II. geographical name river 380 miles (612 ...
Rupert's Land
geographical name Prince Rupert's Land
rupiah
noun (plural rupiah or rupiahs) Etymology: Malay, from Hindi & Urdu rūpaiyā rupee Date: 1947 — see money table
rupture
I. noun Etymology: Middle English ruptur, from Anglo-French or Latin; Anglo-French rupture, from Latin ruptura fracture, from ruptus, past participle of rumpere to break — ...
rural
adjective Etymology: Middle English, from Middle French, from Latin ruralis, from rur-, rus open land — more at room Date: 15th century of or relating to the country, ...
rural dean
noun Date: circa 1628 dean 1b
rural delivery
noun see rural free delivery
rural free delivery
noun Date: 1892 free delivery of mail to a rural area — called also rural delivery
rural route
noun Date: 1898 a mail-delivery route in a rural free delivery area
ruralist
noun Date: 1739 one who lives in a rural area
rurality
noun see rural
rurally
adverb see rural
rurban
adjective Etymology: blend of rural and urban Date: 1918 of, relating to, or constituting an area which is chiefly residential but where some farming is carried on
Ruritan
noun Etymology: Ruritan National, a service club Date: 1968 a member of a major national service club
Ruritanian
adjective Etymology: Ruritania, fictional kingdom in the novel Prisoner of Zenda (1894) by Anthony Hope Date: 1896 of, relating to, or having the characteristics of an ...
rus in urbe
foreign term Etymology: Latin country in the city
Ruschuk
geographical name see Ruse
ruse
noun Etymology: French, from Old French, roundabout path taken by fleeing game, trickery, from reuser Date: 1625 a wily subterfuge Synonyms: see trick
Ruse
or Turkish Ruschuk geographical name city NE Bulgaria on the Danube S of Bucharest population 192,365
ruse de guerre
foreign term Etymology: French war stratagem
Rush
I. biographical name Benjamin 1745-1813 American physician & patriot II. biographical name Richard 1780-1859 son of preceding American diplomat & statesman
rush
I. noun Etymology: Middle English, from Old English rysc; akin to Middle High German rusch rush, Lithuanian regzti to knit Date: before 12th century any of various ...
rush candle
noun Date: 1591 rushlight
rush hour
noun Date: 1890 a period of the day when the demands especially of traffic or business are at a peak
Rushdie
biographical name (Ahmed) Salman 1947- British (Indian-born) writer
rushee
noun Date: circa 1916 a college or university student who is being rushed by a fraternity or sorority
rusher
noun Date: 1654 one that rushes; especially ballcarrier
rushing
noun Date: 1883 the act of advancing a football by running plays ; the use of running plays; also yardage gained by running plays
rushlight
noun Date: 1710 a candle that consists of the pith of a rush dipped in grease
Rushmore, Mount
geographical name mountain 5600 feet (1707 meters) W South Dakota in Black Hills on which are carved faces of presidents Washington, Jefferson, Lincoln, Theodore Roosevelt; a ...
rushy
adjective see rush I
rusk
noun Etymology: modification of Spanish & Portuguese rosca coil, twisted roll Date: 1595 1. hard crisp bread originally used as ship's stores 2. a sweet or plain bread ...
Rusk
biographical name (David) Dean 1909-1994 United States secretary of state (1961-69)
Ruska
biographical name Ernst August Friedrich 1906-1988 German physicist
Ruskin
biographical name John 1819-1900 English essayist, critic, & reformer • Ruskinian adjective
Ruskinian
adjective see Ruskin
Russ
noun (plural Russ or Russes) Etymology: ultimately from Old Russian Rus' the East Slavic-speaking lands Date: 1537 Russian • Russ adjective
Russell
I. biographical name Bertrand Arthur William 1872-1970 3d Earl Russell English mathematician & philosopher II. biographical name Bill 1934- William Felton Russell American ...
Russell Cave National Monument
geographical name reservation NE Alabama including cavern where remains of early pre-Columbian humans have been found
Russellville
geographical name city NW central Arkansas population 23,682
russet
I. noun Etymology: Middle English, from Anglo-French, from russet, adjective, russet, from rus, rous red, from Latin russus; akin to Latin ruber red — more at red Date: 13th ...
russeting
also russetting noun Date: 1912 a brownish roughened area on the skin of fruit (as apples) caused by injury
russetting
noun see russeting
Russia
or Russian Rossiya geographical name 1. (or formerly Muscovy) former empire E Europe & N Asia coextensive (except for Finland & Kars, a mountainous region now in NE Turkey) ...
Russia calf
noun see Russia leather
Russia leather
noun Etymology: Russia, Europe Date: 1658 leather made by tanning various skins with willow, birch, or oak and then rubbing the flesh side with a phenolic oil distilled ...
Russian
noun Date: 1538 1. a. a native or inhabitant of Russia b. a member of the dominant Slavic-speaking ethnic group of Russia c. a person of Russian descent 2. a Slavic ...
Russian blue
noun Usage: often capitalized B Date: 1889 any of a breed of slender long-bodied large-eared domestic cats with short silky bluish-gray fur
Russian dressing
noun Date: 1915 a dressing (as of mayonnaise or oil and vinegar) with added chili sauce, chopped pickles, or pimientos
Russian Federation
geographical name see Russia 3
Russian olive
noun Date: 1913 a Eurasian large shrub or small tree (Elaeagnus angustifolia) of the oleaster family that has silvery foliage and is widely cultivated especially as an ...
Russian roulette
noun Date: 1937 1. an act of bravado consisting of spinning the cylinder of a revolver loaded with one cartridge, pointing the muzzle at one's own head, and pulling the ...
Russian sage
noun Date: 1940 an upright Asian subshrub (Perovskia atriplicifolia) of the mint family that is grown as an ornamental for its long narrow panicles of violet-blue flowers and ...
Russian thistle
noun Date: 1894 a prickly European saltwort (Salsola kali) that is a serious weed in North America — called also Russian tumbleweed
Russian tumbleweed
noun see Russian thistle
Russian Turkestan
geographical name region formerly comprising the republics of Soviet Central Asia
Russian wolfhound
noun Date: 1872 borzoi
Russianization
noun see Russianize
Russianize
transitive verb (-ized; -izing) Date: 1831 to make Russian • Russianization noun
Russianness
noun see Russian
Russification
noun see Russify
Russify
transitive verb (-fied; -fying) Date: 1865 Russianize • Russification noun
Russki
or Russky or Russkie noun (plural Russkies or Russkis) Etymology: Russian russkiĭ, adjective & noun, Russian, from Old Russian, from Rus' Date: 1858 Russian 1
Russkie
noun see Russki
Russky
noun see Russki
Russo-
combining form Etymology: Russia & Russian Russian and
rust
I. noun Etymology: Middle English, from Old English rūst; akin to Old English rēad red — more at red Date: before 12th century 1. a. the reddish brittle coating formed ...
rust belt
noun Usage: often capitalized R&B Date: 1983 the northeastern and midwestern states of the United States in which heavy industry has declined — called also rust bowl
rust bowl
noun see rust belt
rust bucket
noun Date: 1945 an old and dilapidated ship
rust mite
noun Date: 1884 any of various small eriophyid mites that burrow in the surface of leaves or fruits usually producing brown or reddish patches
rustic
I. adjective also rustical Etymology: Middle English rustik, from Latin rusticus, from rus open land — more at room Date: 15th century 1. of, relating to, or suitable for ...
rustical
adjective see rustic I
rustically
adverb see rustic I
rusticate
verb (-cated; -cating) Date: 1660 intransitive verb to go into or reside in the country ; follow a rustic life transitive verb 1. chiefly British to suspend from school ...
rustication
noun see rusticate
rusticator
noun see rusticate
rusticity
noun see rustic I
rustily
adverb see rusty I
Rustin
biographical name Bayard 1910-1987 American civil rights leader
rustiness
noun see rusty I
rustle
I. verb (rustled; rustling) Etymology: Middle English rustelen Date: 14th century intransitive verb 1. to make or cause a rustle 2. a. to act or move with energy or ...
rustler
noun see rustle I
rustproof
adjective Date: 1691 incapable of rusting
rusty
I. adjective (rustier; -est) Date: before 12th century 1. affected by or as if by rust; especially stiff with or as if with rust 2. inept and slow through lack of practice ...
rut
I. noun Etymology: Middle English rutte, from Middle French ruit rut, disturbance, from Late Latin rugitus roar, from Latin rugire to roar; akin to Middle Irish rucht roar, Old ...
rutabaga
noun Etymology: Swedish dialect rotabagge, from rot root + bagge bag Date: circa 1791 a turnip (Brassica napus napobrassica) that usually produces a large yellowish root ...
ruth
noun Etymology: Middle English ruthe, from ruen to rue Date: 13th century 1. compassion for the misery of another 2. sorrow for one's own faults ; remorse
Ruth
I. noun Etymology: Hebrew Rūth Date: 14th century 1. a Moabite woman who accompanied Naomi to Bethlehem and became the ancestress of David 2. a short narrative book of ...
Ruthene
noun see Ruthenia
Ruthenia
geographical name — see Zakarpats'ka • Ruthene noun • Ruthenian adjective or noun
Ruthenian
adjective or noun see Ruthenia
ruthenium
noun Etymology: New Latin, from Medieval Latin Ruthenia Ruthenia Date: 1848 a rare hard silvery-white metallic element occurring in platinum ores and used especially as a ...
Rutherford
I. biographical name Ernest 1871-1937 1st Baron Rutherford of Nelson British physicist II. biographical name Joseph Franklin 1869-1942 American leader of Jehovah's Witnesses
rutherfordium
noun Etymology: New Latin, from Ernest Rutherford Date: 1969 a short-lived radioactive element that is produced artificially — see element table
ruthful
adjective Date: 13th century 1. full of ruth ; tender 2. full of sorrow ; woeful 3. causing sorrow • ruthfully adverb • ruthfulness noun
ruthfully
adverb see ruthful
ruthfulness
noun see ruthful
Ruthian
adjective see Ruth II
ruthless
adjective Date: 14th century having no pity ; merciless, cruel • ruthlessly adverb • ruthlessness noun
ruthlessly
adverb see ruthless
ruthlessness
noun see ruthless
rutilant
adjective Etymology: Middle English rutilaunt, from Latin rutilant-, rutilans, past participle of rutilare to glow reddish, from rutilus ruddy; probably akin to Latin ruber red ...
rutile
noun Etymology: German Rutil, from Latin rutilus Date: 1803 a reddish-brown to black mineral that consists of titanium dioxide usually with a little iron and has a brilliant ...
rutin
noun Etymology: German, from New Latin Ruta, genus that includes rue + German -in 1-in Date: 1857 a yellow crystalline flavonol glycoside C27H30O16 that occurs in various ...
Rutland
or Rutlandshire geographical name former county E central England capital Oakham
Rutlandshire
geographical name see Rutland
Rutledge
I. biographical name John 1739-1800 American statesman & jurist; chief justice United States Supreme Court (1795) II. biographical name Wiley Blount 1894-1949 American ...
ruttish
adjective Date: 1601 inclined to rut ; lustful • ruttishly adverb • ruttishness noun
ruttishly
adverb see ruttish
ruttishness
noun see ruttish
rutty
adjective (ruttier; -est) Date: 1596 full of ruts
Ruvuma
or Portuguese Rovuma geographical name river about 450 miles (724 kilometers) SE Africa rising in S Tanzania & flowing E into Indian Ocean
Ruwenzori
geographical name mountain group E central Africa between Lake Albert & Lake Edward, on boundary between Uganda & Democratic Republic of the Congo — see Stanley (Mount)
Ruysdael
biographical name see Ruisdael
Ružička
biographical name Leopold 1887-1976 Swiss (Croatian-born) chemist
RV
I. noun Date: 1967 recreational vehicle II. abbreviation Revised Version
RW
abbreviation 1. radiological warfare; radiological weapon 2. right worthy
Rwanda
or formerly Ruanda geographical name country E central Africa; a republic capital Kigali area 10,169 square miles (26,338 square kilometers), population 7,584,000 — see ...
Rwandan
adjective or noun see Rwanda
Rwandese
adjective or noun see Rwanda
rwy
or ry abbreviation railway
Rx
noun Etymology: alteration of ℞, symbol used at the beginning of a prescription, abbreviation for Latin recipe, literally, take — more at recipe Date: 1926 prescription ...
ry
abbreviation see rwy
rya
noun Etymology: Rya, village in southwest Sweden Date: 1945 a Scandinavian handwoven rug with a deep resilient comparatively flat pile; also the weave typical of this rug
Ryazan'
geographical name city W central Russia in Europe on Oka River SE of Moscow population 529,000
Rybinsk
or 1946-57 Shcherbakov or 1984-89 Andropov geographical name city W central Russia in Europe population 252,000
Rybnik
geographical name commune S Poland population 142,588
Ryder
biographical name Albert Pinkham 1847-1917 American painter
Rydz-Śmigły
biographical name Edward 1886-1941 Polish general
Rye
geographical name town SE England in East Sussex population 4293
rye
I. noun Etymology: Middle English, from Old English ryge; akin to Old High German rocko rye, Lithuanian rugys Date: before 12th century 1. a hardy annual grass (Secale ...
rye bread
noun Date: 1547 bread made wholly or in part of rye flour; especially a light bread often with caraway seeds
rye whiskey
noun Date: 1785 a whiskey distilled from rye or from rye and malt
ryegrass
noun Date: 1712 any of several grasses (genus Lolium); especially either of two grasses (L. perenne and L. multiflorum) that are used as lawn and pasture grasses and as cover ...
Ryukyu Islands
geographical name islands W Pacific extending between Kyushu, Japan, & Taiwan; belonged to Japan 1895-1945; occupied by United States 1945; returned to Japan in 1953 (N ...
Ryukyuan
adjective or noun see Ryukyu Islands
Rzeszow
geographical name commune SE Poland population 150,754
S
I. abbreviation 1. satisfactory 2. short 3. standard deviation of a sample 4. svedberg II. symbol sulfur
s
I. noun (plural s's or ss) Usage: often capitalized, often attributive Date: before 12th century 1. a. the 19th letter of the English alphabet b. a graphic ...
S and H
abbreviation shipping and handling
S and L
noun Date: 1951 savings and loan association
S and M
noun Date: circa 1965 sadomasochism
S Dak
abbreviation South Dakota
S level
noun Date: 1951 1. the highest of three standardized British examinations in a secondary school subject used as a qualification for university entrance; also successful ...
S phase
noun Etymology: synthesis Date: 1966 the period in the cell cycle during which DNA replication takes place — compare G1 phase, G2 phase, M phase
S wave
noun Etymology: secondary Date: 1913 a wave (as from an earthquake) in which the propagated disturbance is a shear in an elastic medium (as the earth) — compare pressure ...
s'il vous plaît
foreign term Etymology: French if you please
s'more
noun Etymology: alteration of some more Date: 1974 a dessert consisting usually of toasted marshmallow and pieces of chocolate bar sandwiched between two graham crackers
S-M
or S/M abbreviation sadomasochism; sadomasochist
s/he
pronoun Date: 1973 she or he — used in writing as a pronoun of common gender
S/M
abbreviation see S-M
Sa
abbreviation Saturday
SA
abbreviation 1. Salvation Army 2. seaman apprentice 3. sex appeal 4. [L sine anno without year] without date 5. South Africa 6. South America 7. subject to approval
Saale
geographical name river 265 miles (426 kilometers) E central Germany rising in NE Bavaria in the Fichtelgebirge & flowing N into the Elbe
Saami
variant of Sami
Saanen
noun Etymology: Saanen, locality in southwest Switzerland Date: 1906 any of a Swiss breed of usually white and hornless short-haired dairy goats
Saanich
geographical name municipality Canada in British Columbia on SE Vancouver Island N of Victoria population 103,654
Saar
geographical name 1. (or French Sarre) river about 150 miles (241 kilometers) Europe flowing from Vosges Mountains in France N to the Moselle in W Germany 2. (or Saarland) ...
Saarbrücken
geographical name city SW Germany capital of Saarland population 192,030
Saaremaa
geographical name — see Sarema
Saarinen
I. biographical name Eero 1910-1961 American architect II. biographical name (Gottlieb) Eliel 1873-1950 father of preceding Finnish architect
Saarland
geographical name see Saar 2
Saba
geographical name 1. island West Indies in Leeward Islands; part of Netherlands Antilles; chief settlement The Bottom area 5 square miles (13 square kilometers), population ...
Sabadell
geographical name commune NE Spain NW of Barcelona population 184,460
sabadilla
noun Etymology: Spanish cebadilla Date: 1812 a Mexican plant (Schoenocaulon officinale) of the lily family; also its seeds that are used as a source of veratrine and in ...
Sabah
or formerly North Borneo geographical name state Malaysia in NE Borneo, formerly a British colony capital Kota Kinabalu area 29,507 square miles (76,423 square kilometers), ...
Sabana Grande
geographical name city SW Puerto Rico population 25,935
Sabarmati
geographical name river about 250 miles (402 kilometers) W India flowing S into head of Gulf of Khambhat
Sabatier
biographical name Paul 1854-1941 French chemist
Sabatini
biographical name Rafael 1875-1950 English (Italian-born) author
sabayon
noun Etymology: French, modification of Italian zabaione Date: 1906 1. zabaglione 2. a sauce of egg yolks, wine, and savory seasonings (as mustard or pepper)
sabbat
noun Usage: often capitalized Etymology: French, literally, sabbath, from Latin sabbatum Date: 1652 1. witches' Sabbath 2. any of eight neo-pagan religious festivals ...
Sabbatarian
I. noun Etymology: Latin sabbatarius, from sabbatum sabbath Date: 1613 1. one who observes the Sabbath on Saturday in conformity with the letter of the fourth commandment 2. ...
Sabbatarianism
noun Date: circa 1674 strict and often rigorous observance of the Sabbath
Sabbath
noun Etymology: Middle English sabat, from Anglo-French & Old English, from Latin sabbatum, from Greek sabbaton, from Hebrew shabbāth, literally, rest Date: before 12th ...
sabbatic
adjective see sabbatical I
sabbatical
I. adjective or sabbatic Etymology: Late Latin sabbaticus, from Greek sabbatikos, from sabbaton Date: 1599 1. of or relating to a sabbatical year 2. of or relating to the ...
sabbatical leave
noun see sabbatical year
sabbatical year
noun Date: 1599 1. often capitalized S a year of rest for the land observed every seventh year in ancient Judea 2. a leave often with pay granted usually every seventh year ...
Sabellian
noun Etymology: Latin Sabellus Sabine Date: 1601 1. a member of one of a group of early Italian peoples including Sabines and Samnites 2. one or all of several little known ...
saber
I. noun or sabre Etymology: French sabre, modification of German dialect Sabel, from Middle High German, probably of Slavic origin; akin to Russian sablya saber Date: 1680 1. ...
saber rattling
noun Date: 1922 ostentatious display of military power
saber saw
noun Date: 1953 a light portable electric saw with a pointed reciprocating blade; especially jigsaw 2
saber-toothed
adjective Date: 1849 having long sharp canine teeth
saber-toothed cat
noun see saber-toothed tiger
saber-toothed tiger
noun Date: 1849 any of numerous extinct cats (as genus Smilodon) widely distributed from the Oligocene through the Pleistocene and characterized by long curving upper canines ...
sabermetrician
noun see sabermetrics
sabermetrics
noun plural but singular in construction Etymology: saber- (from Society for American Baseball Research) + -metrics (as in econometrics) Date: 1982 the statistical analysis ...
Sabi
or in Mozambique Save geographical name river 400 miles (644 kilometers) SE Africa rising in central Zimbabwe & flowing E across S Mozambique to Indian Ocean
sabin
noun Etymology: Wallace C. W. Sabine died 1919 American physicist Date: 1934 a unit of acoustic absorption equivalent to the absorption by one square foot of a perfect ...
Sabin
biographical name Albert Bruce 1906-1993 American physician
Sabine
I. noun Etymology: Middle English Sabin, from Latin Sabinus Date: 14th century 1. a member of an ancient people of the Apennines northeast of Latium 2. the Italic language ...
sable
I. noun (plural sables) Etymology: Middle English, from Anglo-French, from Middle Low German sabel sable or its fur, from Middle High German zobel, of Slavic origin; akin to ...
Sable Island
geographical name island Canada 20 miles (32 kilometers) long in the Atlantic SE of Cape Canso; belongs to Nova Scotia
Sable, Cape
geographical name 1. cape at SW tip of Florida; southernmost point of United States mainland, at about 25°7′N 2. headland E Canada on an islet S of Cape Sable Island (7 ...
sablefish
noun Date: 1917 black cod
sabot
noun Etymology: French Date: 1607 1. a. a wooden shoe worn in various European countries b. (1) a strap across the instep in a shoe especially of the sandal type ...
sabotage
I. noun Etymology: French, from saboter to clatter with sabots, botch, sabotage, from sabot Date: 1910 1. destruction of an employer's property (as tools or materials) or the ...
saboteur
noun Etymology: French, from saboter Date: 1921 one that practices sabotage
sabra
noun Usage: often capitalized Etymology: Modern Hebrew ṣabhār, literally, prickly pear Date: 1945 a native-born Israeli
Sabrata
geographical name see Sabratha
Sabratha
or ancient Sabrata geographical name town Libya on the coast WNW of Tripoli population 30,836
sabre
I. noun see saber I II. transitive verb see saber II
Sac
variant of Sauk
SAC
abbreviation 1. special agent in charge 2. Strategic Air Command
sac
I. noun Etymology: French, literally, bag, from Latin saccus — more at sack Date: 1741 a pouch within an animal or plant often containing a fluid • saclike ...
sac fungus
noun Date: circa 1929 ascomycete
Sacagawea
also Sacajawea biographical name 1786?-1812 American Indian guide
sacahuista
noun see sacahuiste
sacahuiste
or sacahuista noun Etymology: Mexican Spanish zacahuiscle, from Nahuatl *zacahuitztli, from zacatl grass, hay + huitztli thorn Date: 1896 a bear grass (Nolina texana) of the ...
Sacajawea
biographical name see Sacagawea
sacaton
noun Etymology: American Spanish zacatón, from zacate coarse grass, from Nahuatl zacatl Date: 1846 a coarse perennial grass (Sporobolus wrightii) of the southwestern United ...
saccade
noun Etymology: French, twitch, jerk, from Middle French, from saquer to pull, draw Date: 1938 a small rapid jerky movement of the eye especially as it jumps from fixation ...
saccadic
adjective see saccade
saccate
adjective Etymology: New Latin saccatus, from Latin saccus Date: 1830 having the form of a sac or pouch
sacchar-
or sacchari- or saccharo- combining form Etymology: Latin saccharum, from Greek sakcharon, from Prakrit sakkharā, from Sanskrit śarkarā gravel, sugar sugar
saccharase
noun Etymology: International Scientific Vocabulary Date: 1920 invertase
sacchari-
combining form see sacchar-
saccharide
noun Date: 1895 a monosaccharide sugar or combination of sugars ; carbohydrate
saccharification
noun Date: 1839 the process of breaking a complex carbohydrate (as starch or cellulose) into its monosaccharide components • saccharify transitive verb
saccharify
transitive verb see saccharification
saccharimeter
noun Etymology: International Scientific Vocabulary Date: 1869 a device for measuring the amount of sugar in a solution; specifically a polarimeter so used
saccharin
noun Etymology: International Scientific Vocabulary Date: 1885 a crystalline compound C7H5NO3S that is unrelated to the carbohydrates, is several hundred times sweeter than ...
saccharine
adjective Etymology: Latin saccharum Date: circa 1674 1. a. of, relating to, or resembling that of sugar b. yielding or containing sugar 2. overly or sickishly ...
saccharinity
noun see saccharine
saccharo-
combining form see sacchar-
saccharoidal
adjective Date: 1838 having or being a fine granular texture like that of sugar lumps
saccharometer
noun Date: 1784 saccharimeter; especially a hydrometer with a special scale
saccharomyces
noun Etymology: New Latin, from sacchar- + -myces fungus, from Greek mykēs — more at myc- Date: 1873 any of a genus (Saccharomyces of the family Saccharomycetaceae) of ...
Sacco
biographical name Nicola 1891-1927 & Vanzetti Bartolomeo 1888-1927 American (Italian-born) anarchists
saccular
adjective Date: circa 1859 resembling a sac
sacculate
adjective see sacculated
sacculated
also sacculate adjective Date: circa 1836 having or formed of a series of saccular expansions • sacculation noun
sacculation
noun see sacculated
saccule
noun Etymology: New Latin sacculus, from Latin, diminutive of saccus bag — more at sack Date: circa 1839 a little sac; specifically the smaller chamber of the membranous ...
sacculus
noun (plural sacculi) Etymology: New Latin Date: 1728 saccule
sacerdotal
adjective Etymology: Middle English, from Middle French, from Latin sacerdotalis, from sacerdot-, sacerdos priest, from sacer sacred + -dot-, -dos (akin to facere to make) — ...
sacerdotalism
noun Date: 1856 religious belief emphasizing the powers of priests as essential mediators between God and humankind • sacerdotalist noun
sacerdotalist
noun see sacerdotalism
sacerdotally
adverb see sacerdotal
sachem
noun Etymology: Narragansett sâchim Date: 1622 1. a North American Indian chief; especially the chief of a confederation of the Algonquian tribes of the North Atlantic ...
sachemic
adjective see sachem
Sacher torte
noun Etymology: German Sachertorte, from Sacher (name of a family of 19th and 20th century Austrian restaurant proprietors) + German Torte torte Date: 1906 a rich chocolate ...
sachet
noun Etymology: Middle French, from Old French, diminutive of sac bag — more at sac Date: 15th century 1. a small bag or packet 2. a small bag containing a perfumed ...
sacheted
adjective see sachet
Sachs
I. biographical name Hans 1494-1576 German poet & Meistersinger II. biographical name Nelly 1891-1970 Swedish (German-born) dramatist & poet
Sachsen
geographical name — see saxony
sack
I. noun Etymology: Middle English sak bag, sackcloth, from Old English sacc, from Latin saccus bag & Late Latin saccus sackcloth, both from Greek sakkos bag, sackcloth, of ...
sack coat
noun Date: 1847 a man's jacket with a straight back

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