Слова на букву quin-sask (6389) New Collegiate Dictionary
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Слова на букву quin-sask (6389)

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rajah
noun see raja
rake
I. noun Etymology: Middle English, from Old English racu; akin to Old High German rehho rake Date: before 12th century 1. a. an implement equipped with projecting prongs ...
rake up
transitive verb Date: 1581 to make known or public ; uncover
rake-off
noun Etymology: rake off, verb; from the use of a rake by a croupier to collect the operator's profits in a gambling casino Date: 1888 a percentage or cut taken (as by an ...
rakehell
noun Date: 1554 libertine 2 • rakehell or rakehelly adjective
rakehelly
adjective see rakehell
raker
noun see rake II
raki
noun Etymology: Turkish, from Arabic 'araqī, literally, of liquor, from 'araq liquor, arrack Date: 1675 a Turkish liqueur flavored with aniseed
rakish
I. adjective Etymology: 5rake Date: 1706 of, relating to, or characteristic of a rake ; dissolute II. adjective Etymology: probably from 4rake; from the raking masts of ...
rakishly
adverb Date: 1838 in a rakish manner
rakishness
noun Date: circa 1828 the quality or state of being rakish
raku
noun Usage: often attributive Etymology: Japanese, literally, pleasure; from the use of the character for this word on a seal given to the family of the potter who introduced ...
rale
noun Etymology: French râle, from râler to make a rattling sound in the throat Date: 1828 an abnormal sound heard accompanying the normal respiratory sounds on auscultation ...
Ralegh
biographical name see Raleigh I
Raleigh
I. biographical name or Ralegh Sir Walter 1554-1618 English courtier, navigator, & historian II. geographical name city E central North Carolina, its capital population ...
Ralik
geographical name the W chain of the Marshall Islands
rallentando
adverb or adjective Etymology: Italian, literally, slowing down, verbal of rallentare to slow down again, from re- + allentare to slow down, from Late Latin, from Latin al- ad- ...
rally
I. verb (rallied; rallying) Etymology: French rallier, from Old French ralier, from re- + alier to unite — more at ally Date: 1603 transitive verb 1. a. to muster for ...
rallye
noun see rally II, 4
rallying
noun Date: 1957 the sport of driving in automobile rallies
rallying cry
noun Date: 1798 war cry
raloxifene
noun Etymology: ral- (of unknown origin) + -oxifene, alteration of -oxifen (as in tamoxifen) Date: 1993 a drug used orally in the form of its hydrochloride C28H27NO4S•HCl ...
RAM
noun Etymology: random-access memory Date: 1957 a computer memory on which data can be both read and written and on which the location of data does not affect the speed of ...
ram
I. noun Etymology: Middle English, from Old English ramm; akin to Old High German ram Date: before 12th century 1. a. a male sheep b. capitalized Aries 2. a. ...
Rama
noun Etymology: Sanskrit Rāma Date: 1819 a deity or deified hero of later Hinduism worshipped as an avatar of Vishnu
ramada
noun Etymology: American Spanish, from Spanish, arbor, from rama branch, alteration of ramo, from Latin ramus — more at ramify Date: 1853 Southwest a roofed shelter with ...
Ramadan
noun Etymology: Arabic Ramaḍān Date: circa 1595 the ninth month of the Islamic year observed as sacred with fasting practiced daily from dawn to sunset — see month ...
Ramakrishna
biographical name 1836-1886 Hindu religious
Raman
biographical name Sir Chandrasekhara Venkata 1888-1970 Indian physicist
Ramapo Mountains
geographical name mountains of the Appalachians N New Jersey & S New York; highest point 1164 feet (355 meters)
Ramat Gan
geographical name city W Israel E of Tel Aviv population 122,700
ramate
adjective Etymology: Latin ramus branch — more at ramify Date: 1897 ramose
ramble
I. verb (rambled; rambling) Etymology: Middle English, probably alteration of romblen, frequentative of romen to roam Date: 15th century intransitive verb 1. a. to move ...
rambler
noun Date: 1624 1. one that rambles 2. any of various climbing roses with long flexible canes and rather small often double flowers in large clusters 3. ranch house
ramblingly
adverb see ramble I
rambouillet
noun Usage: often capitalized Etymology: Rambouillet, France Date: 1847 any of a breed of large sturdy sheep developed in France
Rambouillet
geographical name town N France SW of Paris population 25,293
rambunctious
adjective Etymology: probably alteration of rumbustious Date: 1830 marked by uncontrollable exuberance ; unruly • rambunctiously adverb • rambunctiousness noun
rambunctiously
adverb see rambunctious
rambunctiousness
noun see rambunctious
rambutan
noun Etymology: Malay Date: 1707 a bright red spiny Malayan fruit closely related to the lychee; also a tree (Nephelium lappaceum) of the soapberry family that bears this ...
Rameau
biographical name Jean-Philippe 1683-1764 French composer
Ramée
biographical name Marie Louise de la 1839-1908 pseudonym Ouida English novelist
ramekin
also ramequin noun Etymology: French ramequin, from Low German ramken, diminutive of ram cream Date: circa 1706 1. a preparation of cheese especially with bread crumbs or ...
ramen
noun Etymology: Japanese rāmen Date: 1972 quick-cooking egg noodles usually served in a broth with bits of meat and vegetables
ramequin
noun see ramekin
Rameses
biographical name see Ramses
ramet
noun Etymology: Latin ramus branch Date: 1929 an independent member of a clone
Ramganga
geographical name river about 350 miles (563 kilometers) N India in Uttar Pradesh flowing S into the Ganges
ramie
noun Etymology: Malay rami Date: 1832 1. an Asian perennial plant (Boehmeria nivea) of the nettle family 2. a. the strong lustrous bast fiber of ramie capable of being ...
ramification
noun Date: 1665 1. a. branch, offshoot b. a branched structure 2. a. the act or process of branching b. arrangement of branches (as on a plant) 3. consequence, ...
ramify
verb (-fied; -fying) Etymology: Middle English ramifien, from Anglo-French ramifier, from Medieval Latin ramificare, from Latin ramus branch; akin to Latin radix root — more ...
Ramism
noun Etymology: Petrus Ramus died 1572 French philosopher Date: 1710 the doctrines of Ramus based on opposition to Aristotelianism and advocacy of a new logic blended with ...
Ramist
noun or adjective see Ramism
ramjet
noun Date: 1942 a jet engine that consists essentially of a hollow tube without mechanical components and depends on the aircraft's speed of flight to compress the air which ...
rammer
noun see ram II
Ramón y Cajal
biographical name Santiago 1852-1934 Spanish histologist
Ramos
biographical name Fidel V. 1928- president of the Philippines (1992-98)
Ramos-Horta
biographical name José 1949- East Timorese peace activist
ramose
adjective Etymology: Latin ramosus, from ramus branch Date: 1689 consisting of or having branches
ramp
I. verb Etymology: Middle English, from Anglo-French ramper to crawl, climb, rear, of Germanic origin; akin to Old High German rimpfan to bend, wrinkle — more at rumple Date: ...
ramp-up
noun Date: 1980 buildup, increase
rampage
I. intransitive verb (rampaged; rampaging) Etymology: Scots Date: 1808 to rush wildly about II. noun Date: 1861 a course of violent, riotous, or reckless action or ...
rampageous
adjective see rampage II
rampageously
adverb see rampage II
rampageousness
noun see rampage II
Rampal
biographical name Jean-Pierre 1922-2000 French flutist
rampancy
noun Date: 1664 the quality or state of being rampant
rampant
adjective Etymology: Middle English, from Anglo-French, present participle of ramper Date: 14th century 1. a. rearing upon the hind legs with forelegs extended b. ...
rampantly
adverb see rampant
rampart
noun Etymology: Middle French, from ramparer to fortify, from re- + emparer to defend, from Old Occitan emparar, from Vulgar Latin *imparare, from Latin in- 2in- + parare to ...
rampike
noun Etymology: origin unknown Date: 1853 an erect broken or dead tree
Rampur
geographical name 1. former state N India NW of Bareilly, now in Uttar Pradesh 2. city, its capital, ENE of Delhi population 242,752
ramrod
I. noun Date: 1757 1. a rod for ramming home the charge in a muzzle-loading firearm 2. a cleaning rod for small arms 3. boss, overseer II. adjective Date: 1850 marked ...
Ramsay
I. biographical name Allan 1686-1758 Scottish poet II. biographical name James Andrew Broun 1812-1860 10th Earl & 1st Marquis of Dalhousie British colonial ...
Ramses
or Rameses biographical name name of 11 kings of Egypt: especially II (reigned 1304-1237 B.C.); III (reigned 1198-1166 B.C.)
Ramsey
I. biographical name (Arthur) Michael 1904-1988 archbishop of Canterbury (1961-74) II. biographical name Norman Foster 1915- American physicist
Ramsgate
geographical name town SE England in Kent on North Sea N of Dover population 39,642
ramshackle
adjective Etymology: alteration of earlier ransackled, from past participle of obsolete ransackle, frequentative of ransack Date: 1830 1. appearing ready to collapse ; ...
ramshorn
noun Date: 1901 any of various snails (as genera Planorbis, Helisoma, and Planorbarius) often used as aquarium scavengers
ramus
noun (plural rami) Etymology: New Latin, from Latin, branch — more at ramify Date: 1733 a projecting part, elongated process, or branch: as a. the posterior more or less ...
ran
past of run
Rancagua
geographical name city central Chile population 139,925
ranch
I. noun Etymology: Mexican Spanish rancho small ranch, from Spanish, camp, hut & Spanish dialect, small farm, from Old Spanish ranchearse to take up quarters, from Middle ...
ranch dressing
noun Date: 1981 a creamy salad dressing usually containing milk or buttermilk and mayonnaise
ranch house
noun Date: 1862 1. the main dwelling house on a ranch 2. a one-story house typically with a low-pitched roof and an open plan
rancher
noun Date: 1836 one who owns or works on a ranch
ranchero
noun (plural -ros) Etymology: Mexican Spanish, from rancho Date: 1826 rancher; also ranch 1
Ranchi
geographical name city E India, capital of Jharkhand population 599,306
ranchman
noun Date: 1856 rancher
rancho
noun (plural ranchos) Etymology: Mexican Spanish, small ranch Date: 1840 ranch 1
Rancho Cucamonga
geographical name city SW California NW of Riverside population 127,743
Rancho Palos Verdes
geographical name city SW California on coast S of Torrance population 41,145
Rancho Santa Margarita
geographical name city S California population 47,214
rancid
adjective Etymology: Latin rancidus, from rancēre to be rancid Date: 1646 1. having a rank smell or taste 2. offensive • rancidity noun • rancidness noun
rancidity
noun see rancid
rancidness
noun see rancid
rancor
noun Etymology: Middle English rancour, from Anglo-French rancur, from Late Latin rancor rancidity, rancor, from Latin rancēre Date: 14th century bitter deep-seated ill ...
rancorous
adjective Date: circa 1570 marked by rancor ; deeply malevolent • rancorously adverb
rancorously
adverb see rancorous
rancour
British variant of rancor
rand
noun (plural rand) Etymology: the Rand, South Africa Date: 1961 1. — see money table 2. a former monetary unit of Botswana, Lesotho, and Swaziland
Rand
I. biographical name Ayn 1905-1982 American (Russian-born) writer II. geographical name Witwatersrand
Randers
geographical name city & port NE Denmark population 61,137
randiness
noun see randy I
Randolph
I. biographical name A(sa) Philip 1889-1979 American labor leader II. biographical name Edmund Jennings 1753-1813 American statesman III. biographical name John 1773-1833 ...
random
I. noun Etymology: Middle English, succession, surge, from Anglo-French randun, from Old French randir to run, of Germanic origin; akin to Old High German rinnan to run — more ...
random variable
noun Date: 1937 a variable that is itself a function of the result of a statistical experiment in which each outcome has a definite probability of occurrence — called also ...
random walk
noun Date: 1905 a process (as Brownian motion or genetic drift) consisting of a sequence of steps (as movements or changes in gene frequency) each of whose characteristics (as ...
random-access
adjective Date: 1953 permitting access to stored data in any order the user desires
random-access memory
noun Date: 1955 ram
randomization
noun see randomize
randomize
transitive verb (-ized; -izing) Date: 1926 to select, assign, or arrange in a random way • randomization noun • randomizer noun
randomized block
noun Date: 1926 an experimental design (as in horticulture) in which different treatments are distributed in random order in a block or plot — called also randomized block ...
randomized block design
noun see randomized block
randomizer
noun see randomize
randomly
adverb see random II
randomness
noun see random II
randy
I. adjective Etymology: probably from obsolete rand to rant Date: 1698 1. chiefly Scottish having a coarse manner 2. lustful, lecherous • randiness noun II. noun (plural ...
ranee
noun see rani
rang
past of ring
range
I. noun Usage: often attributive Etymology: Middle English, row of persons, from Anglo-French range, renge, from renger to range Date: 14th century 1. a. (1) a series ...
range finder
noun Date: 1872 1. an instrument used in gunnery to determine the distance of a target 2. a surveying instrument (as a transit) for determining quickly the distances, ...
rangeland
noun Date: 1931 land used or suitable for range
Rangeley Lakes
geographical name chain of lakes W Maine & N New Hampshire
ranger
noun Date: 14th century 1. a. the keeper of a British royal park or forest b. forest ranger 2. one that ranges 3. a. one of a body of organized armed men who ...
ranginess
noun see rangy
Rangoon
geographical name 1. (or Yangon) river 25 miles (40 kilometers) S Myanmar, the E outlet of the Irrawaddy 2. — see Yangon 2
rangy
adjective (rangier; -est) Date: 1868 1. able to range for considerable distances 2. a. long-limbed and long-bodied b. tall and slender 3. having room for ranging ...
rani
or ranee noun Etymology: Hindi & Urdu rānī, from Sanskrit rājñī, feminine of rājan king — more at royal Date: 1673 a Hindu queen ; a rajah's wife
ranid
noun Etymology: ultimately from Latin rana frog Date: 1888 any of a large family (Ranidae) of long-legged frogs distinguished by extensively webbed hind feet, horizontal ...
ranitidine
noun Etymology: probably from ranit- (blend of furan and nitr-) + -idine (as in cimetidine) Date: 1979 a histamine blocker C13H22N4O3S that is administered in the form of its ...
Ranjit Singh
biographical name 1780-1839 Lion of the Punjab founder of Sikh kingdom
rank
I. adjective Etymology: Middle English, from Old English ranc overbearing, strong; akin to Old Norse rakkr erect and perhaps to Old English riht right — more at right Date: ...
rank and file
noun Date: 1598 1. the enlisted personnel of an armed force 2. the individuals who constitute the body of an organization, society, or nation as distinguished from the ...
rank and filer
noun see rank and file
rank correlation
noun Date: 1907 a measure of correlation depending on rank
rank-and-file
adjective see rank and file
Ranke
biographical name Leopold von 1795-1886 German historian
ranker
noun Date: 1878 one who serves or has served in the ranks; especially a commissioned officer promoted from the ranks
Rankine
adjective Etymology: William J. M. Rankine died 1872 Scottish engineer & physicist Date: circa 1926 being, according to, or relating to an absolute-temperature scale on which ...
ranking
adjective Date: 1847 having a high position: as a. of the highest rank b. being next to the chairman in seniority
rankle
verb (rankled; rankling) Etymology: Middle English ranclen to fester, from Anglo-French rancler, from Old French draoncler, raoncler, from draoncle, raoncle festering sore, ...
rankly
adverb see rank I
rankness
noun see rank I
Rann of Kachchh
geographical name — see kachchh (Rann of)
Rann of Kutch
geographical name see Kachchh, Rann of
Rannoch, Loch
geographical name lake 9 miles (14 kilometers) long central Scotland
ransack
transitive verb Etymology: Middle English ransaken, from Old Norse rannsaka, from rann house + -saka (akin to Old English sēcan to seek) — more at seek Date: 13th century ...
ransacker
noun see ransack
Ransom
biographical name John Crowe 1888-1974 American educator & poet
ransom
I. noun Etymology: Middle English ransoun, from Anglo-French rançun, from Latin redemption-, redemptio — more at redemption Date: 13th century 1. a consideration paid or ...
ransomer
noun see ransom II
rant
I. verb Etymology: obsolete Dutch ranten, randen Date: 1601 intransitive verb 1. to talk in a noisy, excited, or declamatory manner 2. to scold vehemently transitive ...
ranter
noun see rant I
rantingly
adverb see rant I
ranula
noun Etymology: New Latin, from Latin, swelling on the tongue of cattle, from diminutive of rana frog Date: 15th century a cyst formed under the tongue by obstruction of a ...
ranunculus
noun (plural ranunculus or ranunculuses or ranunculi) Etymology: New Latin, from Latin, from diminutive of rana frog Date: 1543 buttercup
Rao
biographical name Pamulaparti Venkata Narasimha 1921- prime minister of India (1991-96)
rap
I. noun Etymology: Middle English rappe Date: 14th century 1. a sharp blow or knock 2. a. a sharp rebuke or criticism b. a negative and often undeserved reputation or ...
rap sheet
noun Date: 1960 a police arrest record especially for an individual
Rapa
geographical name island S Pacific in SE Tubuai group area 15 square miles (39 square kilometers), population 516
Rapa Nui
geographical name — see Easter Island
rapacious
adjective Etymology: Latin rapac-, rapax, from rapere to seize — more at rapid Date: 1651 1. excessively grasping or covetous 2. living on prey 3. ravenous Synonyms: ...
rapaciously
adverb see rapacious
rapaciousness
noun see rapacious
rapacity
noun Date: 1543 the quality of being rapacious
rape oil
noun see rapeseed oil
rapeseed
noun Date: 15th century the seed of the rape plant; also rape I
raphe
noun Etymology: New Latin, from Greek rhaphē seam, from rhaptein to sew Date: circa 1753 1. the seamlike union of the two lateral halves of a part or organ (as the tongue) ...
raphia
noun Etymology: New Latin, genus of palms, from Malagasy rafia raffia Date: circa 1866 raffia
raphide
noun (plural raphides) Etymology: French & New Latin; French raphide, from New Latin raphides, plural, from Greek rhaphides, plural of rhaphid-, rhaphis needle, from rhaptein ...
rapid eye movement sleep
noun Date: 1965 REM sleep
rapid-fire
adjective Date: 1890 1. firing or adapted for firing shots in rapid succession 2. marked by rapidity, liveliness, or sharpness
rapidly
adverb see rapid I
rapine
noun Etymology: Middle English rapyne, from Anglo-French rapine, from Latin rapina, from rapere to seize, rob Date: 15th century pillage, plunder
rapini
also rappini noun Etymology: Italian rapini, plural of rapino, diminutive of rapo turnip, from Latin rapum — more at rape Date: 1942 broccoli rabe
Rappahannock
geographical name river 212 miles (341 kilometers) NE Virginia flowing into Chesapeake Bay
rapparee
noun Etymology: Irish rapaire, ropaire, literally, thruster, stabber, from rop thrust, stab Date: 1690 1. an Irish irregular soldier or bandit 2. vagabond, plunderer
rappel
intransitive verb (-pelled; also -peled; -pelling; also -peling) Etymology: French, literally, recall, from Old French rapel, from rapeler to recall, from re- + apeler to ...
rappen
noun (plural rappen) Etymology: German, from German dialect, literally, raven Date: 1838 the centime of Switzerland
rapprochement
noun Etymology: French, from rapprocher to bring together, from Middle French, from re- + approcher to approach, from Old French aprochier, from Late Latin appropiare — more ...
rapscallion
noun Etymology: alteration of earlier rascallion, irregular from rascal Date: 1699 rascal, ne'er-do-well
rapt
adjective Etymology: Middle English, from Latin raptus, past participle of rapere to seize — more at rapid Date: 14th century 1. lifted up and carried away 2. transported ...
Rapti
geographical name river 400 miles (644 kilometers) Nepal & N India flowing SE into the Ghaghara
raptly
adverb see rapt
raptness
noun see rapt
raptor
noun Etymology: New Latin Raptores, former order name, from Latin, plural of raptor plunderer, from rapere Date: 1873 1. bird of prey 2. [New Latin -raptor (as in ...
raptorial
adjective Date: 1825 1. predaceous 1 2. adapted to seize prey 3. of, relating to, or being a bird of prey
rapture
I. noun Etymology: Latin raptus Date: 1594 1. an expression or manifestation of ecstasy or passion 2. a. a state or experience of being carried away by overwhelming ...
rapture of the deep
Date: 1953 nitrogen narcosis
rapturous
adjective see rapture I
rapturously
adverb see rapture I
rapturousness
noun see rapture I
rara avis
noun (plural rara avises or rarae aves) Etymology: Latin, rare bird Date: 1607 rarity 2
rare
I. adjective (rarer; rarest) Etymology: Middle English, from Latin rarus Date: 14th century 1. marked by wide separation of component particles ; thin 2. a. marked by ...
rare bird
noun Date: 1631 rarity 2, rara avis
rare earth
noun Date: 1875 1. any of a group of similar oxides of metals or a mixture of such oxides occurring together in widely distributed but relatively scarce minerals 2. rare ...
rare earth element
noun Date: 1924 any of a series of metallic elements of which the oxides are classed as rare earths and which include the elements of the lanthanide series and sometimes ...
rare earth metal
noun see rare earth element
rarebit
noun Etymology: (Welsh) rarebit Date: circa 1785 Welsh rabbit
raree-show
noun Etymology: alteration of rare show Date: 1684 a small display or scene viewed in a box ; peep show; broadly an unusual or amazing show or spectacle
rarefaction
noun Etymology: French or Medieval Latin; French raréfaction, from Medieval Latin rarefaction-, rarefactio, from Latin rarefacere to rarefy Date: 1572 1. the action or ...
rarefactional
adjective see rarefaction
rarefied
also rarified adjective Date: 1941 1. of, relating to, or interesting to a select group ; esoteric 2. very high
rarefy
also rarify verb (-fied; -fying) Etymology: Middle English rarefien, rarifien, modification of Latin rarefacere, from rarus rare + facere to make — more at do Date: 14th ...
rarely
adverb Date: 1549 1. not often ; seldom 2. with rare skill ; excellently 3. in an extreme or exceptional manner
rareness
noun see rare I
rareripe
noun Etymology: English dialect rare early + English ripe Date: 1722 1. an early ripening fruit or vegetable 2. dialect green onion
rarified
adjective see rarefied
rarify
verb see rarefy
raring
adjective Etymology: from present participle of English dialect rare to rear, alteration of English rear Date: 1909 full of enthusiasm or eagerness
Raritan
geographical name river 75 miles (121 kilometers) N central New Jersey flowing E into Raritan Bay (inlet of the Atlantic S of Staten Island, New York)
rarity
noun (plural -ties) Date: 1542 1. the quality, state, or fact of being rare 2. one that is rare
Rarotonga
geographical name island S Pacific in SW part of Cook Islands population 9826; site of Avarua (capital if Cook Islands)
ras
noun Usage: often attributive Etymology: probably from 1rat + sarcoma; from the isolation of such genes in rat sarcomas Date: 1982 any of a family of genes that undergo ...
Ras al-Khaimah
geographical name see Ra's al Khaymah
Ras Dashen
geographical name mountain 15,158 feet (4260 meters) N Ethiopia NE of Lake Tana; highest in Ethiopia
rasbora
noun Etymology: New Latin Date: 1931 any of a genus (Rasbora) of tiny brilliantly colored cyprinid freshwater fishes often kept in tropical aquariums
rascal
noun Etymology: Middle English rascaile foot soldiers, commoners, worthless person, from Anglo-French rascaille, from Old French dialect (Norman & Picard) *rasquer to scrape, ...
rascality
noun (plural -ties) Date: circa 1577 1. rabble 2. a. the character or actions of a rascal ; knavery b. a rascally act
rascally
adjective Date: 1594 of or characteristic of a rascal • rascally adverb
rase
transitive verb (rased; rasing) Etymology: Middle English, from Anglo-French raser, from Vulgar Latin *rasare, frequentative of Latin radere to scrape, shave — more at rodent ...
rash
I. adverb Etymology: Middle English (northern dialect) rasch quickly; akin to Old High German rasc fast Date: 15th century archaic in a rash manner II. adjective Date: ...
rasher
noun Etymology: perhaps from obsolete rash to cut, from Middle English rashen Date: 1591 a thin slice of bacon or ham broiled or fried; also a portion consisting of several ...
Rashid
geographical name — see Rosetta
Rashīd
geographical name see Rosetta
rashly
adverb see rash II
rashness
noun see rash II
Rasht
geographical name city NW Iran near the Caspian population 2,900,897
Rask
biographical name Rasmus Kristian 1787-1832 Danish philologist & orientalist
Rasmussen
biographical name Knud Johan Victor 1879-1933 Danish explorer & ethnologist
rasp
I. verb Etymology: Middle English, from Anglo-French *rasper, of Germanic origin; akin to Old High German raspōn to scrape together Date: 14th century transitive verb 1. ...
raspberry
noun Etymology: English dialect rasp raspberry + English berry Date: circa 1616 1. a. any of various usually black or red edible berries that are aggregate fruits ...
rasper
noun see rasp I
raspingly
adverb see rasp I
Rasputin
biographical name Grigory Yefimovich 1872-1916 Russian mystic
raspy
adjective (raspier; -est) Date: 1838 1. harsh, grating 2. irritable
rassle
intransitive verb Etymology: by alteration Date: 1758 wrestle
Rasta
noun Date: 1955 Rastafarian • Rasta adjective
Rastafarian
noun Etymology: Ras Tafari, precoronation name of Haile Selassie Date: 1955 an adherent of Rastafarianism • Rastafarian adjective
Rastafarianism
noun Date: 1968 a religious movement among black Jamaicans that teaches the eventual redemption of blacks and their return to Africa, employs the ritualistic use of marijuana, ...
raster
noun Etymology: German, from Latin raster, rastrum rake, from radere to scrape Date: 1934 a scan pattern (as of the electron beam in a cathode-ray tube) in which an area is ...
rasure
noun Etymology: Middle French, from Latin rasura, from rasus, past participle of radere Date: 1508 erasure, obliteration
rat
I. noun Etymology: Middle English, from Old English ræt; akin to Old High German ratta rat and perhaps to Latin rodere to gnaw — more at rodent Date: before 12th century 1. ...

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