Слова на букву quin-sask (6389) New Collegiate Dictionary
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Слова на букву quin-sask (6389)

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rat cheese
noun Date: 1939 cheddar
rat fink
noun Date: 1964 fink, informer
Rat Islands
geographical name islands SW Alaska in W Aleutians — see Amchitka, Kiska
rat race
noun Date: 1939 strenuous, wearisome, and usually competitive activity or rush
rat snake
noun Date: 1860 any of various large harmless chiefly rat-eating colubrid snakes (especially genus Elaphe) — called also chicken snake
rat trap cheese
noun Date: 1927 cheddar
rat-a-tat
or rat-a-tat-tat noun Etymology: imitative Date: 1681 a rapid succession of knocking, tapping, or cracking sounds
rat-a-tat-tat
noun see rat-a-tat
rat-bite fever
noun Date: 1910 either of two febrile bacterial diseases of humans usually transmitted by the bite of a rat
rat-tail file
noun Date: 1744 a round slender tapered file
ratable
or rateable adjective Date: 1503 capable of being rated, estimated, or apportioned • ratably adverb
ratably
adverb see ratable
ratafia
noun Etymology: French Date: 1699 1. a liqueur made from an infusion of macerated fruit or fruit juice in a liquor (as brandy) and often flavored with almonds 2. a sweet ...
Ratak
geographical name the E chain of the Marshall Islands
rataplan
noun Etymology: French, of imitative origin Date: circa 1848 the iterative sound of beating
ratatouille
noun Etymology: French, from blend of ratouiller to disturb, shake and tatouiller to stir Date: circa 1877 a seasoned stew made of eggplant, tomatoes, green peppers, ...
ratbag
noun Date: 1890 chiefly Australian a stupid, eccentric, or disagreeable person
ratchet
I. noun also rachet Etymology: alteration of earlier rochet, from French, alteration of Middle French rocquet ratchet, bobbin, of Germanic origin; akin to Old High German rocko ...
rate
I. verb (rated; rating) Etymology: Middle English Date: 14th century transitive verb 1. to rebuke angrily or violently 2. obsolete to drive away by scolding ...
rate of change
Date: 1876 a value that results from dividing the change in a function of a variable by the change in the variable
rate of exchange
Date: circa 1741 the amount of one currency that will buy a given amount of another
rateable
adjective see ratable
ratel
noun Etymology: Afrikaans, literally, rattle, from Dutch, from Middle Dutch — more at rattle Date: 1777 an African or Asian nocturnal omnivorous mammal (Mellivora capensis) ...
ratemeter
noun Date: 1949 an instrument that indicates the counting rate of an electronic counter
ratepayer
noun Date: 1845 1. British taxpayer 2. one who pays for a utility service and especially electricity according to established rates
rater
noun Date: 1611 1. one that rates; specifically a person who estimates or determines a rating 2. one having a specified rating or class — usually used in combination
ratfish
noun Date: 1882 chimaera; especially a silvery iridescent white-spotted chimaera (Hydrolagus colliei) of cold deep waters of the Pacific coast of North America
rathe
adjective Etymology: Middle English, quick, from Old English hræth, alteration of hræd; akin to Old High German hrad quick Date: 14th century archaic early
rather
adverb Etymology: Middle English, from Old English hrathor, comparative of hrathe quickly; akin to Old High German rado quickly, Old English hræd quick Date: before 12th ...
rather than
I. conjunction Date: 14th century 1. — used with the infinitive form of a verb to indicate negation as a contrary choice or wish 2. and not II. preposition Date: ...
rathskeller
noun Etymology: obsolete German (now Ratskeller), city-hall basement restaurant, from Rat council + Keller cellar Date: 1766 a usually basement tavern or restaurant
Ratibor
geographical name see Racibórz
raticide
noun Date: 1908 a substance for killing rats
ratification
noun see ratify
ratifier
noun see ratify
ratify
transitive verb (-fied; -fying) Etymology: Middle English ratifien, from Anglo-French ratifier, from Medieval Latin ratificare, from Latin ratus determined, from past participle ...
ratiné
or ratine noun Etymology: French ratiné Date: circa 1914 1. a rough bulky fabric usually woven loosely in plain weave from ratiné yarns 2. a nubby ply yarn of various ...
ratine
noun see ratiné
rating
noun Date: 1702 1. a classification according to grade; specifically a military or naval specialist classification 2. chiefly British a naval enlisted man 3. a. ...
ratio
noun (plural ratios) Etymology: Latin, computation, reason — more at reason Date: 1660 1. a. the indicated quotient of two mathematical expressions b. the ...
ratiocinate
intransitive verb (-nated; -nating) Etymology: Latin ratiocinatus, past participle of ratiocinari to reckon, from ratio + -cinari (as in vaticinari to prophesy) — more at ...
ratiocination
noun Date: circa 1530 1. the process of exact thinking ; reasoning 2. a reasoned train of thought • ratiocinative adjective
ratiocinative
adjective see ratiocination
ratiocinator
noun see ratiocinate
ration
I. noun Etymology: French, from Latin ration-, ratio computation, reason Date: circa 1711 1. a. a food allowance for one day b. plural food, provisions 2. a share ...
rational
I. adjective Etymology: Middle English racional, from Anglo-French racionel, from Latin rationalis, from ration-, ratio Date: 14th century 1. a. having reason or ...
rational function
noun Date: 1859 a function that is the quotient of two polynomials; also polynomial
rational number
noun Date: 1879 a number that can be expressed as an integer or the quotient of an integer divided by a nonzero integer
rationale
noun Etymology: Latin, neuter of rationalis Date: 1657 1. an explanation of controlling principles of opinion, belief, practice, or phenomena 2. an underlying reason ; ...
rationalise
British variant of rationalize
rationalism
noun Date: 1827 1. reliance on reason as the basis for establishment of religious truth 2. a. a theory that reason is in itself a source of knowledge superior to and ...
rationalist
I. noun see rationalism II. adjective see rationalism
rationalistic
adjective see rationalism
rationalistically
adverb see rationalism
rationality
noun (plural -ties) Date: 1628 1. the quality or state of being rational 2. the quality or state of being agreeable to reason ; reasonableness 3. a rational opinion, ...
rationalizable
adjective see rationalize
rationalization
noun see rationalize
rationalize
verb (-ized; -izing) Date: 1803 transitive verb 1. to bring into accord with reason or cause something to seem reasonable: as a. to substitute a natural for a ...
rationalizer
noun see rationalize
rationally
adverb see rational I
rationalness
noun see rational I
ratite
noun Etymology: ultimately from Latin ratitus marked with the figure of a raft, from ratis raft Date: 1877 a bird with a flat breastbone; especially any of various mostly ...
ratlike
adjective see rat I
ratline
noun Etymology: Middle English radelyng Date: 15th century any of the small transverse ropes attached to the shrouds of a ship so as to form the steps of a rope ladder — ...
Raton
geographical name pass 7834 feet (2388 meters) SE Colorado just N of Colorado-New Mexico border in Raton Range (E spur of Sangre de Cristo Mountains)
ratoon
I. noun Etymology: Spanish retoño, from retoñar to sprout, from re- (from Latin) + otoñar to grow in autumn, from otoño autumn, from Latin autumnus Date: 1631 1. a shoot ...
rats
interjection Date: 1886 — used to express disappointment, frustration, or disgust
rattail
noun Date: 1705 1. a horse's tail with little or no hair 2. grenadier 2
rattail cactus
noun Date: 1900 a commonly cultivated tropical American cactus (Aporocactus flagelliformis) with showy crimson flowers
rattan
noun Etymology: Malay rotan Date: 1660 1. a rattan cane or switch 2. a. a climbing palm (especially of the genera Calamus and Daemonorops) with very long tough stems ...
ratteen
noun Etymology: French ratine Date: 1685 archaic a coarse woolen fabric
ratter
noun Date: 1857 one that catches rats; specifically a rat-catching dog or cat
rattle
I. verb (rattled; rattling) Etymology: Middle English ratelen; akin to Middle Dutch ratel rattle Date: 14th century intransitive verb 1. to make a rapid succession of short ...
rattlebrain
noun Date: 1709 a flighty or thoughtless person • rattlebrained adjective
rattlebrained
adjective see rattlebrain
rattler
noun Date: 15th century 1. one that rattles 2. rattlesnake
rattlesnake
noun Date: 1630 any of several American pit vipers (genera Crotalus and Sistrurus) that have horny interlocking joints at the end of the tail which make a sharp rattling sound ...
rattlesnake master
noun Date: 1843 button snakeroot 2
rattlesnake plantain
noun Date: 1778 any of a genus (Goodyera) of orchids with variegated leaves and small flowers in a twisted spike
rattlesnake root
noun Date: 1682 any of various plants formerly believed to be distasteful to rattlesnakes or effective against their venom: as a. any of a genus (Prenanthes, especially P. ...
rattlesnake weed
noun Date: 1760 a hawkweed (Hieracium venosum) of eastern North America with purple-veined leaves
rattletrap
noun Date: 1822 something rattly or rickety; especially an old car • rattletrap adjective
rattling
I. adjective Date: 1560 1. lively, brisk 2. extraordinarily good ; splendid • rattlingly adverb II. adverb Date: 1829 to an extreme degree ; very
rattlingly
adverb see rattling I
rattly
adjective Date: 1881 likely to rattle ; making a rattle
ratton
noun Etymology: Middle English ratoun, from Anglo-French, diminutive of rat, probably of Germanic origin; akin to Old English ræt rat Date: 14th century chiefly dialect rat
rattrap
noun Date: 15th century 1. a trap for rats 2. a dirty dilapidated structure 3. a hopeless situation
ratty
adjective (rattier; -est) Date: 1865 1. a. infested with rats b. of, relating to, or suggestive of a rat 2. shabby, unkempt 3. a. despicable, treacherous b. ...
raucous
adjective Etymology: Latin raucus hoarse; akin to Latin ravis hoarseness Date: 1769 1. disagreeably harsh or strident ; hoarse 2. boisterously disorderly Synonyms: ...
raucously
adverb see raucous
raucousness
noun see raucous
raunch
noun Etymology: back-formation from raunchy Date: 1964 vulgarity, lewdness
raunchily
adverb see raunchy
raunchiness
noun see raunchy
raunchy
adjective (raunchier; -est) Etymology: origin unknown Date: 1939 1. slovenly, dirty ; also very smelly 2. obscene, smutty • raunchily adverb • raunchiness noun
Rauschenberg
biographical name Robert 1925- American artist
rauwolfia
noun Etymology: New Latin, from Leonhard Rauwolf died 1596 German botanist Date: 1752 1. any of a genus (Rauvolfia syn. Rauwolfia) of pantropical trees and shrubs of the ...
ravage
I. noun Etymology: French, from Middle French, from ravir to ravish — more at ravish Date: circa 1611 1. an act or practice of ravaging 2. damage resulting from ravaging ...
ravagement
noun see ravage II
ravager
noun see ravage II
rave
I. verb (raved; raving) Etymology: Middle English Date: 14th century intransitive verb 1. a. to talk irrationally in or as if in delirium b. to speak out wildly ...
Ravel
biographical name (Joseph) Maurice 1875-1937 French composer • Ravelian adjective
ravel
I. verb (-eled or -elled; -eling or ravelling) Etymology: Dutch rafelen, from rafel loose thread Date: 1582 transitive verb 1. a. to separate or undo the texture of ; ...
raveler
noun see ravel I
Ravelian
adjective see Ravel
raveling
or ravelling noun Date: 1658 ravel b
ravelling
noun see raveling
ravelment
noun see ravel I
raven
I. noun Etymology: Middle English, from Old English hræfn; akin to Old High German hraban raven, Latin corvus, Greek korax Date: before 12th century a large glossy black ...
ravener
noun see raven III
Ravenna
geographical name commune N Italy NE of Florence population 135,435
ravenous
adjective Date: 15th century 1. rapacious 2. very eager or greedy for food, satisfaction, or gratification Synonyms: see voracious • ravenously adverb • ...
ravenously
adverb see ravenous
ravenousness
noun see ravenous
raver
noun Date: 15th century 1. one that raves 2. a person who frequents raves
Ravi
or ancient Hydraotes geographical name river 450 miles (724 kilometers) N India (subcontinent) flowing SW to the Chenab & forming part of boundary between East Punjab (India) & ...
ravin
noun Etymology: Middle English, from Anglo-French ravine Date: 14th century 1. plunder, pillage 2. a. an act or habit of preying b. something seized as prey
ravine
noun Etymology: French, from Middle French, rapine, rush, from Latin rapina rapine Date: circa 1772 a small narrow steep-sided valley that is larger than a gully and smaller ...
ravined
adjective Date: 1606 obsolete rapacious, ravenous
raving
I. noun Date: 14th century irrational, incoherent, wild, or extravagant utterance or declamation — usually used in plural II. adjective Date: 15th century 1. talking ...
ravioli
noun (plural ravioli; also raviolis) Etymology: Italian, from Italian dialect, plural of raviolo, literally, little turnip, diminutive of rava turnip, from Latin rapa — more ...
ravish
transitive verb Etymology: Middle English ravisshen, from Anglo-French raviss-, stem of ravir, from Vulgar Latin *rapire, alteration of Latin rapere to seize, rob — more at ...
ravisher
noun see ravish
ravishing
adjective Date: 14th century unusually attractive, pleasing, or striking • ravishingly adverb
ravishingly
adverb see ravishing
ravishment
noun see ravish
raw
I. adjective (rawer; rawest) Etymology: Middle English, from Old English hrēaw; akin to Old High German hrō raw, Latin crudus raw, cruor blood, Greek kreas flesh Date: before ...
raw bar
noun Date: 1943 a counter (as in a restaurant) that serves raw shellfish
raw deal
noun Date: 1911 an instance of unfair treatment
raw material
noun Date: 1796 crude or processed material that can be converted by manufacture, processing, or combination into a new and useful product ; broadly something with a ...
raw score
noun Date: 1920 an individual's actual achievement score (as on a test) before being adjusted for relative position in the test group
Rawalpindi
geographical name city NE Pakistan NNW of Lahore population 966,000
rawboned
adjective Date: 1591 relatively thin with prominent bone structure; also heavy-framed and rugged but not attractively built Synonyms: see lean
rawhide
I. noun Date: 1829 1. a whip of untanned hide 2. untanned cattle skin II. transitive verb (rawhided; rawhiding) Date: 1858 1. to whip or drive with or as if with a ...
rawinsonde
noun Etymology: radar + wind + radiosonde Date: 1946 a radiosonde tracked by a radio direction-finding device to determine the velocity of winds aloft
Rawlinson
biographical name Sir Henry Creswicke 1810-1895 English orientalist
rawly
adverb see raw I
rawness
noun see raw I
rax
verb Etymology: Middle English (northern dialect) raxen, from Old English raxan; akin to Old English reccan to stretch — more at rack Date: before 12th century chiefly ...
Ray
I. biographical name John 1627-1705 English naturalist II. biographical name Satyajit 1921-1992 Indian film director, writer, & producer
ray
I. noun Etymology: Middle English raye, from Anglo-French raie, from Latin raia Date: 14th century any of an order (Rajiformes) of usually marine cartilaginous fishes (as ...
ray flower
noun Date: 1839 1. one of the marginal flowers of the head in a composite plant (as the aster) that also has disk flowers 2. the entire head in a plant (as chicory) that ...
Rayburn
biographical name Samuel Taliaferro 1882-1961 American politician
rayed
adjective see ray II
Rayleigh
biographical name Lord 1842-1919 John William Strutt English mathematician & physicist
Rayleigh scattering
noun Etymology: John W. S. Rayleigh Date: 1937 scattering of light by particles small enough to render the effect selective so that different colors are deflected through ...
rayless
adjective Date: 1747 having, admitting, or emitting no rays; especially dark • raylessness noun
rayless goldenrod
noun Date: 1923 a shrubby to herbaceous composite plant (Haplopappus heterophyllus syn. Isocoma wrightii) especially of open saline ground from Texas to Arizona and northern ...
raylessness
noun see rayless
rayon
noun Etymology: irregular from 2ray Date: 1924 1. any of a group of smooth textile fibers made from regenerated cellulose by extrusion through minute holes 2. a rayon ...
Raytown
geographical name city W Missouri SE of Kansas City population 30,388
raze
transitive verb (razed; razing) Etymology: alteration of rase Date: 1536 1. a. archaic erase b. to scrape, cut, or shave off 2. to destroy to the ground ; demolish ...
razee
noun Etymology: French (vaisseau) rasé, literally, cut-off ship Date: 1794 a wooden warship with the upper deck cut away
razer
noun see raze
razor
noun Etymology: Middle English rasour, from Anglo-French rasur, from raser to raze, shave — more at rase Date: 14th century a keen-edged cutting instrument for shaving or ...
razor clam
noun Date: circa 1882 any of a family (Solenidae) of marine lamellibranch mollusks having a long narrow thin shell
razor wire
noun Date: 1977 coiled wire fitted with sharp razor edges and used as an obstacle or barrier; also concertina wire
razor-backed
or razorback adjective Date: 1829 having a sharp narrow back
razor-billed auk
noun see razorbill
razorback
noun Date: 1849 a thin-bodied long-legged feral hog chiefly of the southeastern United States
razorbill
noun Date: 1674 a North Atlantic auk (Alca torda) with the plumage black above and white below and a compressed sharp-edged bill — called also razor-billed auk
razz
I. noun Etymology: short for razzberry sound of contempt, alteration of raspberry Date: circa 1919 raspberry 2 II. transitive verb Date: 1918 heckle, deride
razzamatazz
chiefly British variant of razzmatazz
razzle-dazzle
noun Etymology: reduplication of dazzle Date: 1889 1. a state of confusion or hilarity 2. a complex maneuver (as in sports) designed to confuse an opponent 3. a confusing ...
razzmatazz
noun Etymology: probably alteration of razzle-dazzle Date: 1942 1. razzle-dazzle 3 2. double-talk 2 3. vim, zing
Rb
symbol rubidium
RBC
abbreviation red blood cells
RBI
noun (plural RBIs or RBI) Etymology: run batted in Date: 1948 a run in baseball that is driven in by a batter; also official credit to a batter for driving in a run
RC
abbreviation 1. Red Cross 2. resistance-capacitance 3. Roman Catholic
RCAF
abbreviation Royal Canadian Air Force
RCMP
abbreviation Royal Canadian Mounted Police
RCN
abbreviation Royal Canadian Navy
rd
abbreviation 1. road 2. rod 3. round
RD
abbreviation 1. registered dietitian 2. rural delivery
RDA
abbreviation 1. recommended daily allowance 2. recommended dietary allowance
RDF
abbreviation 1. radio direction finder; radio direction finding 2. Rapid Deployment Force 3. refuse-derived fuel
Re
symbol rhenium
re
I. noun Etymology: Medieval Latin, from the syllable sung to this note in a medieval hymn to Saint. John the Baptist Date: 14th century the second tone of the diatonic scale ...
re infecta
foreign term Etymology: Latin the business being unfinished ; without accomplishing one's purpose
re-
prefix Etymology: Middle English, from Anglo-French, from Latin re-, red- back, again, against 1. again ; anew 2. back ; backward
re-collect
transitive verb Etymology: partly from Latin recollectus, past participle of recolligere, from re- + colligere to collect; partly from re- + collect Date: 1604 to collect ...
re-cover
transitive verb Date: 15th century to cover again or anew
re-creatable
adjective see re-create
re-create
transitive verb Date: 1587 to create again; especially to form anew in the imagination • re-creatable adjective • re-creation noun • re-creative adjective • ...
re-creation
noun see re-create
re-creative
adjective see re-create
re-creator
noun see re-create
re-form
Date: 14th century transitive verb to form again intransitive verb to take form again
re-lease
transitive verb Date: 1828 to lease again
re-present
transitive verb Date: 1564 to present again or anew • re-presentation noun
re-presentation
noun see re-present
re-press
transitive verb Date: 14th century to press again
re-sign
Date: 1805 transitive verb to sign again; especially to rehire (as an athlete) by means of a signed contract intransitive verb to sign up again
re-sort
transitive verb Date: 1889 to sort again
re-tread
transitive verb (re-trod; re-trodden or -trod; -treading) Date: 1598 to tread again
re-up
intransitive verb Etymology: re- + sign up Date: circa 1906 to sign on again ; especially to enlist again
REA
abbreviation Rural Electrification Administration
reabsorb
transitive verb Date: circa 1774 to take up (something previously secreted or emitted) ; also resorb 2
reach
I. verb Etymology: Middle English rechen, from Old English rǣcan; akin to Old High German reichen to reach, Lithuanian raižytis to stretch oneself Date: before 12th century ...
reach-me-down
adjective or noun Date: 1862 chiefly British hand-me-down
reachable
adjective see reach I
reacher
noun see reach I
react
verb Etymology: New Latin reactus, past participle of reagere, from Latin re- + agere to act — more at agent Date: 1644 intransitive verb 1. to exert a reciprocal or ...
reactance
noun Date: circa 1893 the part of the impedance of an alternating-current circuit that is due to capacitance or inductance or both and that is expressed in ohms
reactant
noun Date: circa 1920 a substance that enters into and is altered in the course of a chemical reaction
reaction
noun Date: circa 1611 1. a. the act or process or an instance of reacting b. resistance or opposition to a force, influence, or movement; especially tendency toward a ...
reactionary
adjective Date: 1840 relating to, marked by, or favoring reaction; especially ultraconservative in politics • reactionary noun • reactionaryism noun
reactionaryism
noun see reactionary
reactive
adjective Date: 1794 1. of, relating to, or marked by reaction or reactance 2. a. readily responsive to a stimulus b. occurring as a result of stress or emotional ...
reactively
adverb see reactive
reactiveness
noun see reactive
reactivity
noun see reactive
reactor
noun Date: 1890 1. one that reacts 2. a device (as a coil, winding, or conductor of small resistance) used to introduce reactance into an alternating-current circuit 3. ...
Read
I. biographical name George 1733-1798 American statesman in Revolution II. biographical name Sir Herbert 1893-1968 English writer
read
I. verb (read; reading) Etymology: Middle English reden to advise, interpret, read, from Old English rǣdan; akin to Old High German rātan to advise, Sanskrit rādhnoti he ...
read between the lines
phrasal to understand more than is directly stated
read out
transitive verb Date: 1600 1. a. to read aloud b. to produce a readout of 2. to expel from an organization or group
read the riot act
phrasal 1. to order a mob to disperse 2. a. to order or warn to cease something b. to protest vehemently c. to reprimand severely
read-only memory
noun Date: 1961 ROM
readability
noun see readable
readable
adjective Date: 15th century able to be read easily: as a. legible b. interesting to read • readability noun • readableness noun • readably adverb
readableness
noun see readable
readably
adverb see readable
Reade
biographical name Charles 1814-1884 English novelist & dramatist
reader
noun Date: before 12th century 1. a. one that reads b. one appointed to read to others: as (1) lector (2) one chosen to read aloud selected material in a ...
readerly
adjective Date: 1959 of, relating to, or typical of a reader
readership
noun Date: 1719 1. a. the office or position of a reader b. the quality or state of being a reader 2. the mass or a particular group of readers
readily
adverb Date: 14th century in a ready manner: as a. without hesitating ; willingly b. without much difficulty ; easily
readiness
noun see ready I
reading
noun Date: before 12th century 1. the act of reading 2. a. material read or for reading b. extent of material read 3. a. a particular version b. data indicated ...
Reading
I. biographical name 1st Marquis of 1860-1935 Rufus Daniel Isaacs British statesman; viceroy of India (1921-26) II. geographical name 1. town E Massachusetts N of Boston ...
reading desk
noun Date: 1703 lectern
reading frame
noun Date: 1965 a sequence of nucleotide triplets that is potentially translatable into a polypeptide and that is determined by the placement of a codon that initiates ...
readout
noun Date: 1652 1. the process of reading 2. a. the process of removing information from an automatic device (as an electronic computer) and displaying it in an ...
ready
I. adjective (readier; -est) Etymology: Middle English redy; akin to Old English gerǣde ready, Gothic garaiths arranged Date: 13th century 1. a. prepared mentally or ...
ready box
noun Date: 1942 a box placed near a gun (as on a ship) to hold ammunition kept ready for immediate use
ready room
noun Date: 1941 a room in which pilots or astronauts are briefed and await orders
ready-made
I. adjective Date: 15th century 1. made beforehand especially for general sale 2. lacking originality or individuality 3. readily available II. noun Date: 1882 1. ...
ready-to-wear
adjective Date: 1895 1. of clothing ready-made 2. dealing in ready-made clothes • ready-to-wear noun
ready-witted
adjective Date: 1581 quick-witted
readymade
noun see ready-made II, 2
reafforest
transitive verb see reafforestation
reafforestation
noun Date: 1884 chiefly British reforestation • reafforest transitive verb, chiefly British
Reagan
biographical name Ronald Wilson 1911- American actor & politician; 40th president of the United States (1981-89) • Reaganesque adjective
Reaganesque
adjective see Reagan
reagent
noun Etymology: New Latin reagent-, reagens, present participle of reagere to react — more at react Date: 1797 a substance used (as in detecting or measuring a component, ...
reaggregate
transitive verb Date: 1862 to cause to re-form into an aggregate or a whole • reaggregate noun • reaggregation noun
reaggregation
noun see reaggregate
reagin
noun Etymology: International Scientific Vocabulary, from reagent Date: circa 1911 1. a substance in the blood of persons with syphilis responsible for positive serological ...
reaginic
adjective see reagin
real
I. adjective Etymology: Middle English, real, relating to things (in law), from Anglo-French, from Medieval Latin & Late Latin; Medieval Latin realis relating to things (in ...
real estate
noun Date: 1666 1. property in buildings and land 2. space, capacity
real focus
noun Date: 1909 a point at which rays (as of light) converge or from which they diverge
real image
noun Date: 1882 an optical image formed of real foci
real number
noun Date: circa 1909 a number that has no imaginary part
real part
noun Date: 1949 the term in a complex number (as 2 in 2 + 3i) that does not contain the imaginary unit as a factor
real presence
noun Usage: often capitalized R&P Date: 1554 the doctrine that Christ is actually present in the Eucharist
real time
noun Date: 1953 the actual time during which something takes place • real-time adjective
real-life
adjective Date: 1838 existing or occurring in reality ; drawn from or drawing on actual events or situations
real-time
adjective see real time
real-valued
adjective Date: 1965 taking on only real numbers for values
real-world
adjective Date: 1963 real-life
realgar
noun Etymology: Middle English, from Medieval Latin, from Catalan, from Arabic rahj al-ghār powder of the mine Date: 15th century an orange-red mineral consisting of arsenic ...
realia
noun plural Etymology: Late Latin, neuter plural of realis real Date: 1937 objects or activities used to relate classroom teaching to the real life especially of peoples ...
realign
transitive verb Date: 1899 to align again; especially to reorganize or make new groupings of • realignment noun

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