Слова на букву quin-sask (6389) New Collegiate Dictionary
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Слова на букву quin-sask (6389)

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realignment
noun see realign
realisation
chiefly British variant of realization
realise
chiefly British variant of realize
realism
noun Date: 1817 1. concern for fact or reality and rejection of the impractical and visionary 2. a. a doctrine that universals exist outside the mind; specifically the ...
realist
adjective or noun see realism
realistic
adjective see realism
realistically
adverb see realism
reality
noun (plural -ties) Date: 1550 1. the quality or state of being real 2. a. (1) a real event, entity, or state of affairs (2) the totality of real things and ...
reality check
noun Date: 1960 something that clarifies or serves as a reminder of reality often by correcting a misconception
realizable
adjective see realize
realization
noun Date: circa 1611 1. the action of realizing ; the state of being realized 2. something realized
realize
transitive verb (-ized; -izing) Etymology: French réaliser, from Middle French realiser, from real real Date: circa 1611 1. a. to bring into concrete existence ; ...
realizer
noun see realize
really
adverb Date: 15th century 1. a. in reality ; actually b. truly, unquestionably — used as an intensifier c. very 2 2. — used to emphasize an assertion
realm
noun Etymology: Middle English realme, from Anglo-French, alteration of Old French reiame, from Latin regimen control — more at regimen Date: 13th century 1. kingdom 2 2. ...
realness
noun see real I
realpolitik
noun Usage: often capitalized Etymology: German, from real actual + Politik politics Date: 1914 politics based on practical and material factors rather than on theoretical ...
Realtor
collective mark — used for a real estate agent who is a member of the National Association of Realtors
realty
noun Etymology: real + -ty (as in property) Date: 1670 real estate 1
ream
I. noun Etymology: Middle English reme, from Anglo-French, ultimately from Arabic rizma, literally, bundle Date: 14th century 1. a quantity of paper being 20 quires or ...
reamer
noun Date: 1825 one that reams: as a. a rotating finishing tool with cutting edges used to enlarge or shape a hole b. a fruit juice extractor with a ridged and pointed ...
reap
verb Etymology: Middle English repen, from Old English reopan Date: before 12th century transitive verb 1. a. (1) to cut with a sickle, scythe, or reaping machine ...
reaper
noun Date: before 12th century one that reaps; especially any of various machines for reaping grain
reaphook
noun Date: circa 1591 a hand implement with a hook-shaped blade used in reaping
reapportion
Date: circa 1828 transitive verb to apportion (as a house of representatives) anew intransitive verb to make a new apportionment • reapportionment noun
reapportionment
noun see reapportion
rear
I. verb Etymology: Middle English reren, from Old English rǣran; akin to Old Norse reisa to raise, Old English rīsan to rise Date: before 12th century transitive verb 1. ...
rear admiral
noun Date: 1589 a commissioned officer in the navy or coast guard having either of two ranks: a. one who ranks above a captain — called also rear admiral (lower half) ...
rear admiral (lower half)
noun see rear admiral
rear admiral (upper half)
noun see rear admiral
rear echelon
noun Date: circa 1934 an element of a military headquarters or unit located at a considerable distance from the front and concerned especially with administrative and supply ...
rear end
noun Date: circa 1930 buttocks
rear guard
noun Etymology: Middle French reregarde, from Old French, from rere + garde guard Date: 1659 a military detachment detailed to bring up and protect the rear of a main body or ...
rear-end
transitive verb Date: 1957 to crash into the back of (as an automobile)
rearer
noun see rear I
rearguard
adjective Date: 1898 of or relating to resistance especially to sweeping social forces
rearm
Date: 1750 transitive verb to arm (as a nation or a military force) again with new or better weapons intransitive verb to become armed again • rearmament noun
rearmament
noun see rearm
rearmost
adjective Date: 1718 farthest in the rear ; last
rearview mirror
noun Date: 1926 a mirror (as in an automobile) that gives a view of the area behind a vehicle
rearward
I. noun Etymology: Middle English rerewarde, from Anglo-French rereguard, rerewarde rear guard Date: 14th century rear; especially the rear division (as of an army) II. ...
rearwards
adverb see rearward III
reas
abbreviation reasonable
reason
I. noun Etymology: Middle English resoun, from Anglo-French raisun, from Latin ration-, ratio reason, computation, from reri to calculate, think; probably akin to Gothic rathjo ...
reasonability
noun see reasonable
reasonable
adjective Date: 14th century 1. a. being in accordance with reason b. not extreme or excessive c. moderate, fair d. inexpensive 2. a. having the ...
reasonableness
noun see reasonable
reasonably
adverb see reasonable
reasoner
noun see reason II
reasoning
noun Date: 14th century 1. the use of reason; especially the drawing of inferences or conclusions through the use of reason 2. an instance of the use of reason ; argument
reasonless
adjective Date: 14th century 1. not having the faculty of reason 2. not reasoned ; senseless 3. not based on or supported by reasons • reasonlessly adverb
reasonlessly
adverb see reasonless
reassurance
noun Date: circa 1611 1. the action of reassuring ; the state of being reassured 2. reinsurance
reassure
transitive verb Date: 1594 1. to assure anew 2. to restore to confidence 3. reinsure • reassuringly adverb
reassuringly
adverb see reassure
reata
noun Etymology: American Spanish — more at lariat Date: 1846 lariat
Reaumur
adjective Etymology: René Antoine Ferchault de Réaumur Date: 1799 relating to or conforming to a thermometric scale on which the boiling point of water is at 80° above ...
Réaumur
biographical name René-Antoine Ferchault de 1683-1757 French naturalist & physicist
reave
verb (reaved or reft; reaving) Etymology: Middle English reven, from Old English rēafian; akin to Old High German roubōn to rob, Latin rumpere to break Date: before 12th ...
reaver
noun see reave
reb
noun Etymology: short for rebel Date: 1862 Johnny Reb
Reb
noun Etymology: Yiddish, from Hebrew rabbī my master, rabbi Date: 1858 rabbi, mister — used as a title
rebar
noun (plural rebar or rebars) Etymology: reinforcing bar Date: 1953 a steel rod with ridges for use in reinforced concrete
rebarbative
adjective Etymology: French rébarbatif, from Middle French, from rebarber to be repellent, from re- + barbe beard, from Latin barba — more at beard Date: 1892 repellent, ...
rebarbatively
adverb see rebarbative
rebate
I. verb (rebated; rebating) Etymology: Middle English, from Anglo-French rebatre, rabatre to beat back, deduct, from re- + abatre to strike down, from a- (from Latin ad-) + ...
rebater
noun see rebate I
rebato
noun Etymology: modification of Middle French rabat, literally, act of folding over — more at rabbet Date: 1591 a wide lace-edged collar of the early 17th century often ...
rebbe
noun Etymology: Yiddish rebe, from Hebrew rabbī rabbi Date: 1881 a Jewish spiritual leader or teacher ; rabbi
rebec
or rebeck noun Etymology: Middle English rebecke, from Middle French rebec, alteration of Old French rebebe, from Old Occitan rebeb, from Arabic rabāb Date: 15th century an ...
rebeck
noun see rebec
Rebekah
noun Etymology: Hebrew Ribhqāh Date: before 12th century the wife of Isaac
rebel
I. adjective Etymology: Middle English, from Anglo-French, from Latin rebellis, from re- + bellum war, from Old Latin duellum Date: 14th century 1. a. opposing or taking ...
rebel yell
noun Date: 1862 a prolonged high-pitched yell often uttered by Confederate soldiers in the American Civil War
rebellion
noun Date: 14th century 1. opposition to one in authority or dominance 2. a. open, armed, and usually unsuccessful defiance of or resistance to an established ...
rebellious
adjective Date: 15th century 1. a. given to or engaged in rebellion b. of, relating to, or characteristic of a rebel or rebellion 2. resisting treatment or ...
rebelliously
adverb see rebellious
rebelliousness
noun see rebellious
Rebild
geographical name village N Denmark in N Jutland S of Ålborg in Rebild Hills (site of Rebild National Park)
rebirth
noun Date: 1837 1. a. a new or second birth ; metempsychosis b. spiritual regeneration 2. renaissance, revival
Reblochon
noun Etymology: French reblochon, from French dialect (Savoy) Date: 1908 a semisoft creamy mild-flavored French cheese
reboant
adjective Etymology: Latin reboant-, reboans, present participle of reboare to resound, from re- + boare to cry aloud, roar, from Greek boan, of imitative origin Date: 1830 ...
reborn
adjective Date: 1598 born again ; regenerated, revived
rebound
I. verb Etymology: Middle English, from Anglo-French rebundir, from re- + Old French bondir to bound — more at bound Date: 14th century intransitive verb 1. a. to ...
rebounder
noun see rebound I
rebozo
noun (plural -zos) Etymology: Spanish, shawl, from rebozar to muffle, alteration of embozar to muffle, probably from Vulgar Latin *imbucciare, from Latin in- + bucca cheek ...
rebranch
intransitive verb Date: 1888 to form secondary branches
rebroadcast
transitive verb (-cast; -casting) Date: 1923 1. to broadcast again (a radio or television program being simultaneously received from another source) 2. to repeat (a ...
rebuff
transitive verb Etymology: Middle French rebuffer, from Old Italian ribuffare to reprimand, from ribuffo reprimand Date: circa 1586 to reject or criticize sharply ; snub • ...
rebuild
verb (rebuilt; -building) Date: 1537 transitive verb 1. a. to make extensive repairs to ; reconstruct b. to restore to a previous state 2. to make extensive ...
rebuke
I. transitive verb (rebuked; rebuking) Etymology: Middle English, from Anglo-French rebucher, rebouker to blunt, check, reprimand Date: 14th century 1. a. to criticize ...
rebuker
noun see rebuke I
rebus
noun Etymology: Latin, by things, ablative plural of res thing — more at real Date: 1605 a representation of words or syllables by pictures of objects or by symbols whose ...
rebut
verb (rebutted; rebutting) Etymology: Middle English, from Anglo-French reboter, from re- + boter to butt — more at butt Date: 14th century transitive verb 1. to drive or ...
rebuttable
adjective see rebut
rebuttal
noun Date: 1830 the act of rebutting especially in a legal suit; also argument or proof that rebuts
rebutter
I. noun Etymology: Anglo-French rebuter, reboter, from reboter, verb Date: 1540 the answer of a defendant in matter of fact to a plaintiff's surrejoinder II. noun Date: ...
rec
abbreviation 1. received 2. receipt 3. record; recording 4. recreation; recreational
rec room
noun see recreation room
rec'd
abbreviation received
recalcitrance
noun Date: 1856 the state of being recalcitrant
recalcitrancy
noun Date: 1869 recalcitrance
recalcitrant
adjective Etymology: Late Latin recalcitrant-, recalcitrans, present participle of recalcitrare to be stubbornly disobedient, from Latin, to kick back, from re- + calcitrare to ...
recall
I. transitive verb Date: 15th century 1. cancel, revoke 2. a. to call back b. to bring back to mind c. to remind one of ; resemble 3. restore, revive ...
recallability
noun see recall I
recallable
adjective see recall I
recaller
noun see recall I
recamier
noun Etymology: from its appearance in a portrait of Mme. Récamier by Jacques-Louis David Date: 1924 a sometimes backless couch with a high curved headrest and low footrest
Récamier
biographical name Jeanne-Françoise-Julie-Adélaïde 1777-1849 Madame de Récamier née Bernard French society wit
recanalization
noun Date: 1953 the process of restoring flow to or reuniting an interrupted channel of a bodily tube (as a blood vessel or vas deferens) • recanalize transitive verb
recanalize
transitive verb see recanalization
recant
verb Etymology: Latin recantare, from re- + cantare to sing — more at chant Date: 1535 transitive verb 1. to withdraw or repudiate (a statement or belief) formally and ...
recantation
noun see recant
recap
I. noun Etymology: by shortening Date: circa 1926 recapitulation II. verb (recapped; recapping) Date: 1945 recapitulate III. noun Etymology: 4recap Date: 1940 retread ...
recapitalization
noun Date: 1920 a revision of the capital structure of a corporation
recapitalize
transitive verb Date: 1904 to change the capital structure of
recapitulate
verb (-lated; -lating) Etymology: Late Latin recapitulatus, past participle of recapitulare to restate by heads, sum up, from Latin re- + capitulum division of a book — more ...
recapitulation
noun Date: 14th century 1. a concise summary 2. the hypothetical occurrence in an individual organism's development of successive stages resembling the series of ancestral ...
recappable
adjective see recap IV
recapture
I. noun Date: 1752 1. a. the act of retaking b. an instance of being retaken 2. the retaking of a prize or goods under international law 3. a government seizure ...
recast
transitive verb (-cast; -casting) Date: 1603 to cast again ; also remodel, refashion • recast noun
recce
noun Usage: often attributive Etymology: by shortening & alteration Date: 1941 reconnaissance
recede
I. intransitive verb (receded; receding) Etymology: Middle English, from Latin recedere to go back, from re- + cedere to go Date: 15th century 1. a. to move back or away ; ...
receipt
I. noun Etymology: Middle English receite, from Anglo-French, from Medieval Latin recepta, probably from Latin, neuter plural of receptus, past participle of recipere to ...
receivable
adjective Date: 14th century 1. capable of being received 2. subject to call for payment
receivables
noun plural Date: 1863 amounts of money receivable
receive
verb (received; receiving) Etymology: Middle English, from Anglo-French receivre, from Latin recipere, from re- + capere to take — more at heave Date: 14th century ...
received
adjective Date: 15th century generally accepted ; common
Received Pronunciation
noun Date: 1869 the pronunciation of Received Standard
Received Standard
noun Date: 1913 a traditionally prestigious form of English spoken at the English public schools, at the universities of Oxford and Cambridge, and by many educated British ...
receiver
noun Date: 14th century one that receives: as a. treasurer b. (1) a person appointed to hold in trust and administer property under litigation (2) a person ...
receiver general
noun (plural receivers general) Date: 15th century a public officer in charge of the treasury (as of Massachusetts)
receivership
noun Date: 15th century 1. the office or function of a receiver 2. the state of being in the hands of a receiver
receiving blanket
noun Date: 1926 a small lightweight blanket used to wrap an infant (as after bathing)
receiving end
noun Date: 1937 the position of being a recipient or especially a victim — usually used in the phrase on the receiving end
receiving line
noun Date: 1933 a group of people who stand in a line and individually welcome guests (as at a wedding reception)
recency
noun Date: 1612 the quality or state of being recent
recension
noun Etymology: Latin recension-, recensio enumeration, from recensēre to review, from re- + censēre to assess, tax — more at censor Date: circa 1828 1. a critical ...
recent
adjective Etymology: Middle English, from Latin recent-, recens; perhaps akin to Greek kainos new Date: 15th century 1. a. having lately come into existence ; new, fresh ...
recently
adverb Date: 1533 during a recent period of time ; lately
recentness
noun see recent
receptacle
noun Etymology: Middle English, from Anglo-French, from Latin receptaculum, from receptare to receive, frequentative of recipere to receive Date: 15th century 1. one that ...
reception
noun Etymology: Middle English recepcion, from Anglo-French or Latin; Anglo-French reception, from Latin reception-, receptio, from recipere Date: 15th century 1. the act or ...
receptionist
noun Date: 1901 a person employed to greet telephone callers, visitors, patients, or clients
receptive
adjective Date: 15th century 1. able or inclined to receive; especially open and responsive to ideas, impressions, or suggestions 2. a. of a sensory end organ fit to ...
receptively
adverb see receptive
receptiveness
noun see receptive
receptivity
noun see receptive
receptor
noun Date: 1898 receiver: as a. a cell or group of cells that receives stimuli ; sense organ b. a chemical group or molecule (as a protein) on the cell surface or in the ...
recess
I. noun Etymology: Latin recessus, from recedere to recede Date: 1531 1. the action of receding ; recession 2. a hidden, secret, or secluded place or part 3. a. ...
recession
I. noun Date: circa 1652 1. the act or action of receding ; withdrawal 2. a departing procession (as of clergy and choir at the end of a church service) 3. a period of ...
recessional
I. adjective Date: 1867 of or relating to a withdrawal II. noun Date: 1867 1. a hymn or musical piece at the conclusion of a service or program 2. recession I,2
recessionary
adjective see recession I
recessive
I. adjective Date: circa 1673 1. a. tending to recede b. withdrawn 2 2. a. producing little or no phenotypic effect when occurring in heterozygous condition with a ...
recessively
adverb see recessive I
recessiveness
noun see recessive I
recharge
Date: 1598 intransitive verb 1. to make a new attack 2. to regain energy or spirit transitive verb 1. to charge again; especially to restore anew the active ...
rechargeable
adjective see recharge
recharger
noun see recharge
réchauffé
noun Etymology: French, from réchauffé warmed-over, from past participle of réchauffer to warm over, from ré- re- + chauffer to warm, from Middle French chaufer — more at ...
recheat
noun Etymology: Middle English rechate, from rechaten to blow the recheat, from Anglo-French rechater, from Vulgar Latin *recaptare to gather, assemble, from Latin re- + captare ...
recherché
adjective Etymology: French, from past participle of rechercher to seek out, alteration of recercher, from Middle French — more at research Date: 1722 1. a. exquisite, ...
recidivism
noun Date: 1886 a tendency to relapse into a previous condition or mode of behavior; especially relapse into criminal behavior
recidivist
noun Etymology: French récidiviste, from récidiver to relapse, from Middle French, from Medieval Latin recidivare, from Latin recidivus recurring, from recidere to fall back, ...
recidivistic
adjective see recidivist
Recife
or formerly Pernambuco geographical name city & port NE Brazil capital of Pernambuco state municipal area population 1,300,000
recipe
noun Etymology: Latin, take, imperative of recipere to take, receive — more at receive Date: 1584 1. prescription 4a 2. a set of instructions for making something from ...
recipient
noun Etymology: Latin recipient-, recipiens, present participle of recipere Date: 1558 one that receives ; receiver • recipient adjective
reciprocal
I. adjective Etymology: Latin reciprocus returning the same way, alternating Date: 1570 1. a. inversely related ; opposite b. of, constituting, or resulting from paired ...
reciprocal pronoun
noun Date: 1755 a pronoun (as each other) used when its referents are predicated to bear the same relationship to one another
reciprocally
adverb see reciprocal I
reciprocate
verb (-cated; -cating) Date: 1607 transitive verb 1. to give and take mutually 2. to return in kind or degree intransitive verb 1. to make a return for something ...
reciprocating engine
noun Date: 1822 an engine in which the to-and-fro motion of one or more pistons is transformed into the rotary motion of a crankshaft
reciprocation
noun Date: 1561 1. a. a mutual exchange b. a return in kind or of like value 2. an alternating motion • reciprocative adjective
reciprocative
adjective see reciprocation
reciprocator
noun see reciprocate
reciprocity
noun (plural -ties) Date: 1766 1. the quality or state of being reciprocal ; mutual dependence, action, or influence 2. a mutual exchange of privileges; specifically a ...
recision
noun Etymology: French, from Middle French, alteration of rescision, from Late Latin rescission-, rescissio rescission Date: 1611 an act of rescinding ; cancellation
recital
noun Date: 1536 1. a. a detailed account ; enumeration b. the act or process or an instance of reciting c. discourse, narration 2. a. a concert given by an ...
recitalist
noun see recital
recitation
noun Date: 15th century 1. the act of enumerating 2. the act or an instance of reading or repeating aloud especially publicly 3. a. a student's oral reply to ...
recitative
noun Etymology: Italian recitativo, from recitare to recite, from Latin Date: 1656 1. a rhythmically free vocal style that imitates the natural inflections of speech and that ...
recitativo
noun (plural recitativi or -vos) Etymology: Italian Date: 1645 recitative 1
recite
verb (recited; reciting) Etymology: Middle English, to relate, state, from Anglo-French or Latin; Anglo-French reciter, from Latin recitare to recite, from re- + citare to ...
reciter
noun see recite
reck
verb Etymology: Middle English, to take heed, from Old English reccan; akin to Old High German ruohhen to take heed Date: before 12th century intransitive verb 1. worry, ...
reckless
adjective Date: before 12th century 1. marked by lack of proper caution ; careless of consequences 2. irresponsible Synonyms: see adventurous • recklessly adverb • ...
recklessly
adverb see reckless
recklessness
noun see reckless
Recklinghausen
geographical name city W Germany SW of Münster population 125,966
reckon
verb (reckoned; reckoning) Etymology: Middle English rekenen, from Old English -recenian (as in gerecenian to narrate); akin to Old English reccan Date: 13th century ...
reckon with
phrasal to take into consideration
reckon without
phrasal to fail to consider ; ignore
reckoning
noun Date: 14th century 1. the act or an instance of reckoning: as a. account, bill b. computation c. calculation of a ship's position 2. a settling of accounts ...
reclaim
transitive verb Etymology: Middle English reclamen, from Anglo-French reclamer, from Latin reclamare to cry out, protest, from re- + clamare to cry out — more at claim Date: ...
reclaimable
adjective see reclaim
reclamation
noun Etymology: French réclamation, from Latin reclamation-, reclamatio, from reclamare Date: 1633 the act or process of reclaiming: as a. reformation, rehabilitation ...
réclame
noun Etymology: French, advertising, from réclamer to appeal, from Middle French reclamer Date: 1883 1. a gift for dramatization or publicity ; showmanship 2. public ...
recline
verb (reclined; reclining) Etymology: Middle English, from Anglo-French or Latin; Anglo-French recliner, from Latin reclinare, from re- + clinare to bend — more at lean Date: ...
recliner
noun Date: 1928 a chair with an adjustable back and footrest
reclosable
adjective Date: 1965 capable of being tightly closed again after opening
recluse
I. adjective Etymology: Middle English, from Anglo-French reclus, literally, shut away, from Late Latin reclusus, past participle of recludere to shut up, from Latin re- + ...
reclusion
noun Date: 15th century the state of being recluse
reclusive
adjective see recluse I
reclusively
adverb see recluse I
reclusiveness
noun see recluse I
recognise
chiefly British variant of recognize
recognition
noun Etymology: Middle English recognicion, from Anglo-French recognition, from Latin recognition-, recognitio, from recognoscere Date: 15th century 1. the action of ...
recognizability
noun see recognize
recognizable
adjective see recognize
recognizably
adverb see recognize
recognizance
noun Etymology: Middle English recognissance, alteration of reconissaunce, from Anglo-French, from reconoistre to recognize Date: 14th century 1. a. an obligation of ...
recognize
transitive verb (-nized; -nizing) Etymology: modification of Anglo-French reconois-, stem of reconoistre, from Latin recognoscere, from re- + cognoscere to know — more at ...
recognizer
noun see recognize
recoil
I. intransitive verb Etymology: Middle English reculen, recoilen, from Anglo-French reculer, recuiler, from re- + cul backside — more at culet Date: 14th century 1. a. ...
recoil-operated
adjective Date: 1942 of a firearm utilizing the movement of parts in recoil to operate the action
recoilless
adjective Date: 1943 venting expanding propellant gas before recoil is produced
recoin
transitive verb Date: 1663 to coin again or anew; especially remint • recoinage noun
recoinage
noun see recoin
recollect
verb Etymology: Medieval Latin recollectus, past participle of recolligere, from Latin, to gather again Date: 1559 transitive verb 1. to bring back to the level of ...
recollected
adjective Date: 1627 composed, calm
recollection
noun Date: 1624 1. a. tranquillity of mind b. religious contemplation 2. a. the action or power of recalling to mind b. something recalled to the mind ...
recombinant
adjective Date: 1942 1. relating to or exhibiting genetic recombination 2. a. relating to or containing genetically engineered DNA b. produced by genetic engineering ...
recombinant DNA
noun Date: 1975 genetically engineered DNA usually incorporating DNA from more than one species of organism
recombination
noun Date: 1903 the formation by the processes of crossing-over and independent assortment of new combinations of genes in progeny that did not occur in the parents • ...
recombinational
adjective see recombination
recombine
verb Date: 1619 transitive verb 1. to combine again or anew 2. to cause to undergo recombination intransitive verb to undergo recombination
recommend
transitive verb Etymology: Middle English, from Anglo-French recommender, from Medieval Latin recommendare, from Latin re- + commendare to commend Date: 14th century 1. a. ...
recommendable
adjective see recommend
recommendation
noun Date: 15th century 1. a. the act of recommending b. something (as a procedure) recommended 2. something that recommends or expresses commendation
recommendatory
adjective see recommend
recommender
noun see recommend
recommit
transitive verb Date: 1621 1. to refer (as a bill) back to a committee 2. to entrust or consign again • recommitment noun • recommittal noun
recommitment
noun see recommit
recommittal
noun see recommit
recompense
I. transitive verb (-pensed; -pensing) Etymology: Middle English, from Anglo-French recompenser, from Late Latin recompensare, from Latin re- + compensare to compensate Date: ...
recompose
transitive verb Date: 1611 1. to compose again ; rearrange 2. to restore to composure • recomposition noun
recomposition
noun see recompose
recon
noun Date: 1918 reconnaissance
reconcilability
noun see reconcile
reconcilable
adjective see reconcile
reconcile
verb (-ciled; -ciling) Etymology: Middle English, from Anglo-French or Latin; Anglo-French reconciler, from Latin reconciliare, from re- + conciliare to conciliate Date: 14th ...
reconcilement
noun see reconcile
reconciler
noun see reconcile
reconciliation
noun Etymology: Middle English reconsiliacioun, from Anglo-French, from Latin reconciliation-, reconciliatio, from reconciliare Date: 14th century 1. the action of ...
reconciliatory
adjective see reconciliation
recondite
adjective Etymology: Latin reconditus, past participle of recondere to conceal, from re- + condere to store up, from com- + -dere to put — more at com-, do Date: 1649 1. ...
reconditely
adverb see recondite
reconditeness
noun see recondite
recondition
transitive verb Date: 1920 1. to restore to good condition (as by replacing parts) 2. to condition (as a person or a person's attitudes) anew; also to reinstate (a ...
reconfirm
transitive verb Date: 1611 to confirm again; also to establish more strongly • reconfirmation noun
reconfirmation
noun see reconfirm
reconnaissance
noun Etymology: French, literally, recognition, from Middle French reconoissance, from Old French reconoistre to recognize Date: 1810 a preliminary survey to gain ...
reconnoiter
or reconnoitre verb (-noitered or -noitred; -noitering or reconnoitring) Etymology: obsolete French reconnoître, literally, to recognize, from Old French reconoistre — more ...
reconnoitre
verb see reconnoiter
reconsider
Date: 1571 transitive verb to consider again especially with a view to changing or reversing intransitive verb to consider something again • reconsideration noun
reconsideration
noun see reconsider
reconstitute
transitive verb Date: 1812 to constitute again or anew; especially to restore to a former condition by adding water • reconstitution noun
reconstitution
noun see reconstitute
reconstruct
transitive verb Date: 1768 to construct again: as a. to establish or assemble again b. to subject (an organ or part) to surgery to re-form its structure or correct a ...
reconstructible
adjective see reconstruct
reconstruction
noun Date: 1791 1. a. the action of reconstructing ; the state of being reconstructed b. often capitalized the reorganization and reestablishment of the seceded states ...
reconstructionism
noun Usage: often capitalized Date: 1942 1. a movement in 20th century American Judaism that advocates a creative adjustment to contemporary conditions through the ...
reconstructionist
adjective or noun see reconstructionism
reconstructive
adjective see reconstruct

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