Слова на букву quin-sask (6389) New Collegiate Dictionary
На главную О проекте Обратная связь Поддержать проектДобавить в избранное

  
EN-DE-FR →  New Collegiate Dictionary →  acto-axio axio-buck buck-cobl cobl-deco deco-elec elec-flüg flüg-gulp gulp-innu inob-leni leni-micr micr-obtr obtr-phyl phyl-quin quin-sask sask-soma soma-tano tans-unco uncr-wool


Слова на букву quin-sask (6389)

< 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 > >>
redistribute
transitive verb Date: 1611 1. to alter the distribution of ; reallocate 2. to spread to other areas • redistribution noun • redistributional adjective • ...
redistribution
noun see redistribute
redistributional
adjective see redistribute
redistributionist
noun Date: 1961 one who believes in or advocates a welfare state • redistributionist adjective
redistributive
adjective see redistribute
redistrict
Date: 1850 transitive verb to divide anew into districts; specifically to revise the legislative districts of intransitive verb to revise legislative districts
redivivus
adjective Etymology: Late Latin, from Latin, reused Date: 1675 brought back to life ; reborn — used postpositively
Redlands
geographical name city S California SE of San Bernardino population 63,591
redleg
noun Date: 1900 artilleryman
redline
I. noun Date: 1952 a recommended safety limit ; the fastest, farthest, or highest point or degree considered safe; also the red line which marks this point on a gauge II. ...
redly
adverb Date: 1611 in a red manner ; with red color
Redmond
I. biographical name John Edward 1856-1918 Irish politician II. geographical name city W central Washington NE of Seattle population 45,256
redneck
noun Date: 1830 1. sometimes disparaging a white member of the Southern rural laboring class 2. often disparaging a person whose behavior and opinions are similar to those ...
rednecked
adjective see redneck
redness
noun Date: before 12th century the quality or state of being red or red-hot
redo
transitive verb (redid; redone; redoing; redoes) Date: 1597 1. to do over or again 2. redecorate • redo noun
redolence
noun Date: 15th century 1. an often pungent or agreeable odor 2. the quality or state of being redolent Synonyms: see fragrance
redolent
adjective Etymology: Middle English, from Middle French, from Latin redolent-, redolens, present participle of redolēre to emit a scent, from re-, red- + olēre to smell — ...
redolently
adverb see redolent
Redon
biographical name Odilon 1840-1916 French artist
Redondo Beach
geographical name city SW California population 63,261
redouble
Date: 15th century transitive verb 1. to make twice as great in size or amount; broadly intensify, strengthen 2. a. obsolete to echo back b. archaic repeat ...
redoubt
noun Etymology: French redoute, from Italian ridotto, from Medieval Latin reductus secret place, from Latin, withdrawn, from past participle of reducere to lead back — more ...
redoubtable
adjective Etymology: Middle English redoutable, from Anglo-French, from reduter to dread, from re- + duter to doubt Date: 15th century 1. causing fear or alarm ; formidable ...
redoubtably
adverb see redoubtable
redound
intransitive verb Etymology: Middle English, from Middle French redunder, from Latin redundare, from re-, red- re- + unda wave — more at water Date: 14th century 1. archaic ...
redout
noun Date: 1942 a condition in which centripetal acceleration (as that created when an aircraft abruptly enters a dive) drives blood to the head and causes reddening of the ...
redox
adjective Etymology: reduction + oxidation Date: 1928 of or relating to oxidation-reduction
redpoll
noun Date: 1738 either of two small finches (genus Carduelis syn. Acanthis of the family Fringillidae) having brownish streaked plumage and a red or rosy crown; especially ...
redress
I. transitive verb Etymology: Middle English, from Anglo-French redresser to set upright, restore, redress, from re- + dresser to set straight — more at dress Date: 14th ...
redresser
noun see redress I
redroot
noun Date: 1709 1. a perennial herb (Lachnanthes caroliniana syn. L. tinctoria) of the eastern United States whose red root is the source of a dye 2. New Jersey tea 3. ...
redshank
noun Date: 1525 a common Old World sandpiper (Tringa totanus) with pale red legs and feet
redshift
noun Date: 1923 a displacement of the spectrum of a celestial body toward longer wavelengths that is a consequence of the Doppler effect or the gravitational field of the ...
redshifted
adjective see redshift
redshirt
noun Etymology: from the red jersey commonly worn by such a player in practice scrimmages against the regulars Date: 1955 a college athlete who is kept out of varsity ...
redskin
noun Date: 1699 usually offensive American Indian
redstart
noun Etymology: red + obsolete start handle, tail Date: circa 1570 1. a small Old World songbird (Phoenicurus phoenicurus of the family Turdidae) with the male having a ...
redtail
noun see red-tailed hawk
redtop
noun Date: 1790 any of several grasses (genus Agrostis) with usually reddish panicles; especially a Eurasian grass (A. alba syn. A. gigantea) grown in eastern North America ...
reduce
verb (reduced; reducing) Etymology: Middle English, to lead back, from Latin reducere, from re- + ducere to lead — more at tow Date: 14th century transitive verb 1. a. ...
reducer
noun see reduce
reducibility
noun see reduce
reducible
adjective see reduce
reducibly
adverb see reduce
reducing agent
noun Date: circa 1817 a substance that reduces a chemical compound usually by donating electrons
reductant
noun Date: 1925 reducing agent
reductase
noun Date: 1902 an enzyme that catalyzes reduction
reductio ad absurdum
noun Etymology: Late Latin, literally, reduction to the absurd Date: 1741 1. disproof of a proposition by showing an absurdity to which it leads when carried to its logical ...
reduction
noun Etymology: Middle English reduccion restoration, from Middle French reducion, from Late Latin & Latin; Late Latin reduction-, reductio reduction (in a syllogism), from ...
reduction division
noun Date: 1891 the usually first division of meiosis in which chromosome reduction occurs; also meiosis 2
reduction gear
noun Date: 1894 a combination of gears used to reduce the input speed (as of a marine turbine) to a lower output speed (as of a ship's propeller)
reductional
adjective see reduction
reductionism
noun Date: 1943 1. explanation of complex life-science processes and phenomena in terms of the laws of physics and chemistry; also a theory or doctrine that complete ...
reductionist
noun or adjective see reductionism
reductionistic
adjective see reductionism
reductive
adjective Date: 1633 1. of, relating to, causing, or involving reduction 2. of or relating to reductionism ; reductionistic • reductively adverb • reductiveness noun
reductively
adverb see reductive
reductiveness
noun see reductive
redundancy
noun (plural -cies) Date: circa 1602 1. a. the quality or state of being redundant ; superfluity b. the use of redundant components; also such components c. chiefly ...
redundant
adjective Etymology: Latin redundant-, redundans, present participle of redundare to overflow — more at redound Date: 1594 1. a. exceeding what is necessary or normal ; ...
redundantly
adverb see redundant
reduplicate
transitive verb Etymology: Late Latin reduplicatus, past participle of reduplicare, from Latin re- + duplicare to double — more at duplicate Date: circa 1570 1. to make or ...
reduplication
noun Date: 1555 1. an act or instance of doubling or reiterating 2. a. an often grammatically functional repetition of a radical element or a part of it occurring usually ...
reduplicative
adjective see reduplication
reduplicatively
adverb see reduplication
reduviid
noun Etymology: ultimately from Latin reduvia hangnail Date: 1888 assassin bug • reduviid adjective
redux
adjective Etymology: Latin, returning, from reducere to lead back Date: 1860 brought back — used postpositively
redware
noun Date: 1699 earthenware pottery made of clay containing considerable iron oxide
redwing
noun Date: 1657 1. a European thrush (Turdus iliacus syn. T. musicus) having the underwing coverts red 2. red-winged blackbird
redwing blackbird
noun see red-winged blackbird
redwood
noun Date: circa 1585 1. any of various woods (as brazilwood) yielding a red dye 2. a tree that yields a red dyewood or produces red or reddish wood 3. a. a very tall ...
Redwood City
geographical name city W California SE of San Francisco population 75,402
Redwood National Park
geographical name reservation NW California containing groves of redwoods
reecho
Date: 1590 intransitive verb to repeat or return an echo ; echo again or repeatedly ; reverberate transitive verb to echo back ; repeat
Reed
I. biographical name John 1887-1920 American journalist, poet, & Communist II. biographical name Stanley Forman 1884-1980 American jurist III. biographical name Thomas ...
reed
I. noun Etymology: Middle English rede, from Old English hrēod; akin to Old High German hriot reed Date: before 12th century 1. a. any of various tall grasses with ...
reed organ
noun Date: 1851 a keyboard wind instrument in which the wind acts on a set of free reeds
reed pipe
noun Date: circa 1741 a pipe-organ pipe producing its tone by vibration of a beating reed in a current of air
reedbuck
noun (plural reedbuck; also reedbucks) Date: 1834 any of a genus (Redunca) of fawn-colored African antelopes in which the males have curved and ridged horns
reeded
adjective Date: 1823 decorated with reeds or reeding
reedify
transitive verb (-fied; -fying) Etymology: Middle English reedifien, from Anglo-French reedifier, from Late Latin reaedificare, from Latin re- + aedificare to build — more at ...
reediness
noun see reedy
reeding
noun Date: 1815 1. a. a small convex molding — see molding illustration b. decoration by series of reedings 2. milling
reedit
transitive verb Date: 1797 to edit again ; make a new edition of • reedition noun
reedition
noun see reedit
reedlike
adjective see reed I
reedman
noun Date: 1872 one who plays a reed instrument
reeducate
transitive verb Date: 1808 to train again; especially to rehabilitate through education • reeducation noun • reeducative adjective
reeducation
noun see reeducate
reeducative
adjective see reeducate
reedy
adjective (reedier; -est) Date: 14th century 1. abounding in or covered with reeds 2. made of or resembling reeds; especially slender, frail 3. having the tone quality of ...
reef
I. noun Etymology: Middle English riff, from Old Norse rif; probably akin to Old Norse rīfa to rend — more at rive Date: 14th century 1. a part of a sail taken in or let ...
reef knot
noun Date: 1841 a square knot used in reefing a sail
reefable
adjective see reef II
reefer
I. noun Date: 1818 1. one that reefs 2. a close-fitting usually double-breasted jacket or coat of thick cloth II. noun Etymology: by shortening & alteration Date: 1914 1. ...
reefy
adjective see reef III
reek
I. noun Etymology: Middle English rek, from Old English rēc; akin to Old High German rouh smoke Date: before 12th century 1. chiefly dialect smoke 2. vapor, fog 3. a ...
reeker
noun see reek II
reeky
adjective see reek II
reel
I. noun Etymology: Middle English, from Old English hrēol; akin to Old Norse hræll weaver's reed, Greek krekein to weave Date: before 12th century 1. a revolvable device on ...
reel off
transitive verb Date: 1837 1. to tell or recite readily and usually at length 2. to chalk up usually as a series
reel-to-reel
adjective Date: 1961 of, relating to, or utilizing magnetic tape that requires threading on a take-up reel
reelable
adjective see reel II
reelect
transitive verb Date: 1601 to elect for another term in office • reelection noun
reelection
noun see reelect
reeler
noun Date: circa 1598 1. one that reels 2. a motion picture having a specified number of reels
Reelfoot
geographical name lake NW Tennessee near the Mississippi
reembroider
transitive verb Date: 1927 to outline a design (as on lace) with embroidery stitching
reenact
transitive verb Date: circa 1676 1. to enact (as a law) again 2. to act or perform again 3. to repeat the actions of (an earlier event or incident) • reenactment noun
reenactment
noun see reenact
reenactor
noun Date: 1980 a person who participates in reenactments of historical events
reenforce
variant of reinforce
reengineer
transitive verb Date: 1944 1. to engineer again or anew ; redesign 2. to reorganize the operations of (an organization) so as to improve efficiency
reenter
Date: 15th century transitive verb 1. to enter (something) again 2. to return to and enter intransitive verb to enter again
reentrance
noun Date: 1594 reentry
reentrant
I. adjective Date: 1781 directed inward II. noun Date: 1899 1. one that reenters 2. one that is reentrant 3. an indentation in a landform
reentry
noun Date: 15th century 1. a retaking possession; especially entry by a lessor on leased premises on the tenant's failure to perform the conditions of the lease 2. a second ...
reest
intransitive verb Etymology: probably short for Scots arreest to arrest, from Middle English (Scots) arreisten, from Anglo-French arester — more at arrest Date: 1786 ...
reeve
I. noun Etymology: Middle English reve, from Old English gerēfa, from ge- (associative prefix) + -rēfa (akin to Old English -rōf number, Old High German ruova) — more at ...
ref
I. noun Date: 1899 a referee in a game or sport II. abbreviation 1. reference 2. refunding
refashion
transitive verb Date: 1628 remake, alter
refect
transitive verb Etymology: Latin refectus, past participle of reficere Date: 14th century archaic to refresh with food or drink
refection
noun Etymology: Middle English refeccioun, from Anglo-French refectiun, from Latin refection-, refectio, from reficere to restore, from re- + facere to make — more at do ...
refectory
noun (plural -ries) Etymology: Middle English, from Anglo-French refectorie, from Late Latin refectorium, from Latin reficere Date: 15th century a dining hall (as in a ...
refectory table
noun Date: 1857 a long table with heavy legs
refel
transitive verb (refelled; refelling) Etymology: Latin refellere to prove false, refute, from re- + fallere to deceive Date: 1530 obsolete reject, repulse
refer
verb (referred; referring) Etymology: Middle English referren, from Anglo-French referer, referir, from Latin referre to bring back, report, refer, from re- + ferre to carry — ...
referable
adjective see refer
referee
I. noun Date: 1621 1. one to whom a thing is referred: as a. a person to whom a legal matter is referred for investigation and report or for settlement b. a person who ...
reference
I. noun Date: 1589 1. the act of referring or consulting 2. a bearing on a matter ; relation 3. something that refers: as a. allusion, mention b. something (as a ...
reference mark
noun Date: 1856 a conventional mark (as *, †, or ‡) placed in written or printed text to direct the reader's attention especially to a footnote
referendum
noun (plural referenda or -dums) Etymology: New Latin, from Latin, neuter of referendus, gerundive of referre to refer Date: 1847 1. a. the principle or practice of ...
referent
noun Etymology: Latin referent-, referens, present participle of referre Date: 1844 one that refers or is referred to; especially the thing that a symbol (as a word or sign) ...
referential
adjective Date: 1660 of, containing, or constituting a reference; especially pointing to or involving a referent • referentiality noun • referentially adverb
referentiality
noun see referential
referentially
adverb see referential
referral
noun Date: 1927 1. the act, action, or an instance of referring 2. one that is referred
referrer
noun see refer
refigure
transitive verb Date: 14th century 1. to figure again or anew 2. to give new meaning or use to
refill
I. Date: 1615 transitive verb to fill again ; replenish intransitive verb to become filled again • refillable adjective II. noun Date: 1886 1. a product or a ...
refillable
adjective see refill I
refinance
Date: 1908 transitive verb to renew or reorganize the financing of intransitive verb to finance something anew
refine
verb (refined; refining) Date: 1582 transitive verb 1. to free (as metal, sugar, or oil) from impurities or unwanted material 2. to free from moral imperfection ; ...
refined
adjective Date: 1582 1. free from impurities 2. fastidious, cultivated 3. precise, exact
refinement
noun Date: circa 1611 1. the action or process of refining 2. the quality or state of being refined ; cultivation 3. a. a refined feature or method b. a highly ...
refiner
noun see refine
refinery
noun (plural -eries) Date: circa 1741 a building and equipment for refining or processing (as oil or sugar)
refinish
Date: 1886 transitive verb to give (as furniture) a new surface intransitive verb to refinish furniture • refinisher noun
refinisher
noun see refinish
refit
I. Date: 1666 transitive verb to fit out or supply again intransitive verb to obtain repairs or fresh supplies or equipment II. noun Date: 1799 the action of ...
reflate
verb see reflation
reflation
noun Etymology: re- + -flation (as in deflation) Date: 1932 restoration of deflated prices to a desirable level • reflate verb • reflationary adjective
reflationary
adjective see reflation
reflect
verb Etymology: Middle English, from Latin reflectere to bend back, from re- + flectere to bend Date: 15th century transitive verb 1. archaic to turn into or away from a ...
reflectance
noun Date: 1926 the fraction of the total radiant flux incident upon a surface that is reflected and that varies according to the wavelength distribution of the incident ...
reflecting telescope
noun Date: circa 1704 reflector 2
reflection
noun Etymology: Middle English, alteration of reflexion, from Late Latin reflexion-, reflexio act of bending back, from Latin reflectere Date: 14th century 1. an instance of ...
reflectional
adjective see reflection
reflective
adjective Date: 1627 1. capable of reflecting light, images, or sound waves 2. marked by reflection ; thoughtful, deliberative 3. of, relating to, or caused by reflection ...
reflectively
adverb see reflective
reflectiveness
noun see reflective
reflectivity
noun see reflectance
reflectometer
noun Date: 1891 a device for measuring reflectance • reflectometry noun
reflectometry
noun see reflectometer
reflector
noun Date: 1665 1. one that reflects; especially a polished surface for reflecting light or other radiation 2. a telescope in which the principal focusing element is a ...
reflectorize
transitive verb (-ized; -izing) Date: 1940 1. to make reflecting 2. to provide with reflectors
reflex
I. noun Etymology: Latin reflexus, past participle of reflectere to reflect Date: 1508 1. a. archaic reflected heat, light, or color b. a mirrored image c. a copy ...
reflex action
noun see reflex I
reflex arc
noun Date: 1882 the complete nervous path involved in a reflex
reflexed
adjective Etymology: Latin reflexus + English 1-ed Date: 1733 bent or curved backward or downward
reflexion
chiefly British variant of reflection
reflexive
I. adjective Etymology: Medieval Latin reflexivus, from Latin reflexus Date: 1640 1. a. directed or turned back on itself; also overtly and usually ironically reflecting ...
reflexive pronoun
noun Date: 1867 a pronoun referring to the subject of the sentence, clause, or verbal phrase in which it stands; specifically a personal pronoun compounded with -self
reflexively
adverb see reflexive I
reflexiveness
noun see reflexive I
reflexivity
noun see reflexive I
reflexly
adverb see reflex II
reflexologist
noun see reflexology
reflexology
noun Etymology: International Scientific Vocabulary Date: 1923 1. the study and interpretation of behavior in terms of simple and complex reflexes 2. massage of the hands ...
reflow
intransitive verb Date: 14th century 1. to flow back ; ebb 2. to flow in again • reflow noun
refluence
noun Date: 15th century archaic reflux 1a
refluent
adjective Etymology: Middle English, from Latin refluent-, refluens, present participle of refluere to flow back, from re- + fluere to flow — more at fluid Date: 15th ...
reflux
I. noun Etymology: Middle English, from Medieval Latin refluxus, from Latin re- + fluxus flow — more at flux Date: 15th century 1. a. a flowing back b. ...
refocus
Date: circa 1865 transitive verb 1. to focus again 2. to change the emphasis or direction of intransitive verb 1. to focus something again 2. to change emphasis ...
reforest
transitive verb see reforestation
reforestation
noun Date: 1887 the action of renewing forest cover (as by natural seeding or by the artificial planting of seeds or young trees) • reforest transitive verb
reform
I. verb Etymology: Middle English, from Anglo-French refurmer, from Latin reformare, from re- + formare to form, from forma form Date: 14th century transitive verb 1. a. ...
Reform Judaism
noun Date: circa 1905 Judaism marked by a liberal approach in nonobservance of much legal tradition regarded as irrelevant to the present and in shortening and simplification ...
reform school
noun Date: circa 1859 a reformatory for boys or girls
reformability
noun see reform I
reformable
adjective see reform I
reformate
noun Date: 1949 a product of hydrocarbon reforming
reformation
noun Date: 15th century 1. the act of reforming ; the state of being reformed 2. capitalized a 16th century religious movement marked ultimately by rejection or modification ...
reformational
adjective see reformation
reformative
adjective Date: 1593 intended or tending to reform
reformatory
I. adjective Date: 1589 reformative II. noun (plural -ries) Date: 1834 a penal institution to which especially young or first offenders are committed for training and ...
reformed
adjective Date: 1563 1. changed for the better 2. capitalized protestant; specifically of or relating to the chiefly Calvinist Protestant churches formed in various ...
reformed spelling
noun Date: 1879 any of several methods of spelling English words that use letters with more phonetic consistency than conventional spelling and that usually discard some ...
reformer
noun Date: 1526 1. one that works for or urges reform 2. capitalized a leader of the Protestant Reformation 3. an apparatus for cracking oils or gases to form specialized ...
reformism
noun Date: 1904 a doctrine, policy, or movement of reform • reformist noun or adjective
reformist
noun or adjective see reformism
refr
abbreviation refraction
refract
transitive verb Etymology: Latin refractus, past participle of refringere to break open, break up, from re- + frangere to break — more at break Date: 1612 1. a. to ...
refractile
adjective Date: circa 1849 capable of refracting ; refractive
refracting telescope
noun Date: 1764 refractor
refraction
noun Date: 1603 1. deflection from a straight path undergone by a light ray or energy wave in passing obliquely from one medium (as air) into another (as glass) in which its ...
refractive
adjective Date: 1673 1. having power to refract 2. relating or due to refraction • refractively adverb • refractiveness noun • refractivity noun
refractive index
noun Date: 1839 the ratio of the speed of radiation (as light) in one medium (as air, glass, or a vacuum) to that in another medium
refractively
adverb see refractive
refractiveness
noun see refractive
refractivity
noun see refractive
refractometer
noun Etymology: International Scientific Vocabulary Date: circa 1859 an instrument for measuring refractive indices (as for identification or the determination of sugar ...
refractometric
adjective see refractometer
refractometry
noun see refractometer
refractor
noun Date: 1769 a telescope whose principal focusing element is a lens
refractorily
adverb see refractory I
refractoriness
noun see refractory I
refractory
I. adjective Etymology: alteration of refractary, from Latin refractarius, irregular from refragari to oppose, from re- + -fragari (as in suffragari to support with one's vote) ...
refractory period
noun Date: circa 1880 the brief period immediately following the response especially of a muscle or nerve before it recovers the capacity to make a second response — called ...
refractory phase
noun see refractory period
refrain
I. verb Etymology: Middle English refreynen, from Anglo-French refreiner, refreindre, from Latin refrenare, from re- + frenum bridle — more at frenum Date: 14th century ...
refrainment
noun see refrain I
refrangibility
noun see refrangible
refrangible
adjective Etymology: irregular from Latin refringere to break up Date: 1673 capable of being refracted • refrangibility noun • refrangibleness noun
refrangibleness
noun see refrangible
refresh
verb Etymology: Middle English refresshen, from Anglo-French refreschir, from re- + fresch fresh — more at fresh Date: 14th century transitive verb 1. to restore strength ...
refreshen
transitive verb Etymology: re- + freshen Date: 1782 refresh
refresher
noun Date: 15th century 1. something (as a drink) that refreshes 2. reminder 3. review or instruction designed especially to keep one abreast of professional developments
refreshing
adjective Date: circa 1580 serving to refresh; especially agreeably stimulating because of freshness or newness • refreshingly adverb
refreshingly
adverb see refreshing
refreshment
noun Date: 14th century 1. the act of refreshing ; the state of being refreshed 2. a. something (as food or drink) that refreshes b. plural (1) a light meal (2) ...
refried beans
noun plural Date: 1957 beans cooked with seasonings, fried, then mashed and fried again
refrig
abbreviation refrigerator
refrigerant
I. adjective Date: 1599 allaying heat or fever II. noun Date: 1676 a refrigerant agent or agency: as a. a medication for reducing body heat b. a substance used in ...
refrigerate
transitive verb (-ated; -ating) Etymology: Latin refrigeratus, past participle of refrigerare, from re- + frigerare to cool, from frigor-, frigus cold — more at frigid Date: ...
refrigeration
noun see refrigerate
refrigerator
noun Date: 1611 something that refrigerates; especially a room or appliance for keeping food or other items cool
reft
past of reave
refuel
Date: 1811 transitive verb to provide with additional fuel intransitive verb to take on additional fuel
refuge
I. noun Etymology: Middle English, from Anglo-French, from Latin refugium, from refugere to escape, from re- + fugere to flee — more at fugitive Date: 14th century 1. ...
refugee
noun Etymology: French réfugié, past participle of (se) réfugier to take refuge, from Middle French refugier, from Latin refugium Date: 1685 one that flees; especially a ...
refugeeism
noun see refugee
refugium
noun (plural refugia) Etymology: New Latin, from Latin, refuge Date: 1943 an area of relatively unaltered climate that is inhabited by plants and animals during a period of ...
refulgence
noun Etymology: Latin refulgentia, from refulgent-, refulgens, present participle of refulgēre to shine brightly, from re- + fulgēre to shine — more at fulgent Date: 1634 ...
refulgent
adjective see refulgence
refund
I. transitive verb Etymology: Middle English refounden, from Anglo-French & Latin; Anglo-French refunder, from Latin refundere, literally, to pour back, from re- + fundere to ...
refundability
noun see refund I
refundable
adjective see refund I
refurbish
transitive verb Date: 1611 to brighten or freshen up ; renovate • refurbisher noun • refurbishment noun
refurbisher
noun see refurbish
refurbishment
noun see refurbish
refusal
noun Date: 15th century 1. the act of refusing or denying 2. the opportunity or right of refusing or taking before others
refuse
I. verb (refused; refusing) Etymology: Middle English, from Anglo-French refuser, from Vulgar Latin *refusare, perhaps blend of Latin refutare to refute and recusare to demur ...
refusenik
also refusnik noun Etymology: part translation of Russian otkaznik, from otkaz refusal Date: 1974 1. a Soviet citizen and especially a Jew refused permission to emigrate 2. ...
refuser
noun see refuse I
refusnik
noun see refusenik
refutable
adjective see refute
refutably
adverb see refute
refutation
noun Date: circa 1548 the act or process of refuting
refute
transitive verb (refuted; refuting) Etymology: Latin refutare to check, suppress, refute Date: 1545 1. to prove wrong by argument or evidence ; show to be false or erroneous ...
refuter
noun see refute
reg
I. noun Etymology: by shortening Date: 1904 regulation II. abbreviation 1. region 2. register; registered; registration 3. regular
regal
adjective Etymology: Middle English, from Anglo-French or Latin; Anglo-French, from Latin regalis — more at royal Date: 14th century 1. of, relating to, or suitable for a ...
regale
I. verb (regaled; regaling) Etymology: French régaler, from Middle French, from regale, noun Date: circa 1656 transitive verb 1. to entertain sumptuously ; feast with ...

< 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 > >>

© en-de-fr.com.ua - EN-DE-FR 2009-2017 Информация публикуется на сайте для ознакомительного процесса.
 
Выполнено за: 0.036 c;