Слова на букву quin-sask (6389) New Collegiate Dictionary
На главную О проекте Обратная связь Поддержать проектДобавить в избранное

  
EN-DE-FR →  New Collegiate Dictionary →  acto-axio axio-buck buck-cobl cobl-deco deco-elec elec-flüg flüg-gulp gulp-innu inob-leni leni-micr micr-obtr obtr-phyl phyl-quin quin-sask sask-soma soma-tano tans-unco uncr-wool


Слова на букву quin-sask (6389)

< 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 > >>
regalia
noun plural Etymology: Medieval Latin, from Latin, neuter plural of regalis Date: circa 1540 1. royal rights or prerogatives 2. a. the emblems, symbols, or paraphernalia ...
regality
noun see regal
regally
adverb see regal
regard
I. noun Etymology: Middle English, from Anglo-French, from regarder Date: 14th century 1. archaic appearance 2. a. attention, consideration b. a protective interest ...
regardant
adjective Etymology: Middle English regardand, from Anglo-French regardant, present participle of regarder Date: 15th century looking backward over the shoulder — used of a ...
regardful
adjective Date: circa 1586 1. heedful, observant 2. full or expressive of regard or respect ; respectful • regardfully adverb • regardfulness noun
regardfully
adverb see regardful
regardfulness
noun see regardful
regarding
preposition Date: 1802 with respect to ; concerning
regardless
I. adjective Date: 1591 heedless, careless • regardlessly adverb • regardlessness noun II. adverb Date: 1872 despite everything Usage: see irregardless
regardless of
preposition Date: 1784 without taking into account ; also in spite of
regardlessly
adverb see regardless I
regardlessness
noun see regardless I
regatta
noun Etymology: Italian regata Date: 1652 a rowing, speedboat, or sailing race or a series of such races
regency
noun (plural -cies) Date: 15th century 1. the office, jurisdiction, or government of a regent or body of regents 2. a body of regents 3. the period of rule of a regent or ...
Regency
adjective Date: 1880 of, relating to, or characteristic of the styles of George IV's regency as Prince of Wales during the period 1811-20
regenerable
adjective see regenerate II
regeneracy
noun Date: 1626 the state of being regenerated
regenerate
I. adjective Etymology: Middle English regenerat, from Latin regeneratus, past participle of regenerare to regenerate, from re- + generare to beget — more at generate Date: ...
regenerated cellulose
noun Date: 1904 cellulose obtained in a changed form by chemical treatment (as of a cellulose solution or derivative)
regenerately
adverb see regenerate I
regenerateness
noun see regenerate I
regeneration
noun Date: 14th century 1. an act or the process of regenerating ; the state of being regenerated 2. spiritual renewal or revival 3. renewal or restoration of a body, ...
regenerative
adjective Date: 14th century 1. of, relating to, or marked by regeneration 2. tending to regenerate
regenerator
noun Date: circa 1550 1. one that regenerates 2. a device used especially with hot-air engines or gas furnaces in which incoming air or gas is heated by contact with masses ...
Regensburg
geographical name city SE Germany in Bavaria on the Danube NNE of Munich population 123,002
regent
noun Etymology: Middle English, from Anglo-French or Medieval Latin; Anglo-French, from Medieval Latin regent-, regens, from Latin, present participle of regere to direct — ...
regental
adjective see regent
reggae
noun Etymology: origin unknown Date: 1968 popular music of Jamaican origin that combines native styles with elements of rock and soul music and is performed at moderate ...
Reggane
geographical name oasis central Algeria in Tanezrouft SSE of Béchar
Reggio
geographical name 1. (or Reggio di Calabria) (or Reggio Calabria) (or ancient Rhegium) commune & port S Italy on Strait of Messina population 169,709 2. (or Reggio ...
Reggio Calabria
geographical name see Reggio 1
Reggio di Calabria
geographical name see Reggio 1
Reggio Emilia
geographical name see Reggio 2
Reggio nell'Emilia
geographical name see Reggio 2
regicidal
adjective see regicide
regicide
noun Etymology: Latin reg-, rex king + English -cide — more at royal Date: circa 1548 1. a person who kills a king 2. the killing of a king • regicidal adjective
regime
also régime noun Etymology: French régime, from Old French regimen, regime, from Late Latin regimin-, regimen Date: 1776 1. a. regimen 1 b. a regular pattern of ...
régime
noun see regime
regimen
noun Etymology: Middle English, from Medieval Latin regimin-, regimen position of authority, direction, set of rules, from Latin, steering, control, from regere to direct Date: ...
regiment
I. noun Etymology: Middle English, from Middle French, from Late Latin regimentum, alteration of Latin regimen Date: 14th century 1. archaic governmental rule 2. a military ...
regimental
adjective Date: 1659 1. of or relating to a regiment 2. authoritative, dictatorial
regimentals
noun plural Date: 1742 1. a regimental uniform 2. military dress
regimentation
noun see regiment II
Regina
geographical name city Canada capital of Saskatchewan population 178,225
region
noun Etymology: Middle English regioun, from Anglo-French regiun, from Latin region-, regio line, direction, area, from regere to direct Date: 14th century 1. an ...
regional
I. adjective Date: 15th century 1. affecting a particular region ; localized 2. of, relating to, characteristic of, or serving a region 3. marked by regionalism II. ...
regionalism
noun Date: 1881 1. a. consciousness of and loyalty to a distinct region with a homogeneous population b. development of a political or social system based on one or more ...
regionalist
noun or adjective see regionalism
regionalistic
adjective see regionalism
regionalization
noun see regionalize
regionalize
transitive verb (-ized; -izing) Date: 1921 to divide into regions or administrative districts ; arrange regionally • regionalization noun
regionally
adverb Date: 1879 on a regional basis
regisseur
or régisseur noun Etymology: French régisseur, from régir to direct, from Old French regir, reger, Latin regere to rule Date: 1828 a director responsible for staging a ...
régisseur
noun see regisseur
register
I. noun Etymology: Middle English registre, from Anglo-French, from Medieval Latin registrum, alteration of Late Latin regesta, plural, register, from Latin, neuter plural of ...
register ton
noun Date: circa 1909 ton 1a
registerable
adjective see registrable
registered
adjective Date: 1861 1. a. having the owner's name entered in a register b. recorded as the owner of a security 2. recorded on the basis of pedigree or breed ...
registered mail
noun Date: 1886 mail recorded in the post office of mailing and at each successive point of transmission and guaranteed special care in delivery
registered nurse
noun Date: 1896 a graduate trained nurse who has been licensed by a state authority after qualifying for registration
registrable
also registerable adjective Date: 1765 capable of being registered
registrant
noun Date: circa 1890 one that registers or is registered
registrar
noun Etymology: alteration of Middle English registrer, from registren to register, from Anglo-French registrer, from Medieval Latin registrare, from registrum Date: 1675 an ...
registration
noun Date: circa 1566 1. the act of registering 2. an entry in a register 3. the number of individuals registered ; enrollment 4. a. the art or act of selecting and ...
registry
noun (plural -tries) Date: 1589 1. registration, enrollment 2. the nationality of a ship according to its entry in a register ; flag 3. a place of registration 4. a. ...
regius professor
noun Etymology: New Latin, royal professor Date: 1621 a holder of a professorship founded by royal subsidy at a British university
reglet
noun Etymology: French réglet, from Middle French reglet straightedge, from regle rule, from Latin regula — more at rule Date: 1664 1. a flat narrow architectural ...
regnal
adjective Etymology: Medieval Latin regnalis, from Latin regnum reign — more at reign Date: 1612 of or relating to a king or his reign; specifically calculated from a ...
regnant
adjective Etymology: Latin regnant-, regnans, present participle of regnare to reign, from regnum Date: 1600 1. exercising rule ; reigning 2. a. having the chief power ; ...
regnat populus
foreign term Etymology: Latin the people rule — motto of Arkansas
regnum
noun (plural regna) Etymology: Latin Date: circa 1890 kingdom
regolith
noun Etymology: Greek rhēgos blanket + English -lith; akin to Greek rhezein to dye — more at raga Date: 1897 unconsolidated residual or transported material that overlies ...
regosol
noun Etymology: rego- (as in regolith) + Latin solum soil — more at sole Date: 1949 any of a group of azonal soils consisting chiefly of imperfectly consolidated material ...
regreet
transitive verb Date: 1593 archaic to greet in return
regreets
noun plural Date: 1596 obsolete greetings
regress
I. noun Etymology: Middle English regresse, from Anglo-French, from Latin regressus, from regredi to go back, from re- + gradi to go — more at grade Date: 14th century 1. ...
regression
noun Date: 1597 1. the act or an instance of regressing 2. a trend or shift toward a lower or less perfect state: as a. progressive decline of a manifestation of ...
regressive
adjective Date: 1634 1. tending to regress or produce regression 2. being, characterized by, or developing in the course of an evolutionary process involving increasing ...
regressively
adverb see regressive
regressiveness
noun see regressive
regressivity
noun see regressive
regressor
noun see regress II
regret
I. verb (regretted; regretting) Etymology: Middle English regretten, from Anglo-French regreter, from re- + -greter (perhaps of Germanic origin; akin to Old Norse grāta to ...
regretful
adjective see regret II
regretfully
adverb Date: 1682 1. with regret 2. it is to be regretted
regretfulness
noun see regret II
regrettable
adjective Date: 1603 deserving regret
regrettably
adverb Date: 1866 1. to a regrettable extent 2. it is to be regretted
regretter
noun see regret I
regroup
Date: 1885 transitive verb to form into a new grouping intransitive verb 1. to reorganize (as after a setback) for renewed activity 2. to alter the tactical ...
regrow
verb (regrew; regrown; -growing) Date: 1872 transitive verb to grow (as a missing part) anew intransitive verb to continue growth after interruption or injury
regt
abbreviation regiment
regular
I. adjective Etymology: Middle English reguler, from Anglo-French, from Late Latin regularis regular, from Latin, of a bar, from regula rule — more at rule Date: 14th ...
regular solid
noun Date: 1785 any of the five possible regular polyhedrons that include the regular forms of the tetrahedron, hexahedron, octahedron, dodecahedron, and icosahedron
regularity
noun (plural -ties) Date: 1603 1. the quality or state of being regular 2. something that is regular
regularization
noun see regularize
regularize
transitive verb (-ized; -izing) Date: 1623 to make regular by conformance to law, rules, or custom • regularization noun
regularly
adverb Date: 14th century 1. in a regular manner 2. on a regular basis ; at regular intervals
regulate
transitive verb (-lated; -lating) Etymology: Middle English, from Late Latin regulatus, past participle of regulare, from Latin regula rule Date: 15th century 1. a. to ...
regulation
I. noun Date: 1665 1. the act of regulating ; the state of being regulated 2. a. an authoritative rule dealing with details or procedure b. a rule or order issued by ...
regulative
adjective see regulate
regulator
noun Date: 1655 1. one that regulates 2. regulatory gene
regulator gene
noun see regulatory gene
regulatory
adjective see regulate
regulatory gene
or regulator gene noun Date: 1961 a gene that regulates the expression of one or more structural genes by controlling the production of a protein (as a genetic repressor) ...
regulus
noun Etymology: New Latin, from Latin, petty king, from reg-, rex king — more at royal Date: 1559 1. capitalized a first-magnitude star in the constellation Leo 2. ...
Regulus
biographical name Marcus Atilius died circa 250 B.C. Roman general
regurgitate
verb (-tated; -tating) Etymology: Medieval Latin regurgitatus, past participle of regurgitare, from Latin re- + Late Latin gurgitare to engulf, from Latin gurgit-, gurges ...
regurgitation
noun Date: 1601 an act of regurgitating: as a. the casting up of incompletely digested food (as by some birds in feeding their young) b. the backward flow of blood ...
rehab
noun Usage: often attributive Etymology: short for rehabilitation or rehabilitate Date: 1941 1. the action or process of rehabilitating ; rehabilitation; especially a ...
rehabber
noun see rehab
rehabilitant
noun Date: 1961 a disabled person undergoing rehabilitation
rehabilitate
transitive verb (-tated; -tating) Etymology: Medieval Latin rehabilitatus, past participle of rehabilitare, from Latin re- + Late Latin habilitare to habilitate Date: circa ...
rehabilitation
noun see rehabilitate
rehabilitative
adjective see rehabilitate
rehabilitator
noun see rehabilitate
rehash
I. transitive verb Date: circa 1822 1. to talk over or discuss again 2. to present or use again in another form without substantial change or improvement II. noun Date: ...
rehear
transitive verb (reheard; rehearing) Date: 1756 to hear again or anew especially judicially
rehearing
noun Date: 1686 a second or new hearing by the same tribunal
rehearsal
noun Date: 14th century 1. something recounted or told again ; recital 2. a. a private performance or practice session preparatory to a public appearance b. a ...
rehearse
verb (rehearsed; rehearsing) Etymology: Middle English rehersen, from Anglo-French rehercer, from re- + hercer to harrow, from herce harrow — more at hearse Date: 14th ...
rehearser
noun see rehearse
Rehnquist
biographical name William Hubbs 1924- American jurist; chief justice United States Supreme Court (1986- )
rehouse
transitive verb Date: 1820 to house again or anew; especially to establish in a new or different housing unit of a better quality
rehydratable
adjective see rehydrate
rehydrate
transitive verb Date: 1943 to restore fluid to (something dehydrated) • rehydratable adjective • rehydration noun
rehydration
noun see rehydrate
Reich
biographical name Wilhelm 1897-1957 Austrian psychologist • Reichian adjective
Reichian
adjective see Reich
reichsmark
noun (plural reichsmarks; also reichsmark) Etymology: German, from Reich empire, kingdom + Mark mark Date: 1924 the German mark from 1925 to 1948
Reichstein
biographical name Tadeus 1897-1996 Swiss (Polish-born) chemist
Reid
I. biographical name Thomas 1710-1796 Scottish philosopher II. biographical name Whitelaw 1837-1912 American journalist & diplomat
reification
noun Date: 1846 the process or result of reifying
reify
transitive verb (reified; reifying) Etymology: Latin res thing — more at real Date: 1854 to regard (something abstract) as a material or concrete thing
reign
I. noun Etymology: Middle English regne, from Anglo-French, from Latin regnum, from reg-, rex king — more at royal Date: 13th century 1. a. royal authority ; sovereignty ...
reign of terror
Etymology: Reign of Terror, a period of the French Revolution that was conspicuous for mass executions of political suspects Date: 1798 a state or a period of time marked by ...
Reiki
noun Etymology: Japanese, literally, spirit, from rei spirit, soul + ki vital force, mind Date: 1985 a system of touching with the hands based on the belief that such ...
reimagine
transitive verb Date: circa 1934 to imagine again or anew; especially to form a new conception of ; re-create
reimbursable
adjective see reimburse
reimburse
transitive verb (-bursed; -bursing) Etymology: re- + obsolete English imburse to put in the pocket, pay, from Medieval Latin imbursare, from Latin in- in- + Medieval Latin bursa ...
reimbursement
noun see reimburse
reimpression
noun Date: 1616 reprint a
Reims
or Rheims geographical name city NE France ENE of Paris population 185,164
rein
I. noun Etymology: Middle English reine, from Anglo-French resne, reine, from Vulgar Latin *retina, from Latin retinēre to restrain — more at retain Date: 14th century 1. ...
rein
I. noun Etymology: Middle English reine, from Anglo-French resne, reine, from Vulgar Latin *retina, from Latin retinēre to restrain — more at retain Date: 14th century 1. ...
reincarnate
transitive verb Date: 1858 to incarnate again
reincarnation
noun Date: 1845 1. a. the action of reincarnating ; the state of being reincarnated b. rebirth in new bodies or forms of life; especially a rebirth of a soul in a new ...
reindeer
noun Etymology: Middle English reindere, from Old Norse hreinn reindeer + Middle English deer animal, deer Date: 14th century caribou — used especially for one of the Old ...
Reindeer Lake
geographical name lake Canada on Manitoba-Saskatchewan border area about 2500 square miles (6475 square kilometers)
reindeer lichen
noun see reindeer moss
reindeer moss
noun Date: circa 1753 a gray, erect, tufted, and much-branched lichen (Cladonia rangiferina) that forms extensive patches in arctic and north-temperate regions, constitutes a ...
reindustrialization
noun Date: 1968 a policy of stimulating economic growth especially through government aid to revitalize and modernize aging industries and encourage growth of new ones • ...
reindustrialize
verb see reindustrialization
Reiner
biographical name Fritz 1888-1963 American (Hungarian-born) conductor
Reines
biographical name Frederick 1918-1998 American physicist
reinfection
noun Date: 1882 infection following recovery from or superimposed on infection of the same type
reinforce
also reenforce verb Etymology: re- + inforce, alteration of enforce Date: 1567 transitive verb 1. to strengthen by additional assistance, material, or support ; make ...
reinforceable
adjective see reinforce
reinforced concrete
noun Date: 1902 concrete in which metal (as steel) is embedded so that the two materials act together in resisting forces
reinforcement
noun Date: 1602 1. the action of reinforcing ; the state of being reinforced 2. something that reinforces
reinforcer
noun Date: 1955 a stimulus (as a reward or the removal of an electric shock) that increases the probability of a desired response in operant conditioning by being applied or ...
reinfuse
transitive verb Date: 1963 to return (as blood or lymphocytes) to the body by infusion after previous withdrawal • reinfusion noun
reinfusion
noun see reinfuse
Reinhardt
biographical name Max 1873-1943 originally surname Goldmann Austrian theater director
reins
noun plural Etymology: Middle English, from Anglo-French, from Latin renes Date: 14th century 1. a. kidneys b. the region of the kidneys ; loins 2. the seat of the ...
reinscribe
transitive verb Date: 1878 to reestablish or rename in a new and especially stronger form or context
reinsman
noun Date: 1855 a skilled driver or rider of horses
reinstate
transitive verb (-stated; -stating) Date: 1599 1. to place again (as in possession or in a former position) 2. to restore to a previous effective state • reinstatement ...
reinstatement
noun see reinstate
reinsurance
noun Date: 1755 insurance by another insurer of all or a part of a risk previously assumed by an insurance company
reinsure
Date: 1755 transitive verb 1. to insure again by transferring to another insurance company all or a part of a liability assumed 2. to insure again by assuming all or a ...
reinsurer
noun see reinsure
reintegrate
transitive verb Etymology: Medieval Latin reintegratus, past participle of reintegrare to renew, reinstate, from Latin re- + integrare to integrate Date: 1626 to integrate ...
reintegration
noun see reintegrate
reintegrative
adjective see reintegrate
reinterpret
transitive verb Date: circa 1611 to interpret again; specifically to give a new or different interpretation to • reinterpretation noun
reinterpretation
noun see reinterpret
reinvent
transitive verb Date: 1686 1. to make as if for the first time something already invented 2. to remake or redo completely 3. to bring into use again • reinvention noun
reinvest
transitive verb Date: circa 1611 1. to invest again or anew 2. a. to invest (as income from investments) in additional securities b. to invest (as earnings) in a ...
reinvestment
noun Date: circa 1611 1. the action of reinvesting ; the state of being reinvested 2. a second or repeated investment
reis
plural of real
reissue
Date: circa 1618 intransitive verb to come forth again transitive verb to issue again; especially to cause to become available again • reissue noun
Reiter's disease
noun see Reiter's syndrome
Reiter's syndrome
noun Etymology: Hans Reiter died 1969 German physician Date: circa 1947 a disease that is usually initiated by infection in genetically predisposed individuals and is ...
reiterate
transitive verb (-ated; -ating) Etymology: Middle English, from Latin reiteratus, past participle of reiterare to repeat, from re- + iterare to iterate Date: 15th century to ...
reiteration
noun see reiterate
reiterative
adjective see reiterate
reiteratively
adverb see reiterate
reive
verb (reived; reiving) Etymology: Middle English (Scots) reifen, from Old English rēafian to rob — more at reave Date: before 12th century Scottish raid • reiver noun, ...
reiver
noun see reive
reject
I. transitive verb Etymology: Middle English, from Latin rejectus, past participle of reicere, from re- + jacere to throw — more at jet Date: 15th century 1. a. to ...
rejectee
noun Date: 1941 one that is rejected; especially a person rejected as unfit for military service
rejecter
noun see reject I
rejectingly
adverb see reject I
rejection
noun Date: circa 1552 1. a. the action of rejecting ; the state of being rejected b. an immune response in which foreign tissue (as of a skin graft or transplanted ...
rejection slip
noun Date: 1906 a printed slip enclosed with a rejected manuscript returned by an editor to an author
rejective
adjective see reject I
rejector
noun see reject I
rejig
transitive verb (rejigged; rejigging) Date: 1948 chiefly British rejigger
rejigger
transitive verb Etymology: re- + 3jigger Date: 1942 alter, rearrange
Rejment
biographical name see Reymont
rejoice
verb (rejoiced; rejoicing) Etymology: Middle English, from Anglo-French rejois-, stem of rejoier, rejoir, from re- + joir to welcome, enjoy, from Latin gaudēre to be glad — ...
rejoice in
phrasal have, possess
rejoicer
noun see rejoice
rejoicing
noun Date: 14th century 1. the action of one that rejoices 2. an instance, occasion, or expression of joy ; festivity
rejoicingly
adverb see rejoice
rejoin
verb Etymology: Middle English, from Anglo-French rejoindre, from re- + joindre to join — more at join Date: 15th century intransitive verb to answer the replication of ...
rejoinder
noun Etymology: Middle English rejoiner, from Anglo-French rejoinder, from rejoinder, verb Date: 15th century 1. the defendant's answer to the plaintiff's replication 2. ...
rejuvenate
verb (-nated; -nating) Etymology: re- + Latin juvenis young — more at young Date: 1789 transitive verb 1. a. to make young or youthful again ; give new vigor to b. ...
rejuvenation
noun see rejuvenate
rejuvenator
noun see rejuvenate
rejuvenescence
noun Etymology: Medieval Latin rejuvenescere to become young again, from Latin re- + juvenescere to become young, from juvenis Date: circa 1631 a renewal of youthfulness or ...
rejuvenescent
adjective see rejuvenescence
rel
abbreviation 1. released 2. religion; religious
relapse
I. noun Etymology: Middle English, from Medieval Latin relapsus, from Latin relabi to slide back, from re- + labi to slide — more at sleep Date: 15th century 1. the act or ...
relapser
noun see relapse II
relapsing fever
noun Date: 1849 a variable acute epidemic disease that is marked by recurring high fever usually lasting three to seven days and is caused by a spirochete (genus Borrelia) ...
relatable
adjective see relate
relate
verb (related; relating) Etymology: Latin relatus (past participle of referre to carry back), from re- + latus, past participle of ferre to carry — more at tolerate, bear ...
related
adjective Date: circa 1663 1. connected by reason of an established or discoverable relation 2. connected by common ancestry or sometimes by marriage 3. having close ...
relatedly
adverb see related
relatedness
noun see related
relater
noun see relate
relation
noun Etymology: Middle English relacion, from Anglo-French, from Latin relation-, relatio, from referre (past participle relatus) to carry back Date: 14th century 1. the act ...
relational
adjective Date: 1662 1. of or relating to kinship 2. characterized or constituted by relations 3. having the function chiefly of indicating a relation of syntax 4. ...
relational grammar
noun Date: 1982 a grammar based on a theory in which grammatical relations (as subject or object) are primitives in terms of which syntactic operations are defined
relationally
adverb see relational
relationship
noun Date: 1741 1. the state of being related or interrelated 2. the relation connecting or binding participants in a relationship: as a. kinship b. a specific ...
relative
I. noun Date: 14th century 1. a word referring grammatically to an antecedent 2. a thing having a relation to or connection with or necessary dependence on another thing 3. ...
relative humidity
noun Date: 1820 the ratio of the amount of water vapor actually present in the air to the greatest amount possible at the same temperature
relative to
preposition Date: 1649 with regard to ; in connection with
relative wind
noun Date: 1915 the motion of the air relative to a body in it
relatively
adverb Date: 1561 to a relative degree or extent ; somewhat
relatively prime
adjective Date: circa 1890 of integers having no common factors except ±1
relativism
noun Date: 1865 1. a. a theory that knowledge is relative to the limited nature of the mind and the conditions of knowing b. a view that ethical truths depend on the ...
relativist
noun see relativism
relativistic
adjective Date: 1886 1. of, relating to, or characterized by relativity or relativism 2. moving at a velocity such that there is a significant change in properties (as ...
relativistically
adverb see relativistic
relativity
noun (plural -ties) Date: circa 1834 1. a. the quality or state of being relative b. something that is relative 2. the state of being dependent for existence on or ...
relativize
transitive verb (-ized; -izing) Date: 1935 to treat or describe as relative
relator
noun see relate
relax
verb Etymology: Middle English, from Latin relaxare, from re- + laxare to loosen, from laxus loose — more at slack Date: 15th century transitive verb 1. to make less ...
relaxant
I. adjective Date: 1771 of, relating to, or producing relaxation II. noun Date: circa 1847 a substance (as a drug) that relaxes; specifically one that relieves muscular ...
relaxation
noun Date: 1548 1. the act of relaxing or state of being relaxed 2. a relaxing or recreative state, activity, or pastime ; diversion 3. the lengthening that characterizes ...
relaxed
adjective Date: 1623 1. freed from or lacking in precision or stringency 2. set or being at rest or at ease 3. easy of manner ; informal 4. somewhat loose-fitting and ...
relaxedly
adverb see relaxed
relaxedness
noun see relaxed
relaxer
noun see relax
relaxin
noun Date: 1930 a sex hormone of the corpus luteum that facilitates birth by causing relaxation of the pelvic ligaments
relay
I. noun Etymology: Middle English, set of fresh hounds, from relayen Date: 1651 1. a. a supply (as of horses) arranged beforehand for successive relief b. a number of ...
releasable
adjective see release I
release
I. verb (released; releasing) Etymology: Middle English relesen, from Anglo-French relesser, from Latin relaxare to relax Date: 14th century transitive verb 1. to set free ...
release print
noun Date: 1937 a motion-picture film released for public showing
released time
noun Date: 1941 time off from regularly scheduled activities (as school) given to take part in some other specified activity
releaser
noun Date: 15th century one that releases; specifically a stimulus that serves as the initiator of complex reflex behavior
relegate
transitive verb (-gated; -gating) Etymology: Latin relegatus, past participle of relegare, from re- + legare to send with a commission — more at legate Date: 1599 1. to ...
relegation
noun see relegate
relent
verb Etymology: Middle English, to melt, soften, from Anglo-French relenter, from re- + Latin lentare to bend, from lentus soft, pliant, slow — more at lithe Date: 1526 ...
relentless
adjective Date: circa 1592 showing or promising no abatement of severity, intensity, strength, or pace ; unrelenting • relentlessly adverb • relentlessness noun
relentlessly
adverb see relentless
relentlessness
noun see relentless
relevance
noun Date: 1733 1. a. relation to the matter at hand b. practical and especially social applicability ; pertinence 2. the ability (as of an information retrieval ...
relevancy
noun (plural -cies) Date: 1561 relevance; also something relevant

< 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 > >>

© en-de-fr.com.ua - EN-DE-FR 2009-2017 Информация публикуется на сайте для ознакомительного процесса.
 
Выполнено за: 0.045 c;