Слова на букву quin-sask (6389) New Collegiate Dictionary
На главную О проекте Обратная связь Поддержать проектДобавить в избранное

  
EN-DE-FR →  New Collegiate Dictionary →  acto-axio axio-buck buck-cobl cobl-deco deco-elec elec-flüg flüg-gulp gulp-innu inob-leni leni-micr micr-obtr obtr-phyl phyl-quin quin-sask sask-soma soma-tano tans-unco uncr-wool


Слова на букву quin-sask (6389)

< 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 > >>
relevant
adjective Etymology: Medieval Latin relevant-, relevans, from Latin, present participle of relevare to raise up — more at relieve Date: 1560 1. a. having significant and ...
relevantly
adverb see relevant
reliability
noun Date: 1816 1. the quality or state of being reliable 2. the extent to which an experiment, test, or measuring procedure yields the same results on repeated trials
reliable
I. adjective Date: 1569 1. suitable or fit to be relied on ; dependable 2. giving the same result on successive trials • reliableness noun • reliably adverb II. noun ...
reliableness
noun see reliable I
reliably
adverb see reliable I
reliance
noun Date: 1607 1. the act of relying ; the state of being reliant 2. something or someone relied on
reliant
adjective Date: 1849 having reliance on something or someone ; dependent • reliantly adverb
reliantly
adverb see reliant
relic
noun Etymology: Middle English relik, from Anglo-French relike, from Medieval Latin reliquia, from Late Latin reliquiae, plural, remains of a martyr, from Latin, remains, from ...
relict
I. noun Etymology: in sense 1, from Middle English relicte, from Late Latin relicta, from Latin, feminine of relictus, past participle of relinquere; in senses 2 & 3, from ...
reliction
noun Etymology: Latin reliction-, relictio act of leaving behind, from relinquere Date: circa 1676 1. the gradual recession of water leaving land permanently uncovered 2. ...
relief
I. noun Etymology: Middle English relef, relief, from Anglo-French from relever to relieve Date: 14th century 1. a payment made by a male feudal tenant to his lord on ...
relief map
noun Date: 1876 a map representing topographic relief
relief pitcher
noun Date: 1906 a baseball pitcher who takes over for another during a game
relief printing
noun Date: 1875 letterpress 1
relier
noun see rely
relievable
adjective see relieve
relieve
verb (relieved; relieving) Etymology: Middle English releven, from Anglo-French relever to raise, relieve, from Latin relevare, from re- + levare to raise — more at lever ...
relieved
adjective Date: 1850 experiencing or showing relief especially from anxiety or pent-up emotions • relievedly adverb
relievedly
adverb see relieved
reliever
noun Date: 15th century one that relieves; especially relief pitcher
relievo
noun (plural -vos) Etymology: Italian rilievo, from rilevare to raise, from Latin relevare Date: 1625 relief 6
relig
abbreviation religion
religio loci
foreign term Etymology: Latin religious sanctity of a place
religio-
combining form religion and
religion
noun Etymology: Middle English religioun, from Anglo-French religiun, Latin religion-, religio supernatural constraint, sanction, religious practice, perhaps from religare to ...
religionist
noun Date: 1653 a person adhering to a religion; especially a religious zealot
religionless
adjective see religion
religiose
adjective Etymology: religion + 1-ose Date: 1853 religious; especially excessively, obtrusively, or sentimentally religious • religiosity noun
religiosity
noun see religiose
religious
I. adjective Etymology: Middle English, from Anglo-French religius, from Latin religiosus, from religio Date: 13th century 1. relating to or manifesting faithful devotion to ...
religiously
adverb see religious I
religiousness
noun see religious I
reline
transitive verb Date: 1838 to put new lines on or a new lining in
relinquish
transitive verb Etymology: Middle English relinquisshen, from Anglo-French relinquiss-, stem of relinquir, from Latin relinquere to leave behind, from re- + linquere to leave ...
relinquishment
noun see relinquish
reliquary
noun (plural -quaries) Etymology: French reliquaire, from Medieval Latin reliquiarium, from reliquia relic — more at relic Date: 1652 a container or shrine in which sacred ...
relique
archaic variant of relic
reliquiae
noun plural Etymology: Latin — more at relic Date: 1654 remains of the dead ; relics
relish
I. noun Etymology: alteration of Middle English reles odor, taste, from Middle French, something left behind, release — more at release Date: 1530 1. characteristic flavor; ...
relishable
adjective see relish II
relive
Date: 1548 intransitive verb to live again transitive verb to live over again; especially to experience again in the imagination
relocatable
adjective see relocate
relocate
Date: 1834 transitive verb to locate again ; establish or lay out in a new place intransitive verb to move to a new location • relocatable adjective • relocation ...
relocatee
noun Date: 1954 one who moves to a new location ; one that is relocated
relocation
noun see relocate
relucent
adjective Etymology: Latin relucent-, relucens, past participle of relucēre to shine back, from re- + lucēre to shine — more at light Date: 15th century reflecting light ...
reluct
intransitive verb Etymology: Latin reluctari Date: 1547 to show reluctance
reluctance
noun Date: 1629 1. the quality or state of being reluctant 2. the opposition offered in a magnetic circuit to magnetic flux; specifically the ratio of the magnetic ...
reluctancy
noun Date: 1634 reluctance
reluctant
adjective Etymology: Latin reluctant-, reluctans, present participle of reluctari to struggle against, from re- + luctari to struggle Date: 1667 feeling or showing ...
reluctantly
adverb see reluctant
relume
transitive verb (relumed; reluming) Etymology: irregular from Late Latin reluminare, from Latin re- + luminare to light up — more at illuminate Date: 1604 archaic to light ...
rely
intransitive verb (relied; relying) Etymology: Middle English relien to rally, from Anglo-French relier to retie, gather, rally, from Latin religare to tie out of the way, from ...
rem
noun Etymology: roentgen equivalent man Date: 1947 the dosage of an ionizing radiation that will cause the same biological effect as one roentgen of X-ray or gamma-ray ...
REM
noun Date: 1957 rapid eye movement
rem acu tetigisti
foreign term Etymology: Latin you have touched the point with a needle ; you have hit the nail on the head
REM sleep
noun Date: 1965 a state of sleep that recurs cyclically several times during a normal period of sleep and that is characterized especially by increased neuronal activity of ...
Remagen
geographical name town W Germany on W bank of the Rhine NW of Koblenz population 15,460
remain
I. intransitive verb Etymology: Middle English, from Anglo-French remaindre, from Latin remanēre, from re- + manēre to remain — more at mansion Date: 14th century 1. a. ...
remainder
I. noun Etymology: Middle English, from Anglo-French, from remaindre, verb Date: 14th century 1. an interest or estate in property that follows and is dependent on the ...
remainder theorem
noun Date: 1886 a theorem in algebra: if f(x) is a polynomial in x then the remainder on dividing f(x) by x - a is f(a)
remake
I. transitive verb (remade; -making) Date: circa 1635 to make anew or in a different form • remaker noun II. noun Date: 1936 one that is remade; especially a new ...
remaker
noun see remake I
reman
transitive verb Date: 1666 1. to man again or anew 2. to imbue with courage again
remand
transitive verb Etymology: Middle English remaunden, from Anglo-French remander, from Late Latin remandare to send back word, from Latin re- + mandare to order — more at ...
remanence
noun Date: circa 1880 the magnetic induction remaining in a magnetized substance no longer under external magnetic influence
remanent
adjective Etymology: Middle English, from Anglo-French remanant — more at remnant Date: 15th century 1. residual, remaining 2. of, relating to, or characterized by ...
remanufacture
transitive verb Date: 1825 to manufacture into a new product • remanufacture noun • remanufacturer noun
remanufacturer
noun see remanufacture
remap
transitive verb Date: 1931 to map again; also to lay out in a new pattern
remark
I. noun Etymology: French remarque, from Middle French, from remarquer to remark, from re- re- + marquer to mark — more at marque Date: 1660 1. the act of remarking ; ...
remarkable
adjective Date: circa 1604 worthy of being or likely to be noticed especially as being uncommon or extraordinary Synonyms: see noticeable • remarkableness noun
remarkableness
noun see remarkable
remarkably
adverb Date: 1638 1. in a remarkable manner 2. as is remarkable
remarque
noun Etymology: French remarque remark, note, from Middle French, from remarquer Date: 1882 1. a drawn, etched, or incised scribble or sketch done on the margin of a plate or ...
Remarque
biographical name Erich Maria 1898-1970 American (German-born) novelist
remaster
transitive verb Date: 1964 to create a new master of especially by altering or enhancing the sound quality of an older recording
rematch
noun Date: 1941 a second match between the same contestants or teams
Rembrandt
biographical name 1606-1669 in full Rembrandt Harmensz (or Harmenszoon) van Rijn (or Ryn) Dutch painter • Rembrandtesque adjective
Rembrandtesque
adjective see Rembrandt
remediability
noun see remediable
remediable
adjective Date: 15th century capable of being remedied • remediability noun
remedial
adjective Date: 1651 1. intended as a remedy 2. concerned with the correction of faulty study habits and the raising of a pupil's general competence ; also receiving or ...
remedially
adverb see remedial
remediate
adjective Date: 1605 archaic remedial
remediation
noun Date: 1818 the act or process of remedying • remediate transitive verb
remediless
adjective see remedy I
remedy
I. noun (plural -dies) Etymology: Middle English remedie, from Anglo-French, from Latin remedium, from re- + mederi to heal — more at medical Date: 13th century 1. a ...
remember
verb (-bered; remembering) Etymology: Middle English remembren, from Anglo-French remembrer, from Late Latin rememorari, from Latin re- + Late Latin memorari to be mindful of, ...
rememberability
noun see remember
rememberable
adjective see remember
rememberer
noun see remember
remembrance
noun Date: 14th century 1. the state of bearing in mind 2. a. the ability to remember ; memory b. the period over which one's memory extends 3. an act of recalling ...
Remembrance Day
noun Date: 1918 November 11 set aside in commemoration of the end of hostilities in 1918 and 1945 and observed as a legal holiday in Canada; also Remembrance Sunday
Remembrance Sunday
noun Date: 1942 a Sunday that is usually closest to November 11 and that in Great Britain is set aside in commemoration of the end of hostilities in 1918 and 1945
remembrancer
noun Date: 15th century 1. any of several English officials 2. one that reminds
remind
transitive verb Date: 1660 to put in mind of something ; cause to remember Synonyms: see remember • reminder noun
reminder
noun see remind
remindful
adjective Date: 1810 1. mindful 2. tending to remind ; suggestive, evocative
Remington
biographical name Frederic 1861-1909 American artist
reminisce
intransitive verb (-nisced; -niscing) Etymology: back-formation from reminiscence Date: 1829 to indulge in reminiscence Synonyms: see remember • reminiscer noun
reminiscence
noun Date: 1589 1. apprehension of a Platonic idea as if it had been known in a previous existence 2. a. recall to mind of a long-forgotten experience or fact b. the ...
reminiscent
adjective Etymology: Latin reminiscent-, reminiscens, present participle of reminisci to remember, from re- + -minisci (akin to Latin ment-, mens mind) — more at mind Date: ...
reminiscential
adjective Date: 1646 reminiscent
reminiscently
adverb see reminiscent
reminiscer
noun see reminisce
remint
transitive verb Date: 1823 to melt down (old or worn coin) and make into new coin
remise
transitive verb (remised; remising) Etymology: Middle English, from Anglo-French remis, past participle of remettre to put back, from Latin remittere to send back Date: 15th ...
remiss
adjective Etymology: Middle English, from Anglo-French remis, Latin remissus, from past participle of remittere to send back, relax Date: 15th century 1. negligent in the ...
remissible
adjective Date: 1577 capable of being forgiven • remissibly adverb
remissibly
adverb see remissible
remission
noun Date: 13th century 1. the act or process of remitting 2. a state or period during which something is remitted
remissly
adverb see remiss
remissness
noun see remiss
remit
I. verb (remitted; remitting) Etymology: Middle English remitten, from Latin remittere to send back, from re- + mittere to send Date: 14th century transitive verb 1. a. ...
remitment
noun see remit I
remittable
adjective see remit I
remittal
noun Date: 1596 remission
remittance
noun Date: 1705 1. a. a sum of money remitted b. an instrument by which money is remitted 2. transmittal of money (as to a distant place)
remittance man
noun Date: 1886 one living abroad on remittances from home
remittent
adjective Etymology: Latin remittent-, remittens, present participle of remittere Date: 1693 of a disease marked by alternating periods of abatement and increase of symptoms ...
remitter
noun see remit I
remix
I. transitive verb Date: 1662 to mix again II. noun Date: 1980 a variant of an original recording (as of a song) made by rearranging or adding to the original
remnant
I. noun Etymology: Middle English, contraction of remenant, from Anglo-French remanant, from present participle of remaindre to remain — more at remain Date: 14th century 1. ...
remodel
transitive verb Date: 1789 to alter the structure of ; remake
remonstrance
noun Date: 1585 1. an earnest presentation of reasons for opposition or grievance; especially a document formally stating such points 2. an act or instance of remonstrating
remonstrant
adjective Date: 1641 vigorously objecting or opposing • remonstrant noun • remonstrantly adverb
remonstrantly
adverb see remonstrant
remonstrate
verb (-strated; -strating) Etymology: Medieval Latin remonstratus, past participle of remonstrare to demonstrate, from Latin re- + monstrare to show — more at muster Date: ...
remonstration
noun see remonstrate
remonstrative
adjective see remonstrate
remonstratively
adverb see remonstrate
remonstrator
noun see remonstrate
remora
noun Etymology: Late Latin, from Latin, delay, from remorari to delay, from re- + morari to delay — more at moratorium Date: 1567 1. any of a family (Echeneidae) of marine ...
remorse
noun Etymology: Middle English, from Anglo-French remors, from Medieval Latin remorsus, from Late Latin, act of biting again, from Latin remordēre to bite again, from re- + ...
remorseful
adjective Date: 1592 motivated or marked by remorse • remorsefully adverb • remorsefulness noun
remorsefully
adverb see remorseful
remorsefulness
noun see remorseful
remorseless
adjective Date: 1593 1. having no remorse ; merciless 2. relentless • remorselessly adverb • remorselessness noun
remorselessly
adverb see remorseless
remorselessness
noun see remorseless
remote
I. adjective (remoter; -est) Etymology: Middle English, from Latin remotus, from past participle of removēre to remove Date: 15th century 1. separated by an interval or ...
remote control
noun Date: 1904 1. control (as by radio signal) of operation from a point at some distance removed 2. a device or mechanism for controlling something from a distance
remotely
adverb see remote I
remoteness
noun see remote I
remotion
noun Date: 15th century 1. the quality or state of being remote 2. the act of removing ; removal 3. obsolete departure
rémoulade
or remoulade noun Etymology: French rémoulade Date: 1845 a pungent sauce or dressing resembling mayonnaise and usually including savory herbs and condiments
remoulade
noun see rémoulade
remount
I. verb Etymology: Middle English, partly from re- + mounten to mount, partly from Anglo-French remunter, from re- + munter to mount Date: 15th century transitive verb 1. ...
removability
noun see remove I
removable
adjective see remove I
removableness
noun see remove I
removably
adverb see remove I
removal
noun Date: 1597 the act or process of removing ; the fact of being removed
remove
I. verb (removed; removing) Etymology: Middle English remeven, removen, from Anglo-French remuver, removeir, from Latin removēre, from re- + movēre to move Date: 14th ...
removeable
adjective see remove I
removed
adjective Date: circa 1548 1. a. distant in degree of relationship b. of a younger or older generation
remover
noun see remove I
Remscheid
geographical name city W Germany in North Rhine-Westphalia ESE of Düsseldorf population 123,618
Remsen
biographical name Ira 1846-1927 American chemist
remuda
noun Etymology: American Spanish, relay of horses, from Spanish, exchange, from remudar to exchange, from re- + mudar to change, from Latin mutare — more at mutable Date: ...
remunerate
transitive verb (-ated; -ating) Etymology: Latin remuneratus, past participle of remunerare to recompense, from re- + munerare to give, from muner-, munus gift — more at mean ...
remuneration
noun Date: 15th century 1. something that remunerates ; recompense, pay 2. an act or fact of remunerating
remuneratively
adverb see remunerative
remunerativeness
noun see remunerative
remunerator
noun see remunerate
remuneratory
adjective see remunerate
Remus
noun Etymology: Latin Date: 13th century a son of Mars slain by his twin brother Romulus
renaissance
noun Usage: often attributive Etymology: French, from Middle French, rebirth, from Old French renaistre to be born again, from Latin renasci, from re- + nasci to be born — ...
Renaissance man
noun Date: 1906 a person who has wide interests and is expert in several areas
renal
adjective Etymology: French or Late Latin; French rénal, from Late Latin renalis, from Latin renes kidneys Date: circa 1656 relating to, involving, or located in the region ...
renal clearance
noun Date: 1948 clearance 3
Renan
biographical name Joseph Ernest 1823-1892 French philologist & historian
renascence
noun Usage: often capitalized Date: 1727 renaissance
renascent
adjective Etymology: Latin renascent-, renascens, present participle of renasci Date: circa 1727 rising again into being or vigor
renaturation
noun see renature
renature
transitive verb (renatured; renaturing) Etymology: re- + denature Date: 1926 to restore (as a denatured protein) to an original or normal condition • renaturation noun
rencontre
or rencounter noun Etymology: rencounter from Middle French rencontre, from rencontrer; rencontre from French Date: 1523 1. a hostile meeting or a contest between forces or ...
rencounter
transitive verb Etymology: Middle French rencontrer to meet by chance or in hostility, from re- + encontrer to encounter Date: 1549 archaic to meet casually
rend
verb (rent; also rended; rending) Etymology: Middle English, from Old English rendan; akin to Old Frisian renda to tear and perhaps to Sanskrit randhra hole Date: before 12th ...
render
I. verb (rendered; rendering) Etymology: Middle English rendren, from Anglo-French rendre to give back, surrender, from Vulgar Latin *rendere, alteration of Latin reddere, ...
renderable
adjective see render I
renderer
noun see render I
rendezvous
I. noun (plural rendezvous) Etymology: Middle French, from rendez vous present yourselves Date: 1582 1. a. a place appointed for assembling or meeting b. a place of ...
rendition
noun Etymology: obsolete French, from Middle French, alteration of reddition, from Late Latin reddition-, redditio, from Latin reddere to return Date: 1601 the act or result ...
Rendova
geographical name island W Pacific in central Solomon Islands off SW central coast of New Georgia Island
rendzina
noun Etymology: Polish rędzina rich limy soil Date: 1922 any of a group of dark grayish-brown intrazonal soils developed in grassy regions of high to moderate humidity from ...
renegade
I. noun Etymology: Spanish renegado, from Medieval Latin renegatus, from past participle of renegare to deny, from Latin re- + negare to deny — more at negate Date: 1583 1. ...
renege
verb (reneged; reneging) Etymology: Medieval Latin renegare Date: 1548 transitive verb deny, renounce intransitive verb 1. obsolete to make a denial 2. revoke 3. ...
reneger
noun see renege
renegotiable
adjective Date: 1943 subject to renegotiation
renegotiate
transitive verb Date: circa 1934 to negotiate again (as to adjust interest rates or repayments or to get more money) • renegotiation noun
renegotiation
noun see renegotiate
renew
Date: 14th century transitive verb 1. to make like new ; restore to freshness, vigor, or perfection 2. to make new spiritually ; regenerate 3. a. to restore to ...
renewability
noun see renewable
renewable
adjective Date: 1727 1. capable of being renewed 2. capable of being replaced by natural ecological cycles or sound management practices • renewability noun • ...
renewably
adverb see renewable
renewal
noun Date: circa 1686 1. the act or process of renewing ; repetition 2. the quality or state of being renewed 3. something (as a subscription to a magazine) renewed 4. ...
renewer
noun see renew
Renfrew
or Renfrewshire geographical name former county SW Scotland capital Paisley
Renfrewshire
geographical name administrative area of W Scotland area 101 square miles (261 square kilometers)
Reni
biographical name Guido 1575-1642 Italian painter
reni-
or reno- combining form Etymology: Latin renes kidneys kidney
reniform
adjective Etymology: New Latin reniformis, from reni- + -formis -form Date: circa 1753 suggesting a kidney in outline — see leaf illustration
renin
noun Etymology: International Scientific Vocabulary, from Latin renes Date: 1906 a proteolytic enzyme of the kidney that plays a major role in the release of angiotensin
renitency
noun Date: 1613 resistance, opposition
renitent
adjective Etymology: French or Latin; French rénitent, from Latin renitent-, renitens, present participle of reniti to resist, from re- + niti to strive — more at nisus ...
renminbi
noun plural Etymology: Chinese (Beijing) rénmínbì, from rénmín people + bì currency Date: 1957 the currency of the People's Republic of China consisting of yuan
Renner
biographical name Karl 1870-1950 president of Austria (1945-50)
Rennes
geographical name city NW France N of Nantes population 203,533
rennet
noun Etymology: Middle English, from Middle English *rennen to cause to coagulate, from Old English gerennan, from ge- together + *rennan to cause to run; akin to Old High ...
rennin
noun Etymology: rennet + 1-in Date: 1897 an enzyme that coagulates milk and is used in making cheese and junkets; especially one from the mucous membrane of the stomach of a ...
Reno
I. biographical name Janet 1938- United States attorney general (1993-2001) II. geographical name city W Nevada NNE of Lake Tahoe population 180,480
reno-
combining form see reni-
renogram
noun Date: 1952 a photographic depiction of the course of renal excretion of a radiolabeled substance • renographic adjective • renography noun
renographic
adjective see renogram
renography
noun see renogram
Renoir
I. biographical name Jean 1894-1979 son of P.-A. French film director & writer II. biographical name (Pierre-) Auguste 1841-1919 French painter
renominate
transitive verb Date: 1864 to nominate again especially for a succeeding term • renomination noun
renomination
noun see renominate
renounce
verb (renounced; renouncing) Etymology: Middle English, from Anglo-French renuncer, from Latin renuntiare, from re- + nuntiare to report, from nuntius messenger Date: 14th ...
renouncement
noun see renounce
renouncer
noun see renounce
renovascular
adjective Date: 1961 of, relating to, or involving the blood vessels of the kidneys
renovate
transitive verb (-vated; -vating) Etymology: Latin renovatus, past participle of renovare, from re- + novare to make new, from novus new — more at new Date: circa 1522 1. ...
renovation
noun see renovate
renovative
adjective see renovate
renovator
noun see renovate
renown
I. noun Etymology: Middle English renoun, from Anglo-French renum, renoun, from renomer to report, speak of, from re- + nomer to name, from Latin nominare, from nomin-, nomen ...
renowned
adjective Date: 14th century having renown ; celebrated Synonyms: see famous
rent
I. noun Etymology: Middle English rente, from Anglo-French, payment, income, from Vulgar Latin *rendita, from feminine of *renditus, past participle of *rendere to yield — ...
rent control
noun Date: 1931 government regulation of the amount charged as rent for housing and often also of eviction • rent-controlled adjective
rent strike
noun Date: 1964 a refusal by a group of tenants to pay rent (as in protest against high rates)
rent-a-car
noun Date: 1935 a rented car
rent-a-cop
noun Date: 1971 often disparaging a security worker (as a guard) who is not a police officer
rent-controlled
adjective see rent control
rentability
noun see rent II
rentable
adjective see rent II
rental
I. noun Date: 14th century 1. an amount paid or collected as rent 2. something that is rented 3. an act of renting 4. a business that rents something II. adjective ...
rental library
noun Date: 1928 a commercially operated library (as in a store) that lends books at a fixed charge per book per day — called also lending library
rente
noun Etymology: French Date: 1873 a government security (as in France) paying interest; also the interest paid
renter
noun Date: 1655 one that rents; specifically the lessee or tenant of property
rentier
noun Etymology: French, from Old French, from rente Date: circa 1847 a person who lives on income from property or securities
Renton
geographical name city W Washington SE of Seattle population 50,052
renunciation
noun Etymology: Middle English renunciacion, from Anglo-French, from Latin renuntiation-, renuntiatio, from renuntiare to renounce Date: 14th century the act or practice of ...
renunciative
adjective see renunciation
renunciatory
adjective see renunciation
Renwick
biographical name James 1818-1895 American architect
reoffer
transitive verb Date: 1920 to offer (a security issue) for public sale
reopen
Date: 1733 transitive verb 1. to open again 2. a. to take up again ; resume b. to resume discussion or consideration of 3. to begin again intransitive ...
reorder
I. Date: 1656 transitive verb 1. to arrange in a different way 2. to give a reorder for intransitive verb to place a reorder II. noun Date: 1901 an order like a ...
reorganization
noun Date: 1813 the act or process of reorganizing ; the state of being reorganized; especially the financial reconstruction of a business concern • reorganizational ...
reorganizational
adjective see reorganization
reorganize
Date: circa 1686 transitive verb to organize again or anew intransitive verb to reorganize something • reorganizer noun
reorganizer
noun see reorganize
reovirus
noun Etymology: respiratory enteric orphan (i.e., unidentified) virus Date: 1959 any of a family (Reoviridae) of double-stranded RNA viruses that have a virion with ...
Rep
abbreviation Republican
rep
I. noun Date: circa 1705 slang reputation; especially status in a group (as a gang) II. noun Date: 1848 representative III. noun or repp Etymology: French reps, ...
repackage
transitive verb Date: 1899 to package again or anew; specifically to put into a more efficient or attractive form • repackager noun
repackager
noun see repackage
repair
I. intransitive verb Etymology: Middle English, from Anglo-French repairer to go back, return from Late Latin repatriare to go home again, from Latin re- + patria native country ...
repairability
noun see repair III

< 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 > >>

© en-de-fr.com.ua - EN-DE-FR 2009-2017 Информация публикуется на сайте для ознакомительного процесса.
 
Выполнено за: 0.043 c;