Слова на букву quin-sask (6389) New Collegiate Dictionary
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Слова на букву quin-sask (6389)

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repairable
adjective see repair III
repairer
noun see repair III
repairman
noun Date: 1871 one who repairs; specifically one whose occupation is to make repairs in a mechanism
repand
adjective Etymology: Latin repandus spread out, from repandere to open wide, from re- + pandere to spread — more at fathom Date: circa 1760 having a slightly undulating ...
reparable
adjective Date: 1570 capable of being repaired
reparation
noun Etymology: Middle English reparacion, from Anglo-French, from Late Latin reparation-, reparatio, from Latin reparare Date: 14th century 1. a. a repairing or keeping ...
reparative
adjective Date: 1656 1. of, relating to, or effecting repair 2. serving to make amends
repartee
noun Etymology: French repartie, from repartir to retort, from Middle French, from re- + partir to divide — more at part Date: circa 1645 1. a. a quick and witty reply ...
repartition
I. noun Etymology: probably from Spanish repartición, from repartir to distribute, from re- + partir to divide, from Latin partire — more at part Date: 1555 ...
repass
verb Etymology: Middle English, from Anglo-French repasser, from re- + passer to pass Date: 15th century intransitive verb to pass again especially in the opposite ...
repassage
noun see repass
repast
I. noun Etymology: Middle English, from Anglo-French, from (soi) repaistre to feed upon, from re- + pestre, paistre to feed, from Latin pascere — more at food Date: 14th ...
repatriate
transitive verb (-ated; -ating) Etymology: Late Latin repatriatus, past participle of repatriare to go home again — more at repair Date: 1611 to restore or return to the ...
repatriation
noun see repatriate
repay
verb (repaid; -paying) Date: 15th century transitive verb 1. a. to pay back b. to give or inflict in return or requital 2. to make a return payment to ; ...
repayable
adjective see repay
repayment
noun see repay
repeal
transitive verb Etymology: Middle English repelen, from Anglo-French repeler, literally, to call back, from re- + apeler to appeal, call Date: 14th century 1. to rescind or ...
repealable
adjective see repeal
repealer
noun Date: 1765 one that repeals; specifically a legislative act that abrogates an earlier act
repeat
I. verb Etymology: Middle English repeten, from Middle French & Latin; Middle French repeter, from Old French, from Latin repetere to return to, repeat, from re- + petere to go ...
repeatability
noun see repeat I
repeatable
adjective see repeat I
repeated
adjective Date: 1611 1. renewed or recurring again and again 2. said, done, or presented again
repeatedly
adverb Date: circa 1718 again and again
repeater
noun Date: 1598 one that repeats: as a. one who relates or recites b. a watch or clock with a striking mechanism that upon pressure of a spring will indicate the time in ...
repeating
adjective Date: 1824 of a firearm designed to load cartridges from a magazine
repeating decimal
noun Date: 1773 a decimal in which after a certain point a particular digit or sequence of digits repeats itself indefinitely — compare terminating decimal
repechage
noun Etymology: French repêchage second chance, reexamination for a candidate who has failed, from repêcher to fish out, rescue, from re- + pêcher to fish, from Latin piscari ...
repel
verb (repelled; repelling) Etymology: Middle English repellen, from Middle French repeller, from Latin repellere, from re- + pellere to drive — more at felt Date: 15th ...
repellant
I. adjective see repellent I II. noun see repellent II
repellency
noun Date: 1747 the quality or capacity of repelling
repellent
I. adjective also repellant Etymology: Latin repellent-, repellens, present participle of repellere Date: 1643 1. serving or tending to drive away or ward off — often used ...
repellently
adverb see repellent I
repeller
noun see repel
repent
I. verb Etymology: Middle English, from Anglo-French repentir, from Medieval Latin repoenitēre, from Latin re- + Late Latin poenitēre to feel regret, alteration of Latin ...
repentance
noun Date: 14th century the action or process of repenting especially for misdeeds or moral shortcomings Synonyms: see penitence
repentant
adjective Date: 13th century 1. experiencing repentance ; penitent 2. expressive of repentance • repentantly adverb
repentantly
adverb see repentant
repenter
noun see repent I
Repentigny
geographical name town Canada in S Quebec N of Montreal population 54,550
repercussion
noun Etymology: Latin repercussion-, repercussio, from repercutere to drive back, from re- + percutere to beat — more at percussion Date: 1536 1. reflection, reverberation ...
repercussive
adjective see repercussion
reperfusion
noun Date: 1966 restoration of the flow of blood to a previously ischemic tissue or organ
repertoire
noun Etymology: French répertoire, from Late Latin repertorium Date: 1847 1. a. a list or supply of dramas, operas, pieces, or parts that a company or person is prepared ...
repertory
noun (plural -ries) Etymology: Late Latin repertorium list, from Latin reperire to find, from re- + parere to produce — more at pare Date: 1593 1. a place where something ...
repetend
noun Etymology: Latin repetendus to be repeated, gerundive of repetere to repeat Date: 1874 a repeated sound, word, or phrase; specifically refrain
repetition
noun Etymology: Middle English repeticion, from Middle French, from Latin repetition-, repetitio, from repetere to repeat Date: 15th century 1. a. the act or an instance ...
repetitional
adjective see repetition
repetitious
adjective Date: 1675 characterized or marked by repetition; especially tediously repeating • repetitiously adverb • repetitiousness noun
repetitiously
adverb see repetitious
repetitiousness
noun see repetitious
repetitive
adjective Date: 1839 1. repetitious 2. containing repetition • repetitively adverb • repetitiveness noun
repetitive strain injury
noun Date: 1983 any of various painful musculoskeletal disorders (as carpal tunnel syndrome or tendinitis) caused by cumulative damage to muscles, tendons, ligaments, ...
repetitive stress injury
noun see repetitive strain injury
repetitively
adverb see repetitive
repetitiveness
noun see repetitive
repine
intransitive verb Date: 1530 1. to feel or express dejection or discontent ; complain 2. to long for something • repiner noun
repiner
noun see repine
repl
abbreviation replace; replacement; replacing
replace
transitive verb Date: 1595 1. to restore to a former place or position 2. to take the place of especially as a substitute or successor 3. to put something new in the ...
replaceable
adjective see replace
replacement
noun Date: circa 1790 1. the action or process of replacing ; the state of being replaced 2. one that replaces another especially in a job or function
replacement set
noun Date: 1959 a set of elements any one of which may be used to replace a given variable or placeholder in a mathematical sentence or expression (as an equation)
replacement therapy
noun Date: 1944 therapy involving the supply of a substance (as a hormone or nutrient) lacking in or lost from the body — compare estrogen replacement therapy, hormone ...
replacer
noun see replace
replant
transitive verb Date: 1575 1. to plant again or anew 2. to provide with new plants 3. to subject to replantation
replantation
noun Date: 1870 reattachment or reinsertion of a bodily part (as a limb or tooth) after separation from the body
replay
I. transitive verb Date: 1884 to play again or over II. noun Date: 1895 1. a. an act or instance of replaying b. the playing of a tape (as a videotape) 2. ...
repleader
noun Etymology: replead to plead again + -er (as in misnomer) Date: 1607 1. a second legal pleading 2. the right of pleading again granted usually when the issue raised is ...
replenish
verb Etymology: Middle English replenisshen, from Anglo-French repleniss-, stem of replenir to fill, from re- + plein full, from Latin plenus — more at full Date: 14th ...
replenishable
adjective see replenish
replenisher
noun see replenish
replenishment
noun see replenish
replete
adjective Etymology: Middle English, from Middle French & Latin; Middle French replet, from Latin repletus, past participle of replēre to fill up, from re- + plēre to fill — ...
repleteness
noun see replete
repletion
noun Date: 14th century 1. the act of eating to excess ; the state of being fed to excess ; surfeit 2. the condition of being filled up or overcrowded 3. fulfillment of a ...
repleviable
adjective see replevy II
replevin
I. noun Etymology: Middle English, from Anglo-French, from replevir to give security, from re- + plevir to pledge, from Late Latin *plebere — more at pledge Date: 15th ...
replevy
I. noun (plural replevies) Etymology: Middle English, from Anglo-French replevir, verb Date: 15th century replevin II. transitive verb (replevied; replevying) Date: 1596 ...
replica
noun Etymology: Italian, repetition, from replicare to repeat, from Late Latin, from Latin, to fold back — more at reply Date: 1824 1. an exact reproduction (as of a ...
replicability
noun see replicable
replicable
adjective Date: 1950 capable of replication • replicability noun
replicase
noun Etymology: replication + -ase Date: 1963 a polymerase of viruses that promotes synthesis of a particular RNA in the presence of a template of RNA
replicate
I. verb (-cated; -cating) Etymology: Middle English, from Late Latin replicatus, past participle of replicare Date: 15th century transitive verb duplicate, repeat
replication
noun Date: 14th century 1. a. answer, reply b. (1) an answer to a reply ; rejoinder (2) a plaintiff's reply to a defendant's plea, answer, or counterclaim 2. ...
replicative
adjective Date: circa 1890 of, relating to, involved in, or characterized by replication
replicon
noun Etymology: replicate + 2-on Date: 1963 a linear or circular section of DNA or RNA which replicates sequentially as a unit
replier
noun see reply I
reply
I. verb (replied; replying) Etymology: Middle English replien to fold back, oppose, respond, from Anglo-French replier, from Latin replicare to fold back, make a legal ...
repo
I. adjective Etymology: short for repossession Date: 1954 of, relating to, or being in the business of repossessing property (as a car) from buyers who have defaulted on ...
repolarization
noun Date: 1922 restoration of the difference in charge between the inside and outside of the cell membrane following depolarization • repolarize verb
repolarize
verb see repolarization
répondez s'il vous plaît
foreign term Etymology: French reply, if you please
report
I. noun Etymology: Middle English, from Anglo-French, from reporter to bring back, report, from Latin reportare, from re- + portare to carry — more at fare Date: 14th ...
report card
noun Date: 1920 1. a report on a student that is periodically submitted by a school to the student's parents or guardian 2. an evaluation of performance
report out
transitive verb Date: 1907 to return after consideration and often with revisions to a legislative body for action
report stage
noun Date: circa 1906 the stage in the British legislative process preceding the third reading and concerned especially with amendments and details
reportable
adjective Date: 1858 1. worth reporting 2. required by law to be reported
reportage
noun Etymology: French, from reporter to report Date: circa 1864 1. a. the act or process of reporting news b. something (as news) that is reported 2. writing ...
reportedly
adverb Date: 1901 according to report
reporter
noun Date: 14th century one that reports: as a. a person who makes authorized statements of law decisions or legislative proceedings b. a person who makes a shorthand ...
reportorial
adjective see reporter
reportorially
adverb see reporter
reposal
noun Date: 1605 obsolete the act of reposing
repose
I. verb (reposed; reposing) Etymology: Middle English, from Anglo-French reposer, from Late Latin repausare, from Latin re- + Late Latin pausare to stop, from Latin pausa pause ...
reposeful
adjective Date: 1852 of a kind to induce ease and relaxation • reposefully adverb • reposefulness noun
reposefully
adverb see reposeful
reposefulness
noun see reposeful
reposit
transitive verb (reposited; repositing) Etymology: Latin repositus, past participle of reponere to replace, from re- + ponere to place — more at position Date: circa 1641 1. ...
reposition
I. noun Date: 1588 the act of repositing ; the state of being reposited II. transitive verb Date: circa 1859 1. to change the position of 2. to revise the marketing ...
repository
I. noun (plural -ries) Date: 15th century 1. a place, room, or container where something is deposited or stored ; depository 2. a side altar in a Roman Catholic church where ...
repossess
transitive verb Date: 15th century 1. a. to regain possession of b. to take possession of (something bought) from a buyer in default of the payment of installments due ...
repossession
noun see repossess
repossessor
noun see repossess
repoussé
I. adjective Etymology: French, literally, pushed back Date: 1858 1. shaped or ornamented with patterns in relief made by hammering or pressing on the reverse side — used ...
repower
transitive verb Date: 1954 to provide again or anew with power; especially to provide (as a boat) with a new engine
repp
variant of rep
repped
past and past participle of rep V
repping
present part of rep V
Repplier
biographical name Agnes 1855-1950 American essayist
reprehend
transitive verb Etymology: Middle English, from Latin reprehendere, literally, to hold back, from re- + prehendere to grasp — more at get Date: 14th century to voice ...
reprehensibility
noun see reprehensible
reprehensible
adjective Date: 14th century worthy of or deserving reprehension ; culpable • reprehensibility noun • reprehensibleness noun • reprehensibly adverb
reprehensibleness
noun see reprehensible
reprehensibly
adverb see reprehensible
reprehension
noun Etymology: Middle English reprehensioun, from Anglo-French or Latin; Anglo-French reprehension, from Latin reprehension-, reprehensio, from reprehendere Date: 14th ...
reprehensive
adjective Date: 1589 serving to reprehend ; conveying reprehension or reproof
represent
verb Etymology: Middle English, from Anglo-French representer, from Latin repraesentare, from re- + praesentare to present Date: 14th century transitive verb 1. to bring ...
representable
adjective see represent
representation
noun Date: 15th century 1. one that represents: as a. an artistic likeness or image b. (1) a statement or account made to influence opinion or action (2) an ...
representational
adjective see representation
representationalism
noun Date: 1842 1. the doctrine that the immediate object of knowledge is an idea in the mind distinct from the external object which is the occasion of perception 2. the ...
representationalist
noun see representationalism
representationally
adverb see representation
representative
I. adjective Date: 14th century 1. serving to represent 2. a. standing or acting for another especially through delegated authority b. of, based on, or constituting a ...
representatively
adverb see representative I
representativeness
noun see representative I
representativity
noun see representative I
representer
noun see represent
repress
verb Etymology: Middle English, from Anglo-French represser, from Latin repressus, past participle of reprimere to check, from re- + premere to press — more at press Date: ...
repressed
adjective Date: 1665 1. subjected to or marked by repression 2. characterized by restraint
repressibility
noun see repress
repressible
adjective see repress
repression
noun Date: 1533 1. a. the action or process of repressing ; the state of being repressed b. an instance of repressing 2. a. a mental process by which ...
repressionist
adjective see repression
repressive
adjective see repress
repressively
adverb see repress
repressiveness
noun see repress
repressor
noun Etymology: New Latin Date: 1611 one that represses; especially a protein that is determined by a regulatory gene, binds to a genetic operator, and inhibits the ...
reprieval
noun Date: circa 1586 archaic reprieve
reprieve
I. transitive verb (reprieved; reprieving) Etymology: probably blend of obsolete repreve to reprove (from Middle English) and obsolete repry to remand, postpone, from ...
reprimand
I. noun Etymology: French réprimande, from Latin reprimenda, feminine of reprimendus, gerundive of reprimere to check — more at repress Date: 1636 a severe or formal ...
reprint
I. transitive verb Date: 1551 to print again ; make a reprint of II. noun Date: 1611 a reproduction of printed matter: as a. a subsequent printing of a book already ...
reprinter
noun Date: 1689 one that publishes a reprint
reprisal
noun Etymology: Middle English reprisail, from Anglo-French reprisaile, from Medieval Latin represalia, from Old Italian rappresaglia, ultimately from ripreso, past participle ...
reprise
I. noun Etymology: Middle English, from Anglo-French, seizure, repossession, expense, from feminine past participle of reprendre to take back, from re- + prendre to take, from ...
repristinate
transitive verb (-nated; -nating) Etymology: re- + pristine + 4-ate Date: 1659 to restore to an original state or condition • repristination noun
repristination
noun see repristinate
repro
noun (plural repros) Etymology: short for reproduction Date: 1946 1. a clear sharp proof made especially from a letterpress printing surface to serve as photographic copy for ...
reproach
I. noun Etymology: Middle English reproche, from Anglo-French, from reprocher to reproach, from Vulgar Latin *repropiare to bring close, show, from Latin re- + prope near — ...
reproachable
adjective see reproach II
reproacher
noun see reproach II
reproachful
adjective see reproach I
reproachfully
adverb see reproach I
reproachfulness
noun see reproach I
reproachingly
adverb see reproach II
reprobance
noun Date: 1604 archaic reprobation
reprobate
I. transitive verb (-bated; -bating) Etymology: Middle English, from Late Latin reprobatus, past participle of reprobare — more at reprove Date: 15th century 1. to condemn ...
reprobation
noun Date: 14th century the act of reprobating ; the state of being reprobated
reprobative
adjective see reprobate I
reprobatory
adjective see reprobate I
reprocess
transitive verb Date: 1921 to subject to a special process or treatment in preparation for reuse; especially to extract uranium and plutonium from (the spent fuel rods of a ...
reproduce
Date: circa 1611 transitive verb to produce again: as a. to produce (new individuals of the same kind) by a sexual or asexual process b. to cause to exist again or ...
reproducer
noun see reproduce
reproducibility
noun see reproduce
reproducible
adjective or noun see reproduce
reproducibly
adverb see reproduce
reproduction
noun Date: 1659 1. the act or process of reproducing; specifically the process by which plants and animals give rise to offspring and which fundamentally consists of the ...
reproduction proof
noun Date: 1945 repro 1
reproductive
I. adjective Date: 1753 of, relating to, or capable of reproduction • reproductively adverb II. noun Date: 1934 an actual or potential parent; specifically a sexually ...
reproductive isolation
noun Date: 1949 the inability of a species to breed successfully with related species due to geographical, behavioral, physiological, or genetic barriers or differences
reproductively
adverb see reproductive I
reprogram
Date: 1959 transitive verb to program anew; especially to revise or write a new program for (as a computer) intransitive verb to rewrite or revise a program especially ...
reprogrammable
adjective see reprogram
reprographer
noun see reprography
reprographic
adjective see reprography
reprographics
noun plural see reprography
reprography
noun Etymology: reproduction + -graphy Date: 1956 facsimile reproduction (as by photocopying) of graphic matter • reprographer noun • reprographic adjective • ...
reproof
noun Etymology: Middle English repref, reprofe, from Anglo-French reproefe, from reprover Date: 14th century criticism for a fault ; rebuke
reprove
verb (reproved; reproving) Etymology: Middle English repreven, reproven, from Anglo-French reprover, from Late Latin reprobare to disapprove, condemn, from Latin re- + probare ...
reprover
noun see reprove
reprovingly
adverb see reprove
rept
abbreviation report
reptile
I. noun Etymology: Middle English reptil, from Middle French or Late Latin; Middle French reptile (feminine), from Late Latin reptile (neuter), from neuter of reptilis creeping, ...
reptilian
I. adjective Date: 1833 1. resembling or having the characteristics of the reptiles 2. of or relating to the reptiles 3. cold-bloodedly treacherous II. noun Date: ...
republic
noun Etymology: French république, from Middle French republique, from Latin respublica, from res thing, wealth + publica, feminine of publicus public — more at real, public ...
Republic of Georgia
geographical name see Georgia 2
Republic of the Congo
geographical name see Congo 3
República Oriental del Uruguay
geographical name see Uruguay 2
Republican
geographical name river 445 miles (716 kilometers) Nebraska & Kansas rising in E Colorado & flowing E to unite with the Smoky Hill forming Kansas River
republican
I. noun Date: 1699 1. one that favors or supports a republican form of government 2. capitalized a. a member of a political party advocating republicanism b. a member ...
republicanism
noun Date: 1689 1. adherence to or sympathy for a republican form of government 2. the principles or theory of republican government 3. capitalized a. the principles, ...
republicanize
transitive verb (-ized; -izing) Date: 1797 to make republican in character, form, or principle
republication
noun Date: 1789 1. the act or action of republishing ; the state of being republished 2. something that has been republished
republish
transitive verb Date: 1592 1. to publish again or anew 2. to execute (a will) anew • republisher noun
republisher
noun see republish
repudiate
transitive verb (-ated; -ating) Etymology: Latin repudiatus, past participle of repudiare, from repudium rejection of a prospective spouse, divorce, probably from re- + pudēre ...
repudiation
noun Date: 1545 the act of repudiating ; the state of being repudiated; especially the refusal of public authorities to acknowledge or pay a debt • repudiationist noun
repudiationist
noun see repudiation
repudiator
noun see repudiate
repugn
verb Etymology: Middle English, from Anglo-French & Latin; Anglo-French repugner, from Latin repugnare Date: 14th century intransitive verb archaic to offer opposition, ...
repugnance
noun Date: 15th century 1. a. the quality or fact of being contradictory or inconsistent b. an instance of such contradiction or inconsistency 2. strong dislike, ...
repugnancy
noun (plural -cies) Date: 15th century repugnance
repugnant
adjective Etymology: Middle English, opposed, contradictory, incompatible, from Anglo-French, from Latin repugnant-, repugnans, present participle of repugnare to fight against, ...
repugnantly
adverb see repugnant
repulse
I. transitive verb (repulsed; repulsing) Etymology: Latin repulsus, past participle of repellere to repel Date: 15th century 1. to drive or beat back ; repel 2. to repel by ...
repulsion
noun Date: 15th century 1. the action of repulsing ; the state of being repulsed 2. the action of repelling ; the force with which bodies, particles, or like forces repel ...
repulsive
adjective Date: 1594 1. serving or able to repulse 2. tending to repel or reject ; cold, forbidding 3. arousing aversion or disgust • repulsively adverb • ...
repulsively
adverb see repulsive
repulsiveness
noun see repulsive
repurchase agreement
noun Date: 1924 a contract giving the seller of securities (as treasury bills) the right to repurchase after a stated period and the buyer the right to retain interest ...
repurpose
transitive verb Date: 1984 to give a new purpose or use to
reputability
noun see reputable
reputable
adjective Date: 1662 1. enjoying good repute ; held in esteem 2. employed widely or sanctioned by good writers • reputability noun • reputably adverb
reputably
adverb see reputable
reputation
noun Etymology: Middle English reputacion, from Anglo-French, from Latin reputation-, reputatio consideration, from reputare Date: 14th century 1. a. overall quality or ...
reputational
adjective see reputation
repute
I. transitive verb (reputed; reputing) Etymology: Middle English, from Anglo-French reputer, from Latin reputare to reckon up, think over, from re- + putare to reckon Date: ...
reputed
adjective Date: 1549 1. having a good repute ; reputable 2. being such according to reputation or general belief
reputedly
adverb Date: 1687 according to reputation or general belief
req
abbreviation 1. request 2. require; required 3. requistion
reqd
abbreviation required
request
I. noun Etymology: Middle English requeste, from Anglo-French, from Vulgar Latin *requaesta, from feminine of requaestus, past participle of requaerere to require Date: 14th ...
requester
noun see request II
requestor
noun see request II
requiem
noun Etymology: Middle English, from Latin (first word of the introit of the requiem mass), accusative of requies rest, from re- + quies quiet, rest — more at while Date: ...
requiem shark
noun Etymology: obsolete French requiem shark, alteration of French requin Date: 1900 any of a family (Carcharhinidae) of sharks (as the tiger shark) that includes some ...
requiescat
noun Etymology: Latin, may he (or she) rest, from requiescere to rest, from re- + quiescere to be quiet, from quies Date: 1824 a prayer for the repose of a dead person
requiescat in pace
foreign term Etymology: Latin may he or she rest in peace — used on tombstones
require
verb (required; requiring) Etymology: Middle English requeren, from Anglo-French requere, from Vulgar Latin *requaerere to seek for, need, require, alteration of Latin ...
requirement
noun Date: 1662 something required: a. something wanted or needed ; necessity b. something essential to the existence or occurrence of something else ; condition
requisite
adjective Etymology: Middle English, from Latin requisitus, past participle of requirere Date: 15th century essential, necessary • requisite noun • requisiteness noun
requisiteness
noun see requisite
requisition
noun Etymology: Middle English requisicion, from Middle French or Medieval Latin; Middle French requisition, from Medieval Latin requisition-, requisitio, from Latin, act of ...
requital
noun Date: 1567 1. something given in return, compensation, or retaliation 2. the act or action of requiting ; the state of being requited
requite
transitive verb (requited; requiting) Etymology: re- + obsolete quite to quit, pay, from Middle English quiten — more at quit Date: 1529 1. a. to make return for ; ...
requiter
noun see requite
reradiate
transitive verb Date: 1913 to radiate again or anew; especially to emit (energy) in the form of radiation after absorbing incident radiation • reradiation noun
reradiation
noun see reradiate
reredos
noun Etymology: Middle English, from Anglo-French reredors, areredos, from arere behind + dos back, from Latin dorsum — more at arrear Date: 14th century a usually ...
rereward
noun Etymology: Middle English rerewarde, from Anglo-French, from rere, arere behind + warde, gard guard Date: 14th century obsolete rear guard
rerun
I. transitive verb (reran; -run; -running) Date: 1804 to run again or anew II. noun Date: circa 1934 the act or action or an instance of rerunning ; repetition; especially ...
res
I. noun (plural res) Etymology: Latin — more at real Date: 1851 a particular thing ; matter — used especially in legal phrases II. abbreviation 1. research 2. ...
res adjudicata
noun Etymology: Late Latin Date: 1849 res judicata
res gestae
noun plural Etymology: Latin Date: 1616 things done; especially the facts that form the environment of a litigated issue and are admissible in evidence
res judicata
noun Etymology: Latin, judged matter Date: 1693 a matter finally decided on its merits by a court having competent jurisdiction and not subject to litigation again between ...
res publica
noun Etymology: Latin — more at republic Date: circa 1898 1. commonwealth, state, republic 2. commonweal
resalable
adjective Date: 1866 fit for resale
resale
noun Date: 1625 1. the act of selling again usually to a new party 2. a. a secondhand sale b. an additional sale to the same buyer
rescale
transitive verb Date: 1944 to plan, establish, or formulate on a new and usually smaller scale
reschedule
transitive verb Date: 1965 to schedule or plan again according to a different timetable; especially to defer required payment of (a debt or loan)
rescind
transitive verb Etymology: Latin rescindere to annul, from re- + scindere to cut — more at shed Date: 1579 1. to take away ; remove 2. a. take back, cancel b. to ...
rescinder
noun see rescind
rescindment
noun see rescind

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