Слова на букву sask-soma (6389) New Collegiate Dictionary
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Слова на букву sask-soma (6389)

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Saskatoon
geographical name city Canada in central Saskatchewan on South Saskatchewan River population 196,811
Sasquatch
noun Etymology: Halkomelem (Salishan language of southwestern British Columbia) sésq̓əc Date: 1929 a hairy creature like a human being reported to exist in the ...
sass
I. noun Etymology: alteration of 1sauce Date: 1835 impudent speech II. transitive verb Date: 1856 to talk impudently or disrespectfully to
sassafras
noun Etymology: Spanish sasafrás Date: 1577 1. an eastern North American tree (Sassafras albidum) of the laurel family having both ovate and lobed aromatic leaves 2. the ...
Sassanian
I. adjective or Sasanian Date: 1788 of, relating to, or having the characteristics of the Sassanid dynasty of ancient Persia or its art or architecture II. noun or Sasanian ...
Sassanid
or Sasanid noun Etymology: New Latin Sassanidae Sassanids, from Sassan, founder of the dynasty Date: 1776 a member of a dynasty of Persian kings of the third to seventh ...
Sassari
geographical name commune Italy in NW Sardinia population 116,989
Sassoon
biographical name Siegfried Lorraine 1886-1967 English writer
sassy
adjective (sassier; -est) Etymology: alteration of saucy Date: 1833 1. impudent, saucy 2. vigorous, lively 3. distinctively smart and stylish
sastruga
noun (plural sastrugi) Etymology: German, from Russian dialect (Siberia) zastruga Date: 1840 a wavelike ridge of hard snow formed by the wind — usually used in plural
Sat
abbreviation Saturday
sat
I. past and past participle of sit II. abbreviation 1. satellite 2. saturated
Satan
noun Etymology: Middle English, from Old English, from Late Latin, from Greek, from Hebrew śāṭān adversary Date: before 12th century 1. the angel who in Jewish belief is ...
satang
noun (plural satang or satangs) Etymology: Thai sataŋ Date: circa 1915 — see baht at money table
satanic
adjective Date: 1667 1. of, relating to, or characteristic of Satan or satanism 2. characterized by extreme cruelty or viciousness • satanically adverb
satanically
adverb see satanic
satanism
noun Usage: often capitalized Date: 1565 1. innate wickedness ; diabolism 2. obsession with or affinity for evil; specifically the worship of Satan marked by the ...
satanist
noun see satanism
satchel
noun Etymology: Middle English sachel, from Anglo-French sachel, sacel, from Late Latin saccellum, diminutive of Latin sacculus, diminutive of saccus bag — more at sack Date: ...
satchelful
noun see satchel
Satcher
biographical name David 1941- United States surgeon general (1998-2002)
sate
I. archaic past of sit II. transitive verb (sated; sating) Etymology: probably by shortening & alteration from satiate Date: 1579 1. to cloy with overabundance ; glut 2. ...
sateen
noun Etymology: alteration of satin Date: circa 1878 a smooth durable lustrous fabric usually made of cotton in satin weave
satellite
noun Etymology: Middle French, from Latin satellit-, satelles attendant Date: circa 1548 1. a hired agent or obsequious follower ; minion, sycophant 2. a. a celestial ...
satellite dish
noun Date: 1978 a microwave dish for receiving usually television transmissions from an orbiting satellite
satellite DNA
noun Date: 1969 a fraction of a eukaryotic organism's DNA that differs in density from most of its DNA as determined by centrifugation, that consists of short repetitive ...
satem
adjective Etymology: Avestan satəm hundred; from the fact that its initial sound (derived from an alveolar fricative) is the representative of an Indo-European palatal stop — ...
sati
variant of suttee
satiable
adjective Date: 1570 capable of being appeased or satisfied
satiate
I. adjective Date: 15th century filled to satiety II. transitive verb (-ated; -ating) Etymology: Latin satiatus, past participle of satiare, from satis enough — more at ...
satiation
noun see satiate II
Satie
biographical name Erik (-Alfred-Leslie) 1866-1925 French composer
satiety
noun Etymology: Middle French satieté, from Latin satietat-, satietas, from satis Date: 1533 1. the quality or state of being fed or gratified to or beyond capacity ; ...
Satilla
geographical name river 220 miles (354 kilometers) SE Georgia flowing E into the Atlantic
satin
I. noun Etymology: Middle English, from Anglo-French, probably from Arabic zaytūnī, literally, of Zaytūn, seaport in China during the Middle Ages Date: 14th century a ...
satin stitch
noun Date: 1664 an embroidery stitch worked in parallel lines so closely and evenly as to resemble satin
satin weave
noun Date: circa 1883 a weave in which warp threads interlace with filling threads to produce a smooth-faced fabric
satinet
noun Date: 1703 1. a thin silk satin or imitation satin 2. a variation of satin weave used in making satinet
satinwood
noun Date: 1792 1. a. a tree (Chloroxylon swietenia) of the rue family native to India and Sri Lanka that yields a lustrous yellowish-brown wood b. a tree (as the West ...
satiny
adjective Date: 1786 having or resembling the soft usually lustrous smoothness of satin
satire
noun Etymology: Middle French or Latin; Middle French, from Latin satura, satira, perhaps from (lanx) satura dish of mixed ingredients, from feminine of satur well-fed; akin to ...
satiric
or satirical adjective Date: 1509 1. of, relating to, or constituting satire 2. manifesting or given to satire Synonyms: see sarcastic • satirically adverb
satirical
adjective see satiric
satirically
adverb see satiric
satirise
British variant of satirize
satirist
noun Date: 1589 one that satirizes; especially a writer of satire
satirizable
adjective see satirize
satirize
verb (-rized; -rizing) Date: circa 1598 intransitive verb to utter or write satire transitive verb to censure or ridicule by means of satire • satirizable adjective
satisfaction
noun Etymology: Middle English, from Anglo-French, from Late Latin satisfaction-, satisfactio, from Latin, reparation, amends, from satisfacere to satisfy Date: 14th century ...
satisfactorily
adverb see satisfactory
satisfactoriness
noun see satisfactory
satisfactory
adjective Date: 15th century giving satisfaction ; adequate • satisfactorily adverb • satisfactoriness noun
satisfiable
adjective Date: 1638 capable of being satisfied
satisfy
verb (-fied; -fying) Etymology: Middle English satisfien, from Anglo-French satisfier, modification of Latin satisfacere, from satis enough + facere to do, make — more at sad, ...
satisfyingly
adverb see satisfy
satori
noun Etymology: Japanese Date: 1727 sudden enlightenment and a state of consciousness attained by intuitive illumination representing the spiritual goal of Zen Buddhism
Satpura Range
geographical name range of hills W central India between the Narmada & the Tapi
satrap
noun Etymology: Middle English, from Latin satrapes, from Greek satrapēs, from Old Persian khshathrapāvan, literally, protector of the dominion Date: 14th century 1. the ...
satrapy
noun (plural -pies) Date: 1603 the territory or jurisdiction of a satrap
satsuma
noun Etymology: Satsuma, former province in Kyushu, Japan Date: 1882 1. any of several cultivated cold-tolerant mandarin trees that bear medium-sized largely seedless fruits ...
Satu-Mare
geographical name city NW Romania in Transylvania on the Somes population 136,881
saturable
adjective Date: 1570 capable of being saturated
saturant
noun Date: circa 1775 something that saturates
saturate
I. transitive verb (-rated; -rating) Etymology: Latin saturatus, past participle of saturare, from satur well-fed — more at satire Date: 1538 1. to satisfy fully ; satiate ...
saturated
adjective Date: 1741 1. full of moisture ; made thoroughly wet 2. a. being a solution that is unable to absorb or dissolve any more of a solute at a given temperature ...
saturation
noun Date: circa 1554 1. a. the act of saturating ; the state of being saturated b. satiety, surfeit 2. conversion of an unsaturated to a saturated chemical compound ...
saturator
noun see saturate I
Saturday
noun Etymology: Middle English saterday, from Old English sæterndæg (akin to Old Frisian sāterdei), from Latin Saturnus Saturn + Old English dæg day Date: before 12th ...
Saturday night special
noun Date: 1968 a cheap easily concealed handgun
Saturdays
adverb see Saturday
Saturn
noun Etymology: Latin Saturnus Date: before 12th century 1. a Roman god of agriculture and father by Ops of Jupiter 2. the planet sixth in order from the sun — see planet ...
saturnalia
noun plural but singular or plural in construction Etymology: Latin, from neuter plural of saturnalis of Saturn, from Saturnus Date: 1591 1. capitalized the festival of ...
saturnalian
adjective see saturnalia
saturnalianly
adverb see saturnalia
Saturnian
adjective Date: 1557 1. of, relating to, or influenced by the planet Saturn 2. archaic of or relating to the god Saturn or the golden age of his reign
saturniid
noun Etymology: New Latin Saturniidae, from Saturnia, genus of moths, from Latin, daughter of the god Saturn Date: circa 1909 any of a family (Saturniidae) of usually large ...
saturnine
adjective Date: 15th century 1. born under or influenced astrologically by the planet Saturn 2. a. cold and steady in mood ; slow to act or change b. of a gloomy or ...
saturnism
noun Etymology: saturn lead Date: circa 1855 lead poisoning
satyagraha
noun Etymology: New Sanskrit satyāgraha, from Sanskrit satya truth + āgraha persistence Date: 1920 pressure for social and political reform through friendly passive ...
satyr
noun Etymology: Middle English, from Latin satyrus, from Greek satyros Date: 14th century 1. often capitalized a sylvan deity in Greek mythology having certain ...
satyr play
noun Date: 1929 a comic play of ancient Greece burlesquing a mythological subject and having a chorus representing satyrs
satyriasis
noun Etymology: Late Latin, from Greek, from satyros Date: 15th century excessive or abnormal sexual craving in the male
satyric
adjective see satyr
satyrid
noun Etymology: New Latin Satyridae, ultimately from Greek satyros Date: 1901 any of a family (Satyridae) of usually brown or gray butterflies that feed on grasses as larvae, ...
sauce
I. noun Etymology: Middle English, from Anglo-French, from Latin salsa, feminine of salsus salted, from past participle of sallere to salt, from sal salt — more at salt Date: ...
sauceboat
noun Date: 1747 a low boat-shaped pitcher for serving sauces and gravies
saucebox
noun Date: 1588 a saucy impudent person
saucepan
noun Date: 1686 a small deep cooking pan with a handle
saucer
noun Etymology: Middle English, plate containing a condiment, from Anglo-French, from sauce Date: circa 1702 1. a small shallow dish in which a cup is set at table 2. ...
saucerlike
adjective see saucer
sauch
noun see saugh
saucily
adverb see saucy
sauciness
noun see saucy
saucy
adjective (saucier; -est) Date: 1508 1. served with or having the consistency of sauce 2. a. impertinently bold and impudent b. amusingly forward and flippant ; ...
Saud
biographical name 1902-1969 king of Saudi Arabia (1953-64)
Saudi
adjective or noun see Saudi Arabia
Saudi Arabia
geographical name country SW Asia occupying most of Arabia; a kingdom, comprising former kingdoms of Nejd & Hejaz & principality of Asir capital Riyadh area 865,000 square ...
Saudi Arabian
adjective or noun see Saudi Arabia
sauerbraten
noun Etymology: German, from sauer sour + Braten roast meat Date: 1889 oven-roasted or pot-roasted beef marinated before cooking in vinegar with peppercorns, garlic, onions, ...
sauerkraut
noun Etymology: German, from sauer sour + Kraut greens Date: 1617 cabbage cut fine and fermented in a brine made of its own juice with salt
sauger
noun Etymology: origin unknown Date: 1882 a pike perch (Stizostedion canadense) of Canada and the United States similar to the walleye but smaller
saugh
or sauch noun Etymology: Middle English (Scots) sauch, from Old English salh, alteration of sealh — more at sallow Date: before 12th century chiefly Scottish sallow
Saugus
geographical name town NE Massachusetts W of Lynn population 26,078
Sauk
or Sac noun (plural Sauk or Sauks or Sac or Sacs) Etymology: short for Saukie, Saki, from American French saki, from Ojibwa osa•ki•, or a cognate Algonquian word Date: ...
Saul
noun Etymology: Late Latin Saulus, from Greek Saulos, from Hebrew Shā'ūl Date: before 12th century 1. the first king of Israel 2. the apostle Paul — called also Saul of ...
Saul of Tarsus
noun see Saul
Sault Sainte Marie
geographical name city Canada in Ontario across the St. Marys River from Michigan population 74,566
Sault Sainte Marie Canals
or Soo Canals geographical name three ship canals (two in the United States & one in Canada) at rapids in St. Marys River connecting Lake Superior & Lake Huron
Saumur
geographical name commune NW France on the Loire SE of Angers population 31,894
sauna
noun Etymology: Finnish Date: 1881 1. a Finnish steam bath in which the steam is provided by water thrown on hot stones; also a bathhouse or room used for such a bath 2. ...
saunter
intransitive verb Etymology: probably from Middle English santren to muse Date: circa 1667 to walk about in an idle or leisurely manner ; stroll • saunter noun • ...
saunterer
noun see saunter
Saurashtra
geographical name former state (1948-56) W India on Kathiawar Peninsula; in Bombay state 1956-60 & since 1960 in Gujarat
saurel
noun Etymology: French, from Late Latin saurus horse mackerel, from Greek sauros horse mackerel, lizard Date: 1882 jack mackerel
saurian
noun Etymology: New Latin Sauria, from New Latin saurus lizard, from Greek sauros Date: 1824 any of a suborder (Sauria) of reptiles including the lizards and in older ...
saurischian
noun Etymology: New Latin Saurischia, ultimately from Greek sauros lizard + New Latin ischium ischium Date: circa 1889 any of an order (Saurischia) of herbivorous or ...
sauropod
noun Etymology: New Latin Sauropoda, from Greek sauros lizard + New Latin -poda Date: circa 1889 any of a suborder (Sauropoda) of quadrupedal herbivorous saurischian ...
saury
noun (plural sauries) Etymology: New Latin saurus lizard Date: circa 1771 a widely distributed fish (Scombresox saurus) of temperate waters of the Atlantic that resembles ...
sausage
noun Etymology: Middle English sausige, from Anglo-French sauseche, saucis, from Late Latin salsicia, from Latin salsus salted — more at sauce Date: 15th century a highly ...
Saussure
biographical name Ferdinand de 1857-1913 Swiss linguist • Saussurean also Saussurian adjective
Saussurean
adjective see Saussure
Saussurian
adjective see Saussure
sauté
I. noun also saute Etymology: French, from past participle of sauter to jump, from Old French, from Latin saltare — more at saltation Date: 1813 a sautéed dish • sauté ...
saute
I. noun see sauté I II. transitive verb see sauté II
sauterne
noun see sauternes 2
sauternes
noun Etymology: French, from Sauternes, commune in France Date: 1711 1. capitalized a full-bodied sweet white wine from the Bordeaux region of France 2. (usually sauterne) ...
sauvignon blanc
noun Etymology: French, white sauvignon (variety of grape) Date: 1941 a dry white wine made from a grape originally grown in Bordeaux and the Loire valley
Sava
geographical name river 584 miles (940 kilometers) flowing from Italian border E through Slovenia, into Croatia, along Croatia-Bosnia and Herzegovina border, & into Yugoslavia ...
Sava
geographical name river 584 miles (940 kilometers) flowing from Italian border E through Slovenia, into Croatia, along Croatia-Bosnia and Herzegovina border, & into Yugoslavia ...
savable
adjective see save I
Savage
I. biographical name Michael Joseph 1872-1940 prime minister of New Zealand (1935-40) II. biographical name Richard 1697?-1743 English poet
savage
I. adjective Etymology: Middle English, from Anglo-French salvage, savage, from Late Latin salvaticus, alteration of Latin silvaticus of the woods, wild, from silva wood, ...
savagely
adverb see savage I
savageness
noun see savage I
savagery
noun (plural -ries) Date: 1597 1. a. the quality of being savage b. an act of cruelty or violence 2. an uncivilized state
savagism
noun Date: 1796 savagery
Savaii
geographical name island Samoa (nation) SW Pacific, largest in Samoa islands
savanna
also savannah noun Etymology: Spanish zavana, from Taino zabana Date: 1555 1. a treeless plain especially in Florida 2. a. a tropical or subtropical grassland (as of ...
Savannah
geographical name 1. river 314 miles (505 kilometers) E Georgia flowing SE to the Atlantic & forming Georgia-South Carolina boundary 2. city & port E Georgia at mouth of ...
savannah
noun see savanna
savant
noun Etymology: French, from Middle French, from present participle of savoir to know, from Latin sapere to be wise — more at sage Date: 1719 1. a person of learning; ...
savarin
noun Etymology: French, from Anthelme Brillat-Savarin died 1826 French politician, writer, and gourmet Date: 1877 a rich yeast cake baked in a ring mold and soaked in a rum ...
savate
noun Etymology: French, literally, old shoe Date: 1862 a form of boxing in which blows are delivered with either the hands or the feet
Save
geographical name — see Sabi
save
I. verb (saved; saving) Etymology: Middle English, from Anglo-French salver, from Late Latin salvare, from Latin salvus safe — more at safe Date: 13th century transitive ...
save-all
noun Date: circa 1645 something that prevents waste, loss, or damage (as a receptacle for catching waste products for further use)
saveable
adjective see save I
saveloy
noun Etymology: modification of French cervelas, from Middle French, from Old Italian cervellata, literally, pig's brains, from cervello brain, from Latin cerebellum — more at ...
saver
noun see save I
Savimbi
biographical name Jonas (Malheiro) 1934- Angolan guerilla leader & politician
savin
noun Etymology: Middle English, from Anglo-French, from Latin (herba) sabina, literally, Sabine plant Date: 14th century 1. a Eurasian juniper (Juniperus sabina) with dark ...
saving
I. noun Etymology: Middle English, from gerund of saven to save Date: 14th century 1. preservation from danger or destruction ; deliverance 2. the act or an instance of ...
saving grace
noun Date: 1597 a redeeming quality or factor
savings account
noun Date: 1911 an account (as in a bank) on which interest is usually paid and from which withdrawals can be made usually only by presentation of a passbook or by written ...
savings and loan
noun see savings and loan association
savings and loan association
noun Date: 1884 a cooperative association organized to hold savings of members in the form of dividend-bearing shares and to invest chiefly in home mortgage loans — called ...
savings bank
noun Date: 1817 a bank organized to hold funds of individual depositors in interest-bearing accounts and to make long-term investments (as in home mortgage loans)
savings bond
noun Date: 1948 a nontransferable registered United States bond issued in denominations of $50 to $10,000
savior
or saviour noun Etymology: Middle English saveour, from Anglo-French, from Late Latin salvator, from salvare to save Date: 14th century 1. one that saves from danger or ...
saviour
noun see savior
Savo
geographical name island W Pacific in SE Solomons N of W Guadalcanal
Savoia
geographical name see Savoy
Savoie
geographical name see Savoy
savoir faire
noun Etymology: French savoir-faire, literally, knowing how to do Date: 1815 capacity for appropriate action; especially a polished sureness in social behavior Synonyms: ...
Savona
geographical name commune & port NW Italy SW of Genoa population 67,137
Savonarola
biographical name Girolamo 1452-1498 Italian reformer
savor
I. noun also savour Etymology: Middle English, from Anglo-French savur, from Latin sapor, from sapere to taste — more at sage Date: 13th century 1. the taste or smell of ...
savorer
noun see savor II
savorily
adverb see savory I
savoriness
noun see savory I
savorless
adjective see savor I
savorous
adjective see savor I
savory
I. adjective also savoury Date: 13th century having savor: as a. piquantly pleasant to the mind b. morally exemplary ; edifying c. pleasing to the sense of taste ...
savour
I. noun see savor I II. verb see savor II
savoury
I. adjective see savory I II. noun see savory II
Savoy
or French Savoie or Italian Savoia geographical name region SE France in Savoy Alps SW of Switzerland & bordering on Italy; duchy 1416-1720, part of kingdom of Sardinia ...
Savoy Alps
geographical name section of W Alps SE France — see Mont Blanc
savoy cabbage
noun Usage: often capitalized S Etymology: translation of French chou de Savoie cabbage of Savoy Date: 1707 a cabbage with compact heads of wrinkled and curled leaves
Savoyard
noun Etymology: Savoy Theater, London, built for the presentation of Gilbert and Sullivan operas Date: 1890 a devotee, performer, or producer of the comic operas of West ...
savvy
I. verb (savvied; savvying) Etymology: alteration of sabi know (in English-based creoles and pidgins), from Portuguese sabe he knows, from saber to know, from Latin sapere to be ...
saw
I. past of see II. noun Etymology: Middle English sawe, from Old English sagu; akin to Old High German sega saw, Latin secare to cut Date: before 12th century a hand or ...
saw grass
noun Date: 1822 any of various sedges (as of the genus Cladium) having the edges of the leaves set with minute sharp teeth
saw palmetto
noun Date: 1797 1. any of several shrubby palms chiefly of the southern United States and West Indies that have spiny-toothed petioles; especially a common palm (Serenoa ...
saw set
noun Date: 1846 an instrument used to set the teeth of saws
saw-toothed
adjective Date: circa 1857 1. having teeth like those of a saw 2. sawtooth
saw-whet
noun see saw-whet owl
saw-whet owl
noun Etymology: from the supposed resemblance of its cry to the sound made in filing a saw Date: 1834 a very small harsh-voiced North American owl (Aegolius acadicus) that ...
Sawatch Range
geographical name mountain range central Colorado in Rocky Mountains — see elbert (Mount)
sawbones
noun (plural sawbones or sawboneses) Date: 1837 slang physician, surgeon
sawbuck
noun Date: 1850 1. slang a 10-dollar bill 2. sawhorse; especially one with X-shaped ends
sawdust
noun Date: circa 1528 fine particles (as of wood) made by a saw in cutting
sawed-off
adjective Date: 1869 1. having an end sawed off 2. of less than average height
sawer
noun see saw III
sawfish
noun Date: 1635 any of a family (Pristidae) of large elongate rays that resemble sharks but have a long flattened snout with a row of serrate structures along each edge and ...
sawfly
noun Date: 1773 any of numerous hymenopterous insects (superfamily Tenthredinoidea and especially family Tenthredinidae) with the female usually having a sawlike ovipositor ...
sawhorse
noun Date: 1778 a frame on which wood is laid for sawing by hand ; horse 2b
sawlike
adjective see saw II
sawlog
noun Date: 1756 a log of suitable size for sawing into lumber
sawmill
noun Date: 1553 a mill or machine for sawing logs
sawtimber
noun Date: 1901 timber suitable for sawing into lumber
sawtooth
adjective Date: circa 1859 having serrations ; arranged or having parts arranged like the teeth of a saw
sawyer
noun Date: 13th century 1. one that saws 2. any of several large longicorn beetles whose larvae bore large holes in timber or dead wood 3. a tree fast in the bed of a ...
sax
noun Date: circa 1923 saxophone
Saxe
I. biographical name (Hermann-) Maurice 1696-1750 Comte de Saxe French general II. geographical name saxony — its French name; used in English chiefly in names of former ...
saxhorn
noun Etymology: Antoine Sax died 1894 Belgian instrument maker + English horn Date: 1844 any of a group of valved brass instruments ranging from soprano to bass and ...
saxicolous
adjective Etymology: Latin saxum rock (akin to Latin secare to cut) + English -colous — more at saw Date: 1856 inhabiting or growing among rocks
saxifrage
noun Etymology: Middle English, from Anglo-French, from Late Latin saxifraga, from Latin, feminine of saxifragus breaking rocks, from saxum rock + frangere to break — more at ...
saxitoxin
noun Etymology: saxi- (from New Latin Saxidomus giganteus, species of butter clam from which it is isolated) + toxin Date: 1962 a potent nonprotein neurotoxin ...
Saxo Grammaticus
biographical name circa 1150-after 1216 Danish historian
Saxon
noun Etymology: Middle English, from Late Latin Saxones Saxons, of Germanic origin; akin to Old English Seaxan Saxons Date: 13th century 1. a. (1) a member of a ...
saxony
noun (plural -nies) Usage: often capitalized Etymology: Saxony, Germany Date: 1842 1. a. a fine soft woolen fabric b. a fine closely twisted knitting yarn 2. a ...
Saxony
or German Sachsen geographical name 1. region & former duchy NW Germany S of Jutland Peninsula between the Elbe & the Rhine — see Lower Saxony 2. region & state of ...
Saxony-Anhalt
geographical name state of central Germany capital Magdeburg area 7956 square miles (20,606 square kilometers), population 2,874,000
saxophone
noun Etymology: French, from Antoine Sax died 1894 Belgian instrument maker + French -phone Date: 1851 one of a group of single-reed woodwind instruments ranging from ...
saxophonic
adjective see saxophone
saxophonist
noun see saxophone
saxtuba
noun Etymology: Antoine Sax + English tuba Date: 1856 a bass saxhorn
say
I. verb (said; saying; says) Etymology: Middle English, from Old English secgan; akin to Old High German sagēn to say, Lithuanian sakyti, Greek ennepein to speak, tell Date: ...
say uncle
phrasal to admit defeat
say-so
noun Date: 1637 1. a. one's unsupported assertion or assurance b. an authoritative pronouncement 2. a right of final decision ; say
sayable
adjective Date: 1856 1. capable of being said 2. capable of being spoken effectively or easily
Sayan Mountains
geographical name mountains S Russia in Asia on border of Tuva N of Altai Mountains
sayer
noun see say I
Sayers
biographical name Dorothy Leigh 1893-1957 English writer
sayest
archaic second person singular of say
saying
noun Date: 14th century something said; especially adage
sayonara
foreign term Etymology: Japanese good-bye
Sayreville
geographical name borough E central New Jersey population 40,377
sayyid
noun Etymology: Arabic Date: 1788 1. an Islamic chief or leader 2. lord, sir — used as a courtesy title for a Muslim of rank or lineage
Sazan
or Italian Saseno geographical name island Albania in N Strait of Otranto
sb
abbreviation substantive
Sb
symbol Etymology: Latin stibium antimony
SB
abbreviation 1. [New Latin scientiae baccalaureus] bachelor of science 2. southbound
SBA
abbreviation Small Business Administration
SBN
abbreviation Standard Book Number
sc
abbreviation 1. scene 2. science 3. scilicet 4. [Latin sculpsit] he carved it; she carved it; he engraved it; she engraved it
SC
abbreviation 1. small capitals 2. South Carolina 3. supercalendered 4. supreme court
Sc
I. abbreviation stratocumulus II. symbol scandium
Sca Fell
geographical name mountain 3162 feet (964 meters) NW England in Cumbrians SW of Keswick; second highest peak in England
scab
I. noun Etymology: Middle English, of Scandinavian origin; akin to Old Swedish skabbr scab; akin to Old English sceabb scab, Latin scabere to scratch — more at shave Date: ...
scabbard
noun Etymology: Middle English scauberc, scaubert, from Anglo-French escalberc Date: 13th century a sheath for a sword, dagger, or bayonet • scabbard transitive verb
scabby
adjective (scabbier; -est) Date: 15th century 1. a. covered with or full of scabs b. diseased with scab 2. mean, contemptible
scabies
noun (plural scabies) Etymology: Latin, from scabere to scratch Date: 1814 contagious itch or mange especially with exudative crusts that is caused by parasitic mites ...
scabietic
adjective see scabies
scabious
I. noun Etymology: Middle English scabiose, from Anglo-French, from Medieval Latin scabiosa, from Latin, feminine of scabiosus, adjective Date: 14th century any of a genus ...
scabland
noun Date: 1904 a region characterized by elevated tracts of rocky land with little or no soil cover and traversed or isolated by postglacial dry stream channels — usually ...
scabrous
adjective Etymology: Latin scabr-, scaber rough, scurfy; akin to Latin scabere to scratch — more at scab Date: 1646 1. difficult, knotty 2. rough to the touch: as a. ...
scabrously
adverb see scabrous
scabrousness
noun see scabrous
scad
I. noun (plural scad; also scads) Etymology: origin unknown Date: 1602 any of several carangid fishes (especially of the genus Decapterus) II. noun Etymology: probably ...
Scafell Pike
geographical name mountain 3210 feet (978 meters) NW England in Cumbria NE of Sca Fell; highest in the Cumbrians & in England
scaffold
noun Etymology: Middle English, from Anglo-French scaffald, alteration of Old French eschaafauz, escafaut, alteration of chaafaut, from Vulgar Latin *catafalicum — more at ...
scaffolding
noun Date: 14th century a system of scaffolds; also material for scaffolds
scag
also skag noun Etymology: origin unknown Date: 1967 slang heroin
scagliola
noun Usage: often attributive Etymology: Italian, literally, little chip Date: 1747 an imitation marble used for floors, columns, and ornamental interior work
scalability
noun see scalable
scalable
adjective Date: circa 1580 1. capable of being scaled 2. capable of being easily expanded or upgraded on demand • scalability noun
scalade
or scalado noun (plural -lades or -lados) Etymology: obsolete Italian scalada, from scalare to scale, from scala ladder, staircase, from Late Latin — more at scale Date: ...
scalado
noun see scalade
scalar
I. adjective Etymology: Latin scalaris, from scalae stairs, ladder — more at scale Date: circa 1656 1. having an uninterrupted series of steps ; graduated 2. a. ...
scalar product
noun Date: 1878 a real number that is the product of the lengths of two vectors and the cosine of the angle between them — called also dot product, inner product
scalare
noun Etymology: New Latin, specific epithet, from Latin, neuter of scalaris; from the barred pattern on its body Date: 1928 angelfish 2
scalariform
adjective Etymology: New Latin scalariformis, from Latin scalaris + -iformis -iform Date: 1836 resembling a ladder especially in having transverse bars or markings like the ...
scalariformly
adverb see scalariform
scalawag
or scallywag noun Etymology: origin unknown Date: circa 1848 1. scamp, reprobate 2. a white Southerner acting in support of the reconstruction governments after the ...

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