Слова на букву sask-soma (6389) New Collegiate Dictionary
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Слова на букву sask-soma (6389)

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scald
I. verb Etymology: Middle English, from Anglo-French *escalder, eschauder, from Late Latin excaldare to wash in warm water, from Latin ex- + calida, calda warm water, from ...
scalding
adjective Date: 13th century 1. hot enough to scald 2. a. having or producing the feeling of being burned b. scathing
scale
I. noun Etymology: Middle English scole, scale bowl, scale of a balance, from Old Norse skāl; akin to Old Norse skel shell — more at shell Date: 14th century 1. a. ...
scale armor
noun Date: 1842 armor of small metallic scales on leather or cloth
scale insect
noun Date: 1840 any of numerous small prolific homopterous insects (superfamily Coccoidea) that have winged males, wingless scale-covered females attached to the host plant, ...
scale-down
noun Date: 1931 a reduction according to a fixed ratio
scale-up
noun Date: 1945 an increase according to a fixed ratio
scaled
adjective see scale III
scaleless
adjective see scale III
scalelike
adjective Date: 1611 resembling a scale ; specifically reduced to a minute appressed element resembling a scale
scalene
adjective Etymology: Late Latin scalenus, from Greek skalēnos, literally, uneven; perhaps akin to Greek skolios crooked, skelos leg — more at isosceles Date: 1734 of a ...
scaler
noun Date: 1557 1. one that scales 2. a dental instrument for removing tartar from teeth
Scalia
biographical name Antonin 1936- American jurist
Scaliger
I. biographical name Joseph Justus 1540-1609 French scholar II. biographical name Julius Caesar 1484-1558 father of preceding Italian physician
scaliness
noun see scaly
scall
noun Etymology: Middle English Date: 14th century archaic a scurf or scabby disorder (as of the scalp)
scallion
noun Etymology: Middle English scaloun, from Anglo-French scalun, escaloin, from Vulgar Latin *escalonia, from Latin ascalonia (caepa) onion of Ascalon, from feminine of ...
scallop
I. noun also scollop Etymology: Middle English scalop, from Anglo-French escalope shell, of Germanic origin; akin to Middle Dutch schelpe shell Date: 15th century 1. a. ...
scalloper
noun Date: circa 1881 1. a person who dredges for or gathers scallops 2. a boat equipped and used to dredge for scallops
scallopini
noun see scaloppine
scallywag
variant of scalawag
scalogram
noun Etymology: 6scale + -o- + -gram Date: 1944 an arrangement of items (as problems on a test or features of speech) in ascending order so that the presence or ...
scaloppine
also scallopini noun Etymology: Italian scaloppine, ultimately from French escalope thin slice of meat, probably from Middle French, shell Date: 1946 thin slices of meat (as ...
scalp
I. noun Etymology: Middle English, crown of the head, perhaps of Scandinavian origin; akin to Old Norse skālpr sheath; akin to Middle Dutch schelpe shell Date: 14th century ...
scalp lock
noun Date: 1826 a long tuft of hair on the crown of the otherwise shaved head especially of a warrior of some American Indian tribes
scalpel
noun Etymology: Latin scalpellus, scalpellum, diminutive of scalper, scalprum chisel, knife, from scalpere to scratch, carve Date: 1742 a small straight thin-bladed knife ...
scalper
noun see scalp II
scaly
adjective (scalier; -est) Date: 14th century 1. a. covered with, composed of, or rich in scale or scales b. flaky 2. of or relating to scaly animals 3. despicable, ...
scaly anteater
noun Date: 1840 pangolin
scam
I. noun Etymology: origin unknown Date: 1963 a fraudulent or deceptive act or operation II. transitive verb (scammed; scamming) Date: 1963 1. deceive, defraud 2. to ...
Scamander
geographical name — see Menderes 2
scammer
noun see scam II
scammony
noun (plural -nies) Etymology: Middle English scamonie, from Old English & Anglo-French; Old English scammoniam, from Latin scammonia, from Greek skammōnia; Anglo-French ...
scamp
I. noun Etymology: obsolete scamp to roam about idly Date: 1808 1. rascal, rogue 2. an impish or playful young person • scampish adjective II. transitive verb ...
scamper
I. intransitive verb (scampered; scampering) Etymology: probably from obsolete Dutch schampen to flee, from Middle French escamper, from Italian scampare, from Vulgar Latin ...
scampi
noun (plural scampi) Etymology: Italian, plural of scampo, a European lobster Date: 1925 a usually large shrimp; also large shrimp prepared with a garlic-flavored sauce
scampish
adjective see scamp I
scamster
noun Date: 1984 one that scams ; scammer
scan
I. verb (scanned; scanning) Etymology: Middle English scannen, from Late Latin scandere, from Latin, to climb; akin to Middle Irish sceinnid he springs, Sanskrit skandati he ...
Scand
abbreviation Scandinavia
scandal
I. noun Etymology: Middle English, from Late Latin scandalum stumbling block, offense, from Greek skandalon trap, stumbling block, offense; akin to Latin scandere to climb ...
scandal sheet
noun Date: 1904 a newspaper or periodical dealing to a large extent in scandal and gossip
scandalise
chiefly British variant of scandalize
scandalize
transitive verb (-ized; -izing) Date: 1566 1. archaic to speak falsely or maliciously of 2. archaic to bring into reproach 3. to offend the moral sense of ; shock
scandalmonger
noun Date: 1714 a person who circulates scandal • scandalmongering noun
scandalmongering
noun see scandalmonger
scandalous
adjective Date: 1575 1. libelous, defamatory 2. offensive to propriety or morality ; shocking • scandalously adverb • scandalousness noun
scandalously
adverb see scandalous
scandalousness
noun see scandalous
scandent
adjective Etymology: Latin scandent-, scandens, present participle of scandere to climb — more at scan Date: circa 1682 characterized by a climbing mode of growth
Scanderbeg
biographical name — see Skanderbeg
Scandian
adjective Etymology: Latin Scandia Date: 1668 1. Scandinavian 2. of or relating to the languages of Scandinavia • Scandian noun
Scandinavia
geographical name 1. peninsula N Europe occupied by Norway & Sweden 2. Denmark, Norway, Sweden — sometimes also considered to include Iceland, the Faeroe Islands, & ...
Scandinavian
noun Date: 1766 1. the North Germanic languages 2. a. a native or inhabitant of Scandinavia b. a person of Scandinavian descent • Scandinavian adjective
scandium
noun Etymology: New Latin, from Latin Scandia, ancient name of southern Scandinavian peninsula Date: 1879 a silvery-white metallic element found widely especially in ...
scannable
adjective see scan I
scanner
noun Date: 1556 one that scans: as a. a device for sensing recorded data (as in a bar code) b. a radio receiver that sequentially scans a range of frequencies for a ...
scanning electron microscope
noun Date: 1953 an electron microscope in which a beam of focused electrons moves across the object with the secondary electrons produced by the object and the electrons ...
scanning electron microscopy
noun see scanning electron microscope
scanning microscope
noun see scanning electron microscope
scanning tunneling microscope
noun Date: 1983 a microscope that makes use of the phenomenon of tunneling electrons to map the positions of individual atoms in a surface or to move atoms around on a ...
scanning tunneling microscopy
noun see scanning tunneling microscope
scansion
noun Etymology: Late Latin scansion-, scansio, from Latin, act of climbing, from scandere Date: 1671 the analysis of verse to show its meter
scant
I. adjective Etymology: Middle English, from Old Norse skamt, neuter of skammr short Date: 14th century 1. dialect a. excessively frugal b. not prodigal ; chary 2. ...
scanties
noun plural Etymology: blend of 1scant and panties Date: 1929 abbreviated panties for women
scantily
adverb see scanty
scantiness
noun see scanty
scantling
noun Etymology: alteration of Middle English scantilon, mason's or carpenter's measure, from Anglo-French escauntiloun, eschantillon Date: 1555 1. a. the dimensions of ...
scantly
adverb see scant I
scantness
noun see scant I
scanty
adjective (scantier; -est) Etymology: English dialect scant scanty supply, from Middle English, from Old Norse skamt, from neuter of skammr short Date: 1600 limited or less ...
Scapa Flow
geographical name sea basin N Scotland in the Orkneys
scape
I. verb (scaped; scaping) Etymology: Middle English, short for escapen Date: 13th century escape II. noun Etymology: Latin scapus shaft, stalk — more at shaft Date: ...
scapegoat
I. noun Etymology: 1scape; intended as translation of Hebrew ‘azāzēl (probably name of a demon), as if ‘ēz 'ōzēl goat that departs—Leviticus 16:8(Authorized Version) ...
scapegoatism
noun see scapegoat II
scapegrace
noun Etymology: 1scape Date: 1763 an incorrigible rascal
scaphoid
noun Etymology: New Latin scaphoides, from Greek skaphoeidēs, from skaphos boat Date: 1831 1. navicular a 2. the bone of the thumb side of the carpus that is the largest ...
scapolite
noun Etymology: French, from Latin scapus shaft + French -o- + -lite; from the prismatic shape of its crystals Date: 1802 any of a group of minerals that are essentially ...
scapula
noun (plural scapulae or -las) Etymology: New Latin, from Latin, shoulder blade, shoulder Date: 1578 either of a pair of large triangular bones lying one in each dorsal ...
scapular
I. noun Etymology: Middle English scapulare, from Late Latin, from Latin scapula shoulder Date: 15th century 1. a. a long wide band of cloth with an opening for the head ...
scapular medal
noun Date: 1912 a medal worn in place of a sacramental scapular
scar
I. noun Etymology: Middle English skere, from Old Norse sker skerry; probably akin to Old Norse skera to cut — more at shear Date: 14th century 1. an isolated or protruding ...
scar tissue
noun Date: 1875 the connective tissue forming a scar and composed chiefly of fibroblasts in recent scars and largely of dense collagenous fibers in old scars
scarab
noun Etymology: Middle French scarabee, from Latin scarabaeus Date: 1579 1. any of a family (Scarabaeidae) of stout-bodied beetles (as a dung beetle) with lamellate or ...
scarabaeus
noun Etymology: Latin Date: 1664 scarab 2
scaramouch
or scaramouche noun Etymology: French Scaramouche, from Italian Scaramuccia, from scaramuccia skirmish Date: 1662 1. capitalized a stock character in the Italian commedia ...
scaramouche
noun see scaramouch
Scarborough
geographical name 1. former city Canada in SE Ontario, now part of Toronto 2. town & port NE England in North Yorkshire population 107,800
scarce
I. adjective (scarcer; scarcest) Etymology: Middle English scars, from Anglo-French eschars, escars narrow, stingy, deficient, from Vulgar Latin *excarpsus, literally, plucked ...
scarcely
adverb Date: 14th century 1. a. by a narrow margin ; only just b. almost not 2. a. certainly not b. probably not
scarceness
noun see scarce I
scarcity
noun (plural -ties) Date: 14th century the quality or state of being scarce; especially want of provisions for the support of life
scare
I. verb (scared; scaring) Etymology: Middle English skerren, from Old Norse skirra, from skjarr shy, timid Date: 13th century transitive verb to frighten especially ...
scare quotes
noun plural Date: 1960 quotation marks used to express especially skepticism or derision concerning the use of the enclosed word or phrase
scare up
transitive verb Date: 1841 to find or get together with considerable labor or difficulty ; scrape up
scarecrow
noun Date: 1573 1. a. an object usually suggesting a human figure that is set up to frighten birds away from crops b. something frightening but harmless 2. a skinny or ...
scared
adjective Date: 1579 thrown into or being in a state of fear, fright, or panic
scaredy-cat
noun Etymology: scared (past participle of scare) + 1-y + cat Date: 1948 an unduly fearful person
scarehead
noun Date: 1887 a big, sensational, or alarming newspaper headline
scaremonger
noun Date: 1888 one inclined to raise or excite alarms especially needlessly • scaremongering noun
scaremongering
noun see scaremonger
scarer
noun see scare I
scarf
I. noun (plural scarfs) Etymology: Middle English skarf, probably from Old Norse skarfr butt end of a plank Date: 15th century 1. either of the chamfered or cutaway ends that ...
scarfpin
noun Date: 1858 tiepin
scarfskin
noun Etymology: 3scarf Date: 1615 epidermis; especially that forming the cuticle of a nail
scarification
noun Date: 14th century 1. the act or process of scarifying 2. a mark or marks made by scarifying
scarifier
noun see scarify I
scarify
I. transitive verb (-fied; -fying) Etymology: Middle English scarifien, from Middle French scarefier, from Late Latin scarificare, alteration of Latin scarifare, from Greek ...
scarifyingly
adverb see scarify II
scarily
adverb see scary
scarious
adjective Etymology: New Latin scariosus Date: circa 1806 dry and membranous in texture
scarlatina
noun Etymology: New Latin, from Medieval Latin scarlata scarlet Date: 1771 scarlet fever • scarlatinal adjective
scarlatinal
adjective see scarlatina
Scarlatti
biographical name (Pietro) Alessandro Gaspare 1660-1725 & his son (Giuseppe) Domenico 1685-1757 Italian composers
scarless
adjective see scar II
scarlet
I. noun Etymology: Middle English scarlat, scarlet, from Anglo-French escarlet, from Medieval Latin scarlata, from Persian saqalāt, a kind of rich cloth Date: 13th century 1. ...
scarlet fever
noun Date: 1676 an acute contagious febrile disease caused by hemolytic Group A streptococci and characterized by inflammation of the nose, throat, and mouth, generalized ...
scarlet letter
noun Etymology: from such a letter in the novel The Scarlet Letter (1850) by Nathaniel Hawthorne Date: 1850 a scarlet A worn as a punitive mark of adultery
scarlet pimpernel
noun Date: 1835 1. a European pimpernel (Anagallis arvensis) naturalized in North America and having scarlet, white, or purplish flowers that close in cloudy weather 2. ...
scarlet runner
noun see scarlet runner bean
scarlet runner bean
noun Date: 1899 a tropical American high-climbing bean (Phaseolus coccineus) that has large bright red flowers and red and black seeds and is grown widely as an ornamental and ...
scarlet sage
noun Date: 1863 a salvia (Salvia splendens) of Brazil that is widely cultivated for its long racemes of typically scarlet flowers; also a related salvia (S. coccinea) of ...
scarlet tanager
noun Date: 1810 a common American tanager (Piranga olivacea) with the male having scarlet plumage and black wings during the breeding season and the female having chiefly ...
scarp
noun Etymology: Italian scarpa Date: 1589 1. the inner side of a ditch below the parapet of a fortification 2. a. a line of cliffs produced by faulting or erosion — ...
scarped
adjective see scarp
scarper
intransitive verb Etymology: probably ultimately from Italian scappare, from Vulgar Latin *excappare — more at escape Date: circa 1846 British flee, run away; broadly ...
scarph
transitive verb see scarf II
Scarron
biographical name Paul 1610-1660 French author
scarry
adjective Etymology: 2scar Date: 1653 bearing marks of wounds ; scarred
scary
adjective (scarier; -est) Date: 1582 1. causing fright ; alarming 2. easily scared ; timid 3. feeling alarm or fright ; frightened • scarily adverb
SCAT
abbreviation 1. School and College Ability Test 2. supersonic commercial air transport
scat
I. intransitive verb (scatted; scatting) Etymology: scat, interjection used to drive away a cat Date: 1838 1. to go away quickly 2. to move fast ; scoot II. noun ...
scatback
noun Etymology: 1scat + back Date: 1945 an offensive back in football who is an especially fast and elusive ballcarrier
scathe
I. noun Etymology: Middle English skathe, from Old Norse skathi; akin to Old English sceatha injury, Greek askēthēs unharmed Date: 13th century harm, injury • scatheless ...
scatheless
adjective see scathe I
scathing
adjective Date: 1794 bitterly severe Synonyms: see caustic • scathingly adverb
scathingly
adverb see scathing
scatological
adjective see scatology
scatology
noun Etymology: Greek skat-, skōr excrement; akin to Old English scearn dung, Latin muscerdae mouse droppings Date: 1876 1. interest in or treatment of obscene matters ...
scatt
noun Etymology: Middle English scat, from Old Norse skattr; akin to Old English sceat property, money, a small coin, Old Church Slavic skotŭ domestic animal Date: 13th ...
scatter
I. verb Etymology: Middle English scateren, schateren to disperse, break up, destroy; akin to Middle Dutch schaderen to scatter Date: 14th century transitive verb 1. a. ...
scatter diagram
noun Date: 1925 a two-dimensional graph in rectangular coordinates consisting of points whose coordinates represent values of two variables under study
scatter rug
noun Date: 1926 throw rug
scatteration
noun Date: 1776 1. the act or process of scattering ; the state of being scattered 2. the movement of people and industry away from the city; also the resulting regional ...
scatterbrain
noun Date: 1659 a giddy heedless person
scatterbrained
adjective Date: 1747 having the characteristics of a scatterbrain
scatterer
noun see scatter I
scattergood
noun Date: 1577 a wasteful person ; spendthrift
scattergram
noun Date: 1938 scatter diagram
scattergun
noun or adjective Date: 1836 shotgun
scattering
I. noun Date: 14th century 1. an act or process in which something scatters or is scattered 2. something scattered: as a. a small number or quantity interspersed here and ...
scatteringly
adverb see scattering II
scattershot
adjective Date: 1951 broadly and often randomly inclusive ; shotgun
scatty
adjective (scattier; -est) Etymology: probably from scatterbrain + 1-y Date: 1911 chiefly British crazy
scaup
noun (plural scaup or scaups) Etymology: short for scaup duck; scaup probably alteration of scalp bed of shellfish Date: 1797 either of two diving ducks (Aythya affinis or A. ...
scavenge
verb (scavenged; scavenging) Etymology: back-formation from scavenger Date: circa 1644 transitive verb 1. a. (1) to remove (as dirt or refuse) from an area (2) ...
scavenger
noun Etymology: alteration of earlier scavager, from Anglo-French scawageour collector of scavage (duty collected from non-resident street merchants), from skawage scavage, from ...
scavenger hunt
noun Date: 1936 a game in which players try to acquire without buying specified items within a time limit
ScD
abbreviation doctor of science
scena
noun Etymology: Italian, literally, scene, from Latin Date: 1819 an elaborate solo vocal composition that consists of a recitative usually followed by one or more aria ...
scenario
noun (plural -ios) Etymology: Italian, from Latin scaenarium place for erecting stages, from scaena stage Date: 1875 1. a. an outline or synopsis of a play; especially a ...
scenarist
noun Date: 1920 a writer of scenarios
scend
noun Etymology: perhaps short for ascend Date: 1726 1. the lift of a wave ; send 2. the upward movement of a pitching ship
scene
noun Etymology: Middle French, stage, from Latin scena, scaena stage, scene, probably from Etruscan, from Greek skēnē shelter, tent, building forming the background for a ...
scène à faire
foreign term Etymology: French obligatory scene
scene-stealer
noun Date: 1949 an actor who attracts attention when another is intended to be the center of attention
scenery
noun (plural -eries) Date: 1770 1. the painted scenes or hangings and accessories used on a theater stage 2. a picturesque view or landscape 3. one's usual surroundings
sceneshifter
noun Date: 1749 a worker who moves the scenes in a theater
scenic
also scenical adjective Date: 1623 1. of or relating to the stage, a stage setting, or stage representation 2. of or relating to natural scenery 3. representing an ...
scenic railway
noun Date: 1894 chiefly British a miniature railway (as in an amusement park) with artificial scenery along the way
scenical
adjective see scenic
scenically
adverb see scenic
scenographer
noun see scenography
scenographic
adjective see scenography
scenography
noun Etymology: Greek skēnographia painting of scenery, from skēnē + -graphia -graphy Date: 1645 the art of perspective representation especially as applied to the design ...
scent
I. noun Etymology: Middle English sent, from Anglo-French sente, from sentir Date: 14th century 1. effluvia from a substance that affect the sense of smell: as a. an odor ...
scent hound
noun Date: 1976 a hound (as a bloodhound) that hunts and pursues game by scent rather than by sight — compare sight hound
scented
adjective Date: 1602 having scent: as a. having a perfumed smell b. having the sense of smell c. having or exhaling an odor
scentless
adjective see scent I
scepter
I. noun Etymology: Middle English sceptre, from Anglo-French septre, from Latin sceptrum, from Greek skēptron staff, scepter, from skēptesthai to prop oneself — more at ...
sceptered
adjective Date: 1513 1. invested with a scepter or sovereign authority 2. of or relating to a sovereign or to royalty
sceptic
chiefly British variant of skeptic
sceptical
chiefly British variant of skeptical
scepticism
chiefly British variant of skepticism
sceptre
British variant of scepter
sch
abbreviation school
Schaarbeek
geographical name see Schaerbeek
Schacht
biographical name (Horace Greeley) Hjalmar 1877-1970 German financier
schadenfreude
noun Usage: often capitalized Etymology: German, from Schaden damage + Freude joy Date: 1895 enjoyment obtained from the troubles of others
Schaerbeek
or Flemish Schaarbeek geographical name commune central Belgium, NE suburb of Brussels population 102,702
Schaffhausen
geographical name 1. canton N Switzerland bordering on SW Germany area 115 square miles (298 square kilometers), population 71,210 2. commune, its capital population 34,101
Schally
biographical name Andrew Victor 1926- American (Polish-born) physiologist
Scharnhorst
biographical name Gerhard Johann David von 1755-1813 Prussian general
Schaumburg
geographical name village NE Illinois NW of Chicago population 75,386
Schaumburg-Lippe
geographical name state of Germany 1918-33 in NW between Westphalia & Hannover
Schawlow
biographical name Arthur Leonard 1921-1999 American physicist
schedule
I. noun Etymology: Middle English, from Medieval Latin scedula slip, page, charter, from Late Latin schedula slip of paper, diminutive of Latin *scheda strip of papyrus, ...
scheduler
noun see schedule II
scheelite
noun Etymology: German Scheelit, from Karl W. Scheele died 1786 Swedish chemist Date: circa 1837 a mineral consisting of the tungstate of calcium that is an ore of tungsten ...
schefflera
noun Etymology: New Latin, from Jacob Christoph Scheffler died 1742 German physician Date: 1953 any of a genus (Schefflera) of chiefly tropical and subtropical shrubs and ...
Scheherazade
noun Etymology: German Scheherezade, from Persian Shīrazād Date: 1801 the fictional wife of a sultan and the narrator of the tales in the Arabian Nights' Entertainments
Scheidemann
biographical name Philipp 1865-1939 German politician
Schelde
or Scheldt or French Escaut geographical name river 270 miles (434 kilometers) W Europe flowing from N France through Belgium into North Sea in Netherlands
Scheldt
geographical name see Schelde
Schelling
biographical name Friedrich Wilhelm Joseph von 1775-1854 German philosopher • Schellingian adjective
Schellingian
adjective see Schelling
schema
noun (plural schemata; also schemas) Etymology: Greek schēmat-, schēma Date: circa 1890 1. a diagrammatic presentation; broadly a structured framework or plan ; outline ...
schematic
I. adjective Etymology: New Latin schematicus, from Greek schēmat-, schēma Date: 1701 of or relating to a scheme or schema • schematically adverb II. noun Date: 1929 ...
schematically
adverb see schematic I
schematism
noun Date: 1660 the disposition of constituents in a pattern or according to a scheme ; design; also a particular systematic disposition of parts
schematization
noun see schematize
schematize
transitive verb (-tized; -tizing) Etymology: Greek schēmatizein, from schēmat-, schēma Date: 1828 1. to form or to form into a scheme or systematic arrangement 2. to ...
scheme
I. noun Etymology: Latin schemat-, schema arrangement, figure, from Greek schēmat-, schēma, from echein to have, hold, be in (such) a condition; akin to Old English sige ...
schemer
noun see scheme II
scheming
adjective Date: 1741 given to forming schemes; especially devious
Schenectady
geographical name city E New York population 61,821
Schererville
geographical name town NW Indiana population 24,851
scherzando
I. adverb or adjective Etymology: Italian, from verbal of scherzare to joke, of Germanic origin; akin to Middle High German scherzen to leap for joy, joke; perhaps akin to Greek ...
scherzo
noun (plural scherzos or scherzi) Etymology: Italian, literally, joke, from scherzare Date: 1852 a sprightly humorous instrumental musical composition or movement commonly ...
Scheveningen
geographical name seaside resort SW Netherlands on North Sea; part of The Hague
Schiaparelli
biographical name Giovanni Virginio 1835-1910 Italian astronomer
Schick
biographical name Béla 1877-1967 American (Hungarian-born) pediatrician
Schick test
noun Etymology: Béla Schick Date: 1916 a test for susceptibility to diphtheria by cutaneous injection of a diluted diphtheria toxin that causes an area of reddening and ...
Schiedam
geographical name commune SW Netherlands population 71,117
Schiff reagent
noun see Schiff's reagent
Schiff's reagent
noun Etymology: Hugo Schiff died 1915 German chemist Date: 1897 a solution of fuchsine decolorized by treatment with sulfur dioxide that gives a useful test for aldehydes ...
schiller
noun Etymology: German Date: 1885 a bronzy iridescent luster (as of a mineral)
Schiller
biographical name (Johann Christoph) Friedrich von 1759-1805 German poet & dramatist
schilling
noun Etymology: German, from Old High German skilling, a gold coin — more at shilling Date: 1753 the basic monetary unit of Austria until 2002
Schindler
biographical name Oskar 1908-1974 German humanitarian
schipperke
noun Etymology: Flemish, diminutive of schipper skipper; from its use as a watchdog on boats — more at skipper Date: 1887 any of a Belgian breed of small stocky black ...
Schirach
biographical name Baldur von 1907-1974 German Nazi politician
schism
noun Etymology: Middle English scisme, from Anglo-French scisme, cisme, from Late Latin schismat-, schisma, from Greek, cleft, division, from schizein to split — more at shed ...
schismatic
I. noun Date: 14th century one who creates or takes part in schism II. adjective also schismatical Date: 15th century of, relating to, or guilty of schism • ...
schismatical
adjective see schismatic II
schismatically
adverb see schismatic II
schismatize
verb (-tized; -tizing) Date: 1601 intransitive verb to take part in schism; especially to make a breach of union (as in the church) transitive verb to induce into ...
schist
noun Etymology: French schiste, from Latin schistos (lapis), literally, fissile stone, from Greek schistos that may be split, from schizein Date: circa 1782 a metamorphic ...
schistose
adjective Date: 1794 of or relating to schist ; having the character or structure of a schist • schistosity noun
schistosity
noun see schistose
schistosomal
adjective see schistosome
schistosome
noun Etymology: New Latin Schistosoma, from Greek schistos + sōma body Date: 1905 any of a genus (Schistosoma) of elongated trematode worms with the sexes separate that ...
schistosomiasis
noun (plural schistosomiases) Etymology: New Latin, from Schistosoma Date: 1906 infestation with or disease caused by schistosomes; specifically a severe endemic disease of ...
schiz-
or schizo- combining form Etymology: New Latin, from Greek schizo-, from schizein to split — more at shed 1. split ; cleft 2. characterized by or involving cleavage ...
schizo
noun (plural schizos) Date: 1945 a schizophrenic individual • schizo adjective
schizo-
combining form see schiz-
schizocarp
noun Etymology: International Scientific Vocabulary Date: 1870 a dry compound fruit that splits at maturity into several indehiscent one-seeded carpels
schizogonic
adjective see schizogony
schizogony
noun Etymology: New Latin schizogonia, from schiz- + Latin -gonia -gony Date: 1887 asexual reproduction by multiple segmentation characteristic of sporozoans (as the malaria ...
schizoid
adjective Etymology: International Scientific Vocabulary Date: 1924 characterized by, resulting from, tending toward, or suggestive of schizophrenia • schizoid noun
schizont
noun Etymology: International Scientific Vocabulary Date: 1900 a multinucleate sporozoan that reproduces by schizogony
schizophrene
noun Etymology: International Scientific Vocabulary, probably back-formation from New Latin schizophrenia Date: 1925 one affected with schizophrenia ; schizophrenic
schizophrenia
noun Etymology: New Latin Date: 1912 1. a psychotic disorder characterized by loss of contact with the environment, by noticeable deterioration in the level of functioning in ...
schizophrenic
adjective or noun see schizophrenia
schizophrenically
adverb see schizophrenia
schizy
or schizzy adjective Etymology: by shortening & alteration Date: 1927 schizoid
schizzy
adjective see schizy
Schlegel
I. biographical name August Wilhelm von 1767-1845 German author II. biographical name Friedrich von 1772-1829 brother of preceding German philosopher & writer
Schleicher
biographical name Kurt von 1882-1934 German soldier & politician
Schleiermacher
biographical name Friedrich Ernst Daniel 1768-1834 German theologian & philosopher
schlemiel
also shlemiel noun Etymology: Yiddish shlemil Date: 1892 an unlucky bungler ; chump
schlep
or schlepp; also shlep or shlepp verb (schlepped; also shlepped; schlepping; also shlepping) Etymology: Yiddish shlepn, from Middle High German sleppen, from Middle Low German ...
schlepp
verb see schlep
Schlesinger
biographical name Arthur M(eier) 1888-1965 & his son Arthur M(eier) Jr. 1917- American historians
Schleswig
geographical name 1. (or Danish Slesvig) region N Germany & S Denmark in S Jutland Peninsula 2. city N Germany pop about 26,938

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