Слова на букву sask-soma (6389) New Collegiate Dictionary
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Слова на букву sask-soma (6389)

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Sg
symbol seaborgium
SG
abbreviation 1. sergeant 2. solicitor general 3. often not capitalized specific gravity 4. surgeon general
sgd
abbreviation signed
SGML
noun Etymology: standard generalized markup language Date: 1983 a markup language used to define the structure of and manage documents in electronic form — compare HTML
sgraffito
noun (plural sgraffiti) Etymology: Italian, from past participle of sgraffire to scratch, produce sgraffito Date: circa 1730 1. decoration by cutting away parts of a surface ...
Sgt
abbreviation sergeant
Sgt Maj
abbreviation sergeant major
sh
I. interjection Date: 1847 — used often in prolonged or rapidly repeated form to urge or command silence or less noise II. abbreviation share
Sha-shih
geographical name see Shashi
Shaanxi
or Shensi geographical name province N central China bordering on the Huang capital Xi'an area 75,598 square miles (195,799 square kilometers), population 32,882,403
Shaba
or formerly Katanga geographical name region SE Democratic Republic of the Congo; chief city Lubumbashi
Shaban
noun Etymology: Arabic sha‘bān Date: circa 1771 the eighth month of the Islamic year — see month table
Shabbat
noun Etymology: Hebrew shabbāth Date: circa 1905 the Jewish Sabbath
shabbily
adverb see shabby
shabbiness
noun see shabby
shabby
adjective (shabbier; -est) Etymology: obsolete English shab a low fellow Date: 1669 1. clothed with worn or seedy garments 2. a. threadbare and faded from wear b. ...
shabu-shabu
noun Etymology: Japanese, of imitative origin Date: 1967 a Japanese dish consisting of thinly sliced beef and vegetables cooked briefly in simmering broth at the table
Shabuoth
noun Etymology: Hebrew shābhū‘ōth, literally, weeks Date: 1868 a Jewish holiday observed on the sixth and seventh of Sivan in commemoration of the revelation of the Ten ...
shack
noun Etymology: probably back-formation from English dialect shackly rickety Date: 1878 1. hut, shanty 2. a room or similar enclosed structure for a particular person or ...
shack up
intransitive verb Date: 1935 to sleep or live together as unmarried sexual partners
shackle
I. noun Etymology: Middle English schakel, from Old English sceacul; akin to Old Norse skǫkull pole of a cart Date: before 12th century 1. something (as a manacle or fetter) ...
shacklebone
noun Date: 1571 Scottish wrist
shackler
noun see shackle II
Shackleton
biographical name Sir Ernest Henry 1874-1922 British polar explorer
shad
noun (plural shad) Etymology: Middle English *shad, from Old English sceadd Date: before 12th century any of several fishes (especially genus Alosa) of the herring family ...
shadberry
noun Date: 1847 serviceberry
shadblow
noun Date: 1846 serviceberry 2
shadbush
noun Date: circa 1818 serviceberry 2
shaddock
noun Etymology: Captain Shaddock, 17th century English ship commander Date: 1696 pomelo 2
shade
I. noun Etymology: Middle English, from Old English sceadu; akin to Old High German scato shadow, Greek skotos darkness Date: before 12th century 1. a. comparative ...
shade tree
noun Date: 1806 a tree grown primarily to produce shade
shade-grown
adjective Date: 1922 grown in the shade; specifically grown under cloth
shadeless
adjective see shade I
shader
noun see shade II
shadily
adverb see shady
shadiness
noun see shady
shading
noun Date: 1663 1. the use of marking made within outlines to suggest three-dimensionality, shadow, or degrees of light and dark in a picture or drawing 2. an ...
shadoof
also shaduf noun Etymology: Arabic shādūf Date: 1836 a counterbalanced sweep used since ancient times especially in Egypt for raising water (as for irrigation)
shadow
I. noun Etymology: Middle English shadwe, from Old English sceaduw-, sceadu shade Date: before 12th century 1. partial darkness or obscurity within a part of space from which ...
shadow box
noun Date: 1891 a shallow enclosing case usually with a glass front in which something is set for protection and display
shadow cabinet
noun Date: 1906 a group of leaders of a parliamentary opposition who constitute the probable membership of the cabinet when their party is returned to power
shadow dance
noun Date: circa 1909 a dance shown by throwing the shadows of dancers on a screen
shadow mask
noun Date: 1951 a metal plate in a color cathode-ray tube that contains minute apertures permitting passage of electron beams to specific phosphors on the screen during a scan
shadow play
noun Date: circa 1890 a drama exhibited by throwing shadows of puppets or actors on a screen — called also shadow show
shadow show
noun see shadow play
shadowbox
intransitive verb Date: 1924 to box with an imaginary opponent especially as a form of training
shadower
noun see shadow II
shadowgraph
noun Date: 1886 1. shadow play 2. a photographic image resembling a shadow • shadowgraphy noun
shadowgraphy
noun see shadowgraph
shadowily
adverb see shadowy
shadowiness
noun see shadowy
shadowless
adjective see shadow I
shadowlike
adjective see shadow I
shadowy
adjective Date: 14th century 1. a. of the nature of or resembling a shadow ; unsubstantial b. faintly perceptible ; indistinct, vague 2. being in or obscured by shadow ...
shaduf
noun see shadoof
Shadwell
biographical name Thomas 1642?-1692 English dramatist; poet laureate (1688-92)
shady
adjective (shadier; -est) Date: 1579 1. producing or affording shade 2. sheltered from the sun's rays 3. a. of questionable merit ; uncertain, unreliable b. ...
shaft
I. noun (plural shafts) Etymology: Middle English, from Old English sceaft; akin to Old High German scaft shaft, Latin scapus shaft, stalk, Greek skēptesthai to prop oneself, ...
shaft horsepower
noun Date: 1908 horsepower transmitted by an engine shaft
Shaftesbury
biographical name 1st Earl of 1621-1683 Anthony Ashley Cooper English statesman
shafting
noun Date: 1825 shafts or material for shafts
shag
I. noun Etymology: Middle English *shagge, from Old English sceacga; akin to Old Norse skegg beard, skaga to project Date: before 12th century 1. a. a shaggy tangled mass ...
shagbark
noun Date: 1777 shagbark hickory
shagbark hickory
noun Date: 1751 a hickory (Carya ovata) of eastern North America with sweet edible nuts and a gray shaggy outer bark that peels off in long strips; also its wood
shaggily
adverb see shaggy
shagginess
noun see shaggy
shaggy
adjective (shaggier; -est) Date: 1581 1. a. covered with or consisting of long, coarse, or matted hair b. covered with or consisting of thick, tangled, or unkempt ...
shaggy cap
noun see shaggymane
shaggy-dog
adjective Date: 1946 of, relating to, or being a long-drawn-out circumstantial story concerning an inconsequential happening that impresses the teller as humorous or ...
shaggymane
noun Date: 1895 a common edible mushroom (Coprinus comatus) having an elongated shaggy white pileus with deliquescing gills and black spores — called also shaggy cap
shagreen
noun Etymology: by folk etymology from French chagrin, modification of Turkish sağrı Date: 1677 1. an untanned leather covered with small round granulations and usually ...
shah
noun Usage: often capitalized Etymology: Persian shāh king — more at check Date: 1566 a sovereign of Iran • shahdom noun
Shāh Jāhan
biographical name 1592-1666 Mogul emperor of India (1628-57 or 58)
shahdom
noun see shah
Shahjahanpur
geographical name city N India in central Uttar Pradesh NNW of Kanpur population 237,663
Shahn
biographical name Ben 1898-1969 American (Lithuanian-born) painter
shaitan
noun Etymology: Arabic shayṭān Date: 1638 an evil spirit; specifically an evil jinni
shakable
adjective see shake I
shake
I. verb (shook; shaken; shaking) Etymology: Middle English, from Old English sceacan; akin to Old Norse skaka to shake Date: before 12th century intransitive verb 1. to ...
shake a leg
phrasal 1. dance 2. to hurry up
shake a stick at
phrasal to form a conception of (as by counting or imagining) ; conceive — usually used in the phrase more than one can shake a stick at
shake down
verb Date: circa 1859 intransitive verb 1. a. to take up temporary quarters b. to occupy an improvised or makeshift bed 2. a. to become accustomed especially ...
shake out
intransitive verb Date: 1982 to prove to be in the end ; turn out
shake up
transitive verb Date: 1538 1. obsolete chide, scold 2. to jar by or as if by a physical shock 3. to effect an extensive and often drastic reorganization of
shake-up
noun Date: 1847 an act or instance of shaking up; specifically an extensive and often drastic reorganization
shakeable
adjective see shake I
shakedown
noun Date: circa 1730 1. an improvised bed (as one made up on the floor) 2. a boisterous dance 3. an act or instance of shaking someone down; especially extortion 4. a ...
shakeout
noun Date: 1895 1. the failure or retrenchment of a significant number of firms in the economy or a sector or an industry that usually results in a depressed market 2. a ...
shaker
noun Date: 15th century 1. one that shakes: as a. a utensil or machine used in shaking b. one that incites, promotes, or directs action 2. capitalized [from a ...
Shaker
adjective see shaker
Shaker Heights
geographical name city NE Ohio E of Cleveland population 29,405
Shakerism
noun see shaker
Shakespeare
biographical name William 1564-1616 English dramatist & poet
Shakespearean
I. adjective or Shakespearian; also Shaksperean or Shaksperian Date: 1755 1. of, relating to, or having the characteristics of Shakespeare or his writings 2. evocative of a ...
Shakespearean sonnet
noun Date: 1903 English sonnet
Shakespeareana
or Shakespeariana noun plural Date: 1718 collected items by, about, or relating to Shakespeare
Shakespearian
I. adjective see Shakespearean I II. noun see Shakespearean II
Shakespeariana
noun plural see Shakespeareana
Shakhty
or formerly Aleksandrovsk-Grushevski geographical name city S Russia in Europe NE of Rostov-on-Don population 228,000
shakily
adverb see shaky
shakiness
noun see shaky
shaking palsy
noun Date: 1817 Parkinson's disease
shako
noun (plural shakos or shakoes) Etymology: French, from Hungarian csákó Date: 1793 a stiff military hat with a high crown and plume
Shaksperean
I. adjective see Shakespearean I II. noun see Shakespearean II
Shaksperian
I. adjective see Shakespearean I II. noun see Shakespearean II
Shakta
also Sakta noun or adjective Etymology: Sanskrit śākta, from Śakti Date: 1810 an adherent of Shaktism
Shakti
also Sakti noun Etymology: Sanskrit Śakti Date: 1810 the dynamic energy of a Hindu god personified as his female consort; broadly cosmic energy as conceived in Hindu thought
Shaktism
also Saktism noun Date: 1877 a Hindu sect worshipping Shakti under various names (as Kali or Durga) in a cult of devotion to the female principle often with magical or ...
shaky
adjective (shakier; -est) Date: 1703 1. characterized by shakes 2. a. lacking stability ; precarious b. lacking in firmness (as of beliefs or principles) c. ...
shale
noun Etymology: probably from obsolete or dialect shale scale, shell, from Middle English, from Old English scealu — more at shell Date: 1747 a fissile rock that is formed ...
shale oil
noun Date: 1857 a crude dark oil obtained from oil shale by heating
shaley
adjective see shale
shall
verb (past should; present singular & plural shall) Etymology: Middle English shal (1st & 3d singular present indicative), from Old English sceal; akin to Old High German scal ...
shalloon
noun Etymology: Châlons-sur-Marne, France Date: 1665 a lightweight twilled fabric of wool or worsted
shallop
noun Etymology: Middle French chaloupe Date: circa 1578 1. a usually 2-masted ship with lugsails 2. a small open boat propelled by oars or sails and used chiefly in shallow ...
shallot
noun Etymology: modification of French échalote, from Middle French eschalotte, alteration of eschaloigne, from Vulgar Latin *escalonia — more at scallion Date: 1664 1. a ...
shallow
I. adjective Etymology: Middle English schalowe; probably akin to Old English sceald shallow — more at skeleton Date: 14th century 1. having little depth 2. having ...
shallowly
adverb see shallow I
shallowness
noun see shallow I
shalom
also sholom interjection Etymology: Hebrew shālōm peace Date: 1904 — used as a Jewish greeting and farewell
shalom aleichem
foreign term Etymology: Hebrew shālōm ‘alēkhem peace to you — used as a traditional Jewish greeting
shalt
archaic present second singular of shall
shaly
adjective see shale
sham
I. noun Etymology: perhaps from English dialect sham shame, alteration of English shame Date: 1677 1. a trick that deludes ; hoax 2. cheap falseness ; hypocrisy 3. an ...
shaman
noun (plural shamans) Etymology: ultimately from Evenki (Tungusic language of Siberia) šamān Date: 1698 1. a priest or priestess who uses magic for the purpose of curing ...
shamanic
adjective see shaman
shamanism
noun Date: 1780 a religion practiced by indigenous peoples of far northern Europe and Siberia that is characterized by belief in an unseen world of gods, demons, and ...
shamanist
noun see shamanism
shamanistic
adjective see shamanism
shamble
intransitive verb (shambled; shambling) Etymology: shamble bowed, malformed Date: 1717 to walk awkwardly with dragging feet ; shuffle • shamble noun
shambles
noun plural but singular or plural in construction Etymology: Middle English shameles, plural of schamel vendor's table, footstool, from Old English sceamol stool, from Latin ...
shambling
adjective Date: 1592 characterized by slow awkward movement
shambolic
adjective Etymology: probably from shambles Date: 1970 chiefly British obviously disorganized or confused
shame
I. noun Etymology: Middle English, from Old English scamu; akin to Old High German scama shame Date: before 12th century 1. a. a painful emotion caused by consciousness of ...
shamefaced
adjective Etymology: alteration of shamefast Date: 1593 1. showing modesty ; bashful 2. showing shame ; ashamed • shamefacedly adverb • shamefacedness noun
shamefacedly
adverb see shamefaced
shamefacedness
noun see shamefaced
shamefast
adjective Etymology: Middle English, from Old English scamfæst, from scamu + fæst fixed, fast Date: before 12th century archaic shamefaced
shameful
adjective Date: 13th century 1. a. bringing shame ; disgraceful
shamefully
adverb see shameful
shamefulness
noun see shameful
shameless
adjective Date: before 12th century 1. having no shame ; insensible to disgrace 2. showing lack of shame • shamelessly adverb • shamelessness noun
shamelessly
adverb see shameless
shamelessness
noun see shameless
Shamir
biographical name Yitzhak 1914- originally surname Yizernitzky prime minister of Israel (1983-92)
shammer
noun see sham III
shammes
noun (plural shammosim) Etymology: Yiddish shames, from Late Hebrew shāmmāsh Date: 1650 1. the sexton of a synagogue 2. the candle or taper used to light the other ...
shammy
variant of chamois
shampoo
I. transitive verb Etymology: Hindi & Urdu cẵpo, imperative of cẵpnā to press, massage Date: 1762 1. archaic massage 2. a. to wash (as the hair) with soap and water ...
shampooer
noun see shampoo I
shamrock
noun Etymology: Irish seamróg, diminutive of seamar clover Date: 1577 a trifoliolate plant used as a floral emblem by the Irish: as a. a yellow-flowered Old World clover ...
shamus
noun Etymology: perhaps from Yiddish shames shammes; from a jocular comparison of the duties of a sexton and those of a store detective Date: 1925 1. slang police officer 2. ...
Shan
noun (plural Shan or Shans) Etymology: Burmese Shàn Date: 1795 1. a member of a people living primarily in Myanmar and southern China 2. the Thai language of the Shan
Shan States
geographical name mountainous region SE Asia ruled by the Shan people 12th-16th centuries; now in E Myanmar
shan't
Date: 1664 shall not
Shan-tung
geographical name see Shandong
Shandong
or Shan-tung geographical name 1. peninsula E China projecting ENE between Yellow Sea & Bo Hai 2. province E China including Shandong Peninsula capital Jinan area 59,189 ...
shandy
noun (plural shandies) Date: 1888 1. shandygaff 2. a drink consisting of beer and lemonade
shandygaff
noun Etymology: origin unknown Date: 1853 beer diluted with a nonalcoholic drink (as ginger beer)
Shang
noun Etymology: Chinese (Beijing) Shāng Date: 1669 a Chinese dynasty traditionally dated 1766-1122 B.C. and known especially for bronze work
Shang-ch'iu
geographical name see Shangqiu
shanghai
transitive verb (shanghaied; shanghaiing) Etymology: Shanghai, China; from the former use of this method to secure sailors for voyages to eastern Asia Date: 1871 1. a. to ...
Shanghai
geographical name municipality & port E China on the Huangpu near the Chang estuary population 7,469,509
shanghaier
noun see shanghai
Shangqiu
or Shang-ch'iu geographical name city E China in E Henan population 164,880
Shangri-la
noun Etymology: Shangri-La, imaginary land depicted in the novel Lost Horizon (1933) by James Hilton Date: 1937 1. a remote beautiful imaginary place where life approaches ...
shank
I. noun Etymology: Middle English shanke, from Old English scanca; akin to Old Norse skakkr crooked, Greek skazein to limp Date: before 12th century 1. a. the part of the ...
shank's mare
noun Date: circa 1795 one's own legs
shanked
adjective see shank I
shankpiece
noun Date: 1885 a support for the arch of the foot inserted in the shank of a shoe
Shannon
I. biographical name Claude Elwood 1916-2001 American mathematician & computer scientist II. geographical name river 230 miles (370 kilometers) W Ireland flowing S & W into ...
Shansi
geographical name see Shanxi
Shantou
or Swatow geographical name city & port SE China in E Guangdong on South China Sea population 578,630
shantung
noun Etymology: Shantung (Shandong), China Date: circa 1882 a fabric in plain weave having a slightly irregular surface due to uneven slubbed filling yarns
shanty
I. variant of chantey II. noun (plural shanties) Etymology: probably from Canadian French chantier lumber camp, hut, from French, builder's yard, ways, support for barrels, ...
shantyman
noun Date: 1824 logger
shantytown
noun Date: 1876 a usually poor town or section of a town consisting mostly of shanties
Shanxi
or Shansi geographical name province N China bordering on the Huang capital Taiyuan area 60,656 square miles (157,099 square kilometers), population 28,759,014
Shao-hsing
geographical name see Shaoxing
Shaoxing
or Shao-hsing geographical name city E China in N Zhejiang SE of Hangzhou population 179,818
Shaoyang
or formerly Paoking geographical name city SE China in central Hunan W of Hengyang population 247,227
shapable
or shapeable adjective Date: 1647 1. capable of being shaped 2. shapely
shape
I. verb (shaped; shaping) Etymology: Middle English, from Old English sceapen, gescapen, past participle of scieppan; akin to Old High German skepfen to shape Date: before 12th ...
shape note
noun Date: 1932 one of a system of seven notes showing the musical scale degree by the shape of the note head
shape up
verb Date: circa 1920 intransitive verb to improve to a good or acceptable condition or standard of behavior transitive verb to bring to a good or acceptable condition ...
shape-shift
intransitive verb see shape-shifter
shape-shifter
noun Date: 1887 one that seems able to change form or identity at will; especially a mythical figure that can assume different forms (as of animals) • shape-shift ...
shape-up
noun Date: 1940 a system of hiring workers and especially longshoremen by the day or shift by having applicants gather for each day's selection; also an instance of such ...
shapeable
adjective see shapable
shaped
adjective see shape II
shaped charge
noun Date: 1946 an explosive charge the energy of which is focused in one direction so that it usually achieves an armor-penetrating effect
shapeless
adjective Date: 14th century 1. having no definite shape 2. a. deprived of usual or normal shape ; misshapen b. not shapely • shapelessly adverb • ...
shapelessly
adverb see shapeless
shapelessness
noun see shapeless
shapeliness
noun see shapely
shapely
adjective (shapelier; -est) Date: 14th century 1. having a regular or pleasing shape 2. orderly and consistent in arrangement or plan • shapeliness noun
shapen
adjective Etymology: Middle English, from past participle of shapen to shape Date: 14th century fashioned in or provided with a definite shape — usually used in combination
shaper
noun see shape I
Shapiro
biographical name Karl Jay 1913-2000 American poet & critic
shar-pei
noun (plural shar-peis) Usage: often capitalized S&P Etymology: Chinese (Guangdong) sà sand + péi fur Date: 1975 any of an ancient breed of dogs originating in China that ...
sharable
adjective see shareable
shard
noun Etymology: Middle English, from Old English sceard; akin to Old English scieran to cut — more at shear Date: before 12th century 1. a. a piece or fragment of a ...
share
I. noun Etymology: Middle English schare, from Old English scear; akin to Old High German scaro plowshare, Old English scieran to cut — more at shear Date: before 12th ...
shareability
noun see shareable
shareable
or sharable adjective Date: 1920 capable of being shared • shareability noun
sharecrop
verb Etymology: back-formation from sharecropper Date: circa 1930 intransitive verb to farm as a sharecropper transitive verb to farm (land) or produce (a crop) as a ...
sharecropper
noun Date: 1923 a tenant farmer especially in the southern United States who is provided with credit for seed, tools, living quarters, and food, who works the land, and who ...
shareholder
noun Date: circa 1832 one that holds or owns a share in property; especially stockholder • shareholding noun
shareholding
noun see shareholder
sharer
noun see share III
shareware
noun Date: 1983 software with usually limited capability or incomplete documentation which is available for trial use at little or no cost but which can be upgraded upon ...
Shari
geographical name — see Chari
shari'a
noun see sharia
shari'ah
noun see sharia
sharia
also shari'a or shariah or shari'ah noun Usage: often capitalized Etymology: Arabic sharī‘a Date: 1855 Islamic law based on the Koran
shariah
noun see sharia
sharif
also sherif noun Etymology: Arabic sharīf, literally, illustrious Date: 1599 a descendant of the prophet Muhammad through his daughter Fatima; broadly one of noble ancestry ...
Sharif
biographical name Nawaz 1949- prime minister of Pakistan (1990-93; 1997-99)
sharifian
adjective see sharif
Sharjah
geographical name — see Ash Shariqah
shark
I. noun Etymology: Middle English Date: 15th century any of numerous mostly marine cartilaginous fishes of medium to large size that have a fusiform body, lateral branchial ...
Shark Bay
geographical name inlet of Indian Ocean 150 miles (241 kilometers) long W Western Australia, at about 25°S
shark repellent
noun Date: 1977 any of various measures that a company uses to fend off unwanted takeover attempts
shark sucker
noun Date: circa 1850 remora 1
sharklike
adjective see shark I
sharkskin
noun Date: 1851 1. the hide of a shark or leather made from it 2. a. a smooth durable woolen or worsted suiting in twill or basket weave with small woven designs b. ...
Sharon
biographical name Ariel 1928- Israeli soldier & politician; prime minister of Israel (2001- )
Sharon, Plain of
geographical name region Israel on coast between Mt. Carmel & Jaffa
Sharp
biographical name Phillip Allen 1944- American biologist
sharp
I. adjective Etymology: Middle English, from Old English scearp; akin to Old High German scarf sharp and perhaps to Old English scrapian to scrape — more at scrape Date: ...
sharp practice
noun Date: 1836 the act of dealing in which advantage is taken or sought unscrupulously
sharp-eyed
adjective Date: 1670 having keen sight; also keen in observing or penetrating
sharp-nosed
adjective Date: 1561 1. keen in smelling 2. having a pointed nose or snout
sharp-set
adjective Date: 1540 archaic eager in appetite or desire
sharp-shin
noun see sharp-shinned hawk
sharp-shinned hawk
noun Date: circa 1812 a common widely distributed American accipiter (Accipiter striatus) that is grayish above, has a chestnut breast, short rounded wings, and a tail with a ...
sharp-sighted
adjective Date: 1571 1. having acute sight 2. mentally keen or alert • sharp-sightedly adverb • sharp-sightedness noun
sharp-sightedly
adverb see sharp-sighted
sharp-sightedness
noun see sharp-sighted
sharp-tongued
adjective Date: 1837 having a sharp tongue ; harsh or bitter in speech or language
sharp-witted
adjective Date: circa 1586 having an acute mind
Sharpe
biographical name William Forsyth 1934- American economist
sharpen
verb (sharpened; sharpening) Date: 15th century transitive verb to make sharp or sharper; especially hone intransitive verb to become sharp or sharper • sharpener ...
sharpener
noun see sharpen
sharper
noun Date: 1681 cheat, swindler; especially a cheating gambler
sharpie
or sharpy noun (plural sharpies) Date: circa 1859 1. a long narrow shallow-draft boat with flat or slightly V-shaped bottom and one or two masts each carrying a triangular ...
Sharpless
biographical name K. Barry 1941- American chemist
sharply
adverb see sharp I
sharpness
noun see sharp I
sharpshooter
noun Date: 1802 1. a proficient marksman 2. a consistently accurate shooter (as in basketball)
sharpshooting
noun Date: 1806 1. shooting with great precision 2. accurate and usually unexpected attack (as in words)
sharpy
noun see sharpie
Shashi
or Sha-shih geographical name city E central China in S Hubei on the Chang population 281,352
shashlik
also shaslik noun Etymology: Russian shashlyk, probably modification of Crimean Tatar šišlik, from šiš skewer Date: 1876 kebab
shaslik
noun see shashlik
Shasta daisy
noun Etymology: Mount Shasta, California Date: circa 1893 a large-flowered hybrid garden daisy (Chrysanthemum x superbum syn. Leucanthemum x superbum) that resembles the ...
Shasta, Mount
geographical name mountain 14,162 feet (4316 meters) N California in Cascade Range; an isolated volcanic cone
Shastri
biographical name Lal Bahadur 1904-1966 prime minister of India (1964-66)
shat
past and past participle of shit
Shatt al Arab
geographical name river 120 miles (193 kilometers) SE Iraq formed by the Tigris & the Euphrates & flowing SE into Persian Gulf
shatter
I. verb Etymology: Middle English schateren — more at scatter Date: 14th century transitive verb 1. to cause to drop or be dispersed 2. a. to break at once into ...
shatter cone
noun Date: 1933 a conical fragment of rock that has striations radiating from the apex and that is formed by high pressure (as from volcanism or meteorite impact)
shatteringly
adverb see shatter I
shatterproof
adjective Date: 1930 proof against shattering
shave
I. verb (shaved; shaved or shaven; shaving) Etymology: Middle English, from Old English scafan; akin to Lithuanian skobti to pluck, Latin scabere to scratch, and perhaps to ...

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