Слова на букву sask-soma (6389) New Collegiate Dictionary
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Слова на букву sask-soma (6389)

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Schleswig-Holstein
geographical name state of Germany & formerly of West Germany consisting of Holstein & part of Schleswig capital Kiel area 6046 square miles (15,659 square kilometers), ...
Schliemann
biographical name Heinrich 1822-1890 German archaeologist
schlieren
noun plural Etymology: German Date: 1898 1. small masses or streaks in an igneous rock that differ in composition from the main body 2. regions of varying refraction in a ...
schlieric
adjective see schlieren
schlock
or schlocky; also shlock or shlocky adjective Etymology: perhaps from Yiddish shlak evil, nuisance, literally, blow Date: 1916 of low quality or value • schlock noun
schlocky
adjective see schlock
schlub
also shlub noun Etymology: Yiddish zhlob, zhlub yokel, boor Date: 1950 slang a stupid, worthless, or unattractive person
schlump
noun Etymology: Yiddish shlump sloppy or dowdy person Date: 1948 slang schlub • schlumpy adjective
schlumpy
adjective see schlump
schm-
or shm- prefix Etymology: Yiddish shm- — used to form a rhyming term of derision by replacing the initial consonant or consonant cluster of a word or by preceding the ...
schmaltz
also schmalz noun Etymology: Yiddish shmalts, literally, rendered fat Date: 1935 1. sentimental or florid music or art 2. sentimentality • schmaltzy adjective
schmaltzy
adjective see schmaltz
schmalz
noun see schmaltz
schmear
or schmeer noun Etymology: Yiddish shmir smear Date: 1965 an aggregate of related things
schmeer
noun see schmear
Schmidt
biographical name Helmut 1918- chancellor of West Germany (1974-82)
Schmidt camera
noun Etymology: B. Schmidt died 1935 German optical scientist Date: 1936 a photographic telescope with specialized optics that correct for spherical aberration and coma — ...
Schmidt telescope
noun see Schmidt camera
schmo
or schmoe noun (plural schmoes) Etymology: origin unknown Date: 1947 slang jerk 4a
schmoe
noun see schmo
schmooze
I. verb or shmooze (schmoozed or shmoozed; schmoozing or shmoozing) Etymology: Yiddish shmuesn, from schmues talk, from Hebrew shĕmu'ōth news, rumor Date: 1884 intransitive ...
schmoozer
noun see schmooze I
schmoozy
adjective Date: 1980 of, relating to, characterized by, or given to schmoozing
schmuck
noun Etymology: Yiddish shmok, literally, penis Date: 1892 slang jerk 4b
Schnabel
I. biographical name Artur 1882-1951 Austrian pianist & composer II. biographical name Julian 1951- American artist & filmmaker
schnapps
noun (plural schnapps) Etymology: German Schnaps, literally, dram of liquor, from Low German snaps dram, mouthful, from snappen to snap Date: 1796 any of various liquors of ...
schnauzer
noun Etymology: German, from Schnauze snout — more at snout Date: 1923 a dog of any of three breeds that originated in Germany and are characterized by a wiry coat, long ...
schnitzel
noun Etymology: German, literally, shaving, chip, diminutive of Schnitz slice, from Middle High German snitz; akin to Old High German snīdan to cut, Old English snīthan, and ...
Schnitzler
biographical name Arthur 1862-1931 Austrian dramatist & novelist
schnook
noun Etymology: origin unknown Date: 1940 slang a stupid or unimportant person ; dolt
schnorrer
noun Etymology: Yiddish shnorer Date: 1892 beggar; especially one who wheedles others into supplying his wants
schnoz
or schnozz noun Date: 1940 slang nose; specifically a large nose
schnozz
noun see schnoz
schnozzle
noun Etymology: probably modification of Yiddish shnoitsl, diminutive of shnoits snout Date: 1937 slang schnoz
Schoenberg
biographical name Arnold Franz Walter 1874-1951 American (Austrian-born) composer • Schoenbergian adjective
Schoenbergian
adjective see Schoenberg
Schofield
biographical name John McAllister 1831-1906 American general
schola cantorum
noun (plural scholae cantorum) Etymology: Medieval Latin, school of singers Date: 1782 1. a singing school especially for church choristers; specifically the choir or choir ...
scholar
noun Etymology: Middle English scoler, from Old English scolere & Anglo-French escoler, from Medieval Latin scholaris, from Late Latin, of a school, from Latin schola school ...
scholarly
adjective Date: 1638 of, characteristic of, or suitable to learned persons ; learned, academic
scholarship
noun Date: circa 1536 1. a grant-in-aid to a student (as by a college or foundation) 2. the character, qualities, activity, or attainments of a scholar ; learning 3. a ...
Scholarship level
noun Date: 1947 S level
scholastic
I. adjective Etymology: Medieval Latin & Latin; Medieval Latin scholasticus of the schoolmen, from Latin, of a school, from Greek scholastikos, from scholazein to keep a school, ...
scholastically
adverb see scholastic I
scholasticate
noun Etymology: New Latin scholasticatus, from scholasticus student in a scholasticate Date: 1853 a college-level school of general study for those preparing for membership ...
scholasticism
noun Date: circa 1782 1. capitalized a. a philosophical movement dominant in western Christian civilization from the 9th until the 17th century and combining religious ...
Scholes
biographical name Myron Samuel 1941- American (Canadian-born) economist
scholiast
noun Etymology: Middle Greek scholiastēs, from scholiazein to write scholia on, from Greek scholion Date: 1583 a maker of scholia ; commentator, annotator • scholiastic ...
scholiastic
adjective see scholiast
scholium
noun (plural scholia or -liums) Etymology: New Latin, from Greek scholion comment, scholium, from diminutive of scholē lecture Date: 1535 1. a marginal annotation or comment ...
school
I. noun Etymology: Middle English scole, from Old English scōl, from Latin schola, from Greek scholē leisure, discussion, lecture, school; perhaps akin to Greek echein to hold ...
school board
noun Date: 1836 a board in charge of local public schools
school bus
noun Date: 1908 a vehicle used for transporting children to or from school or on activities connected with school
school committee
noun Date: 1787 school board
school district
noun Date: 1809 a unit for administration of a public-school system often comprising several towns within a state
school-age
adjective Date: 1741 old enough to go to school
school-leaver
noun Date: 1925 British one who has left school usually after completing a course of study
schoolbag
noun Date: 1841 a bag for carrying schoolbooks and school supplies
schoolbook
noun Date: 1634 a school textbook
schoolboy
I. noun Date: 1588 a boy attending school II. adjective Date: 1645 1. of, relating to, or characteristic of a schoolboy 2. of, relating to, or being a sport for high ...
schoolboyish
adjective Date: 1831 schoolboy 1
schoolchild
noun Date: 1801 a child attending school
schoolfellow
noun Date: 15th century schoolmate
schoolgirl
noun Date: 1678 a girl attending school
schoolhouse
noun Date: 14th century a building used as a school and especially as an elementary school
schooling
noun Date: 15th century 1. a. instruction in school ; education b. training, guidance, or discipline derived from experience 2. archaic reproof 3. the cost of ...
schoolkid
noun Date: 1934 a child or teenager attending school
schoolma'am
noun see schoolmarm
schoolman
noun Date: circa 1533 1. a. one skilled in academic disputation b. capitalized scholastic 1a 2. a. educator 1 b. educator 2b
schoolmarm
or schoolma'am noun Etymology: school + marm, alteration of ma'am Date: 1831 1. a woman who is a schoolteacher especially in a rural or small-town school 2. a person who ...
schoolmarmish
adjective see schoolmarm
schoolmaster
noun Date: 13th century 1. a man who teaches school 2. one that disciplines or directs 3. a reddish-brown edible snapper (Lutjanus apodus) of the tropical Atlantic and the ...
schoolmasterish
adjective see schoolmaster
schoolmasterly
adjective see schoolmaster
schoolmate
noun Date: 1563 a companion at school
schoolmistress
noun Date: 15th century a woman who teaches school • schoolmistressy adjective
schoolmistressy
adjective see schoolmistress
schoolroom
noun Date: 1752 classroom
schoolteacher
noun Date: 1751 one who teaches school
schooltime
noun Date: 1740 1. the time for beginning a session of school or during which school is held 2. the period of life spent in school or in study
schoolwork
noun Date: 1846 lessons done in class or assigned to be done at home
schooner
noun Etymology: origin unknown Date: 1716 1. a typically 2-masted fore-and-aft rigged vessel with a foremast and a mainmast stepped nearly amidships 2. a larger-than-usual ...
schooner rig
noun Date: 1828 fore-and-aft rig • schooner-rigged adjective
schooner-rigged
adjective see schooner rig
Schopenhauer
biographical name Arthur 1788-1860 German philosopher • Schopenhauerian adjective
Schopenhauerian
adjective see Schopenhauer
schorl
noun Etymology: German Schörl Date: 1779 tourmaline; especially tourmaline of the black variety
schottische
noun Etymology: German, from schottisch Scottish, from Schotte Scotsman; akin to Old English Scottas Scots Date: 1849 1. a round dance resembling a slow polka 2. music for ...
Schouten Islands
geographical name islands Indonesia in N West Papua at mouth of Sarera Bay area 1230 square miles (3198 square kilometers)
Schrieffer
biographical name John Robert 1931- American physicist
schrod
variant of scrod
Schröder
biographical name Gerhard 1944- chancellor of Germany (1998- )
Schrödinger
biographical name Erwin 1887-1961 Austrian physicist
Schrödinger equation
noun Etymology: Erwin Schrödinger Date: 1936 an equation that describes the wave nature of elementary particles and is fundamental to the description of the properties of ...
schtick
variant of shtick
Schubert
biographical name Franz Peter 1797-1828 Austrian composer • Schubertian adjective
Schubertian
adjective see Schubert
Schultz
biographical name Theodore 1902-1998 American economist
Schulz
biographical name Charles Monroe 1922-2000 American cartoonist
Schuman
I. biographical name Robert 1886-1963 French statesman II. biographical name William Howard 1910-1992 American composer
Schumann
biographical name Robert 1810-1856 German composer
Schumann-Heink
biographical name Ernestine 1861-1936 née Roessler American (Austrian-born) contralto
Schurz
biographical name Carl 1829-1906 American (German-born) lawyer, general, & politician
Schuschnigg
biographical name Kurt von 1897-1977 Austrian statesman
schuss
intransitive verb Etymology: schuss, noun, from German Schuss, literally, shot, from Old High German scuz — more at shot Date: 1940 to ski directly down a slope at high ...
schussboomer
noun Date: 1953 a skier who schusses
schusser
noun see schuss
Schuyler
biographical name Philip John 1733-1804 American general & statesman
Schuylkill
geographical name river 131 miles (211 kilometers) SE Pennsylvania flowing SE into Delaware River at Philadelphia
schwa
noun Etymology: German, from Hebrew schĕwā' Date: 1895 1. an unstressed mid-central vowel (as the usual sound of the first and last vowels of the English word America) ...
Schwaben
geographical name — see Swabia
Schwann cell
noun Etymology: Theodor Schwann died 1882 German naturalist Date: circa 1909 the myelin-secreting cell surrounding a myelinated nerve fiber between two nodes of Ranvier
schwarmerei
noun Etymology: German Schwärmerei, from schwärmen to be enthusiastic, literally, to swarm Date: 1845 excessive or unwholesome sentiment
Schwartz
biographical name Melvin 1932- American physicist
Schwarzkopf
I. biographical name H. Norman 1934- American general II. biographical name (Olga Maria) Elisabeth Friederike 1915- German (Polish-born) soprano
Schwarzwald
geographical name — see Black Forest
Schweinfurt
geographical name city S central Germany on Main River population 54,520
Schweitzer
biographical name Albert 1875-1965 French theologian, philosopher, missionary physician, & music scholar
Schweiz
geographical name — see Switzerland
Schwerin
geographical name city N Germany capital of Mecklenburg-West Pomerania population 125,959
Schwinger
biographical name Julian Seymour 1918- American physicist
Schwyz
geographical name 1. canton E central Switzerland area 351 square miles (909 square kilometers), population 108,576 2. town, its capital, E of Lucerne population 12,596
sci
abbreviation science; scientific
sci-fi
adjective Etymology: science fiction Date: 1955 of, relating to, or being science fiction • sci-fi noun
sciatic
adjective Etymology: Middle French sciatique, from Late Latin sciaticus, alteration of Latin ischiadicus of sciatica, from Greek ischiadikos, from ischiad-, ischias sciatica, ...
sciatic nerve
noun Date: 1741 either of the pair of largest nerves in the body that arise one on each side from the nerve plexus supplying the posterior limb and pelvic region and that pass ...
sciatica
noun Etymology: Middle English, from Medieval Latin, from Late Latin, feminine of sciaticus Date: 14th century pain along the course of a sciatic nerve especially in the back ...
SCID
abbreviation severe combined immune deficiency; severe combined immunodeficiency
science
noun Etymology: Middle English, from Anglo-French, from Latin scientia, from scient-, sciens having knowledge, from present participle of scire to know; perhaps akin to Sanskrit ...
science fair
noun Date: 1962 a competitive exhibition of science projects usually carried out by schoolchildren
science fiction
noun Date: 1851 fiction dealing principally with the impact of actual or imagined science on society or individuals or having a scientific factor as an essential orienting ...
science-fictional
adjective see science fiction
sciential
adjective Date: 15th century 1. relating to or producing knowledge or science 2. having efficient knowledge ; capable
scientific
adjective Etymology: Medieval Latin scientificus producing knowledge, from Latin scient-, sciens + -i- + -ficus -fic Date: 1589 of, relating to, or exhibiting the methods or ...
scientific creationism
noun Date: 1979 a doctrine holding that the biblical account of creation is supported by scientific evidence
scientific method
noun Date: circa 1810 principles and procedures for the systematic pursuit of knowledge involving the recognition and formulation of a problem, the collection of data through ...
scientific notation
noun Date: circa 1934 a widely used floating-point system in which numbers are expressed as products consisting of a number between 1 and 10 multiplied by an appropriate power ...
scientifically
adverb see scientific
scientism
noun Date: 1870 1. methods and attitudes typical of or attributed to the natural scientist 2. an exaggerated trust in the efficacy of the methods of natural science applied ...
scientist
noun Etymology: Latin scientia Date: 1834 1. a person learned in science and especially natural science ; a scientific investigator 2. capitalized christian scientist
scientistic
adjective see scientism
scientize
transitive verb (-tized; -tizing) Date: 1890 to treat with a scientific approach
scilicet
adverb Etymology: Middle English, from Latin, surely, to wit, from scire to know + licet it is permitted, from licēre to be permitted — more at license Date: 14th century ...
scilla
noun Etymology: New Latin, from Latin, squill — more at squill Date: 1824 any of a genus (Scilla) of Old World bulbous herbs of the lily family with narrow basal leaves ...
Scillonian
adjective or noun see Scilly, Isles of
Scilly, Isles of
geographical name island group SW England off Land's End comprising 140 islands capital Hugh Town area 6 square miles (16 square kilometers), population 2900 — see Cornwall ...
scimitar
noun Etymology: Italian scimitarra Date: 1562 a saber having a curved blade with the edge on the convex side and used chiefly by Arabs and Turks
scintigraphic
adjective see scintigraphy
scintigraphy
noun Etymology: scintillation + -graphy; from the scintillation counter used to record radiation on the picture Date: 1958 a diagnostic technique in which a two-dimensional ...
scintilla
noun Etymology: Latin Date: 1661 spark, trace
scintillant
adjective Date: 1610 that scintillates ; sparkling • scintillantly adverb
scintillantly
adverb see scintillant
scintillate
verb (-lated; -lating) Etymology: Latin scintillatus, past participle of scintillare to sparkle, from scintilla spark Date: circa 1623 intransitive verb 1. to emit ...
scintillating
adjective Date: 1846 brilliantly lively, stimulating, or witty
scintillation
noun Date: circa 1623 1. an act or instance of scintillating; especially rapid changes in the brightness of a celestial body 2. a. a spark or flash emitted in ...
scintillation counter
noun Date: 1948 a device for detecting and registering individual scintillations (as in radioactive emission)
scintillator
noun see scintillate
scintillometer
noun Etymology: Latin scintilla + International Scientific Vocabulary -o- + -meter Date: 1877 scintillation counter
sciolism
noun Etymology: Late Latin sciolus smatterer, from diminutive of Latin scius knowing, from scire to know — more at science Date: 1816 a superficial show of learning • ...
sciolist
noun see sciolism
sciolistic
adjective see sciolism
scion
noun Etymology: Middle English sioun, from Old French cion, of Germanic origin; akin to Old English cīth sprout, shoot, Old High German kīdi Date: 13th century 1. a ...
Scioto
geographical name river 237 miles (381 kilometers) Ohio flowing S into Ohio River
Scipio
biographical name Aemilianus Africanus Numantinus Publius Cornelius 185(or 184)-129 B.C. Scipio the Younger Roman general
Scipio Africanus
biographical name Publius Cornelius 236-184(or 183) B.C. Scipio the Elder Roman general
scire facias
noun Etymology: Middle English, from Medieval Latin, you should cause to know Date: 15th century 1. a judicial writ founded on some matter of record and requiring the party ...
scirocco
variant of sirocco
scirrhous
adjective Etymology: New Latin scirrhosus, from scirrhus scirrhous tumor, from Greek skiros, skirrhos overgrown land, hardened tumor Date: 1563 of, relating to, or being a ...
scissile
adjective Etymology: French, from Latin scissilis, from scissus, past participle of scindere to split — more at shed Date: 1621 capable of being cut smoothly or split ...
scission
noun Etymology: Middle English (Scots) scissione, from Late Latin scission-, scissio, from Latin scindere Date: 15th century 1. a division or split in a group or union ; ...
scissor
I. noun Date: 15th century scissors II. transitive verb (scissored; scissoring) Date: 1612 to cut, cut up, or cut off with scissors or shears
scissor-tailed flycatcher
noun Date: circa 1909 a flycatcher (Tyrannus forficatus) of the southern United States, Mexico, and Central America that has a long deeply forked tail — called also ...
scissors
noun plural but singular or plural in construction Etymology: Middle English cisours, sisoures, from Middle French cisoires, from Vulgar Latin *caesorium (singular) cutting ...
scissors hold
noun Date: 1909 a wrestling hold in which the legs are locked around the head or body of an opponent
scissors kick
noun Date: circa 1930 a swimming kick used especially in sidestrokes in which the legs move like scissors
scissors-and-paste
adjective Date: 1902 being a compilation rather than an effort of original and independent investigation
scissortail
noun see scissor-tailed flycatcher
sclaff
intransitive verb Etymology: Scots, from sclaff, noun, literally, blow with the palm; probably of imitative origin Date: 1893 to scrape the ground instead of hitting the ball ...
sclaffer
noun see sclaff
SCLC
abbreviation Southern Christian Leadership Conference
scler-
or sclero- combining form Etymology: New Latin, from Greek sklēr-, sklēro-, from sklēros — more at skeleton 1. hard 2. hardness
sclera
noun Etymology: New Latin, from Greek sklēros Date: 1888 the dense fibrous opaque white outer coat enclosing the eyeball except the part covered by the cornea — see eye ...
scleral
adjective see sclera
sclereid
noun Etymology: International Scientific Vocabulary, irregular from Greek sklēros Date: 1896 a variably shaped sclerenchymatous cell of a higher plant
sclerenchyma
noun Etymology: New Latin Date: 1875 a protective or supporting tissue in higher plants composed of cells with walls thickened and often lignified • sclerenchymatous ...
sclerenchymatous
adjective see sclerenchyma
sclerite
noun Etymology: International Scientific Vocabulary Date: 1861 a hard chitinous or calcareous plate, piece, or spicule (as of the arthropod integument)
sclero-
combining form see scler-
scleroderma
noun Etymology: New Latin Date: circa 1860 a usually slowly progressive disease marked by the deposition of fibrous connective tissue in the skin and often in internal organs ...
sclerometer
noun Etymology: International Scientific Vocabulary Date: circa 1879 an instrument for determining the relative hardnesses of materials
scleroprotein
noun Etymology: International Scientific Vocabulary Date: 1907 any of various fibrous proteins especially from connective and skeletal tissues
sclerosing
adjective Etymology: New Latin sclerosis + English 1-ing Date: 1885 causing or characterized by sclerosis
sclerosis
noun Etymology: Middle English sclirosis tumor, from Medieval Latin, from Greek sklērōsis hardening, from sklēroun to harden, from sklēros Date: 1846 1. pathological ...
sclerotherapy
noun Date: 1944 the injection of a sclerosing agent (as saline) into a varicose vein to produce inflammation and scarring which closes the lumen and is followed by shrinkage
sclerotial
adjective see sclerotium
sclerotic
I. adjective Date: 1543 1. being or relating to the sclera 2. of, relating to, or affected with sclerosis II. noun Etymology: Medieval Latin sclerotica, from Greek ...
sclerotic coat
noun Date: 1741 sclera
sclerotin
noun Etymology: probably scler- + -tin (as in chitin) Date: 1940 an insoluble tanned protein permeating and stiffening the chitin of the cuticle of arthropods
sclerotium
noun (plural sclerotia) Etymology: New Latin, from Greek *sklērōtos Date: 1871 a compact mass of hardened mycelium stored with reserve food material that in some higher ...
sclerotization
noun see sclerotized
sclerotized
adjective Etymology: 1sclerotic + -ize + 1-ed Date: circa 1890 hardened especially by the formation of sclerotin • sclerotization noun
scoff
I. noun Etymology: Middle English scof, perhaps of Scandinavian origin; akin to obsolete Danish skof jest; akin to Old Frisian skof mockery Date: 14th century 1. an ...
scoffer
noun see scoff II
scofflaw
noun Date: 1924 a contemptuous law violator
scold
I. noun Etymology: Middle English scald, scold, perhaps of Scandinavian origin; akin to Old Norse skāld poet, skald, Icelandic skālda to make scurrilous verse Date: 12th ...
scolder
noun see scold II
scolding
noun Date: 1547 1. the action of one who scolds 2. a harsh reproof
scolecite
noun Etymology: German Skolezit, from Greek skōlēk-, skōlēx worm; from the motion of some forms when heated Date: circa 1823 a usually fibrous zeolite mineral that is a ...
scolex
noun (plural scolices; also scoleces) Etymology: New Latin scolic-, scolex, from Greek skōlēk-, skōlēx worm; akin to Greek skolios crooked, skelos leg — more at isosceles ...
scoliosis
noun (plural scolioses) Etymology: New Latin, from Greek skoliōsis crookedness of a bodily part, from skolios Date: circa 1706 a lateral curvature of the spine • ...
scoliotic
adjective see scoliosis
scollop
variant of scallop
scolopendra
noun Etymology: New Latin, genus of centipedes, from Latin, a kind of millipede, from Greek skolopendra Date: 1608 centipede
scombroid
noun Etymology: ultimately from Greek skombros mackerel Date: 1852 any of a suborder (Scombroidei) of marine bony fishes (as mackerels, tunas, albacores, bonitos, and ...
sconce
I. noun Etymology: Middle English, from Anglo-French sconce, *esconse screened candle or lantern, from escunser to hide, obscure, from Old French escons, past participle of ...
scone
noun Etymology: perhaps from Dutch schoonbrood fine white bread, from schoon pure, clean + brood bread Date: 1513 a rich quick bread cut into usually triangular shapes and ...
Scone
geographical name locality E Scotland NE of Perth population 3713
scoop
I. noun Etymology: Middle English scope, from Middle Dutch schope; akin to Old High German skepfen to shape — more at shape Date: 14th century 1. a. a large ladle b. ...
scoop neck
noun see scoop I
scoopable
adjective see scoop II
scooper
noun see scoop II
scoopful
noun see scoop I
scoot
intransitive verb Etymology: perhaps alteration of earlier scout, of unknown origin Date: 1758 1. to move swiftly 2. to slide especially while seated • scoot noun
scooter
noun Date: 1916 1. a child's foot-operated vehicle consisting of a narrow footboard mounted between two wheels tandem with an upright steering handle attached to the front ...
scop
noun Etymology: Old English; akin to Old High German schof poet Date: before 12th century an Old English bard or poet
scope
I. noun Etymology: Italian scopo purpose, goal, from Greek skopos; akin to Greek skeptesthai to watch, look at — more at spy Date: circa 1555 1. intention, object 2. ...
Scopes
biographical name John Thomas 1900-1970 American teacher
scopolamine
noun Etymology: German Scopolamin, from New Latin Scopolia, genus of plants + German Amin amine Date: 1892 a poisonous alkaloid C17H21NO4 similar to atropine that is found in ...
Scopus, Mount
geographical name mountain Israel NE of Jerusalem
scorbutic
adjective Etymology: New Latin scorbuticus, from scorbutus scurvy, probably of Germanic origin; akin to Old English scurf scurf Date: 1655 of, relating to, producing, or ...
scorch
I. verb Etymology: Middle English; probably akin to Middle English scorcnen to become singed, scorklen to parch Date: 14th century transitive verb 1. to burn a surface of ...
scorched
adjective Date: 1566 parched or discolored by scorching
scorched-earth
adjective Date: 1937 1. relating to or being a military policy involving deliberate and usually widespread destruction of property and resources (as housing and factories) so ...
scorcher
noun Date: 1733 one that scorches; especially a very hot day
scorchingly
adverb see scorch I
score
I. noun (plural scores) Etymology: Middle English scor, from Old Norse skor notch, tally, twenty; akin to Old English scieran to cut — more at shear Date: 14th century 1. ...
score points
phrasal to gain favor, status, or advantage
scoreboard
noun Date: 1826 a large board for displaying the score of a game or match
scorecard
noun Date: circa 1877 1. a card for recording the score of a game 2. a report or indication of the status, condition, or success of something or someone
scorekeeper
noun Date: 1880 one that keeps score; specifically an official who records the score during a game or contest
scoreless
adjective Date: 1885 having no score
scorer
noun see score II
Scoresby Sound
geographical name inlet of Norwegian Sea E Greenland N of 70°N
scoria
noun (plural scoriae) Etymology: Middle English, from Latin, from Greek skōria, from skōr excrement — more at scatology Date: 14th century 1. the refuse from melting of ...
scoriaceous
adjective see scoria
scorn
I. noun Etymology: Middle English, from Anglo-French escharne, escar, of Germanic origin; akin to Old High German scern jest Date: 13th century 1. open dislike and disrespect ...
scorner
noun see scorn II
scornful
adjective Date: 14th century full of scorn ; contemptuous • scornfully adverb • scornfulness noun
scornfully
adverb see scornful
scornfulness
noun see scornful
scorpaenid
noun Etymology: ultimately from Greek skorpaina, a kind of fish Date: 1885 any of a family (Scorpaenidae) of marine bony fishes possessing usually venomous spines on the ...
Scorpio
noun Etymology: Latin (genitive Scorpionis), from Greek Skorpios, literally, scorpion Date: 14th century 1. Scorpius 2. a. the eighth sign of the zodiac in astrology — ...
scorpion
noun Etymology: Middle English, from Anglo-French eskorpiun, from Latin scorpion-, scorpio, from Greek skorpios Date: 12th century 1. a. any of an order (Scorpionida) of ...
scorpion fish
noun Date: 1661 any of various scorpaenid fishes (especially genus Scorpaena)
scorpion fly
noun Date: 1668 any of a family (Panorpidae) of insects that have cylindrical bodies, a long beak with biting mouthparts, and the male genitalia enlarged into a swollen bulb; ...
Scorpius
noun Etymology: Latin (genitive Scorpii), from Greek Skorpios, literally, scorpion Date: before 12th century a southern zodiacal constellation partly in the Milky Way and ...
Scorsese
biographical name Martin 1942- American film director
scot
noun Etymology: Middle English, from Old Norse skot shot, contribution — more at shot Date: 14th century money assessed or paid
Scot
noun Etymology: Middle English Scottes Scots, from Old English Scottas from Late Latin Scotus Date: before 12th century 1. a member of a Celtic people of northern Ireland ...
scot and lot
noun Date: 15th century 1. a parish assessment formerly laid on subjects in Great Britain according to their ability to pay 2. obligations of all kinds taken as a whole
scot-free
adjective Etymology: scot Date: 1528 completely free from obligation, harm, or penalty
Scotch
I. adjective Etymology: contraction of Scottish Date: 1591 1. Scottish 2. inclined to frugality II. noun Date: circa 1700 1. Scots 2. plural in construction the people ...
scotch
I. transitive verb Etymology: Middle English scocchen to gash, from Anglo-French escocher, eschocher to pierce Date: 15th century 1. archaic cut, gash, score; also wound ...
Scotch bonnet
noun Date: 1986 a small roundish very hot chili pepper especially of the Caribbean that is usually red or yellow when mature
Scotch broom
noun Date: circa 1818 a deciduous broom (Cytisus scoparius) of western Europe that is widely cultivated for its bright yellow or partly red flowers and that has become ...

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