Слова на букву sask-soma (6389) New Collegiate Dictionary
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Слова на букву sask-soma (6389)

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semigloss
adjective Date: 1937 having a low luster; specifically producing a finish midway between glossy and flat
semigovernmental
adjective Date: 1919 having some governmental functions and powers
semigroup
noun Date: 1904 a mathematical set that is closed under an associative binary operation
semilegendary
adjective Date: 1866 having historical foundation but elaborated in legend
semilethal
noun Date: 1919 a mutation that in the homozygous condition produces more than 50 percent mortality but not complete mortality • semilethal adjective
semiliquid
adjective Date: 1684 having the qualities of both a liquid and a solid ; semifluid • semiliquid noun
semiliterate
adjective Date: 1927 1. a. able to read and write on an elementary level b. able to read but unable to write 2. having limited knowledge or understanding • ...
semilog
adjective Date: 1921 semilogarithmic
semilogarithmic
adjective Date: 1919 having one scale logarithmic and the other arithmetic — used of graph paper or of a graph on such paper
semilunar
adjective Etymology: New Latin semilunaris, from Latin semi- + lunaris lunar Date: 1597 lunate
semilunar valve
noun Date: circa 1719 any of the crescent-shaped cusps that occur as a set of three between the heart and the aorta and another of three between the heart and the pulmonary ...
semilustrous
adjective Date: 1894 slightly lustrous
semimajor axis
noun Date: 1818 one half of the major axis of an ellipse (as that formed by the orbit of a planet)
semimat
adjective see semimatte
semimatt
adjective see semimatte
semimatte
also semimat or semimatt adjective Etymology: semi- + 2matte Date: 1937 having a slight luster
semimetal
noun Date: 1661 an element (as arsenic) possessing metallic properties in an inferior degree and not malleable • semimetallic adjective
semimetallic
adjective see semimetal
semimicro
adjective Date: 1935 of, relating to, or dealing with quantities intermediate between those treated as micro and macro
semiminor axis
noun Date: 1909 one half of the minor axis of an ellipse (as that formed by the orbit of a planet)
semimoist
adjective Date: 1903 slightly moist
semimonastic
adjective Date: 1911 having some features characteristic of a monastic order
semimonthly
I. adverb Date: 1829 twice a month II. adjective Date: 1829 occurring twice a month III. noun Date: 1843 a semimonthly publication
semimystical
adjective Date: 1878 having some of the qualities of mysticism
seminal
adjective Etymology: Middle English, from Latin seminalis, from semin-, semen seed — more at semen Date: 14th century 1. of, relating to, or consisting of seed or semen 2. ...
seminal duct
noun Date: 1882 a tube or passage serving especially or exclusively as an efferent duct of the testis and in the human male being made up of the epididymis, the vas ...
seminal fluid
noun Date: circa 1929 1. semen 2. the part of the semen that is produced by various accessory glands (as the prostate gland and seminal vesicles) ; semen excepting the ...
seminal vesicle
noun Date: circa 1890 either of a pair of glandular pouches that lie one on either side of the male reproductive tract and in the human male secrete a sugar- and ...
seminally
adverb see seminal
seminar
noun Etymology: German, from Latin seminarium nursery Date: 1863 1. a group of advanced students studying under a professor with each doing original research and all ...
seminarian
noun Date: 1794 a student in a seminary especially of the Roman Catholic Church
seminarist
noun Date: 1835 seminarian
seminary
noun (plural -naries) Etymology: Middle English, seedbed, nursery, from Latin seminarium, from semin-, semen seed Date: 1542 1. an environment in which something originates ...
seminatural
adjective Date: 1948 modified by human influence but retaining many natural features
seminiferous
adjective Etymology: Latin semin-, semen seed + English -iferous Date: 1692 producing or bearing seed or semen
seminiferous tubule
noun Date: 1860 any of the coiled threadlike tubules that make up the bulk of the testis and are lined with a layer of epithelial cells from which the spermatozoa are ...
Seminole
noun (plural Seminoles or Seminole) Etymology: Creek simanó•li untamed, wild, alteration of simaló•ni, from American Spanish cimarrón wild Date: 1771 a member of any ...
Seminole, Lake
geographical name reservoir SW Georgia & NW Florida formed by confluence of Chattahoochee & Flint rivers & emptying by the Apalachicola
seminomad
noun Date: circa 1934 a member of a people living usually in portable or temporary dwellings and practicing seasonal migration but having a base camp at which some crops are ...
seminomadic
adjective see seminomad
seminude
adjective Date: 1829 partially nude • seminudity noun
seminudity
noun see seminude
semiofficial
adjective Date: 1806 having some official authority or standing • semiofficially adverb
semiofficially
adverb see semiofficial
semiological
adjective see semiology
semiologically
adverb see semiology
semiologist
noun see semiology
semiology
noun Etymology: Greek sēmeion sign Date: circa 1890 the study of signs; especially semiotic • semiological adjective • semiologically adverb • semiologist noun
semiopaque
adjective Date: 1691 nearly opaque
semiosis
noun Etymology: New Latin, from Greek sēmeiōsis observation of signs, from sēmeioun to observe signs, from sēmeion Date: circa 1907 a process in which something functions ...
semiotic
I. noun see semiotics II. adjective see semiotics
semiotician
noun see semiotics
semioticist
noun see semiotics
semiotics
or semiotic noun (plural semiotics) Etymology: Greek sēmeiōtikos observant of signs, from sēmeiousthai to interpret signs, from sēmeion sign, from sēma sign Date: 1880 a ...
Semipalatinsk
geographical name see Semey
semipalmated
adjective Date: 1785 having the toes joined only part way down with a web
semiparasite
noun see semiparasitic
semiparasitic
adjective Date: circa 1909 of, relating to, or being a parasitic plant that contains some chlorophyll and is capable of photosynthesis • semiparasite noun
semipermanent
adjective Date: 1881 lasting or intended to last for a long time but not permanent
semipermeability
noun see semipermeable
semipermeable
adjective Date: 1888 partially but not freely or wholly permeable; specifically permeable to some usually small molecules but not to other usually larger particles • ...
semipolitical
adjective Date: 1837 of, relating to, or involving some political features or activity
semipopular
adjective Date: 1860 somewhat popular
semiporcelain
noun Date: 1880 any of several ceramic wares resembling or imitative of porcelain; especially a relatively hard-glazed white earthenware widely used for tableware
semipornographic
adjective Date: 1964 somewhat pornographic • semipornography noun
semipornography
noun see semipornographic
semipostal
noun Date: 1927 a postage stamp sold at a premium over its postal value especially for a humanitarian purpose
semiprecious
adjective Date: 1858 of a gemstone of less commercial value than a precious stone
semiprivate
adjective Date: 1876 of, receiving, or associated with hospital service giving a patient more privileges than a ward patient but fewer than a private patient
semipro
adjective or noun Date: 1908 semiprofessional
semiprofessional
I. noun Date: 1861 one who engages in an activity (as a sport) semiprofessionally II. adjective Date: 1900 1. engaging in an activity for pay or gain but not as a full-time ...
semiprofessionally
adverb see semiprofessional II
semipublic
adjective Date: 1804 1. open to some persons outside the regular constituency 2. having some features of a public institution; specifically maintained as a public service ...
semiquantitative
adjective Date: 1927 constituting or involving less than quantitative precision • semiquantitatively adverb
semiquantitatively
adverb see semiquantitative
semiquaver
noun Date: 1576 sixteenth note
semireligious
adjective Date: 1832 somewhat religious
semiretired
adjective Date: 1937 working only part-time especially because of age or ill health
semiretirement
noun Date: 1923 the state or condition of being semiretired
semirigid
adjective Date: 1906 1. rigid to some degree or in some parts 2. of an airship having a flexible cylindrical gas container with an attached stiffening keel that carries the ...
semirural
adjective Date: 1835 somewhat rural
semisacred
adjective Date: 1849 semireligious
semisecret
adjective Date: 1852 not publicly announced but widely known nevertheless
semisedentary
adjective Date: circa 1930 sedentary during part of the year and nomadic otherwise
semishrubby
adjective Date: 1930 resembling or being a subshrub
semiskilled
adjective Date: 1916 having or requiring less training than skilled labor and more than unskilled labor
semisoft
adjective Date: 1859 moderately soft; specifically firm but easily cut
semisolid
adjective Date: 1834 having the qualities of both a solid and a liquid ; highly viscous • semisolid noun
semisubmersible
adjective Date: 1962 being a floating deepwater drilling platform that is towed to a desired location and then partially flooded for stabilization and usually anchored • ...
semisweet
adjective Date: 1943 slightly sweetened
semisynthetic
adjective Date: 1937 1. produced by chemical alteration of a natural starting material 2. containing both chemically identified and complex natural ingredients
Semite
noun Etymology: French sémite, from Semitic Shem, from Late Latin, from Greek Sēm, from Hebrew Shēm Date: 1848 1. a. a member of any of a number of peoples of ancient ...
semiterrestrial
adjective Date: 1919 1. growing on boggy ground 2. frequenting but not living wholly on land
Semitic
I. adjective Etymology: German semitisch, from Semit, Semite Semite, probably from New Latin Semita, from Late Latin Semitic Shem Date: 1813 1. of, relating to, or ...
Semiticist
noun Date: 1956 Semitist
Semitics
noun plural but singular in construction Date: 1888 the study of the language, literature, and history of Semitic peoples; specifically Semitic philology
Semitism
noun Date: 1851 1. a. Semitic character or qualities b. a characteristic feature of a Semitic language occurring in another language 2. policy or predisposition ...
Semitist
noun Date: 1881 1. a scholar of the Semitic languages, cultures, or histories 2. often not capitalized a person favoring or disposed to favor the Jews
semitonal
adjective Date: 1863 chromatic 3a, semitonic • semitonally adverb
semitonally
adverb see semitonal
semitone
noun Date: 15th century the tone at a half step; also half step • semitonic adjective • semitonically adverb
semitonic
adjective see semitone
semitonically
adverb see semitone
semitrailer
noun Date: 1919 1. a freight trailer that when attached is supported at its forward end by the fifth wheel device of the truck tractor 2. a trucking rig made up of a ...
semitranslucent
adjective Date: 1832 somewhat translucent
semitransparent
adjective Date: 1731 imperfectly transparent
semitropic
adjective see semitropical
semitropical
also semitropic adjective Date: 1845 subtropical
semitropics
noun plural Date: 1908 subtropics
semitruck
noun Date: 1969 semitrailer 2
semivowel
noun Date: 1530 1. a speech sound (as \y\, \w\, or \r\) that has the articulation of a vowel but that is shorter in duration and is treated as a consonant in syllabication ...
semiweekly
I. adjective Date: 1791 occurring twice a week • semiweekly adverb II. noun Date: 1833 a semiweekly publication
semiworks
noun plural Usage: often attributive Date: 1926 a manufacturing plant operating on a limited commercial scale to provide final tests of a new product or process
semiyearly
adjective Date: 1845 occurring twice a year
Semmes
biographical name Raphael 1809-1877 American Confederate admiral
semolina
noun Etymology: Italian semolino, diminutive of semola bran, from Latin simila wheat flour Date: 1797 the purified middlings of hard wheat (as durum) used especially for ...
semper eadem
foreign term Etymology: Latin always the same (feminine) — motto of Queen Elizabeth I
semper fidelis
foreign term Etymology: Latin always faithful — motto of the United States Marine Corps
semper idem
foreign term Etymology: Latin always the same (masculine)
semper paratus
foreign term Etymology: Latin always prepared — motto of the United States Coast Guard
sempervivum
noun Etymology: New Latin, from Latin, neuter of sempervivus ever-living, from semper ever + vivus living — more at quick Date: 1591 any of a genus (Sempervivum) of Old ...
sempiternal
adjective Etymology: Middle English, from Late Latin sempiternalis, from Latin sempiternus, from semper ever, always, from sem- one, same (akin to Old Norse samr same) + per ...
sempiternally
adverb see sempiternal
sempiternity
noun Date: 1599 eternity
semple
adjective Etymology: alteration of simple Date: circa 1520 Scottish of humble birth
semplice
adjective or adverb Etymology: Italian, from Latin simplic-, simplex — more at simple Date: circa 1740 simple — used as a direction in music
sempre
adverb Etymology: Italian, from Latin semper Date: circa 1801 always — used in music directions
Sen
biographical name Amartya Kumar 1933- British (Indian-born) economist
sen
I. noun (plural sen) Etymology: Japanese Date: 1875 — see yen at money table II. noun (plural sen) Etymology: Malay, probably from English cent Date: 1952 — see ...
senarius
noun (plural senarii) Etymology: Latin, from senarius consisting of six each, from seni six each, from sex six — more at six Date: 1540 a verse consisting of six feet ...
senary
adjective Etymology: Latin senarius consisting of six Date: 1661 of, based on, or characterized by six ; compounded of six things or six parts
senate
noun Etymology: Middle English senat, from Anglo-French, from Latin senatus, from sen-, senex old, old man — more at senior Date: 13th century 1. an assembly or council ...
senator
noun Etymology: Middle English senatour, from Anglo-French senatur, from Latin senator, from senatus Date: 13th century a member of a senate • senatorship noun
senatorial
adjective Date: 1740 of, relating to, or befitting a senator or a senate
senatorial courtesy
noun Date: 1884 a custom of the United States Senate of refusing to confirm a presidential appointment of an official in or from a state when the appointment is opposed by the ...
senatorial district
noun Date: 1785 a territorial division from which a senator is elected — compare congressional district
senatorian
adjective Date: 1614 senatorial; specifically of or relating to the ancient Roman senate
senatorship
noun see senator
senatus consultum
noun (plural senatus consulta) Etymology: Latin, decree of the senate Date: 1696 a decree of the ancient Roman senate
send
I. verb (sent; sending) Etymology: Middle English, from Old English sendan; akin to Old High German sendan to send, Old English sith road, journey, Old Irish sét path, way ...
send down
transitive verb Date: 1848 British to suspend or expel from a university
send for
phrasal to request by message to come ; summon
send in
transitive verb Date: 1616 1. to cause to be delivered 2. to give (one's name or card) to a servant when making a call 3. to send (a player) into an athletic contest
send packing
phrasal to send off or dismiss roughly or in disgrace
send up
transitive verb Date: 1852 1. to sentence to imprisonment ; send to jail 2. to make fun of ; satirize, parody
send-off
noun Date: 1872 a demonstration of goodwill and enthusiasm for the beginning of a new venture (as a trip)
send-up
noun Date: 1958 parody, takeoff
Sendai
geographical name city Japan in NE Honshu population 918,378
Sendak
biographical name Maurice Bernard 1928- American illustrator & writer
sender
noun see send I
sene
noun (plural sene) Etymology: Samoan, from English cent Date: 1967 — see tala at money table
Seneca
I. noun (plural Seneca or Senecas) Etymology: Dutch Sennecaas, plural, the Iroquois living west of the Mohawks Date: circa 1616 1. a member of an American Indian people of ...
Seneca Lake
geographical name lake 35 miles (56 kilometers) long W central New York; one of the Finger Lakes
seneca snakeroot
noun Date: 1789 a milkwort (Polygala senega) of eastern North America having racemes of small white flowers — called also rattlesnake root, senega root — compare senega
Senecan
adjective see Seneca II
senecio
noun (plural -cios) Etymology: New Latin, from Latin, old man, groundsel (from its hoary pappus), from sen-, senic-, senex old man Date: 1562 any of a large genus (Senecio) ...
senectitude
noun Etymology: Medieval Latin senectitudo, alteration of Latin senectus old age, from sen-, senic-, senex old, old man — more at senior Date: 1796 the final stage of the ...
senega
noun Date: 1748 the dried root of seneca snakeroot that contains an irritating saponin and is used as an expectorant
senega root
noun Etymology: alteration of Seneca root; from its use by the Seneca as a remedy for snakebite Date: circa 1846 1. seneca snakeroot 2. senega
Senegal
geographical name 1. river 1015 miles (1633 kilometers) W Africa flowing from Fouta Djallon NW & W into the Atlantic 2. country W Africa on the Atlantic; a republic of the ...
Senegalese
adjective or noun see Senegal
Senegambia
geographical name 1. region W Africa around Senegal & Gambia rivers 2. confederation of Senegal & Gambia 1982-89 • Senegambian adjective or noun
Senegambian
adjective or noun see Senegambia
senescence
noun Etymology: senescent, from Latin senescent-, senescens, present participle of senescere to grow old, from sen-, senex old Date: 1695 1. the state of being old ; the ...
senescent
adjective see senescence
seneschal
noun Etymology: Middle English, from Anglo-French, of Germanic origin; akin to Gothic sineigs old and to Old High German scalc servant — more at senior Date: 14th century ...
Senghor
biographical name Léopold Sédar 1906-2001 president of Senegal (1960-80)
senhor
noun (plural senhors or senhores) Etymology: Portuguese, from Medieval Latin senior superior, lord, from Latin, adjective, elder Date: 1795 a Portuguese or Brazilian man — ...
senhora
noun Etymology: Portuguese, feminine of senhor Date: 1802 a married Portuguese or Brazilian woman — used as a title equivalent to Mrs.
senhorita
noun Etymology: Portuguese, from diminutive of senhora Date: 1874 an unmarried Portuguese or Brazilian girl or woman — used as a title equivalent to Miss
senile
adjective Etymology: Latin senilis, from sen-, senex old, old man Date: 1661 1. of, relating to, exhibiting, or characteristic of old age ; especially exhibiting a loss of ...
senile dementia
noun Date: circa 1851 dementia of old age especially of the degenerative type associated with Alzheimer's disease
senilely
adverb see senile
senility
noun Date: 1791 the quality or state of being senile; specifically the physical and mental infirmity of old age
senior
I. noun Etymology: Middle English, from Latin, from senior, adjective Date: 14th century 1. a person older than another 2. a. a person with higher standing or rank ...
senior airman
noun Date: circa 1977 an enlisted man in the air force who ranks above an airman first class but who has not been made staff sergeant
senior chief petty officer
noun Date: circa 1960 an enlisted man in the navy or coast guard ranking above a chief petty officer and below a master chief petty officer
senior citizen
noun Date: 1938 an elderly person; especially one who has retired
senior high school
noun Date: 1909 a school usually including grades 10 to 12
senior master sergeant
noun Date: circa 1962 a noncommissioned officer in the air force ranking above a master sergeant and below a chief master sergeant
seniority
noun Date: 15th century 1. the quality or state of being senior ; priority 2. a privileged status attained by length of continuous service (as in a company)
seniti
noun (plural seniti) Etymology: Tongan, modification of English cent Date: 1967 — see pa'anga at money table
Senlac
geographical name hill SE England in Sussex NW of Hastings
Senlis
geographical name commune N France NNE of Paris population 15,226
senna
noun Etymology: New Latin, from Arabic sanā Date: 1543 1. any of a genus (Cassia syn. Senna) of leguminous herbs, shrubs, and trees native to warm regions; especially one ...
Sennaar
geographical name see Sennar
Sennacherib
biographical name died 681 B.C. king of Assyria (704-681)
Sennar
or Sennaar geographical name region E Sudan chiefly between White Nile & Blue Nile rivers; an ancient kingdom
sennet
noun Etymology: probably alteration of obsolete signet signal Date: circa 1590 a signal call on a trumpet or cornet for entrance or exit on the stage
sennight
also se'nnight noun Etymology: Middle English, from Old English seofon nihta seven nights Date: 15th century archaic the space of seven nights and days ; week
sennit
noun Etymology: origin unknown Date: circa 1769 1. a braided cord or fabric (as of plaited rope yarns) 2. a straw or grass braid for hats
senor
or señor noun (plural senors or señores) Etymology: Spanish señor, from Medieval Latin senior superior, lord, from Latin, adjective, elder Date: 1622 a Spanish or ...
señor
noun see senor
senora
or señora noun Etymology: Spanish señora, feminine of señor Date: 1579 a married Spanish or Spanish-speaking woman — used as a title equivalent to Mrs.
señora
noun see senora
senorita
or señorita noun Etymology: Spanish señorita, from diminutive of señora Date: 1822 an unmarried Spanish or Spanish-speaking girl or woman — used as a title equivalent ...
señorita
noun see senorita
senryu
noun (plural senryu) Etymology: Japanese Date: 1938 a 3-line unrhymed Japanese poem structurally similar to haiku but treating human nature usually in an ironic or satiric ...
Sens
geographical name city NE central France WSW of Troyes population 27,755
sensa
plural of sensum
sensate
adjective Etymology: Middle English sensat, from Medieval Latin sensatus, from Late Latin, endowed with sense, from Latin sensus sense Date: 15th century 1. relating to or ...
sensately
adverb see sensate
sensation
noun Etymology: Medieval Latin sensation-, sensatio, from Late Latin, understanding, idea, from Latin sensus Date: 1615 1. a. a mental process (as seeing, hearing, or ...
sensational
adjective Date: 1840 1. of or relating to sensation or the senses 2. arousing or tending to arouse (as by lurid details) a quick, intense, and usually superficial interest, ...
sensationalise
British variant of sensationalize
sensationalism
noun Date: 1846 1. empiricism that limits experience as a source of knowledge to sensation or sense perceptions 2. the use or effect of sensational subject matter or ...
sensationalist
adjective or noun see sensationalism
sensationalistic
adjective see sensationalism
sensationalize
transitive verb (-ized; -izing) Date: 1869 to present in a sensational manner
sensationally
adverb see sensational
sense
I. noun Etymology: Middle English, from Anglo-French or Latin; Anglo-French sen, sens sensation, feeling, mechanism of perception, meaning, from Latin sensus, from sentire to ...
sense organ
noun Date: 1854 a bodily structure that receives a stimulus and is affected in such a manner as to initiate excitation of associated sensory nerve fibers which convey ...
sense-datum
noun (plural sense-data) Date: 1882 an immediate unanalyzable private object of sensation
senseful
adjective Date: 1591 reasonable, judicious
sensei
noun (plural sensei or senseis) Etymology: Japanese, teacher, master Date: 1968 a teacher or instructor usually of Japanese martial arts (as karate or judo)
senseless
adjective Date: 1557 destitute of, deficient in, or contrary to sense: as a. unconscious b. foolish, stupid c. meaningless, purposeless • senselessly adverb ...
senselessly
adverb see senseless
senselessness
noun see senseless
sensibilia
noun plural Etymology: Late Latin, from neuter plural of Latin sensibilis sensible Date: 1856 what may be sensed
sensibility
noun (plural -ties) Date: 15th century 1. ability to receive sensations ; sensitiveness 2. peculiar susceptibility to a pleasurable or painful impression (as from praise ...
sensible
I. adjective Etymology: Middle English, from Anglo-French, from Latin sensibilis, from sensus, past participle of sentire to feel Date: 14th century 1. of a kind to be felt ...
sensible heat
noun Date: 1839 thermal energy whose transfer to or from a substance results in a change of temperature — compare latent heat
sensibleness
noun see sensible I
sensibly
adverb see sensible I
sensilla
noun see sensillum
sensillum
also sensilla noun (plural sensilla; also sensillae) Etymology: New Latin sensillum, diminutive of Medieval Latin sensus sense organ, from Latin, sense Date: 1925 a simple ...
sensitisation
British variant of sensitization
sensitise
British variant of sensitize
sensitive
I. adjective Etymology: Middle English, from Anglo-French, from Medieval Latin sensitivus, probably alteration of sensativus, from sensatus sensate Date: 15th century 1. ...
sensitive plant
noun Date: 1659 any of several mimosas (especially Mimosa pudica) with leaves that fold or droop when touched; broadly a plant responding to touch with movement
sensitively
adverb see sensitive I
sensitiveness
noun see sensitive I
sensitivity
noun (plural -ties) Date: 1803 the quality or state of being sensitive: as a. the capacity of an organism or sense organ to respond to stimulation ; irritability b. the ...
sensitization
noun Date: 1887 1. the action or process of sensitizing 2. the quality or state of being sensitized (as to an antigen)
sensitize
verb (-tized; -tizing) Etymology: sensitive + -ize Date: 1856 transitive verb to make sensitive or hypersensitive intransitive verb to become sensitive • sensitizer ...
sensitizer
noun see sensitize
sensitometer
noun Etymology: International Scientific Vocabulary sensitive + -o- + -meter Date: 1880 an instrument for measuring sensitivity of photographic material • sensitometric ...
sensitometric
adjective see sensitometer
sensitometry
noun see sensitometer
sensor
noun Etymology: Latin sentire to perceive + English 1-or — more at sense Date: circa 1928 1. a device that responds to a physical stimulus (as heat, light, sound, ...
sensorial
adjective Date: 1768 sensory • sensorially adverb
sensorially
adverb see sensorial
sensorimotor
adjective Etymology: sensory + motor Date: 1855 of, relating to, or functioning in both sensory and motor aspects of bodily activity
sensorineural
adjective Date: 1960 of, relating to, or involving the aspects of sense perception mediated by nerves
sensorium
noun (plural -riums or sensoria) Etymology: Late Latin, sense organ, from Latin sentire Date: 1647 the parts of the brain or the mind concerned with the reception and ...
sensory
adjective Date: 1749 1. of or relating to sensation or to the senses 2. conveying nerve impulses from the sense organs to the nerve centers ; afferent
sensory area
noun Date: 1896 an area of the cerebral cortex that receives afferent nerve fibers from lower sensory or motor areas
sensu stricto
adverb Etymology: New Latin Date: 1902 in a narrow or strict sense
sensual
adjective Etymology: Middle English, from Late Latin sensualis, from Latin sensus sense Date: 15th century 1. relating to or consisting in the gratification of the senses or ...
sensualism
noun Date: 1813 persistent or excessive pursuit of sensual pleasures and interests • sensualist noun • sensualistic adjective
sensualist
noun see sensualism
sensualistic
adjective see sensualism
sensuality
noun see sensual
sensualization
noun see sensualize
sensualize
transitive verb (-ized; -izing) Date: circa 1687 to make sensual • sensualization noun
sensually
adverb see sensual
sensum
noun (plural sensa) Etymology: Medieval Latin, from Latin, neuter of sensus, past participle of sentire to feel — more at sense Date: 1868 sense-datum
sensuosity
noun see sensuous
sensuous
adjective Etymology: Latin sensus sense + English -ous Date: 1640 1. a. of or relating to the senses or sensible objects b. producing or characterized by gratification ...
sensuously
adverb see sensuous
sensuousness
noun see sensuous
sent
I. past and past participle of send II. noun (plural senti) Etymology: Estonian (partitive singular senti), probably from French centime or English cent Date: 1930 — see ...
sente
noun (plural licente or lisente) Etymology: Sesotho, from English cent Date: 1966 — see loti at money table
sentence
I. noun Etymology: Middle English, from Anglo-French, from Latin sententia feeling, opinion, from *sentent-, *sentens, irregular present participle of sentire to feel — more ...
sentence accent
noun see sentence stress

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