Слова на букву sask-soma (6389) New Collegiate Dictionary
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Слова на букву sask-soma (6389)

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sentence fragment
noun Date: 1947 a word, phrase, or clause that usually has in speech the intonation of a sentence but lacks the grammatical structure usually found in the sentences of formal ...
sentence stress
noun Date: 1884 the manner in which stresses are distributed on the syllables of words assembled into sentences — called also sentence accent
sententia
noun (plural sententiae) Etymology: Latin, literally, feeling, opinion Date: 1917 aphorism — usually used in plural
sentential
adjective Date: 1646 1. of or relating to a sentence 2. of, relating to, or involving a proposition in logic
sentential calculus
noun Date: 1937 propositional calculus
sentential function
noun Date: 1937 an expression that contains one or more variables and becomes a declarative sentence when constants are substituted for the variables
sententious
adjective Etymology: Middle English, full of meaning, from Latin sententiosus, from sententia sentence, maxim Date: 1509 1. a. given to or abounding in aphoristic ...
sententiously
adverb see sententious
sententiousness
noun see sententious
sentience
noun Date: 1839 1. a sentient quality or state 2. feeling or sensation as distinguished from perception and thought
sentient
adjective Etymology: Latin sentient-, sentiens, present participle of sentire to perceive, feel Date: 1632 1. responsive to or conscious of sense impressions 2. aware 3. ...
sentiently
adverb see sentient
sentiment
noun Etymology: French or Medieval Latin; French, from Medieval Latin sentimentum, from Latin sentire Date: 1639 1. a. an attitude, thought, or judgment prompted by ...
sentimental
adjective Date: 1749 1. a. marked or governed by feeling, sensibility, or emotional idealism b. resulting from feeling rather than reason or thought 2. having an ...
sentimentalise
British variant of sentimentalize
sentimentalism
noun Date: 1817 1. the disposition to favor or indulge in sentimentality 2. an excessively sentimental conception or statement • sentimentalist noun
sentimentalist
noun see sentimentalism
sentimentality
noun (plural -ties) Date: 1770 1. the quality or state of being sentimental especially to excess or in affectation 2. a sentimental idea or its expression
sentimentalization
noun see sentimentalize
sentimentalize
verb (-ized; -izing) Date: 1788 intransitive verb to indulge in sentiment transitive verb to look upon or imbue with sentiment • sentimentalization noun
sentimentally
adverb see sentimental
sentimo
noun (plural -mos) Etymology: Tagalog, from Spanish céntimo Date: 1968 — see peso at money table
sentinel
I. noun Etymology: Middle French sentinelle, from Old Italian sentinella, from sentina vigilance, from sentire to perceive, from Latin Date: 1579 sentry II. transitive ...
sentry
noun (plural sentries) Etymology: perhaps from obsolete sentry sanctuary, watchtower Date: 1608 guard, watch; especially a soldier standing guard at a point of passage (as ...
sentry box
noun Date: circa 1728 a shelter for a sentry on his post
Seongnam
geographical name — see Songnam
Seoul
geographical name city NW South Korea on Han River population 9,639,110; formerly capital of Korea, since 1948 capital of South Korea
sep
abbreviation separate; separated
Sep
abbreviation September
SEP
abbreviation simplified employee pension
sepal
noun Etymology: New Latin sepalum, from sep- (irregular from Greek skepē covering) + -alum (as in petalum petal) Date: 1821 one of the modified leaves comprising a calyx — ...
sepaloid
adjective Date: 1830 resembling or functioning as a sepal
separability
noun see separable
separable
adjective Etymology: Middle English, from Latin separabilis, from separare Date: 14th century 1. capable of being separated or dissociated 2. obsolete causing separation ...
separableness
noun see separable
separate
I. verb (-rated; -rating) Etymology: Middle English, from Latin separatus, past participle of separare, from se- apart + parare to prepare, procure — more at secede, pare ...
separately
adverb see separate II
separateness
noun see separate II
separation
noun Date: 14th century 1. the act or process of separating ; the state of being separated 2. a. a point, line, or means of division b. an intervening space ; gap ...
separation anxiety
noun Date: 1943 a form of anxiety experienced by a young child and caused by separation from a significant nurturant figure and typically a parent or from familiar ...
separationist
noun Date: 1831 separatist
separatism
noun Date: 1628 a belief in, movement for, or state of separation (as schism, secession, or segregation)
separatist
noun Date: 1608 one that favors separatism: as a. capitalized one of a group of 16th and 17th century English Protestants preferring to separate from rather than to reform ...
separatistic
adjective see separatist
separative
adjective Date: 1592 tending toward, causing, or expressing separation
separator
noun Date: 1607 one that separates; especially a device for separating liquids of different specific gravities (as cream from milk) or liquids from solids
Sephardi
noun (plural Sephardim) Etymology: Late Hebrew sĕphāradhī, from sĕphāradh Spain, from Hebrew, region where Jews were once exiled (Obadiah 1:20) Date: 1851 a member of ...
Sephardic
adjective see Sephardi
sepia
I. noun Etymology: Latin, cuttlefish, ink, from Greek sēpia Date: 1821 1. a. a brown melanin-containing pigment from the ink of cuttlefishes b. the inky secretion of a ...
Sepik
geographical name river 600 miles (966 kilometers) N Papua New Guinea
sepiolite
noun Etymology: German Sepiolith, from Greek sēpion cuttlebone (from sēpia) + German -lith -lite Date: 1854 meerschaum 1
sepoy
noun Etymology: Portuguese sipai, from Hindi & Urdu sipāhī, from Persian, cavalryman Date: circa 1718 a native of India employed as a soldier by a European power
seppuku
noun Etymology: Japanese Date: 1871 hara-kiri 1
sepsis
noun (plural sepses) Etymology: New Latin, from Greek sēpsis decay, from sēpein to putrefy Date: 1876 a toxic condition resulting from the spread of bacteria or their toxic ...
sept
noun Etymology: perhaps from Latin septum, saeptum enclosure, fold — more at septum Date: 1517 a branch of a family; especially clan
Sept
abbreviation September
Sept-Îles
geographical name town Canada in E Quebec at the mouth of St. Lawrence River population 23,791
septal
adjective Date: circa 1847 of or relating to a septum
septate
adjective Date: 1846 divided by or having a septum
September
noun Etymology: Middle English Septembre, from Anglo-French & Old English, both from Latin September (seventh month), from septem seven — more at seven Date: before 12th ...
septenarius
noun (plural septenarii) Etymology: Latin, from septenarius of seven, from septeni seven each, from septem seven Date: 1819 a verse consisting of seven feet especially in ...
septendecillion
noun Usage: often attributive Etymology: Latin septendecim seventeen (from septem seven + decem ten) + English -illion (as in million) — more at ten Date: circa 1938 — ...
septennial
adjective Etymology: Late Latin septennium period of seven years, from Latin septem + -ennium (as in biennium) Date: 1640 1. occurring or being done every seven years 2. ...
septennially
adverb see septennial
septentrion
noun Etymology: Middle English, from Anglo-French, from Latin septentriones, plural, the seven stars of Ursa Major or Ursa Minor, from septem seven + triones plowing oxen ...
septentrional
adjective Date: 14th century northern
septet
noun Etymology: German, from Latin septem Date: 1828 1. a musical composition for seven instruments or voices 2. a group or set of seven; especially the performers of a ...
septic
adjective Etymology: Latin septicus, from Greek sēptikos, from sēpein to putrefy Date: 1605 1. of, relating to, or causing putrefaction 2. relating to, involving, caused ...
septic shock
noun Date: 1966 a life-threatening form of sepsis that usually results from the presence of gram-negative bacteria and their toxins in the bloodstream and that is ...
septic sore throat
noun Date: 1924 strep throat
septic tank
noun Date: circa 1902 a tank in which the solid matter of continuously flowing sewage is disintegrated by bacteria
septicemia
noun Etymology: New Latin, from Latin septicus + New Latin -emia Date: circa 1860 invasion of the bloodstream by virulent microorganisms and especially bacteria along with ...
septicemic
adjective see septicemia
septicidal
adjective Etymology: New Latin septum + Latin -cidere to cut, from caedere Date: 1819 dehiscent longitudinally at or along a septum
septillion
noun Usage: often attributive Etymology: French, from Latin septem + French -illion (as in million) — more at seven Date: 1690 — see number table
septuagenarian
noun Etymology: Late Latin septuagenarius seventy years old, from Latin, of or containing seventy, from septuageni seventy each, from septuaginta Date: 1805 a person whose ...
Septuagesima
noun Etymology: Middle English, from Late Latin, from Latin, feminine of septuagesimus seventieth, from septuaginta seventy; from its being approximately seventy days before ...
Septuagint
noun Etymology: Late Latin Septuaginta, from Latin, seventy, irregular from septem seven + -ginta (akin to Latin viginti twenty); from the approximate number of its translators ...
Septuagintal
adjective see Septuagint
septum
noun (plural septa) Etymology: New Latin, from Latin saeptum enclosure, fence, wall, from saepire to fence in, from saepes fence, hedge Date: 1698 a dividing wall or membrane ...
sepulcher
I. noun see sepulchre I II. transitive verb see sepulchre II
sepulchral
adjective Date: 1615 1. of or relating to a sepulchre 2. suited to or suggestive of a sepulchre ; funereal • sepulchrally adverb
sepulchrally
adverb see sepulchral
sepulchre
I. noun or sepulcher Etymology: Middle English sepulcre, from Anglo-French, from Latin sepulcrum, sepulchrum, from sepelire to bury; akin to Greek hepein to care for, Sanskrit ...
sepulture
noun Etymology: Middle English, from Anglo-French, from Latin sepultura, from sepultus, past participle of sepelire Date: 14th century 1. burial 2. sepulchre
sequacious
adjective Etymology: Latin sequac-, sequax inclined to follow, from sequi Date: 1643 1. archaic subservient, tractable 2. intellectually servile • sequaciously adverb ...
sequaciously
adverb see sequacious
sequacity
noun see sequacious
sequel
noun Etymology: Middle English, from Anglo-French sequele, from Latin sequela, from sequi to follow — more at sue Date: 15th century 1. consequence, result 2. a. ...
sequela
noun (plural sequelae) Etymology: New Latin, from Latin, sequel Date: circa 1793 1. an aftereffect of disease, condition, or injury 2. a secondary result
sequence
I. noun Etymology: Middle English, from Anglo-French, from Medieval Latin sequentia, from Late Latin, sequel, literally, act of following, from Latin sequent-, sequens, present ...
sequencer
noun Date: 1949 one that sequences: as a. a device for arranging things (as events in the ignition of a rocket) in a sequence b. a device for determining the order of ...
sequency
noun Etymology: Late Latin sequentia Date: 1818 sequence 3a, 5
sequent
adjective Etymology: Latin sequent-, sequens, present participle Date: 1601 1. consecutive, succeeding 2. consequent, resultant
sequential
adjective Date: 1844 1. of, relating to, or arranged in a sequence ; serial 2. following in sequence 3. relating to or based on a method of testing a statistical ...
sequentially
adverb see sequential
sequester
I. transitive verb (-tered; sequestering) Etymology: Middle English sequestren, from Anglo-French sequestrer, from Latin sequestrare to hand over to a trustee, from sequester ...
sequestrate
transitive verb (-trated; -trating) Etymology: Latin sequestratus, past participle of sequestrare Date: 15th century sequester; especially sequester 2 • sequestrator noun
sequestration
noun Date: 15th century 1. the act of sequestering ; the state of being sequestered 2. a. a legal writ authorizing a sheriff or commissioner to take into custody the ...
sequestrator
noun see sequestrate
sequestrum
noun (plural -trums; also sequestra) Etymology: New Latin, from Latin, legal sequestration, from sequester Date: 1831 a fragment of dead bone detached from adjoining sound ...
sequin
noun Etymology: French, from Italian zecchino, from zecca mint, from Arabic (dār al-) sikka, literally, house of the minting die Date: 1617 1. an old gold coin of Italy and ...
sequined
or sequinned adjective Date: 1894 ornamented with or as if with sequins
sequinned
adjective see sequined
sequitur
noun Etymology: Latin, it follows, 3d person singular present indicative of sequi to follow — more at sue Date: 1836 the conclusion of an inference ; consequence
sequoia
noun Etymology: New Latin, genus name, from Sequoya (George Guess) Date: circa 1866 either of two huge coniferous California trees of the bald cypress family that may reach a ...
Sequoia
biographical name see Sequoya
Sequoia National Park
geographical name reservation SE central California including Mt. Whitney
Sequoya
or Sequoyah or Sequoia biographical name circa 1760-1843 George Guess Cherokee Indian scholar
Sequoyah
biographical name see Sequoya
ser
abbreviation 1. serial 2. series 3. service
sera
plural of serum
serac
noun Etymology: French sérac, literally, a kind of white cheese, from Medieval Latin seracium whey, from Latin serum whey — more at serum Date: 1860 a pinnacle, sharp ...
seraglio
noun (plural -glios) Etymology: Italian serraglio, modification of Turkish saray palace Date: 1581 1. harem 1a 2. a palace of a sultan
serai
noun Etymology: Turkish & Persian; Turkish saray mansion, palace, from Persian sarāī mansion, inn Date: 1609 1. caravansary 2. seraglio 2
seral
adjective Date: 1916 of, relating to, or constituting an ecological sere
Seram
geographical name — see Ceram
serape
also sarape noun Etymology: Mexican Spanish sarape Date: 1834 a colorful woolen shawl worn over the shoulders especially by Mexican men
seraph
noun (plural seraphim or seraphs) Etymology: assumed singular of Hebrew śĕrāphīm Date: 1667 seraphim 2
seraphic
adjective see seraphim
seraphically
adverb see seraphim
seraphim
noun plural Etymology: Late Latin seraphim, plural, seraphs, from Hebrew śĕrāphīm Date: 12th century 1. an order of angels — see celestial hierarchy 2. singular, ...
Serapis
noun Etymology: Latin, from Greek Sarapis Date: 1587 an Egyptian god combining attributes of Osiris and Apis and having a widespread cult in Ptolemaic Egypt and ancient ...
Serb
noun Etymology: ultimately from Serbian & Croatian Srbin (plural Srbi) Date: 1860 1. a native or inhabitant of Serbia 2. Serbian 2 • Serb adjective
Serbia
or formerly Servia geographical name federated republic of Serbia and Montenegro including Kosovo & Vojvodina capital Belgrade area 34,115 square miles (88,358 square ...
Serbia and Montenegro
or formerly Yugoslavia geographical name country S Europe on Balkan Peninsula capital Belgrade area 39,449 square miles (102,173 square kilometers), population 10,561,000
Serbian
noun Date: 1848 1. Serb 1 2. a south Slavic language spoken by the Serbian people • Serbian adjective
Serbo-Croatian
noun Date: 1883 1. the Serbian and Croatian languages together with the Slavic speech of Bosnia, Herzegovina, and Montenegro taken as a single language with regional variants ...
Serbs, Croats, and Slovenes, Kingdom of the
geographical name — see Yugoslavia
Serdica
geographical name — see Sofia
sere
I. adjective also sear Etymology: Middle English, from Old English sēar dry; akin to Old High German sōrēn to wither, Greek hauos dry, Lithuanian sausas Date: before 12th ...
Serekunda
geographical name city W Gambia population 68,824
serenade
I. noun Etymology: French sérénade, from Italian serenata, from sereno clear, calm (of weather), from Latin serenus serene Date: 1649 1. a. a complimentary vocal or ...
serenader
noun see serenade II
serenata
noun Etymology: Italian, serenade Date: circa 1724 an 18th century secular cantata of a dramatic character usually composed in honor of an individual or event
Serendib
geographical name — see Ceylon 1
serendipitous
adjective Date: 1943 obtained or characterized by serendipity • serendipitously adverb
serendipitously
adverb see serendipitous
serendipity
noun Etymology: from its possession by the heroes of the Persian fairy tale The Three Princes of Serendip Date: 1754 the faculty or phenomenon of finding valuable or ...
serene
I. adjective Etymology: Middle English, from Latin serenus clear, cloudless, untroubled Date: 15th century 1. a. clear and free of storms or unpleasant change b. ...
serenely
adverb see serene I
sereneness
noun see serene I
Serengeti Plain
geographical name area N Tanzania including Serengeti National Park (wild game reserve)
serenity
noun Date: 15th century the quality or state of being serene
serf
noun Etymology: French, from Old French, from Latin servus slave Date: 1611 a member of a servile feudal class bound to the land and subject to the will of its owner • ...
serfage
noun see serf
serfdom
noun see serf
serge
noun Etymology: Middle English sarge, from Anglo-French, from Vulgar Latin *sarica, alteration of Latin serica, feminine of sericus silken — more at sericeous Date: 14th ...
sergeancy
noun Date: circa 1670 the function, office, or rank of a sergeant
sergeant
noun Etymology: Middle English, servant, attendant, sergeant, from Anglo-French sergant, serjant, from Latin servient-, serviens, present participle of servire to serve Date: ...
sergeant at arms
Date: 14th century an officer of an organization (as a legislative body or court of law) who preserves order and executes commands
sergeant first class
noun Date: 1948 a noncommissioned officer in the army ranking above a staff sergeant and below a master sergeant
sergeant fish
noun Date: 1873 1. cobia 2. snook 1
sergeant major
noun (plural sergeants major or sergeant majors) Date: 1797 1. a noncommissioned officer in the army or marine corps serving as chief administrative assistant in a ...
sergeant major of the army
Date: 1966 the ranking noncommissioned officer of the army serving as adviser to the chief of staff
sergeant major of the marine corps
Date: circa 1971 the ranking noncommissioned officer of the marine corps serving as adviser to the commandant
sergeanty
noun (plural -geanties) Etymology: Middle English sergeantie, from Anglo-French sergantie, sergeantie, from sergant sergeant Date: 15th century any of numerous feudal ...
serging
noun Etymology: serge Date: circa 1909 the process of overcasting the raw edges of a piece of fabric (as a carpet) to prevent raveling
Sergipe
geographical name state NE Brazil capital Aracajú area 8441 square miles (21,862 square kilometers), population 1,492,400
sergt
abbreviation sergeant
serial
I. adjective Date: 1840 1. of, relating to, consisting of, or arranged in a series, rank, or row 2. appearing in successive parts or numbers 3. belonging to a series ...
serial number
noun Date: 1896 a number indicating place in a series and used as a means of identification
serialise
British variant of serialize
serialism
noun Date: 1958 serial music; also the theory or practice of composing serial music
serialist
noun Date: 1846 1. a writer of serials 2. a composer of serial music
serialization
noun see serialize
serialize
transitive verb (-ized; -izing) Date: 1857 to arrange or publish in serial form • serialization noun
serially
adverb see serial I
seriate
I. adjective Etymology: Latin series Date: 1846 arranged in a series or succession • seriately adverb II. transitive verb (-ated; -ating) Date: circa 1899 to arrange in ...
seriately
adverb see seriate I
seriatim
I. adverb Etymology: Medieval Latin, from Latin series Date: 1680 in a series II. adjective Date: 1871 following seriatim
sericeous
adjective Etymology: Late Latin sericeus silken, from Latin sericum silk garment, silk, from neuter of sericus silken, from Greek sērikos, from Sēres, an eastern Asian people, ...
sericin
noun Etymology: International Scientific Vocabulary, from Latin sericum silk Date: circa 1868 a gelatinous protein that cements the two fibroin filaments in a silk fiber
sericultural
adjective see sericulture
sericulture
noun Etymology: Latin sericum silk + English culture Date: circa 1854 the production of raw silk by raising silkworms • sericultural adjective • sericulturist noun
sericulturist
noun see sericulture
series
noun (plural series) Usage: often attributive Etymology: Latin, from serere to join, link together; akin to Greek eirein to string together, hormos chain, necklace, and perhaps ...
serif
noun Etymology: probably from Dutch schreef stroke, line, from Middle Dutch, from schriven to write, from Latin scribere — more at scribe Date: 1841 any of the short lines ...
serifed
adjective see serif
seriffed
adjective see serif
serigraph
noun Etymology: Latin sericum silk + Greek graphein to write, draw — more at carve Date: 1940 an original silk-screen color print • serigrapher noun • serigraphy noun
serigrapher
noun see serigraph
serigraphy
noun see serigraph
serin
noun Etymology: French Date: circa 1672 a small yellow and grayish Old World finch (Serinus serinus of the family Fringillidae) that is related to the canary
serine
noun Etymology: International Scientific Vocabulary sericin + 2-ine Date: 1880 a crystalline nonessential amino acid C3H7NO3 that occurs as a residue in many proteins
Seringapatam
geographical name town S India N of city of Mysore
seriocomic
adjective Etymology: serious + -o- + comic Date: 1783 having a mixture of the serious and the comic • seriocomically adverb
seriocomically
adverb see seriocomic
serious
adjective Etymology: Middle English seryows, from Anglo-French or Late Latin; Anglo-French serious, from Late Latin seriosus, alteration of Latin serius weighty, serious; ...
serious-minded
adjective Date: 1845 having a serious disposition or trend of thought • serious-mindedly adverb • serious-mindedness noun
serious-mindedly
adverb see serious-minded
serious-mindedness
noun see serious-minded
seriously
adverb Date: 1509 1. in a sincere manner ; earnestly 2. to a serious extent ; severely, extremely
seriousness
noun see serious
serjeant
Usage: British variant of sergeant
serjeant-at-law
noun (plural serjeants-at-law) Usage: British Date: 1503 a member of a former class of barristers of the highest rank
serjeanty
Usage: British variant of sergeanty
Serkin
biographical name Rudolf 1903-1991 American (Bohemian-born) pianist
sermon
noun Etymology: Middle English, from Anglo-French sermun, from Medieval Latin sermon-, sermo, from Latin, speech, conversation, from serere to link together — more at series ...
Sermon on the Mount
an ethical discourse delivered by Jesus and recorded in Matthew 5-7 and paralleled briefly in Luke 6:20-49
sermonette
noun Date: 1814 a short sermon
sermonic
adjective see sermon
sermonize
verb (-ized; -izing) Date: 1635 intransitive verb 1. to compose or deliver a sermon 2. to speak didactically or dogmatically transitive verb to preach to or on at ...
sermonizer
noun see sermonize
sero-
combining form Etymology: Latin serum serum
seroconversion
noun Date: 1963 the production of antibodies in response to an antigen • seroconvert intransitive verb
seroconvert
intransitive verb see seroconversion
serologic
adjective see serology
serological
adjective see serology
serologically
adverb see serology
serologist
noun see serology
serology
noun Etymology: International Scientific Vocabulary Date: 1909 a science dealing with serums and especially their reactions and properties • serological or serologic ...
seronegative
adjective Date: 1927 having or being a negative serum reaction especially in a test for the presence of an antibody • seronegativity noun
seronegativity
noun see seronegative
seropositive
adjective Date: circa 1930 having or being a positive serum reaction especially in a test for the presence of an antibody • seropositivity noun
seropositivity
noun see seropositive
seroprevalence
noun Date: 1977 the frequency of individuals in a population that have a particular element (as antibodies to HIV) in their blood serum
seropurulent
adjective Date: circa 1836 consisting of a mixture of serum and pus
serosa
noun Etymology: New Latin, from feminine of serosus serous, from Latin serum Date: circa 1890 a usually enclosing serous membrane • serosal adjective
serosal
adjective see serosa
serotinal
adjective Etymology: Latin serotinus coming late Date: 1898 of or relating to the latter and usually drier part of summer
serotinous
adjective Etymology: Latin serotinus coming late, from sero late — more at soiree Date: circa 1656 remaining closed on the tree with seed dissemination delayed or occurring ...
serotiny
noun see serotinous
serotonergic
also serotoninergic adjective Etymology: serotonin + -ergic Date: 1957 liberating, activated by, or involving serotonin in the transmission of nerve impulses
serotonin
noun Etymology: sero- + tonic + 1-in Date: 1948 a phenolic amine neurotransmitter C10H12N2O that is a powerful vasoconstrictor and is found especially in the brain, blood ...
serotoninergic
adjective see serotonergic
serotype
noun Date: 1946 a group of intimately related microorganisms distinguished by a common set of antigens; also the set of antigens characteristic of such a group
serous
adjective Etymology: Middle English, from Medieval Latin serosus, from Latin serum Date: 15th century of, relating to, or resembling serum; especially of thin watery ...
serous membrane
noun Date: 1813 a thin membrane (as the peritoneum) with cells that secrete a serous fluid; especially serosa
serow
noun Etymology: Lepcha să-ro long-haired Tibetan goat Date: 1847 any of several goatlike artiodactyl mammals (genus Capricornis) of eastern Asia that are usually rather ...
Serowe
geographical name city E Botswana population 30,264
serpent
noun Etymology: Middle English, from Anglo-French, from Latin serpent-, serpens, from present participle of serpere to creep; akin to Greek herpein to creep, Sanskrit sarpati he ...
serpentine
I. adjective Etymology: Middle English, from Anglo-French serpentin, from Late Latin serpentinus, from Latin serpent-, serpens Date: 15th century 1. of or resembling a ...
serpentinely
adverb see serpentine I
serpiginous
adjective Etymology: Middle English serpiginose, from Medieval Latin serpiginosus, from serpigin-, serpigo creeping skin disease, from Latin serpere to creep Date: 15th ...
serpiginously
adverb see serpiginous
Serra
biographical name Junípero 1713-1784 originally Miguel José Serra Spanish missionary in Mexico & California
Serra da Estrela
geographical name mountain range Portugal; highest point Malhão da Estrela (highest in Portugal) 6532 feet (1991 meters)
Serra do Mar
geographical name mountain range S Brazil along coast
Serra Parima
geographical name mountain range N South America on Venezuela-Brazil border SW of Pacaraima Mountains; source of the Orinoco
Serra Tumucumaque
geographical name see Tumuc-Humac Mountains
Serrai
geographical name city N Greece population 50,875
serranid
noun Etymology: ultimately from Latin serra saw Date: circa 1900 any of a large family (Serranidae) of carnivorous marine bony fishes which have an oblong compressed body ...
serrano
noun (plural -nos) Etymology: Mexican Spanish, from Spanish serrano, adjective, montane, highland, from sierra mountain range — more at sierra Date: circa 1972 a small very ...
serrate
I. adjective Etymology: Latin serratus, from serra saw Date: 1668 notched or toothed on the edge; specifically having marginal teeth pointing forward or toward the apex ...
serration
noun Date: 1842 1. the condition of being serrate 2. a formation resembling the toothed edge of a saw 3. one of the teeth in a serrate margin
serried
adjective Date: 1667 1. crowded or pressed together ; compact 2. [by alteration] marked by ridges ; serrate • serriedly adverb • serriedness noun
serriedly
adverb see serried
serriedness
noun see serried
serry
verb (serried; serrying) Etymology: Middle French serré, past participle of serrer to press, crowd — more at sear Date: 1581 intransitive verb archaic to press together ...
Sertoli cell
noun Etymology: Enrico Sertoli died 1910 Italian histologist Date: 1888 one of the elongated striated cells lining the seminiferous tubules that support and apparently ...
Sertoman
noun Etymology: Sertoma (Club) Date: 1956 a member of a major international service club
Sertorius
biographical name Quintus circa 123-72 B.C. Roman general & statesman
sertraline
noun Etymology: perhaps from serotonin + tetrahydro (combined with four atoms of hydrogen) + naphthalene + amine Date: 1983 an antidepressant drug C17H17NCl2 administered in ...
serum
I. noun (plural serums or sera) Etymology: Latin, whey, wheylike fluid; akin to Greek oros whey Date: 1665 1. the watery portion of an animal fluid remaining after ...
serum albumin
noun Date: 1879 a crystallizable albumin or mixture of albumins that normally constitutes more than half of the protein in blood serum and serves to maintain the osmotic ...
serum globulin
noun Date: circa 1890 a globulin or mixture of globulins occurring in blood serum and containing most of the antibodies of the blood
serum hepatitis
noun Date: 1932 hepatitis B
serum sickness
noun Date: circa 1913 an allergic reaction to the injection of foreign serum manifested by hives, swelling, eruption, arthritis, and fever
serv
abbreviation service
serval
noun Etymology: French, from Portuguese lobo cerval lynx, from Medieval Latin lupus cervalis, literally, deerlike wolf Date: 1771 a long-legged African wildcat (Felis ...
servant
noun Etymology: Middle English, from Anglo-French, from present participle of servir Date: 13th century one that serves others ; especially one that performs duties about ...
servanthood
noun see servant
servantless
adjective see servant
serve
I. verb (served; serving) Etymology: Middle English, from Anglo-French servir, from Latin servire to be a slave, serve, from servus slave, servant Date: 13th century ...

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