Слова на букву soma-tano (6389) New Collegiate Dictionary
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Слова на букву soma-tano (6389)

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Somalian
adjective or noun see Somalia
Somaliland
geographical name region E Africa comprising Somalia, Djibouti, & the Ogaden region of E Ethiopia
soman
noun Usage: often capitalized Etymology: German Date: 1951 an extremely toxic chemical warfare agent C7H16FO2P similar to sarin in action
somat-
or somato- combining form Etymology: New Latin, from Greek sōmat-, sōmato-, from sōmat-, sōma body body
somatic
adjective Etymology: Greek sōmatikos, from sōmat-, sōma Date: circa 1775 1. of, relating to, or affecting the body especially as distinguished from the germplasm or the ...
somatic cell
noun Date: 1888 one of the cells of the body that compose the tissues, organs, and parts of that individual other than the germ cells
somatically
adverb see somatic
somatization
noun Date: 1925 conversion of a mental state (as depression or anxiety) into physical symptoms; also the existence of physical bodily complaints in the absence of a known ...
somato-
combining form see somat-
somatological
adjective see somatology
somatology
noun Etymology: New Latin somatologia, from somat- + -logia -logy Date: circa 1878 a branch of anthropology primarily concerned with the comparative study of human evolution, ...
somatomedin
noun Etymology: somat- + intermediary + 1-in Date: 1971 any of several endogenous peptides produced especially in the liver that are dependent on and probably mediate growth ...
somatopleure
noun Etymology: New Latin somatopleura, from somat- + Greek pleura side Date: 1874 a complex fold of tissue in the embryo of a craniate vertebrate consisting of an outer ...
somatosensory
adjective Date: 1952 of, relating to, or being sensory activity having its origin elsewhere than in the special sense organs (as eyes and ears) and conveying information about ...
somatostatin
noun Etymology: somat- + Latin status (past participle of sistere to halt, cause to stand) + English 1-in; akin to Latin stare to stand — more at stand Date: 1973 a ...
somatotrophin
noun see somatotropin
somatotropic hormone
noun Etymology: somat- + -tropic Date: 1938 growth hormone 1
somatotropin
also somatotrophin noun Etymology: somatotropic + 1-in Date: 1941 growth hormone 1
somatotype
noun Date: 1940 body type ; physique
somber
or sombre adjective Etymology: French sombre Date: 1760 1. so shaded as to be dark and gloomy 2. a. of a serious mien ; grave b. of a dismal or depressing character ...
somberly
adverb see somber
somberness
noun see somber
sombre
adjective see somber
sombrero
noun (plural -ros) Etymology: Spanish, from sombra shade Date: 1599 an often high-crowned hat of felt or straw with a very wide brim worn especially in the Southwest and ...
sombrous
adjective Etymology: French sombre Date: 1730 archaic somber
some
I. adjective Etymology: Middle English som, adjective & pronoun, from Old English sum; akin to Old High German sum some, Greek hamē somehow, homos same — more at same Date: ...
somebody
I. pronoun Date: 14th century one or some person of unspecified or indefinite identity II. noun Date: circa 1566 a person of position or importance
someday
adverb Date: 14th century at some future time
somedeal
adverb Date: before 12th century archaic somewhat
somehow
adverb Date: 1664 in one way or another not known or designated ; by some means
someone
pronoun Date: 14th century some person ; somebody
someplace
adverb Date: 1880 somewhere
somersault
also summersault noun Etymology: Middle French sombresaut leap, ultimately from Latin super over + saltus leap, from salire to jump — more at over, sally Date: circa 1530 a ...
somerset
noun or intransitive verb Etymology: by alteration Date: 1591 somersault
Somerset
or Somersetshire geographical name county SW England capital Taunton area 1383 square miles (3582 square kilometers), population 459,100
Somerset Island
geographical name island N Canada in Nunavut N of Boothia Peninsula area 9370 square miles (24,362 square kilometers)
Somerset Nile
geographical name — see Nile
Somersetshire
geographical name see Somerset
Somerville
geographical name city E Massachusetts N of Cambridge population 77,478
Somes
or Hungarian Szamos geographical name river NE Hungary & NW Romania flowing NW into the Tisza
something
I. pronoun Date: before 12th century 1. a. some indeterminate or unspecified thing b. some indeterminate amount more than a specified number — used in combination ...
something else
phrasal something or someone special or extraordinary
sometime
I. adverb Date: 14th century 1. archaic in the past ; formerly 2. archaic once in a while ; occasionally 3. at some time in the future
sometimes
I. adverb Date: 14th century at times ; now and then ; occasionally II. adjective Date: 1593 sometime
someway
also someways adverb Date: 15th century somehow
someways
adverb see someway
somewhat
I. pronoun Date: 13th century something II. adverb Date: 13th century in some degree or measure ; slightly
somewhen
adverb Date: 1833 sometime
somewhere
I. adverb Date: 13th century 1. in, at, from, or to a place unknown or unspecified 2. to a place symbolizing positive accomplishment or progress
somewheres
adverb Date: 1815 chiefly dialect somewhere
somewhither
adverb Date: 1530 archaic to some place ; somewhere
somite
noun Etymology: International Scientific Vocabulary, from Greek sōma body Date: 1869 one of the longitudinal series of segments into which the body of many animals is ...
Somme
geographical name river about 150 miles (241 kilometers) N France flowing NW into the English Channel
sommelier
noun (plural sommeliers) Etymology: French, from Middle French soumelier official charged with transportation of supplies, from Old French, pack animal driver, probably ...
somnambul-
combining form Etymology: New Latin, from somnambulus somnambulist, from Latin somnus sleep + -ambulus (as in funambulus funambulist) — more at somnolent somnambulism ; ...
somnambulant
adjective Date: 1866 1. walking or having the habit of walking while asleep 2. resembling or having the characteristics of a sleepwalker ; sluggish
somnambulate
intransitive verb (-lated; -lating) Date: 1833 to walk when asleep • somnambulation noun
somnambulation
noun see somnambulate
somnambulism
noun Date: 1797 1. an abnormal condition of sleep in which motor acts (as walking) are performed 2. actions characteristic of somnambulism • somnambulist noun • ...
somnambulist
noun see somnambulism
somnambulistic
adjective see somnambulism
somnambulistically
adverb see somnambulism
somnifacient
adjective Etymology: Latin somnus sleep + English -facient Date: circa 1890 hypnotic 1 • somnifacient noun
somniferous
adjective Etymology: Latin somnifer somniferous, from somnus + -fer -ferous Date: 1602 soporific
somnolence
noun Date: 14th century the quality or state of being drowsy ; sleepiness
somnolent
adjective Etymology: Middle English sompnolent, from Anglo-French, from Latin somnolentus, from somnus sleep; akin to Old English swefn sleep, Greek hypnos Date: 15th century ...
somnolently
adverb see somnolent
son
noun Etymology: Middle English sone, from Old English sunu; akin to Old High German sun son, Greek hyios Date: before 12th century 1. a. a human male offspring especially ...
son et lumière
noun Etymology: French, literally, sound and light Date: 1957 an outdoor spectacle at a historic site consisting of recorded narration with light and sound effects
son of a bitch
noun (plural sons of bitches) Date: 1671 sometimes vulgar bastard 3 — sometimes used interjectionally to express surprise or disappointment
son of a gun
noun (plural sons of guns) Date: 1708 — usually used as a mild or euphemistic alternative to son of a bitch; sometimes used interjectionally to express surprise or ...
son of God
Date: 14th century 1. often capitalized S a superhuman or divine being (as an angel) 2. capitalized S messiah 1 3. a person established in the love of God by divine ...
son of man
Date: 14th century 1. a human being 2. often capitalized S God's messiah destined to preside over the final judgment of mankind
son-
or sono- combining form Etymology: Latin sonus sound sound
son-in-law
noun (plural sons-in-law) Date: 14th century the husband of one's daughter
sonant
adjective Etymology: Latin sonant-, sonans, present participle of sonare to sound — more at sound Date: 1846 1. voiced 2 2. syllabic 1a • sonant noun
sonar
noun Etymology: sound navigation ranging Date: 1945 a method or device for detecting and locating objects especially underwater by means of sound waves sent out to be ...
sonata
noun Etymology: Italian, from sonare to sound, from Latin Date: 1694 an instrumental musical composition typically of three or four movements in contrasting forms and keys
sonata form
noun Date: 1858 a musical form that consists basically of an exposition, a development, and a recapitulation and that is used especially for the first movement of a sonata
sonatina
noun Etymology: Italian, diminutive of sonata Date: 1764 a short usually simplified sonata
sonde
noun Etymology: French, literally, sounding line — more at sound Date: 1901 any of various devices for testing physical conditions (as at high altitudes, below the ...
Sondheim
biographical name Stephen Joshua 1930- American composer
sone
noun Etymology: International Scientific Vocabulary, from Latin sonus sound — more at sound Date: 1948 a subjective unit of loudness for an average listener equal to the ...
song
noun Etymology: Middle English, from Old English sang; akin to Old English singan to sing Date: before 12th century 1. the act or art of singing 2. poetical composition 3. ...
song and dance
noun Date: 1870 1. a theatrical performance (as a vaudeville performance) combining singing and dancing 2. a long and often familiar statement or explanation that is ...
song cycle
noun Date: 1871 a group of related songs designed to form a musical entity
Song of Solomon
Etymology: from the opening verse: “The song of songs, which is Solomon's” Date: 1620 a collection of love poems forming a book in the Protestant canon of the Old ...
Song of Songs
Etymology: translation of Hebrew shīr hashshīrīm Date: 1597 a collection of love poems forming a book in the canonical Jewish Scriptures and in the Roman Catholic canon of ...
song sparrow
noun Date: 1810 a North American sparrow (Melospiza melodia of the family Emberizidae) that is brownish above and white below with brownish streaks on the breast and that has ...
song thrush
noun Date: 1598 an Old World thrush (Turdus philomelos of the family Turdidae) that is largely brown above with brown-spotted white underparts — called also mavis, ...
songbird
noun Date: 1683 1. a. a bird that utters a succession of musical tones b. an oscine bird 2. a female singer
songbook
noun Date: before 12th century a collection of songs; specifically a book containing vocal music (as hymns)
songfest
noun Date: circa 1912 an informal session of group singing of popular or folk songs
songful
adjective Date: 14th century given to or suggestive of singing ; melodious • songfully adverb • songfulness noun
songfully
adverb see songful
songfulness
noun see songful
Songhua
or Sungari geographical name river over 1000 miles (1609 kilometers) NE China in E Manchuria flowing from North Korea border NW & NE into the Amur; dammed in upper part to form ...
songless
adjective Date: circa 1805 lacking in, incapable of, or not given to song • songlessly adverb
songlessly
adverb see songless
songlike
adjective see song
Songnam
or Seongnam geographical name city NW South Korea population 447,692
songsmith
noun Date: 1795 a composer of songs
songster
noun Date: 14th century 1. one that sings with skill 2. songbook
songstress
noun Date: 1684 a female singer
songwriter
noun Date: 1821 a person who composes words or music or both especially for popular songs • songwriting noun
songwriting
noun see songwriter
sonhood
noun see son
sonic
adjective Date: 1923 1. utilizing, produced by, or relating to sound waves ; broadly of or involving sound 2. having a frequency within the audibility range of the human ...
sonic bang
noun see sonic boom
sonic barrier
noun Date: 1946 sound barrier
sonic boom
noun Date: 1952 a sound resembling an explosion produced when a shock wave formed at the nose of an aircraft traveling at supersonic speed reaches the ground — called also ...
sonically
adverb see sonic
sonicate
transitive verb (-cated; -cating) Etymology: sonic + 4-ate Date: 1959 to disrupt (as bacterial cells) by exposure to high-frequency sound waves • sonication noun
sonication
noun see sonicate
sonless
adjective Date: 14th century not possessing or never having had a son
sonly
adjective Date: 15th century filial
sonnet
noun Etymology: Italian sonetto, from Old Occitan sonet little song, from son sound, song, from Latin sonus sound Date: 1557 a fixed verse form of Italian origin consisting ...
sonnet sequence
noun Date: 1881 a series of sonnets often having a unifying theme
sonneteer
noun Date: 1665 1. a composer of sonnets 2. a minor or insignificant poet • sonneteering noun
sonneteering
noun see sonneteer
sonny
noun Date: 1838 a young boy — usually used in address
sono-
combining form see son-
sonobuoy
noun Date: 1945 a buoy equipped for detecting underwater sounds and transmitting them by radio
sonogram
noun Date: 1956 an image produced by ultrasound
sonographer
noun see sonography
sonographic
adjective see sonography
sonography
noun Date: 1975 ultrasound 2 • sonographer noun • sonographic adjective
Sonora
geographical name 1. river 250 miles (400 kilometers) NW Mexico flowing SW into upper Gulf of California 2. state NW Mexico bordering on United States & Gulf of California ...
Sonoran
adjective or noun see Sonora
Sonoran Desert
geographical name desert SW United States & NW Mexico in S Arizona, SE California, & N Sonora
sonority
noun (plural -ties) Date: circa 1623 1. the quality or state of being sonorous ; resonance 2. a sonorous tone or speech
sonorous
adjective Etymology: Latin sonorus; akin to Latin sonus sound Date: 1611 1. producing sound (as when struck) 2. full or loud in sound 3. imposing or impressive in ...
sonorously
adverb see sonorous
sonorousness
noun see sonorous
sonship
noun Date: 1587 the relationship of son to father
sonsie
adjective see sonsy
sonsy
or sonsie adjective Etymology: Scots sons health, from Scottish Gaelic sonas luck, happiness Date: 1725 chiefly dialect buxom, comely
Sontag
biographical name Susan 1933- American writer
Soo Canals
geographical name — see Sault Sainte Marie Canals
Soochow
geographical name — see Suzhou
soon
adverb Etymology: Middle English soone, from Old English sōna; akin to Old High German sān immediately Date: before 12th century 1. a. obsolete at once ; immediately ...
sooner
noun Etymology: sooner, comparative of soon Date: 1890 1. a person settling on land in the early West before its official opening to settlement in order to gain the prior ...
sooner or later
adverb Date: 1577 at some uncertain future time ; sometime
Soong Ai-ling
biographical name 1888-1973 wife of H.H. K'ung
Soong Ch'ing-ling
biographical name 1892-1981 wife of Sun Yat-sen
Soong Mei-ling
biographical name 1897- wife of Chiang Kai-shek
Soong Tzu-wen
or Tse-ven or Tsŭ-wên biographical name 1894-1971 T. V. Soong; brother of preceding Chinese financier & statesman
soot
I. noun Etymology: Middle English, from Old English sōt; akin to Old Irish suide soot, Old English sittan to sit Date: before 12th century a black substance formed by ...
sooth
I. adjective Etymology: Middle English, from Old English sōth; akin to Old High German sand true, Latin esse to be Date: before 12th century 1. archaic true 2. archaic ...
soothe
verb (soothed; soothing) Etymology: Middle English sothen to verify, from Old English sōthian, from sōth Date: 1657 transitive verb 1. to please by or as if by attention ...
soother
noun see soothe
soothfast
adjective Date: before 12th century 1. archaic true 2. archaic truthful
soothing
adjective Date: 1700 tending to soothe; also having a sedative effect • soothingly adverb • soothingness noun
soothingly
adverb see soothing
soothingness
noun see soothing
soothly
adverb Date: before 12th century archaic in truth ; truly
soothsay
intransitive verb see soothsaying
soothsayer
noun Date: 14th century a person who predicts the future by magical, intuitive, or more rational means ; prognosticator
soothsaying
noun Date: 15th century 1. the act of foretelling events 2. prediction, prophecy • soothsay intransitive verb
sootily
adverb see sooty
sootiness
noun see sooty
sooty
adjective (sootier; -est) Date: 13th century 1. a. of, relating to, or producing soot b. soiled with soot 2. of the color of soot • sootily adverb • sootiness ...
sooty mold
noun Date: 1901 a dark growth of fungus mycelium growing in insect honeydew on plants; also any of various ascomycetous fungi (order Dothideales) producing such growth
sooty tern
noun Date: 1785 a widely distributed tern (Sterna fuscata) of tropical oceans that is blackish above and white below — called also wideawake
SOP
abbreviation standard operating procedure; standing operating procedure
sop
I. noun Etymology: Middle English soppe, from Old English sopp; akin to Old English sūpan to swallow — more at sup Date: before 12th century 1. chiefly dialect a piece of ...
sopaipilla
or sopapilla noun Etymology: American Spanish sopaipilla, diminutive of Spanish sopaipa fritter soaked in honey, from sopa food soaked in milk, of Germanic origin; akin to Old ...
sopapilla
noun see sopaipilla
soph
abbreviation sophomore
sophism
noun Date: 15th century 1. an argument apparently correct in form but actually invalid; especially such an argument used to deceive 2. sophistry 1
sophist
noun Etymology: Latin sophista, from Greek sophistēs, literally, expert, wise man, from sophizesthai to become wise, deceive, from sophos clever, wise Date: 14th century 1. ...
sophistic
or sophistical adjective Date: 15th century 1. of or relating to sophists, sophistry, or the ancient Sophists 2. plausible but fallacious • sophistically adverb
sophistical
adjective see sophistic
sophistically
adverb see sophistic
sophisticate
I. transitive verb (-cated; -cating) Etymology: Middle English, from Medieval Latin sophisticatus, past participle of sophisticare, from Latin sophisticus sophistic, from Greek ...
sophisticated
adjective Etymology: Medieval Latin sophisticatus Date: 1601 1. deprived of native or original simplicity: as a. highly complicated or developed ; complex b. having a ...
sophisticatedly
adverb see sophisticated
sophistication
noun Date: 15th century 1. a. the use of sophistry ; sophistic reasoning b. sophism, quibble 2. the process or result of becoming cultured, knowledgeable, or ...
sophistry
noun Date: 14th century 1. subtly deceptive reasoning or argumentation 2. sophism 1
Sophoclean
adjective see Sophocles
Sophocles
biographical name circa 496-406 B.C. Greek dramatist • Sophoclean adjective
sophomore
I. noun Etymology: perhaps from Greek sophos wise + mōros foolish Date: 1688 a student in the second year at college or a 4-year secondary school II. adjective Date: 1953 ...
sophomoric
adjective Date: 1813 1. conceited and overconfident of knowledge but poorly informed and immature 2. of, relating to, or characteristic of a sophomore
Sophonias
noun Etymology: Late Latin, from Greek, from Hebrew Sĕphanyāh Date: 1535 Zephaniah
sophy
noun Etymology: Persian Safī Date: 1534 archaic a sovereign of Persia
soporific
I. adjective Etymology: probably from French soporifique, from Latin sopor deep sleep; akin to Latin somnus sleep — more at somnolent Date: 1665 1. a. causing or tending ...
soppiness
noun see soppy
sopping
adjective Date: 1877 wet through ; soaking
soppy
adjective (soppier; -est) Date: 1631 1. sentimental, mawkish 2. a. soaked through ; saturated b. very wet • soppiness noun
sopranino
noun (plural -nos) Etymology: Italian, diminutive of soprano Date: 1905 a musical instrument (as a recorder or saxophone) higher in pitch than the soprano
soprano
I. adjective Etymology: Italian, adjective & noun, from sopra above, from Latin supra — more at supra- Date: 1730 relating to or having the range or part of a soprano II. ...
Sopron
geographical name city W Hungary population 57,500
sora
noun Etymology: origin unknown Date: 1705 a small short-billed North American rail (Porzana carolina) common in marshes
Sorata
geographical name — see Illampu
sorb
transitive verb Etymology: back-formation from absorb & adsorb Date: 1909 to take up and hold by either adsorption or absorption • sorbability noun • sorbable ...
Sorb
noun Etymology: German Sorbe, from Sorbian serbje Date: 1843 1. wend 2. Wendish • Sorbian adjective or noun
sorbability
noun see sorb
sorbable
adjective see sorb
sorbate
noun Date: circa 1823 a salt or ester of sorbic acid — compare potassium sorbate
sorbent
noun Etymology: Latin sorbent-, sorbens, present participle of sorbēre to suck up — more at absorb Date: circa 1856 a substance that sorbs
sorbet
noun Etymology: French, from Middle French, sweetened fruit juice, from Old Italian sorbetto, from Turkish şerbet — more at sherbet Date: 1864 a usually fruit-flavored ice ...
Sorbian
adjective or noun see Sorb
sorbic acid
noun Etymology: sorb fruit of the service or related trees, from French sorbe, from Latin sorbum Date: 1815 a crystalline acid C6H8O2 obtained from the unripe fruits of the ...
Sorbiodunum
geographical name — see Old Sarum
sorbitol
noun Etymology: sorb fruit of the service or related trees + -itol Date: 1895 a faintly sweet alcohol C6H14O6 that occurs in some fruits, is made synthetically, and is used ...
sorcerer
noun Date: 15th century a person who practices sorcery ; wizard
sorceress
noun Date: 14th century a woman who is a sorcerer
sorcerous
adjective Date: 1546 of or relating to sorcery ; magical
sorcery
noun Etymology: Middle English sorcerie, from Anglo-French, from sorcer sorcerer, from Medieval Latin sortiarius, from Latin sort-, sors chance, lot — more at series Date: ...
Sordello
biographical name circa 1200-before 1269 Italian troubadour
sordid
adjective Etymology: Latin sordidus, from sordes dirt — more at swart Date: 1606 1. marked by baseness or grossness ; vile 2. a. dirty, filthy b. wretched, ...
sordidly
adverb see sordid
sordidness
noun see sordid
sordino
noun (plural sordini) Etymology: Italian, from sordo silent, from Latin surdus Date: circa 1801 mute 3
sore
I. adjective (sorer; sorest) Etymology: Middle English sor, from Old English sār; akin to Old High German sēr sore and probably to Old Irish saeth distress Date: before 12th ...
sore throat
noun Date: 1629 pain in the throat due to inflammation of the fauces and pharynx
sorehead
noun Date: 1848 a person easily angered or disgruntled • sorehead or soreheaded adjective
soreheaded
adjective see sorehead
Sorel-Tracy
geographical name city Canada in S Quebec population 34,194
sorely
adverb Date: before 12th century 1. in a sore manner ; painfully 2. very, extremely
soreness
noun see sore I
sorghum
noun Etymology: New Latin, from Italian sorgo, from Vulgar Latin *Syricum (granum), literally, Syrian grain Date: 1597 1. any of an economically important genus (Sorghum) of ...
sorgo
noun Etymology: Italian Date: circa 1760 a sorghum cultivated primarily for the sweet juice in its stems from which sugar and syrup are made but also used for fodder and ...
Soria
geographical name 1. province N central Spain area 3972 square miles (10,287 square kilometers), population 94,537 2. commune, its capital, W of Saragossa population 32,360
sorites
noun (plural sorites) Etymology: Latin, from Greek sōritēs, from sōros heap Date: 1551 an argument consisting of propositions so arranged that the predicate of any one ...
Sorocaba
geographical name city SE Brazil in SE São Paulo state metropolitan area population 377,270
Sorolla y Bastida
biographical name Joaquín 1863-1923 Spanish painter
Soroptimist
noun Etymology: Soroptimist (Club) Date: 1924 a member of a service club composed of professional women and businesswomen
sororal
adjective Etymology: Latin soror sister — more at sister Date: 1858 of, relating to, or characteristic of a sister ; sisterly
sororate
noun Etymology: Latin soror Date: 1910 the marriage of one man to two or more sisters usually successively and after the first wife has been found to be barren or after her ...
sorority
noun (plural -ties) Etymology: Medieval Latin sororitas sisterhood, from Latin soror sister Date: 1900 a club of women; specifically a women's student organization formed ...
sorption
noun Etymology: back-formation from absorption & adsorption Date: 1909 the process of sorbing ; the state of being sorbed • sorptive adjective
sorptive
adjective see sorption
sorrel
I. noun Etymology: Middle English sorel, noun & adjective, from Anglo-French, from sor red, auburn, probably of Germanic origin; akin to Middle Dutch soor dry, barren, Old ...
sorrel tree
noun Date: 1687 sourwood
Sorrento
or ancient Surrentum geographical name commune & port S Italy on S side of Bay of Naples
sorrily
adverb see sorry
sorriness
noun see sorry
sorrow
I. noun Etymology: Middle English sorow, from Old English sorg; akin to Old High German sorga sorrow Date: before 12th century 1. a. deep distress, sadness, or regret ...
sorrower
noun see sorrow II
sorrowful
adjective Date: before 12th century 1. full of or marked by sorrow 2. expressive of or inducing sorrow • sorrowfully adverb • sorrowfulness noun
sorrowfully
adverb see sorrowful
sorrowfulness
noun see sorrowful
sorry
adjective (sorrier; -est) Etymology: Middle English sory, from Old English sārig, from sār sore Date: before 12th century 1. feeling sorrow, regret, or penitence 2. ...
sort
I. noun Etymology: Middle English, from Anglo-French, fate, lot, characteristic, from Latin sort-, sors lot, share, category — more at series Date: 14th century 1. a. a ...
sort of
adverb Date: 1790 to a moderate degree ; somewhat
sortable
adjective see sort II
sorter
noun see sort II
sortie
noun Etymology: French, from Middle French, from sortir to go out, leave Date: 1778 1. a sudden issuing of troops from a defensive position against the enemy 2. one mission ...
sortilege
noun Etymology: Middle English, from Medieval Latin sortilegium, from Latin sortilegus foretelling, from sort-, sors lot + -i- + legere to gather — more at legend Date: 14th ...
sortition
noun Etymology: Latin sortition-, sortitio, from sortiri to cast or draw lots, from sort-, sors lot Date: 1597 the act or an instance of casting lots
sorus
noun (plural sori) Etymology: New Latin, from Greek sōros heap Date: 1832 a cluster of plant reproductive bodies: as a. a cluster of sporangia on the underside of a ...
SOS
noun Date: 1910 1. an internationally recognized signal of distress in radio code • • • - - - • • • used especially by ships calling for help 2. a call or ...
Sosnowiec
geographical name city SW Poland NE of Katowice population 259,269
sostenuto
I. adjective or adverb Etymology: Italian, from past participle of sostenere to sustain, from Latin sustinēre Date: circa 1724 sustained to or beyond the note's full value ...
sot
noun Etymology: Middle English, fool, from Old English sott Date: 1592 a habitual drunkard
soteriological
adjective see soteriology
soteriology
noun Etymology: Greek sōtērion salvation (from sōtēr savior, preserver) + English -logy — more at creosote Date: circa 1774 theology dealing with salvation especially ...
Sotho
noun (plural Sotho or Sothos) Date: 1928 1. a. any one of the Sotho languages and especially Sesotho b. a group of closely related Bantu languages of Lesotho, Botswana, ...
Soto, de
biographical name Hernando 1496(or 1499 or 1500)-1542 Spanish explorer
sotol
noun Etymology: American Spanish, from Nahuatl zōtōlin palm tree Date: 1881 any of several plants (genus Dasylirion) of the agave family of the southwestern United States ...
sottish
adjective Date: 1583 resembling a sot ; drunken; also doltish, stupid • sottishly adverb • sottishness noun
sottishly
adverb see sottish
sottishness
noun see sottish
sotto voce
adverb or adjective Etymology: Italian sottovoce, literally, under the voice Date: 1737 1. under the breath ; in an undertone; also in a private manner 2. very softly ...

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