Слова на букву soma-tano (6389) New Collegiate Dictionary
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Слова на букву soma-tano (6389)

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suasive
adjective see suasion
suasively
adverb see suasion
suasiveness
noun see suasion
suave
adjective (suaver; -est) Etymology: French, from Middle French, pleasant, sweet, from Latin suavis — more at sweet Date: 1831 1. smoothly though often superficially ...
suavely
adverb see suave
suaveness
noun see suave
suaviter in modo, fortiter in re
foreign term Etymology: Latin gently in manner, strongly in deed
suavity
noun see suave
sub
I. noun Date: 1830 substitute II. verb (subbed; subbing) Date: 1853 intransitive verb to act as a substitute transitive verb 1. British to read and edit as a copy ...
sub judice
adverb Etymology: Latin Date: 1613 before a judge or court ; not yet judicially decided
sub rosa
adverb Etymology: New Latin, literally, under the rose; from the ancient association of the rose with secrecy Date: 1654 in confidence ; secretly
sub specie aeternitatis
adverb Etymology: New Latin, literally, under the aspect of eternity Date: 1895 in its essential or universal form or nature
sub verbo
or sub voce foreign term Etymology: Latin under the word — introducing a cross-reference in a dictionary or index
sub voce
foreign term see sub verbo
sub-
prefix Etymology: Middle English, from Latin, under, below, secretly, from below, near, from sub under, close to — more at up 1. under ; beneath ; below 2. a. ...
sub-rosa
adjective Date: 1904 secretive, private
sub-Saharan
adjective Date: 1955 of, relating to, or being the part of Africa south of the Sahara
subacid
adjective Etymology: Latin subacidus, from sub- + acidus acid Date: 1760 somewhat acrimonious ; cutting • subacidly adverb • subacidness noun
subacidly
adverb see subacid
subacidness
noun see subacid
subacute
adjective Date: 1822 1. having a tapered but not sharply pointed form 2. a. falling between acute and chronic in character especially when closer to acute b. less ...
subacute sclerosing panencephalitis
noun Etymology: panencephalitis from New Latin, from pan- + encephalitis Date: 1950 a usually fatal neurological disease of children and young adults caused by infection of ...
subacutely
adverb see subacute
subadar
noun see subahdar
subadult
noun Date: 1903 an individual that has passed through the juvenile period but not yet attained typical adult characteristics • subadult adjective
subaerial
adjective Date: 1833 situated, formed, or occurring on or immediately adjacent to the surface of the earth • subaerially adverb
subaerially
adverb see subaerial
subahdar
or subadar noun Etymology: Hindi & Urdu sūbadār, sūbedār, from Persian ṣūbadār, from ṣūba province (from Arabic) + -dār one holding Date: 1698 1. a governor of a ...
subalpine
adjective Date: circa 1656 1. of or relating to the region about the foot and lower slopes of the Alps 2. of, relating to, or inhabiting high upland slopes and especially ...
subalpine fir
noun Date: 1898 a medium-sized fir (Abies lasiocarpa) of subalpine regions of North America having bluish-green white-lined needles
subaltern
I. adjective Etymology: Late Latin subalternus, from Latin sub- + alternus alternate, from alter other (of two) — more at alter Date: 1570 1. particular with reference to a ...
subantarctic
adjective Date: 1875 of, relating to, characteristic of, or being a region just outside the antarctic circle
subapical
adjective Date: 1846 situated below or near an apex
subaquatic
adjective Etymology: International Scientific Vocabulary Date: 1844 somewhat aquatic
subaqueous
adjective Date: 1677 existing, formed, or taking place in or under water
subarachnoid
also subarachnoidal adjective Date: 1843 of, relating to, occurring, or situated under the arachnoid membrane
subarachnoidal
adjective see subarachnoid
subarctic
adjective Etymology: International Scientific Vocabulary Date: 1854 of, relating to, characteristic of, or being regions immediately outside of the arctic circle or regions ...
subassembly
noun Date: 1919 an assembled unit designed to be incorporated with other units in a finished product
subatmospheric
adjective Date: 1941 less or lower than that of the atmosphere
subatomic
adjective Date: 1903 1. of or relating to the inside of the atom 2. of, relating to, or being particles smaller than atoms
subaudition
noun Etymology: Late Latin subaudition-, subauditio, from subaudire to understand, from Latin sub- + audire to hear — more at audible Date: 1798 the act of understanding or ...
subbase
noun Date: 1826 underlying support placed below what is normally construed as a base: as a. the lowest member horizontally of an architectural base or of a baseboard or ...
subbituminous
adjective Date: 1908 of, relating to, or being coal of lower rank than bituminous coal but higher than lignite
subcabinet
adjective Date: 1954 of, relating to, or being a high administrative position in the United States government that ranks below the cabinet level
subcapsular
adjective Date: 1889 situated or occurring beneath or within a capsule
subcellular
adjective Date: 1948 of less than cellular scope or level of organization
subcenter
noun Date: circa 1925 a secondary center; especially a center (as for shopping) located outside the main business area of a city
subcentral
adjective Date: 1822 1. nearly but not quite central 2. located under a center • subcentrally adverb
subcentrally
adverb see subcentral
subchaser
noun Date: circa 1918 a small maneuverable patrol or escort vessel used for antisubmarine warfare
subclass
noun Date: 1819 a primary division of a class: as a. a category in biological classification ranking below a class and above an order b. subset 1
subclassification
noun Date: 1873 1. a primary division of a classification 2. arrangement into or assignment to subclassifications • subclassify transitive verb
subclassify
transitive verb see subclassification
subclavian
I. adjective Etymology: New Latin subclavius, from sub- + clavicula clavicle Date: 1646 of, relating to, being, or inserted into a part (as an artery, vein, or nerve) located ...
subclavian artery
noun Date: 1688 the proximal part of the main artery of the arm or forelimb
subclavian vein
noun Date: 1704 the proximal part of the main vein of the arm or forelimb
subclimax
noun Date: 1916 a stage or community in an ecological succession immediately preceding a climax; especially one held in relative stability throughout by edaphic or biotic ...
subclinical
adjective Date: circa 1935 not detectable or producing effects that are not detectable by the usual clinical tests • subclinically adverb
subclinically
adverb see subclinical
subcommittee
noun Date: circa 1607 a subdivision of a committee usually organized for a specific purpose
subcommunity
noun Date: 1966 a distinct grouping within a community
subcompact
noun Date: 1967 an automobile smaller than a compact
subconscious
I. adjective Date: circa 1834 existing in the mind but not immediately available to consciousness • subconsciously adverb • subconsciousness noun II. noun Date: 1886 ...
subconsciously
adverb see subconscious I
subconsciousness
noun see subconscious I
subcontinent
noun Date: 1863 a large landmass smaller than a continent; especially a major subdivision of a continent • subcontinental adjective
subcontinental
adjective see subcontinent
subcontract
I. noun Date: 1817 a contract between a party to an original contract and a third party; especially one to provide all or a specified part of the work or materials required ...
subcontractor
noun Date: 1834 an individual or business firm contracting to perform part or all of another's contract
subcontrary
noun Date: 1685 a proposition so related to another that though both may be true they cannot both be false • subcontrary adjective
subcool
transitive verb Date: 1916 supercool
subcortical
adjective Date: 1899 of, relating to, involving, or being a part of the brain below the cerebral cortex
subcritical
adjective Date: 1930 1. less or lower than critical in respect to a specified factor 2. a. of insufficient size to sustain a chain reaction b. designed for use with ...
subcrustal
adjective Date: 1897 situated or occurring below a crust and especially the crust of the earth
subcultural
adjective see subculture
subculturally
adverb see subculture
subculture
noun Date: 1886 1. a. a culture (as of bacteria) derived from another culture b. an act or instance of producing a subculture 2. an ethnic, regional, economic, or ...
subcutaneous
adjective Etymology: Late Latin subcutaneus, from Latin sub- + cutis skin — more at hide Date: 1651 being, living, occurring, or administered under the skin • ...
subcutaneously
adverb see subcutaneous
subcutis
noun Etymology: New Latin, from Late Latin, beneath the skin, from Latin sub- + cutis Date: 1879 the deeper part of the dermis
subdeacon
noun Etymology: Middle English subdecon, from Anglo-French subdiakene, from Late Latin subdiaconus, from Latin sub- + Late Latin diaconus deacon — more at deacon Date: 14th ...
subdeb
noun Date: 1917 subdebutante
subdebutante
noun Date: 1919 a young girl who is about to become a debutante; broadly a girl in her middle teens
subdermal
adjective Date: 1887 subcutaneous • subdermally adverb
subdermally
adverb see subdermal
subdividable
adjective see subdivide
subdivide
verb Etymology: Middle English, from Late Latin subdividere, from Latin sub- + dividere to divide Date: 15th century transitive verb 1. to divide the parts of into more ...
subdivider
noun see subdivide
subdivision
noun Date: 15th century 1. an act or instance of subdividing 2. something produced by subdividing: as a. a subordinate part of a larger whole b. a tract of land ...
subdominant
noun Date: 1793 1. the fourth tone of a major or minor scale 2. something partly but incompletely dominant; especially an ecologically important life form subordinate in ...
subduct
verb see subduction
subduction
noun Etymology: French, from Late Latin subduction-, subductio withdrawal, from Latin subducere to withdraw, from sub- + ducere to draw — more at tow Date: 1970 the action ...
subdue
transitive verb (subdued; subduing) Etymology: Middle English sodewen, subduen, from Anglo-French soduire, subdure to lead astray, overcome, arrest (influenced in form and ...
subdued
adjective Date: 1796 lacking in vitality, intensity, or strength • subduedly adverb
subduedly
adverb see subdued
subduer
noun see subdue
subdural
adjective Etymology: sub- + dura (mater) Date: 1875 situated or occurring beneath the dura mater or between the dura mater and the arachnoid membrane
subdwarf
noun Date: 1939 a small hot star containing few elements heavier than helium and having lower luminosity than a main-sequence star of similar temperature
subedit
transitive verb see subeditor
subeditor
noun Date: 1819 chiefly British copy editor • subedit transitive verb, chiefly British • subeditorial adjective, chiefly British
subeditorial
adjective see subeditor
subemployed
adjective Date: 1967 underemployed
subemployment
noun Date: 1967 a condition of inadequate employment in a labor force including unemployment and underemployment
subentry
noun Date: 1876 an entry (as in a catalog or an account) made under a more general entry
subepidermal
adjective Date: 1853 lying beneath or constituting the innermost part of the epidermis
suberin
noun Etymology: French subérine, from Latin suber cork tree, cork Date: 1830 a complex fatty substance found especially in the cell walls of cork
suberization
noun Date: 1875 conversion of the cell walls into corky tissue by infiltration with suberin • suberized adjective
suberized
adjective see suberization
subfamily
noun Etymology: International Scientific Vocabulary Date: 1833 1. a category in biological classification ranking below a family and above a genus 2. a subgroup of ...
subfield
noun Date: 1940 1. a subset of a mathematical field that is itself a field 2. a subdivision of a field (as of study)
subfloor
noun Date: 1858 a rough floor laid as a base for a finished floor
subfossil
adjective Etymology: International Scientific Vocabulary Date: 1832 of less than typical fossil age but partially fossilized • subfossil noun
subfreezing
adjective Date: 1949 being or marked by temperature below the freezing point (as of water)
subfusc
adjective Etymology: Latin subfuscus brownish, dusky, from sub- + fuscus dark brown — more at dusk Date: 1710 chiefly British drab, dusky
subgenus
noun Etymology: New Latin Date: 1813 a category in biological classification ranking below a genus and above a species
subglacial
adjective Date: 1820 of or relating to the bottom of a glacier or the area immediately underlying a glacier • subglacially adverb
subglacially
adverb see subglacial
subgrade
noun Date: 1893 a surface of earth or rock leveled off to receive a foundation (as of a road)
subgraph
noun Date: 1931 a graph all of whose points and lines are contained in a larger graph
subgroup
noun Date: 1845 1. a subordinate group whose members usually share some common differential quality 2. a subset of a mathematical group that is itself a group
subgum
noun Etymology: Chinese (Guangdong) sahp-gám, literally, assorted, mixed Date: 1911 a dish of Chinese origin prepared with a mixture of vegetables (as peppers, water ...
subhead
noun Date: 1673 1. a heading of a subdivision (as in an outline) 2. a subordinate caption, title, or headline
subheading
noun Date: 1863 subhead
subhuman
I. adjective Date: 1793 less than human: as a. failing to attain the level (as of morality or intelligence) associated with normal human beings b. unsuitable to or ...
Subic
geographical name town Philippines in W Luzon at head of Subic Bay (inlet of South China Sea NW of Bataan Peninsula) population 30,340
subindex
noun Date: 1923 an index to a division of a main classification
subinfeudate
transitive verb see subinfeudation
subinfeudation
noun Etymology: sub- + infeudation enfeoffment Date: circa 1730 the subdivision of a feudal estate by a vassal who in turn becomes feudal lord over his tenants • ...
subinterval
noun Date: 1927 an interval that is a subdivision or a subset of an interval
subirrigate
transitive verb see subirrigation
subirrigation
noun Date: 1875 irrigation below the surface (as by a periodic rise of the water table or by a system of underground porous pipes) • subirrigate transitive verb
subito
adverb Etymology: Italian, from Latin, suddenly, from subitus sudden — more at sudden Date: circa 1724 immediately, suddenly — used as a direction in music
subj
abbreviation subject
subjacency
noun Date: circa 1891 the quality or state of being subjacent
subjacent
adjective Etymology: Latin subjacent-, subjacens, present participle of subjacēre to lie under, from sub- + jacēre to lie — more at adjacent Date: 1592 lying under or ...
subjacently
adverb see subjacent
subject
I. noun Etymology: Middle English suget, subget, from Anglo-French, from Latin subjectus one under authority & subjectum subject of a proposition, from masculine & neuter ...
subject matter
noun Date: 1657 matter presented for consideration in discussion, thought, or study
subjection
noun see subject III
subjective
I. adjective Date: 15th century 1. of, relating to, or constituting a subject: as a. obsolete of, relating to, or characteristic of one that is a subject especially in lack ...
subjective complement
noun Date: 1923 a grammatical complement relating to the subject of an intransitive verb (as sick in “he had fallen sick”)
subjectively
adverb see subjective I
subjectiveness
noun see subjective I
subjectivise
British variant of subjectivize
subjectivism
noun Date: 1856 1. a. a theory that limits knowledge to subjective experience b. a theory that stresses the subjective elements in experience 2. a. a doctrine ...
subjectivist
noun see subjectivism
subjectivistic
adjective see subjectivism
subjectivity
noun see subjective I
subjectivization
noun see subjectivize
subjectivize
transitive verb (-ized; -izing) Date: 1868 to make subjective • subjectivization noun
subjectless
adjective see subject I
subjoin
transitive verb Etymology: Middle French subjoindre, from Latin subjungere to join beneath, add, from sub- + jungere to join — more at yoke Date: 1573 annex, append
subjugate
transitive verb (-gated; -gating) Etymology: Middle English, from Latin subjugatus, past participle of subjugare, from sub- + jugum yoke — more at yoke Date: 15th century 1. ...
subjugation
noun see subjugate
subjugator
noun see subjugate
subjunction
noun Date: 1633 1. an act of subjoining or the state of being subjoined 2. something subjoined
subjunctive
I. adjective Etymology: Late Latin subjunctivus, from Latin subjunctus, past participle of subjungere to join beneath, subordinate Date: 1530 of, relating to, or constituting ...
subkingdom
noun Date: 1825 a category in biological classification ranking below a kingdom and above a phylum
sublate
transitive verb (sublated; sublating) Etymology: Latin sublatus (past participle of tollere to take away, lift up), from sub- up + latus, past participle of ferre to carry — ...
sublation
noun see sublate
sublease
I. noun Date: 1826 a lease by a tenant or lessee of part or all of leased premises to another person but with the original tenant retaining some right or interest under the ...
sublet
I. verb (-let; -letting) Date: 1766 transitive verb 1. sublease 2. subcontract 1 intransitive verb to lease or rent all or part of a leased or rented property II. ...
sublethal
adjective Date: 1895 less than but usually only slightly less than lethal • sublethally adverb
sublethally
adverb see sublethal
sublieutenant
noun Date: 1796 a commissioned officer in the British navy ranking immediately below lieutenant
sublimable
adjective see sublime I
sublimate
I. transitive verb (-mated; -mating) Etymology: Middle English, from Medieval Latin sublimatus, past participle of sublimare Date: 15th century 1. a. sublime 1 b. ...
sublimation
noun see sublimate I
sublime
I. verb (sublimed; subliming) Etymology: Middle English, from Middle French sublimer, from Medieval Latin sublimare to refine, sublime, from Latin, to elevate, from sublimis ...
sublimely
adverb see sublime II
sublimeness
noun see sublime II
sublimer
noun see sublime I
subliminal
adjective Etymology: sub- + Latin limin-, limen threshold Date: 1886 1. inadequate to produce a sensation or a perception 2. existing or functioning below the threshold ...
subliminally
adverb see subliminal
sublimity
noun (plural -ties) Date: 15th century 1. the quality or state of being sublime 2. something sublime or exalted
subline
noun Date: 1942 an inbred or selectively cultured line (as of cells) within a strain
sublingual
adjective Etymology: New Latin sublingualis, from Latin sub- + lingua tongue — more at tongue Date: 1661 situated or administered under the tongue
subliterary
adjective Date: 1936 relating to or being subliterature
subliterature
noun Date: 1952 popular writing (as mystery or adventure stories) considered inferior to standard literature
sublittoral
I. adjective Date: 1846 1. situated, occurring, or formed on the aquatic side of a shoreline or littoral zone 2. constituting the sublittoral II. noun Date: circa 1935 ...
sublunar
adjective see sublunary
sublunary
also sublunar adjective Etymology: modification of Late Latin sublunaris, from Latin sub- + luna moon — more at lunar Date: 1592 of, relating to, or characteristic of the ...
subluxation
noun Date: 1674 partial dislocation (as of one of the bones in a joint)
submachine gun
noun Date: 1920 a portable automatic firearm that uses pistol-type ammunition and is fired from the shoulder or hip
submandibular
I. adjective Date: 1875 1. of, relating to, situated in, or performed in the region below the lower jaw 2. of, relating to, or associated with the salivary glands inside of ...
submarginal
adjective Date: 1829 1. adjacent to a margin or a marginal part or structure 2. falling below a necessary minimum
submarine
I. adjective Date: 1648 underwater; especially undersea II. noun Date: 1703 1. something that functions or operates underwater; specifically a naval vessel designed ...
submariner
noun Date: 1914 a member of a submarine crew
submaxillary
adjective or noun Date: 1787 submandibular
submediant
noun Date: 1806 the sixth tone of a major or minor scale
submerge
verb (submerged; submerging) Etymology: Latin submergere, from sub- + mergere to plunge — more at merge Date: 1606 transitive verb 1. to put under water 2. to cover or ...
submerged
adjective Date: 1799 1. covered with water 2. submersed b 3. sunk in poverty and misery 4. hidden, suppressed
submergence
noun see submerge
submergible
adjective see submerge
submerse
transitive verb (submersed; submersing) Etymology: Latin submersus, past participle of submergere Date: 1837 submerge • submersion noun
submersed
adjective Date: circa 1727 submerged: as a. covered with water b. growing or adapted to grow underwater
submersible
I. adjective Date: 1866 capable of being submerged II. noun Date: 1900 something that is submersible; especially a usually small underwater craft used especially for ...
submersion
noun see submerse
submetacentric
adjective Date: 1962 having the centromere situated so that one chromosome arm is somewhat shorter than the other • submetacentric noun
submicrogram
adjective Date: 1946 relating to or having a mass of less than one microgram
submicron
adjective Date: 1948 1. being less than a micron in a (specified) measurement and especially in diameter 2. having or consisting of submicron particles
submicroscopic
adjective Etymology: International Scientific Vocabulary Date: 1905 1. too small to be seen in an ordinary light microscope 2. of, relating to, or dealing with the very ...
submicroscopically
adverb see submicroscopic
submillimeter
adjective Date: 1955 being less than a millimeter in diameter or wavelength
subminiature
adjective Etymology: International Scientific Vocabulary Date: 1947 very small — used especially of a very compact assembly of electronic equipment
submiss
adjective Etymology: Latin submissus, from past participle of submittere Date: 1570 archaic submissive, humble
submission
noun Etymology: Middle English, from Anglo-French, from Latin submission-, submissio act of lowering, from submittere Date: 14th century 1. a. a legal agreement to submit ...
submissive
adjective Date: 1575 submitting to others • submissively adverb • submissiveness noun
submissively
adverb see submissive
submissiveness
noun see submissive
submit
verb (submitted; submitting) Etymology: Middle English submitten, from Latin submittere to lower, submit, from sub- + mittere to send Date: 14th century transitive verb 1. ...
submitochondrial
adjective Date: 1963 relating to, composed of, or being parts and especially fragments of mitochondria
submittal
noun see submit
submucosa
noun Etymology: New Latin Date: 1885 a supporting layer of loose connective tissue directly under a mucous membrane • submucosal adjective
submucosal
adjective see submucosa
submultiple
noun Date: 1758 an exact divisor of a number
submunition
noun Date: 1975 any of a group of smaller weapons carried as a warhead by a missile or projectile and expelled as the carrier approaches its target
subnormal
adjective Etymology: International Scientific Vocabulary Date: circa 1890 1. lower or smaller than normal 2. having less of something and especially of intelligence than is ...
subnormality
noun see subnormal
subnormally
adverb see subnormal
subnotebook
noun Date: 1990 a portable microcomputer similar to but smaller and lighter than a notebook computer
subnuclear
adjective Date: 1937 of, relating to, or being a particle smaller than the atomic nucleus
suboceanic
adjective Date: 1858 situated, taking place, or formed beneath the ocean or its bottom
suborbital
adjective Date: circa 1827 1. situated beneath the eye or the orbit of the eye 2. being or involving less than one orbit (as of the earth or moon)
suborder
noun Date: 1826 a subdivision of an order ; especially a taxonomic category ranking between an order and a family
subordinate
I. adjective Etymology: Middle English subordinat, from Medieval Latin subordinatus, past participle of subordinare to subordinate, from Latin sub- + ordinare to order — more ...
subordinately
adverb see subordinate I
subordinateness
noun see subordinate I
subordinating
adjective Date: 1857 introducing and linking a subordinate clause to a main clause
subordination
noun see subordinate III
subordinative
adjective see subordinate III
subordinator
noun Date: 1959 one that subordinates; especially a subordinating conjunction
suborn
transitive verb Etymology: Middle French suborner, from Latin subornare, from sub- secretly + ornare to furnish, equip — more at ornate Date: 1534 1. to induce secretly to ...
subornation
noun see suborn
suborner
noun see suborn
Subotica
geographical name city N Serbia and Montenegro in N Vojvodina near Hungarian border population 150,666
subphylum
noun Etymology: New Latin Date: 1888 a category in biological classification ranking below a phylum and above a class
subplot
noun Date: 1830 1. a subordinate plot in fiction or drama 2. a subdivision of an experimental plot of land
subpoena
I. noun Etymology: Middle English suppena, from Latin sub poena under penalty Date: 15th century a writ commanding a person designated in it to appear in court under a ...
subpoena ad testificandum
noun Etymology: New Latin, under penalty to give testimony Date: circa 1769 a writ commanding a person to appear in court to testify as a witness
subpoena duces tecum
noun Etymology: New Latin, under penalty you shall bring with you Date: 1768 a writ commanding a person to produce in court certain designated documents or evidence
subpolar
adjective Date: 1826 1. subarctic 2. subantarctic
subpopulation
noun Date: 1944 an identifiable fraction or subdivision of a population
subpotency
noun see subpotent
subpotent
adjective Date: circa 1909 less potent than normal • subpotency noun
subprincipal
noun Date: 1597 1. an assistant principal (as of a school) 2. a secondary or bracing rafter
subproblem
noun Date: 1906 a problem that is contingent on or forms a part of another more inclusive problem
subprofessional
adjective Date: 1941 functioning or qualified to function below the professional level but distinctly above the clerical or labor level and usually under the supervision of a ...
subprogram
noun Date: 1947 a semi-independent portion of a program (as for a computer)
subregion
noun Etymology: International Scientific Vocabulary Date: 1864 1. a subdivision of a region 2. one of the primary divisions of a biogeographic region • subregional ...
subregional
adjective see subregion
subreption
noun Etymology: Late Latin subreption-, subreptio, from Latin, act of stealing, from subripere, surripere to take away secretly — more at surreptitious Date: 1600 a ...
subreptitious
adjective see subreption
subreptitiously
adverb see subreption
subring
noun Date: 1937 a subset of a mathematical ring which is itself a ring
subrogate
transitive verb (-gated; -gating) Etymology: Middle English, from Latin subrogatus, past participle of subrogare, surrogare — more at surrogate Date: 15th century to put in ...
subrogation
noun Date: 15th century the act of subrogating; specifically the assumption by a third party (as a second creditor or an insurance company) of another's legal right to ...
subroutine
noun Etymology: International Scientific Vocabulary Date: 1948 a subordinate routine; specifically a sequence of computer instructions for performing a specified task that ...
subsample
I. transitive verb Date: circa 1899 to draw samples from (a previously selected group or population) ; sample a sample of II. noun Date: circa 1899 a sample or specimen ...
subsatellite
noun Date: 1894 an object carried into orbit in and subsequently released from a satellite or spacecraft
subscribe
verb (subscribed; subscribing) Etymology: Middle English, from Latin subscribere, literally, to write beneath, from sub- + scribere to write — more at scribe Date: 15th ...
subscriber
noun see subscribe
subscript
noun Etymology: Latin subscriptus, past participle of subscribere Date: 1901 a distinguishing symbol (as a letter or numeral) written immediately below or below and to the ...
subscription
noun Etymology: Middle English subscripcion mark at the end of a document, concluding formula, from Anglo-French, from Latin subscription-, subscriptio, from subscribere Date: ...

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