Слова на букву soma-tano (6389) New Collegiate Dictionary
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Слова на букву soma-tano (6389)

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subscription television
noun see subscription TV
subscription TV
noun Date: 1953 pay-TV that broadcasts programs directly over the air to customers provided with a special receiver — called also subscription television — compare ...
subsection
noun Date: 1621 1. a subdivision or a subordinate division of a section 2. a subordinate part or branch
subsequence
I. noun Date: circa 1500 the quality or state of being subsequent; also a subsequent event II. noun Date: 1908 a mathematical sequence that is part of another sequence
subsequent
adjective Etymology: Middle English, from Anglo-French, from Latin subsequent-, subsequens, present participle of subsequi to follow close, from sub- near + sequi to follow — ...
subsequent to
preposition Date: 1621 at a time later or more recent than ; since
subsequently
adverb see subsequent
subserve
transitive verb Etymology: Latin subservire to serve, be subservient, from sub- + servire to serve Date: 1661 1. to promote the welfare or purposes of 2. to serve as an ...
subservience
noun Date: circa 1676 1. a subservient or subordinate place or function 2. obsequious servility
subserviency
noun Date: 1651 subservience
subservient
adjective Etymology: Latin subservient-, subserviens, present participle of subservire Date: circa 1626 1. useful in an inferior capacity ; subordinate 2. serving to ...
subserviently
adverb see subservient
subset
noun Date: 1902 1. a set each of whose elements is an element of an inclusive set 2. division, portion
subshrub
noun Date: 1851 a perennial plant having woody stems except for the terminal part of the new growth which is killed back annually; also a low shrub
subside
intransitive verb (subsided; subsiding) Etymology: Latin subsidere, from sub- + sidere to sit down, sink; akin to Latin sedēre to sit — more at sit Date: 1607 1. to sink ...
subsidence
noun see subside
subsidiarily
adverb see subsidiary I
subsidiarity
noun Date: 1936 1. the quality or state of being subsidiary 2. a principle in social organization: functions which subordinate or local organizations perform effectively ...
subsidiary
I. adjective Etymology: Latin subsidiarius, from subsidium reserve troops Date: 1543 1. a. furnishing aid or support ; auxiliary b. of secondary importance 2. of, ...
subsidise
British variant of subsidize
subsidization
noun see subsidize
subsidize
transitive verb (-dized; -dizing) Date: 1769 to furnish with a subsidy: as a. to purchase the assistance of by payment of a subsidy b. to aid or promote (as a private ...
subsidizer
noun see subsidize
subsidy
noun (plural -dies) Etymology: Middle English subsidie, from Anglo-French, from Latin subsidium reserve troops, support, assistance, from sub- near + sedēre to sit — more at ...
subsist
verb Etymology: Late Latin subsistere to exist, from Latin, to come to a halt, remain, from sub- + sistere to come to a stand; akin to Latin stare to stand — more at stand ...
subsistence
noun Etymology: Middle English, from Late Latin subsistentia, from subsistent-, subsistens, present participle of subsistere Date: 15th century 1. a. (1) real being ; ...
subsistence agriculture
noun see subsistence farming
subsistence farmer
noun see subsistence farming
subsistence farming
noun Date: 1938 1. farming or a system of farming that provides all or almost all the goods required by the farm family usually without any significant surplus for sale 2. ...
subsistent
adjective see subsistence
subsocial
adjective Date: circa 1909 incompletely social; especially tending to associate gregariously but lacking fixed or complex social organization
subsoil
I. noun Date: 1796 the stratum of weathered material that underlies the surface soil II. transitive verb Date: 1840 to turn, break, or stir the subsoil of • subsoiler ...
subsoiler
noun see subsoil II
subsolar point
noun Date: circa 1908 the point on the surface of the earth or a planet at which the sun is at the zenith
subsonic
adjective Etymology: International Scientific Vocabulary Date: 1937 1. of, relating to, or being a speed less than that of sound in air 2. moving, capable of moving, or ...
subsonically
adverb see subsonic
subspace
noun Date: 1926 a subset of a space; especially one that has the essential properties (as those of a vector space or topological space) of the including space
subspecies
noun Etymology: New Latin Date: 1699 a subdivision of a species: as a. a category in biological classification that ranks immediately below a species and designates a ...
subspecific
adjective see subspecies
substage
noun Date: 1888 an attachment to a microscope by means of which accessories (as mirrors, diaphragms, or condensers) are held in place beneath the stage of the instrument
substance
noun Etymology: Middle English, from Anglo-French, from Latin substantia, from substant-, substans, present participle of substare to stand under, from sub- + stare to stand — ...
substance P
noun Date: 1934 a neuropeptide that consists of 11 amino acid residues, that is present in the nervous system and gastrointestinal tract, that causes the contraction of smooth ...
substanceless
adjective see substance
substandard
adjective Date: 1897 deviating from or falling short of a standard or norm: as a. of a quality lower than that prescribed by law b. conforming to a pattern of ...
substantia nigra
noun (plural substantiae nigrae) Etymology: New Latin, literally, black substance Date: circa 1882 a layer of deeply pigmented gray matter situated in the midbrain and ...
substantial
adjective Date: 14th century 1. a. consisting of or relating to substance b. not imaginary or illusory ; real, true c. important, essential 2. ample to satisfy and ...
substantiality
noun see substantial
substantially
adverb see substantial
substantialness
noun see substantial
substantiate
transitive verb (-ated; -ating) Date: 1657 1. to give substance or form to ; embody 2. to establish by proof or competent evidence ; verify Synonyms: see confirm • ...
substantiation
noun see substantiate
substantiative
adjective see substantiate
substantival
adjective Date: circa 1832 of, relating to, or serving as a substantive • substantivally adverb
substantivally
adverb see substantival
substantive
I. noun Etymology: Middle English substantif, from Anglo-French sustentif, from sustentif, adjective, having or expressing substance, from Late Latin substantivus, from Latin ...
substantive due process
noun Date: 1954 due process 2
substantive right
noun Date: 1939 a right (as of life, liberty, property, or reputation) held to exist for its own sake and to constitute part of the normal legal order of society
substantively
adverb see substantive II
substantiveness
noun see substantive II
substantivize
transitive verb see substantive I
substation
noun Date: 1881 a subordinate or subsidiary station: as a. a branch post office b. a subsidiary station in which electric current is transformed c. a police station ...
substituent
noun Etymology: Latin substituent-, substituens, present participle of substituere Date: circa 1896 an atom or group that replaces another atom or group in a molecule • ...
substitutability
noun see substitutable
substitutable
adjective Date: 1805 capable of being substituted • substitutability noun
substitute
I. noun Etymology: Middle English, from Anglo-French substitut, from Latin substitutus, past participle of substituere to put in place of, from sub- + statuere to set up, place ...
substitution
noun Etymology: Middle English substitucion, from Middle French, from Late Latin substitution-, substitutio, from substituere Date: 14th century 1. a. the act, process, or ...
substitution cipher
noun Date: 1936 a cipher in which the letters of the plaintext are systematically replaced by substitute letters — compare transposition cipher
substitutional
adjective see substitution
substitutionally
adverb see substitution
substitutionary
adjective see substitution
substitutive
adjective Date: 1668 serving or suitable as a substitute • substitutively adverb
substitutively
adverb see substitutive
substrate
noun Etymology: Medieval Latin substratum Date: 1807 1. substratum 2. the base on which an organism lives 3. a substance acted upon (as by an enzyme)
substratum
noun (plural substrata) Etymology: Medieval Latin, from Latin, neuter of substratus, past participle of substernere to spread under, from sub- + sternere to spread — more at ...
substructural
adjective see substructure
substructure
noun Date: 1726 an underlying or supporting part of a structure • substructural adjective
subsumable
adjective see subsume
subsume
transitive verb (subsumed; subsuming) Etymology: New Latin subsumere, from Latin sub- + sumere to take up — more at consume Date: 1825 to include or place within something ...
subsumption
noun Etymology: New Latin subsumption-, subsumptio, from subsumere Date: 1652 the act or process of subsuming
subsurface
I. noun Date: 1778 earth material (as rock) near but not exposed at the surface of the ground II. adjective Date: 1875 of, relating to, or being something located beneath a ...
subteen
noun Date: 1951 a preadolescent child
subtemperate
adjective Date: 1852 of or occurring in the colder parts of the temperate zones
subtenancy
noun Date: circa 1861 the state of being a subtenant
subtenant
noun Date: 15th century one who rents from a tenant
subtend
transitive verb Etymology: Latin subtendere to stretch beneath, from sub- + tendere to stretch — more at thin Date: 1570 1. a. to be opposite to and extend from one side ...
subterfuge
noun Etymology: Late Latin subterfugium, from Latin subterfugere to escape, evade, from subter- secretly (from subter underneath; akin to Latin sub under) + fugere to flee — ...
subterminal
adjective Date: 1828 situated or occurring near but not precisely at an end
subterranean
also subterraneous adjective Etymology: Latin subterraneus, from sub- + terra earth — more at thirst Date: 1603 1. being, lying, or operating under the surface of the ...
subterraneanly
adverb see subterranean
subterraneous
adjective see subterranean
subterraneously
adverb see subterranean
subtext
noun Date: 1950 the implicit or metaphorical meaning (as of a literary text) • subtextual adjective • subtextually adverb
subtextual
adjective see subtext
subtextually
adverb see subtext
subthreshold
adjective Date: 1942 inadequate to produce a response
subtile
adjective (subtiler; subtilest) Etymology: Middle English subtile, sotil subtle Date: 14th century 1. subtle, elusive 2. a. cunning, crafty b. sagacious, ...
subtilely
adverb see subtile
subtileness
noun see subtile
subtilisin
noun Etymology: New Latin subtilis, specific epithet of Bacillus subtilis, species to which Bacillus amyloliquefaciens was once thought to belong Date: 1953 a protease ...
subtilization
noun see subtilize
subtilize
verb (-ized; -izing) Date: 1592 intransitive verb to act or think subtly transitive verb to make subtile • subtilization noun
subtilty
noun (plural -ties) Date: 14th century subtlety
subtitle
I. noun Date: 1825 1. a secondary or explanatory title 2. a printed statement or fragment of dialogue appearing on the screen between the scenes of a silent motion picture ...
subtle
adjective (subtler; subtlest) Etymology: Middle English sotil, subtile, from Anglo-French, from Latin subtilis, literally, finely textured, from sub- + tela cloth on a loom; ...
subtleness
noun see subtle
subtlety
noun (plural -ties) Etymology: Middle English sotilte, subtilte, from Anglo-French sotilté, from Latin subtilitat-, subtilitas, from subtilis Date: 14th century 1. the ...
subtly
adverb see subtle
subtonic
noun Etymology: from its being a half tone below the upper tonic Date: circa 1854 leading tone
subtotal
I. noun Date: 1906 the sum of part of a series of figures II. adjective Date: 1908 somewhat less than complete ; nearly total • subtotally adverb
subtotally
adverb see subtotal II
subtract
verb Etymology: Latin subtractus, past participle of subtrahere to draw from beneath, withdraw, from sub- + trahere to draw Date: 1557 transitive verb to take away by or as ...
subtracter
noun see subtract
subtraction
noun Etymology: Middle English subtraccion, from Anglo-French sustraction, subtraction, from Late Latin subtraction-, subtractio, from Latin subtrahere Date: 15th century an ...
subtractive
adjective Date: 1690 1. tending to subtract 2. constituting or involving subtraction
subtrahend
noun Etymology: Latin subtrahendus, gerundive of subtrahere Date: 1674 a number that is to be subtracted from a minuend
subtropic
adjective see subtropical
subtropical
also subtropic adjective Etymology: International Scientific Vocabulary Date: 1842 of, relating to, or being the regions bordering on the tropical zone
subtropics
noun plural Date: 1886 subtropical regions
subulate
adjective Etymology: New Latin subulatus, from Latin subula awl, from suere to sew — more at sew Date: 1748 linear and tapering to a fine point
subumbrella
noun Date: 1878 the concave undersurface of a jellyfish
suburb
noun Etymology: Middle English suburbe, from Anglo-French, from Latin suburbium, from sub- near + urbs city — more at sub- Date: 14th century 1. a. an outlying part of a ...
suburban
adjective or noun see suburb
suburbanise
British variant of suburbanize
suburbanite
noun see suburb
suburbanization
noun see suburbanize
suburbanize
transitive verb (-ized; -izing) Date: 1893 to make suburban ; give a suburban character to • suburbanization noun
suburbia
noun Etymology: New Latin, from English suburb Date: 1895 1. the suburbs of a city 2. people who live in the suburbs 3. suburban life
subvention
noun Etymology: Middle English subvencion, from Middle French & Late Latin; Middle French subvenciȯn, from Late Latin subvention-, subventio assistance, from Latin subvenire ...
subventionary
adjective see subvention
subversion
noun Etymology: Middle English, from Anglo-French, from Late Latin subversion-, subversio, from Latin subvertere Date: 14th century 1. the act of subverting ; the state of ...
subversionary
adjective see subversion
subversive
adjective or noun see subversion
subversively
adverb see subversion
subversiveness
noun see subversion
subvert
transitive verb Etymology: Middle English, from Anglo-French subvertir, from Latin subvertere, literally, to turn from beneath, from sub- + vertere to turn — more at worth ...
subverter
noun see subvert
subviral
adjective Date: 1963 relating to, being, or caused by a piece or a structural part (as a protein) of a virus
subvocal
adjective Date: 1924 characterized by the occurrence in the mind of words in speech order with or without inaudible articulation of the speech organs • subvocally adverb
subvocalization
noun Date: 1947 the act or process of inaudibly articulating speech with the speech organs • subvocalize verb
subvocalize
verb see subvocalization
subvocally
adverb see subvocal
subway
noun Date: 1825 an underground way: as a. a passage under a street (as for pedestrians, power cables, or water or gas mains) b. a usually electric underground railway ...
subwoofer
noun Date: 1978 a loudspeaker responsive only to the lowest acoustic frequencies
succedaneous
adjective see succedaneum
succedaneum
noun (plural -neums or succedanea) Etymology: New Latin, from Latin, neuter of succedaneus substituted, from succedere to follow after Date: 1641 substitute • succedaneous ...
succedent
adjective Etymology: Middle English, from Latin succedent-, succedens, present participle of succedere Date: 15th century coming next ; succeeding, subsequent
succeed
verb Etymology: Middle English succeden, from Anglo-French succeeder, from Latin succedere to go up, follow after, succeed, from sub- near + cedere to go — more at sub- Date: ...
succeeder
noun see succeed
succès d'estime
noun Etymology: French, literally, success of esteem Date: 1859 something (as a work of art) that wins critical respect but not popular success; also the reception accorded ...
succès de scandale
noun Etymology: French, literally, success of scandal Date: 1896 something (as a work of art) that wins popularity or notoriety because of its scandalous nature; also the ...
succès fou
noun Etymology: French, literally, mad success Date: 1878 an extraordinary success
success
noun Etymology: Latin successus, from succedere Date: 1537 1. obsolete outcome, result 2. a. degree or measure of succeeding b. favorable or desired outcome; also ...
successful
adjective Date: 1588 1. resulting or terminating in success 2. gaining or having gained success • successfully adverb • successfulness noun
successfully
adverb see successful
successfulness
noun see successful
succession
noun Etymology: Middle English, from Anglo-French or Latin; Anglo-French, from Latin succession-, successio, from succedere Date: 14th century 1. a. the order in which or ...
succession duty
noun Date: 1853 chiefly British inheritance tax
successional
adjective see succession
successionally
adverb see succession
successive
adjective Date: 15th century 1. following in order ; following each other without interruption 2. characterized by or produced in succession • successively adverb • ...
successively
adverb see successive
successiveness
noun see successive
successor
noun Etymology: Middle English successour, from Anglo-French, from Latin successor, from succedere Date: 14th century one that follows; especially one who succeeds to a ...
succinate
noun Date: 1790 a salt or ester of succinic acid
succinate dehydrogenase
noun Date: 1962 an iron-containing flavoprotein enzyme that catalyzes often reversibly the dehydrogenation of succinic acid to fumaric acid in the Krebs cycle and that is ...
succinct
adjective Etymology: Middle English, from Latin succinctus having one's clothes gathered up by a belt, tightly wrapped, concise, from sub- + cinctus, past participle of cingere ...
succinctly
adverb see succinct
succinctness
noun see succinct
succinic acid
noun Etymology: French succinique, from Latin succinum amber Date: 1790 a crystalline dicarboxylic acid C4H6O4 found widely in nature and active in energy-yielding metabolic ...
succinic dehydrogenase
noun see succinate dehydrogenase
succinyl
noun Etymology: International Scientific Vocabulary Date: circa 1868 either of two radicals derived from succinic acid by removal of one or both hydroxyl groups: a. a ...
succinylcholine
noun Date: 1950 a basic compound that is used intravenously chiefly in the form of a hydrated chloride C14H30Cl2N2O4•2H2O as a muscle relaxant in surgery
succor
I. noun Etymology: Middle English socour, sucurs (taken as plural), from Anglo-French sucur, sucors, from Medieval Latin succursus, from Latin succurrere to run to the rescue, ...
succorer
noun see succor II
succory
noun Etymology: alteration of Middle English cicoree Date: 1533 chicory
succotash
noun Etymology: Narragansett msíckquatash boiled corn kernels Date: 1751 lima or shell beans and kernels of green corn cooked together
succour
chiefly British variant of succor
succuba
noun (plural succubae) Etymology: Latin, paramour Date: 1559 succubus
succubus
noun (plural succubi) Etymology: Middle English, from Medieval Latin, alteration of Latin succuba paramour, from succubare to lie under, from sub- + cubare to lie, recline ...
succulence
noun Date: 1787 1. the state of being succulent 2. succulent feed
succulent
I. adjective Etymology: Latin suculentus, from sucus juice, sap; perhaps akin to Latin sugere to suck — more at suck Date: 1601 1. a. full of juice ; juicy b. moist ...
succulently
adverb see succulent I
succumb
intransitive verb Etymology: French & Latin; French succomber, from Latin succumbere, from sub- + -cumbere to lie down; akin to Latin cubare to lie Date: 1604 1. to yield to ...
such
I. adjective Etymology: Middle English, from Old English swilc; akin to Old High German sulīh such, Old English swā so, gelīk like — more at so, like Date: before 12th ...
such and such
I. adjective Date: 13th century not named or specified II. pronoun Date: 15th century something not specified
suchlike
I. adjective Date: 15th century of like kind ; similar II. pronoun Date: 15th century such 3
Suchocka
biographical name Hanna 1946- prime minister of Poland (1992-93)
Süchow
geographical name 1. — see Xuzhou 2. — see Yibin
suck
I. verb Etymology: Middle English suken, from Old English sūcan; akin to Old High German sūgan to suck, Latin sugere Date: before 12th century transitive verb 1. a. ...
suck in
transitive verb Date: 1840 1. dupe, hoodwink 2. to contract, flatten, and tighten (the abdomen) especially by inhaling deeply
suck it up
phrasal to make the effort required to do or deal with something difficult or unpleasant
suck-up
noun Date: 1976 a person who is ingratiating or fawning
sucker
I. noun Date: 14th century 1. a. one that sucks especially a breast or udder ; suckling b. a device for creating or regulating suction (as a piston or valve in a ...
sucker punch
transitive verb Date: 1964 to punch (a person) suddenly without warning and often without apparent provocation • sucker punch noun
sucking
adjective Date: before 12th century not yet weaned; broadly very young
sucking louse
noun Date: circa 1907 any of an order (Anoplura) of wingless insects comprising the true lice with mouthparts adapted to sucking body fluids
suckle
verb (suckled; suckling) Etymology: Middle English suklen, probably back-formation from suklyng Date: 14th century transitive verb 1. a. to give milk to from the breast ...
suckling
noun Etymology: Middle English suklyng, from suken to suck Date: 13th century a young unweaned animal
Suckling
biographical name Sir John 1609-1642 English Cavalier poet
sucky
adjective (suckier; -est) Date: 1984 slang awful 3
sucralose
noun Etymology: probably from sucrose + 3-al + 2-ose Date: 1985 a white crystalline powder C12H19Cl3O3 that is derived from sucrose and is used as a low-calorie sweetener ...
sucrase
noun Etymology: International Scientific Vocabulary, from French sucre sugar, from Middle French — more at sugar Date: circa 1900 invertase
sucre
noun Etymology: Spanish, from Antonio José de Sucre Date: 1886 — see money table
Sucre
I. biographical name Antonio José de 1795-1830 South American liberator II. geographical name city, constitutional capital of Bolivia, SE of La Paz population 130,952
sucrose
noun Etymology: International Scientific Vocabulary, from French sucre sugar Date: 1857 a sweet crystalline dextrorotatory disaccharide sugar C12H22O11 that occurs naturally ...
suction
I. noun Etymology: Late Latin suction-, suctio, from Latin sugere to suck — more at suck Date: 1626 1. the act or process of sucking 2. a. the act or process of ...
suction cup
noun Date: 1942 a cup-shaped device in which a partial vacuum can be produced when applied to a surface
suction pump
noun Date: 1825 a common pump in which the liquid to be raised is pushed by atmospheric pressure into the partial vacuum under a retreating valved piston on the upstroke ...
suction stop
noun Date: 1887 a voice stop in the formation of which air behind the articulation is rarefied with consequent inrush of air when articulation is broken
suctional
adjective see suction I
suctorial
adjective Etymology: New Latin suctorius, from Latin sugere Date: 1833 adapted for sucking; especially serving to draw up fluid or to adhere by suction
suctorian
noun Etymology: New Latin Suctoria, from neuter plural of suctorius suctorial Date: circa 1842 any of a class or subclass (Suctoria) of complex protozoans which are ...
Sudan
geographical name 1. region N Africa between the Atlantic & the upper Nile S of the Sahara including basins of Lake Chad & Niger River & the upper Nile 2. country NE Africa S ...
Sudan grass
noun Etymology: the Sudan, region in Africa Date: 1911 a vigorous tall-growing annual sorghum grass (Sorghum sudanense syn. S. vulgare sudanense) widely grown for hay and ...
Sudanese
adjective or noun see Sudan
Sudanese Republic
geographical name — see Mali 2
sudatorium
noun Etymology: Latin, from sudare to sweat — more at sweat Date: circa 1757 a sweat room in a bath
sudatory
noun (plural -ries) Date: 1615 sudatorium
Sudbury
geographical name city Canada in SE Ontario N of Georgian Bay greater Sudbury population 155,219
sudd
noun Etymology: Arabic, literally, obstruction Date: 1874 floating vegetable matter that forms obstructive masses especially in the upper White Nile
Sudd
geographical name swamp region S Sudan drained by White Nile River
sudden
I. adjective Etymology: Middle English sodain, from Anglo-French sudain, from Latin subitaneus, from subitus sudden, from past participle of subire to come up, from sub- up + ...
sudden death
noun Date: 14th century 1. unexpected death that is instantaneous or occurs within minutes from any cause other than violence 2. extra play to break a tie in a sports ...
sudden infant death syndrome
noun Date: 1970 death of an apparently healthy infant usually before one year of age that is of unknown cause and occurs especially during sleep — abbreviation SIDS; called ...
suddenly
adverb see sudden I
suddenness
noun see sudden I
Sudeten
I. geographical name see Sudety II. adjective or noun see Sudety
Sudetenland
geographical name region N Czech Republic in Sudety Mountains
Sudety
or Sudeten geographical name mountains central Europe W of the Carpathians between Czech Republic & Poland • Sudeten adjective or noun
Sudirman Range
or formerly Nassau Range geographical name mountain range central West Papua, Indonesia — see Puncak Jaya
sudoriferous
adjective Etymology: Late Latin sudorifer, from Latin sudor sweat (from sudare to sweat) + -ifer -iferous — more at sweat Date: 1597 producing or conveying sweat
sudorific
adjective Etymology: New Latin sudorificus, from Latin sudor Date: 1626 causing or inducing sweat ; diaphoretic • sudorific noun
Sudra
noun Etymology: Sanskrit śūdra Date: 1630 a Hindu of a lower caste traditionally assigned to menial occupations • Sudra adjective
suds
I. noun plural but singular or plural in construction Etymology: probably from Middle Dutch sudse marsh; akin to Old English sēothan to seethe — more at seethe Date: 1581 ...
sudser
noun Date: 1967 soap opera
sudsless
adjective see suds I
sudsy
adjective (sudsier; -est) Date: 1866 1. full of suds ; frothy, foamy 2. soapy 4
sue
verb (sued; suing) Etymology: Middle English sewen, siuen to follow, strive for, petition, from Anglo-French sivre, siure, Vulgar Latin *sequere, from Latin sequi to follow; ...
Sue
biographical name Eugène 1804-1857 originally Marie-Joseph Sue French novelist
suede
I. noun also suède Etymology: French gants de Suède Swedish gloves Date: 1883 1. leather with a napped surface 2. a fabric finished with a nap to simulate suede II. ...
suède
noun see suede I
suer
noun see sue
suet
noun Etymology: Middle English sewet, from Anglo-French suet, siuet, from seu, su hard animal fat, from Latin sebum Date: 14th century the hard fat about the kidneys and ...
Suetonius
biographical name circa A.D. 69-after 122 Gaius Suetonius Tranquillus Roman biographer & historian
Suez
geographical name city & port NE Egypt at S end of Suez Canal on Gulf of Suez (arm of Red Sea) population 376,000
Suez Canal
geographical name canal over 100 miles (161 kilometers) long NE Egypt traversing Isthmus of Suez
Suez, Isthmus of
geographical name isthmus NE Egypt between Mediterranean & Red seas connecting Africa & Asia
suffer
verb (suffered; suffering) Etymology: Middle English suffren, from Anglo-French suffrir, from Vulgar Latin *sufferire, from Latin sufferre, from sub- up + ferre to bear — more ...
sufferable
adjective see suffer
sufferableness
noun see suffer
sufferably
adverb see suffer
sufferance
noun Date: 14th century 1. patient endurance 2. pain, misery 3. consent or sanction implied by a lack of interference or failure to enforce a prohibition 4. power or ...
sufferer
noun see suffer
suffering
noun Date: 14th century 1. the state or experience of one that suffers 2. pain Synonyms: see distress
suffice
verb (sufficed; sufficing) Etymology: Middle English, from Anglo-French suffis-, stem of suffire, from Latin sufficere to provide, be adequate, from sub- + facere to make, do ...
sufficer
noun see suffice
sufficiency
noun (plural -cies) Date: 15th century 1. sufficient means to meet one's needs ; competency; also a modest but adequate scale of living 2. the quality or state of being ...
sufficient
adjective Etymology: Middle English, from Latin sufficient-, sufficiens, from present participle of sufficere Date: 14th century 1. a. enough to meet the needs of a ...
sufficient condition
noun Date: 1885 1. a proposition whose truth assures the truth of another proposition 2. a state of affairs whose existence assures the existence of another state of affairs
sufficiently
adverb see sufficient
suffix
I. noun Etymology: New Latin suffixum, from Latin, neuter of suffixus, past participle of suffigere to fasten underneath, from sub- + figere to fasten — more at fix Date: ...
suffixal
adjective see suffix I
suffixation
noun see suffix II
suffocate
verb (-cated; -cating) Etymology: Middle English, from Latin suffocatus, past participle of suffocare to choke, stifle, from sub- + fauces throat Date: 15th century transitive ...
suffocating
adjective Date: 1604 tending or serving to suffocate or overpower ; overwhelming • suffocatingly adverb

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