Слова на букву soma-tano (6389) New Collegiate Dictionary
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Слова на букву soma-tano (6389)

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Sunday-go-to-meeting
adjective Date: 1831 appropriate for Sunday churchgoing
Sundays
adverb see Sunday I
sundeck
noun Date: 1897 1. the usually upper deck of a ship that is exposed to the most sun 2. a roof, deck, or terrace for sunning
sunder
verb (sundered; sundering) Etymology: Middle English, from Old English gesundrian, syndrian; akin to Old High German suntarōn to sunder, Old English sundor apart, Latin sine ...
Sunderland
geographical name seaport N England in Tyne and Wear on North Sea population 286,800
sundew
noun Date: 1578 any of a genus (Drosera of the family Droseraceae, the sundew family) of bog-inhabiting insectivorous herbs having leaves covered with gland-tipped adhesive ...
sundial
noun Date: 1599 an instrument to show the time of day by the shadow of a gnomon on a usually horizontal plate or on a cylindrical surface
sundown
noun Date: 1620 sunset 2
sundowner
noun Date: 1868 1. [from his habit of arriving at a place where he hopes to obtain food and lodging too late to do any work] Australian hobo, tramp 2. chiefly British a ...
sundress
noun Date: 1942 a dress with an abbreviated bodice usually exposing the shoulders, arms, and back
sundries
noun plural Etymology: 1sundry Date: 1755 miscellaneous small articles, details, or items
sundrops
noun plural but singular or plural in construction Date: 1784 any of several day-flowering herbs (genera Oenothera and Calylophus) of the evening-primrose family
sundry
I. adjective Etymology: Middle English, different for each, from Old English syndrig, from sundor apart — more at sunder Date: 13th century miscellaneous, various II. ...
Sundsvall
geographical name city & port E Sweden on Gulf of Bothnia population 94,329
sunfish
noun Date: 1629 1. ocean sunfish 2. any of numerous North American freshwater bony fishes (family Centrarchidae, especially genus Lepomis) usually with a deep compressed ...
Sunfish
trademark used for a small light sailboat that has one sail
sunflower
noun Date: 1597 any of a genus (Helianthus, especially H. annuus) of New World composite plants with large yellow-rayed flower heads bearing edible seeds that yield an edible ...
sung
past and past participle of sing
Sung
noun Etymology: Chinese (Beijing) Sòng Date: 1673 a Chinese dynasty dated A.D. 960-1280 and marked by cultural refinement and achievements in philosophy, literature, and ...
sung mass
noun Date: 1931 high mass
Sungari
geographical name — see Songhua
sunglass
noun Date: 1804 1. a convex lens for converging the sun's rays 2. plural glasses to protect the eyes from the sun
sunk
I. past and past participle of sink II. adjective Date: 1719 1. depressed in spirits 2. done for, ruined
sunk fence
noun Date: circa 1771 a ditch with a retaining wall used to divide lands without defacing a landscape — called also ha-ha
sunken
adjective Etymology: Middle English sonkyn, past participle of sinken to sink Date: 14th century 1. submerged; especially lying at the bottom of a body of water 2. a. ...
sunlamp
noun Date: 1885 an electric lamp designed to emit radiation of wavelengths from ultraviolet to infrared
sunless
adjective Date: 1589 lacking sunshine ; dark, cheerless
sunlight
noun Date: 13th century the light of the sun ; sunshine
sunlit
adjective Date: 1792 lighted by or as if by the sun
sunn
noun Etymology: Hindi & Urdu san, from Sanskrit śaṇa Date: 1774 an annual Indian herb (Crotalaria juncea) of the legume family with slender branches, simple leaves, and ...
sunn hemp
noun Date: 1849 sunn
sunna
also sunnah noun Usage: often capitalized Etymology: Arabic sunna Date: circa 1728 the body of Islamic custom and practice based on Muhammad's words and deeds
sunnah
noun see sunna
Sunni
noun Etymology: Arabic sunnī, from sunna Date: 1595 1. the Muslims of the branch of Islam that adheres to the orthodox tradition and acknowledges the first four caliphs as ...
sunnily
adverb see sunny
sunniness
noun see sunny
Sunnism
noun Date: 1892 the religious system or distinctive tenets of the Sunni
Sunnite
noun Date: 1718 Sunni 2 • Sunnite adjective
sunny
adjective (sunnier; -est) Date: 14th century 1. marked by brilliant sunlight ; full of sunshine 2. cheerful, optimistic 3. exposed to, brightened by, or warmed by the ...
sunny-side up
adjective Date: circa 1901 of an egg fried on one side only
Sunnyvale
geographical name city W California WNW of San Jose population 131,760
sunporch
noun Date: 1918 a screened-in or glassed-in porch with a sunny exposure
sunrise
noun Date: 15th century 1. the apparent rising of the sun above the horizon; also the accompanying atmospheric effects 2. the time when the upper limb of the sun appears ...
Sunrise
geographical name city SE Florida population 85,779
sunroof
noun Date: 1952 a panel in an automobile roof that can be opened
sunroom
noun Date: circa 1902 a glass-enclosed porch or living room with a sunny exposure — called also sun parlor
sunscald
noun Date: 1855 an injury of woody plants (as fruit or forest trees) characterized by localized death of the tissues and sometimes by cankers and caused when it occurs in the ...
sunscreen
noun Date: 1738 1. a screen to protect against sun 2. a preparation (as a lotion) applied to the skin to prevent sunburn (as by chemically absorbing ultraviolet ...
sunscreening
adjective see sunscreen
sunseeker
noun Date: 1954 a person who travels to an area of warmth and sun especially in winter
sunset
I. noun Date: 14th century 1. the apparent descent of the sun below the horizon; also the accompanying atmospheric effects 2. the time when the upper limb of the sun ...
Sunset Crater
geographical name volcanic crater N central Arizona in Sunset Crater Volcano National Monument
sunshade
noun Date: 1842 something used as a protection from the sun's rays: as a. parasol b. awning
sunshine
I. noun Date: 13th century 1. a. the sun's light or direct rays b. the warmth and light given by the sun's rays c. a spot or surface on which the sun's light shines ...
sunshiny
adjective see sunshine I
sunspot
noun Date: 1868 any of the dark spots that appear at times on the sun's surface and are usually visible only through a telescope
sunstroke
noun Date: 1829 heatstroke caused by direct exposure to the sun
sunstruck
adjective Date: 1794 affected or touched by the sun
sunsuit
noun Date: 1929 an outfit worn usually for sunbathing and play
sunt lacrimae rerum
foreign term Etymology: Latin there are tears for things ; tears attend trials
suntan
noun Date: 1867 1. a browning of the skin from exposure to the rays of the sun 2. plural a tan-colored summer uniform • suntanned adjective
suntanned
adjective see suntan
suntanning
noun Date: 1959 the process of tanning the skin by exposure to the sun or artificial light • suntanning adjective
sunup
noun Date: 1653 sunrise
sunward
I. adverb or sunwards Date: 1611 toward the sun II. adjective Date: 1769 facing the sun
sunwards
adverb see sunward I
sunwise
adverb Date: circa 1864 clockwise
suo jure
foreign term Etymology: Latin in his or her own right
suo loco
foreign term Etymology: Latin in its proper place
suo Marte
foreign term Etymology: Latin by one's own exertions
Suomi
geographical name — see Finland
sup
I. verb (supped; supping) Etymology: Middle English suppen, from Old English sūpan, suppan; akin to Old High German sūfan to drink, sip, Old English sopp sop Date: before ...
super
I. adjective Etymology: super- Date: 1842 1. a. of high grade or quality b. — used as a generalized term of approval 2. very large or powerful 3. exhibiting the ...
Super Ball
trademark — used for a toy rubber ball with a high bounce
Super Bowl
service mark — used for the annual championship game of the National Football League
super-
prefix Etymology: Latin, over, above, in addition, from super over, above, on top of — more at over 1. a. (1) over and above ; higher in quantity, quality, or degree ...
super-duper
adjective Etymology: reduplication of 1super Date: 1940 of the greatest excellence, size, effectiveness, or impressiveness
superable
adjective Etymology: Latin superabilis, from superare to surmount — more at insuperable Date: 1629 capable of being overcome or conquered • superableness noun • ...
superableness
noun see superable
superably
adverb see superable
superabound
intransitive verb Etymology: Middle English, from Late Latin superabundare, from Latin super- + abundare to abound Date: 14th century to abound or prevail in greater measure ...
superabundance
noun see superabundant
superabundant
adjective Etymology: Middle English, from Late Latin superabundant-, superabundans, from present participle of superabundare Date: 15th century more than ample ; excessive ...
superabundantly
adverb see superabundant
superadd
transitive verb Etymology: Middle English, from Latin superaddere, from super- + addere to add Date: 15th century to add especially in a way that compounds an effect
superagency
noun Date: 1943 a large complex governmental agency especially when set up to supervise other agencies
superalloy
noun Date: 1948 any of various high-strength often complex alloys resistant to high temperature
superaltern
noun Etymology: super- + subaltern Date: 1921 a universal proposition (as “every P is Q”) that in traditional logic is held to be grounds for the immediate inference of ...
superannuate
verb (-ated; -ating) Etymology: back-formation from superannuated Date: circa 1633 transitive verb 1. to make, declare, or prove obsolete or out-of-date 2. to retire and ...
superannuated
adjective Etymology: Medieval Latin superannuatus, past participle of superannuari to be too old, from Latin super- + annus year — more at annual Date: circa 1633 1. ...
superannuation
noun see superannuate
superb
adjective Etymology: Latin superbus excellent, proud, from super above + -bus (akin to Old English bēon to be) — more at over, be Date: 1549 marked to the highest degree ...
superblock
noun Date: 1928 a very large commercial or residential block barred to through traffic, crossed by pedestrian walks and sometimes access roads, and often spotted with grassed ...
superbly
adverb see superb
superbness
noun see superb
superbug
noun Date: 1985 a pathogenic microorganism and especially a bacterium that has developed resistance to the medications normally used against it
supercalender
I. transitive verb Date: 1888 to process (paper) in a supercalender II. noun Date: 1894 a stack of highly polished calender rolls used to give an extra finish to paper
supercargo
noun Etymology: Spanish sobrecargo, from sobre- over (from Latin super-) + cargo cargo Date: 1697 an officer on a merchant ship in charge of the commercial concerns of the ...
supercede
variant of supersede Usage: Supercede has occurred as a spelling variant of supersede since the 17th century, and it is common in current published writing. It continues, ...
supercenter
noun Date: 1977 a very large discount department store that also sells a complete line of grocery merchandise
supercharge
transitive verb Date: 1876 1. to charge greatly or excessively (as with vigor or tension) 2. to supply a charge to the intake of (as an engine) at a pressure higher than ...
supercharger
noun Date: 1921 a device (as a blower or compressor) for pressurizing the cabin of an airplane or for increasing the volume air charge of an internal combustion engine over ...
superciliary
adjective Etymology: New Latin superciliaris, from Latin supercilium Date: 1732 of, relating to, or adjoining the eyebrow ; supraorbital
supercilious
adjective Etymology: Latin superciliosus, from supercilium eyebrow, haughtiness, from super- + -cilium eyelid (akin to celare to hide) — more at hell Date: 1614 coolly and ...
superciliously
adverb see supercilious
superciliousness
noun see supercilious
supercity
noun Date: 1925 megalopolis
superclass
noun Date: circa 1891 a category in biological classification ranking below a phylum or division and above a class
supercluster
noun Date: 1926 a group of gravitationally associated clusters of galaxies
supercoil
noun Date: 1965 a double helix (as of DNA) that has undergone additional twisting in the same or in the opposite direction as the turns in the original helix • supercoil ...
supercollider
noun Date: 1984 a very large collider capable of accelerating particles to very high energies
supercomputer
noun Date: 1967 a large very fast mainframe used especially for scientific computations
superconduct
intransitive verb Date: 1952 to exhibit superconductivity • superconductive adjective
superconductive
adjective see superconduct
superconductivity
noun Date: 1913 a complete disappearance of electrical resistance in a substance especially at very low temperatures • superconductor noun
superconductor
noun see superconductivity
supercontinent
noun Date: 1960 a hypothetical former large continent from which other continents are held to have broken off and drifted away
supercool
I. Date: 1906 transitive verb to cool below the freezing point without solidification or crystallization intransitive verb to become supercooled II. adjective Date: ...
supercritical
adjective Date: 1934 being or having a temperature above a critical temperature
supercurrent
noun Date: 1940 a current of electricity flowing in a superconductor
superego
noun Etymology: New Latin, translation of German Über-ich, from über over + ich I Date: 1919 the one of the three divisions of the psyche in psychoanalytic theory that is ...
superelevate
transitive verb Date: circa 1945 bank 1c
superelevation
noun Date: 1889 1. the vertical distance between the heights of inner and outer edges of highway pavement or railroad rails 2. additional elevation
supererogation
noun Etymology: Medieval Latin supererogation-, supererogatio, from supererogare to perform beyond the call of duty, from Late Latin, to expend in addition, from Latin super- + ...
supererogatory
adjective Date: 1593 1. observed or performed to an extent not enjoined or required 2. exceeding what is needed ; superfluous
superfamily
noun Date: circa 1890 1. a category of biological classification ranking below an order and above a family 2. a large group of closely related molecules or chemical ...
superfatted
adjective Date: 1891 containing extra oil or fat
superfecundation
noun Date: circa 1855 1. successive fertilization of two or more ova from the same ovulation especially by different sires 2. fertilization at one time of a number of ova ...
superfetation
noun Etymology: Medieval Latin superfetation-, superfetatio, from Latin superfetare to conceive while already pregnant, from super- + fetare to bear young, from fetus newly ...
superficial
adjective Etymology: Middle English, from Late Latin superficialis, from Latin superficies Date: 15th century 1. a. (1) of, relating to, or located near a surface ...
superficial fascia
noun Date: 1876 the thin layer of loose fatty connective tissue underlying the skin and binding it to the parts beneath — called also hypodermis
superficiality
noun (plural -ties) Date: 1530 1. the quality or state of being superficial 2. something superficial
superficially
adverb see superficial
superficies
noun (plural superficies) Etymology: Latin, surface, from super- + facies face, aspect — more at face Date: 1530 1. a surface of a body or a region of space 2. the ...
superfine
adjective Date: 1575 1. overly refined or nice 2. of extremely fine size or texture 3. of high quality or grade — used especially of merchandise
superfix
noun Etymology: super- + -fix (as in prefix) Date: circa 1948 a morpheme consisting of a pattern of stress, intonation, or juncture features that are associated with the ...
superfluid
noun Date: 1938 an unusual state of matter noted only in liquid helium cooled to near absolute zero and characterized by apparently frictionless flow (as through fine holes) ...
superfluidity
noun see superfluid
superfluity
noun (plural -ties) Etymology: Middle English superfluitee, from Anglo-French superfluité, from Late Latin superfluitat-, superfluitas, from Latin superfluus Date: 14th ...
superfluous
adjective Etymology: Middle English, from Latin superfluus, literally, running over, from superfluere to overflow, from super- + fluere to flow — more at fluid Date: 15th ...
superfluously
adverb see superfluous
superfluousness
noun see superfluous
supergene
noun Date: 1949 a group of linked genes acting as an allelic unit especially when due to the suppression of crossing-over
supergiant
noun Date: 1926 something that is extremely large; especially a star of very great intrinsic luminosity and enormous size • supergiant adjective
superglue
noun Date: 1946 a very strong glue; specifically a glue whose chief ingredient is a cyanoacrylate that becomes adhesive through polymerization rather than evaporation of a ...
supergraphics
noun plural but singular or plural in construction Date: 1969 billboard-sized graphic shapes usually of bright color and simple design
supergravity
noun Date: 1976 any of various theories in physics that are based on supersymmetry and attempt to unify general relativity and quantum theory and that state that the ...
supergroup
noun Date: 1968 a rock group made up of prominent former members of other rock groups; also an extremely successful rock group
superheat
I. transitive verb Date: 1859 1. to heat (a vapor not in contact with its own liquid) so as to cause to remain free from suspended liquid droplets 2. to heat (a liquid) ...
superheated
adjective Date: 1857 1. subjected to superheating 2. very hot; also exceedingly emotional or intense
superheater
noun see superheat I
superheavyweight
noun Date: 1971 an athlete (as an Olympic weightlifter, boxer, or wrestler) who competes in the heaviest class or division
superhelical
adjective see superhelix
superhelix
noun Date: 1964 supercoil • superhelical adjective
superhero
noun Date: 1917 a fictional hero having extraordinary or superhuman powers; also an exceptionally skillful or successful person
superheterodyne
adjective Etymology: super sonic + heterodyne Date: 1922 used in or being a radio receiver in which an incoming signal is mixed with a locally generated frequency to produce ...
superhigh frequency
noun Date: 1945 a radio frequency in the next to the highest range of the radio spectrum — see radio frequency table
superhighway
noun Date: 1925 1. a multilane highway (as an expressway or turnpike) designed for high-speed traffic 2. information superhighway
superhuman
adjective Date: 1633 1. being above the human ; divine 2. exceeding normal human power, size, or capability ; Herculean ; also having such power, size, or capability ...
superhumanity
noun see superhuman
superhumanly
adverb see superhuman
superhumanness
noun see superhuman
superimposable
adjective see superimpose
superimpose
transitive verb Date: 1794 to place or lay over or above something • superimposable adjective • superimposition noun
superimposition
noun see superimpose
superincumbent
adjective Etymology: Latin superincumbent-, superincumbens, present participle of superincumbere to lie on top of, from super- + incumbere to lie down on — more at incumbent ...
superincumbently
adverb see superincumbent
superindividual
adjective Date: 1916 of, relating to, or being an organism, entity, or complex of more than individual complexity or nature
superinduce
transitive verb Etymology: Latin superinducere, from super- + inducere to lead in — more at induce Date: circa 1555 1. to introduce as an addition over or above something ...
superinduction
noun see superinduce
superinfect
transitive verb see superinfection
superinfection
noun Date: circa 1922 reinfection or a second infection with a microbial agent (as a bacterium, fungus, or virus) • superinfect transitive verb
superintend
transitive verb Etymology: Late Latin superintendere, from Latin super- + intendere to stretch out, direct — more at intend Date: circa 1615 to have or exercise the charge ...
superintendence
noun Date: 1603 the act or function of superintending or directing ; supervision
superintendency
noun (plural -cies) Date: 1598 the office, post, or jurisdiction of a superintendent; also superintendence
superintendent
noun Etymology: Medieval Latin superintendent-, superintendens, from Late Latin, present participle of superintendere Date: 1554 one who has executive oversight and charge ...
Superior
geographical name city & port NW Wisconsin on Lake Superior population 27,368
superior
I. adjective Etymology: Middle English, from Middle French, from Latin, comparative of superus upper, from super over, above — more at over Date: 14th century 1. situated ...
superior conjunction
noun Date: 1833 a conjunction of a planet with the sun in which the sun is aligned between the earth and the planet
superior court
noun Date: 1686 1. a court of general jurisdiction intermediate between the inferior courts (as a justice of the peace court) and the higher appellate courts 2. a court with ...
superior general
noun (plural superiors general) Date: 1774 the superior of a religious order or congregation
superior planet
noun Date: 1583 a planet (as Jupiter) whose orbit lies outside that of Earth
superior vena cava
noun Date: 1875 the branch of the vena cava of a vertebrate that brings blood back from the head and anterior part of the body to the heart
Superior, Lake
geographical name lake United States & Canada; largest, northernmost, & westernmost of the Great Lakes area 31,800 square miles (82,362 square kilometers)
superiority
noun (plural -ties) Date: 15th century the quality or state of being superior; also a superior characteristic
superiority complex
noun Date: circa 1924 an exaggerated opinion of oneself
superiorly
adverb see superior I
superjacent
adjective Etymology: Latin superjacent-, superjacens, present participle of superjacēre to lie over or upon, from super- + jacēre to lie; akin to Latin jacere to throw — ...
superjet
noun Date: 1958 a very large jet airplane
superlative
I. adjective Etymology: Middle English superlatif, from Anglo-French, from Late Latin superlativus, from Latin superlatus (past participle of superferre to carry over, raise ...
superlatively
adverb see superlative I
superlativeness
noun see superlative I
superliner
noun Date: 1919 a fast luxurious passenger liner of great size
superlunar
adjective see superlunary
superlunary
or superlunar adjective Etymology: Latin super- + luna moon — more at lunar Date: 1614 archaic being above the moon ; celestial
supermajority
noun Date: 1977 a majority (as two-thirds or three-fifths) greater than a simple majority
superman
noun Etymology: translation of German Übermensch, from über over, super- + Mensch man Date: 1903 1. a superior man that according to Nietzsche has learned to forgo ...
supermarket
noun Usage: often attributive Date: 1933 1. a self-service retail market selling especially foods and household merchandise 2. something resembling a supermarket especially ...
supermicro
noun Date: 1982 a very fast and powerful microcomputer
supermini
noun see superminicomputer
superminicomputer
noun Date: 1980 a very fast and powerful minicomputer — called also supermini
supermodel
noun Date: 1977 a famous and successful fashion model
supermom
noun Date: 1974 an exemplary mother; also a woman who performs the traditional duties of housekeeping and child-rearing while also having a full-time job
supernal
adjective Etymology: Middle English, from Middle French supernel, from Latin supernus, from super over, above — more at over Date: 15th century 1. a. being or coming ...
supernally
adverb see supernal
supernatant
noun Etymology: Latin supernatant-, supernatans, present participle of supernatare to float, from super- + natare to swim — more at natant Date: 1922 the usually clear ...
supernatural
adjective Etymology: Middle English, from Medieval Latin supernaturalis, from Latin super- + natura nature Date: 15th century 1. of or relating to an order of existence ...
supernaturalism
noun Date: 1799 1. the quality or state of being supernatural 2. belief in a supernatural power and order of existence • supernaturalist noun or adjective • ...
supernaturalist
noun or adjective see supernaturalism
supernaturalistic
adjective see supernaturalism
supernaturally
adverb see supernatural
supernaturalness
noun see supernatural
supernature
noun Etymology: back-formation from supernatural Date: 1844 the realm of the supernatural
supernormal
adjective Date: 1868 1. exceeding the normal or average 2. being beyond normal human powers ; paranormal • supernormality noun • supernormally adverb
supernormality
noun see supernormal
supernormally
adverb see supernormal
supernova
noun Etymology: New Latin Date: 1926 1. the explosion of a star in which the star may reach a maximum intrinsic luminosity one billion times that of the sun 2. one that ...
supernumerary
I. adjective Etymology: Late Latin supernumerarius, from Latin super- + numerus number Date: 1605 1. a. exceeding the usual, stated, or prescribed number b. not ...
superorder
noun Date: circa 1890 a category of biological classification ranking below a class and above an order
superordinate
adjective Etymology: super- + subordinate Date: 1620 superior in rank, class, or status
superorganism
noun Date: circa 1899 an organized society (as of a social insect) that functions as an organic whole
superovulate
verb see superovulation
superovulation
noun Date: 1927 production of exceptional numbers of ova at one time • superovulate verb
superoxide
noun Date: circa 1847 the monovalent anion O2- or a compound containing it
superoxide dismutase
noun Etymology: dismutation (simultaneous oxidation and reduction) + -ase Date: 1969 a metal-containing antioxidant enzyme that reduces harmful free radicals of oxygen formed ...
superparasitism
noun Date: circa 1899 parasitization of a host by more than one parasitic individual usually of one kind — used especially of parasitic insects
superphosphate
noun Date: 1797 1. an acid phosphate 2. a soluble mixture of phosphates used as fertilizer and made from insoluble mineral phosphates by treatment with sulfuric acid
superphysical
adjective Date: circa 1603 being above or beyond the physical world or explanation on physical principles
superplastic
adjective Date: 1947 1. capable of plastic deformation under low stress at an elevated temperature — used of metals and alloys 2. of or relating to superplastic materials ...
superplasticity
noun see superplastic
superposable
adjective see superpose
superpose
transitive verb (-posed; -posing) Etymology: probably from French superposer, back-formation from superposition, from Late Latin superposition-, superpositio, from Latin ...
superposed
adjective Date: 1823 situated vertically over another layer or part
superposition
noun see superpose
superpower
noun Date: 1920 1. excessive or superior power 2. a. an extremely powerful nation; specifically one of a very few dominant states in an era when the world is divided ...
superpowered
adjective see superpower
supersaturate
transitive verb Date: 1788 to add to (a solution) beyond saturation
supersaturated
adjective Date: 1794 containing an amount of a substance greater than that required for saturation as a result of having been cooled from a higher temperature to a temperature ...
supersaturation
noun Date: 1791 the state of being supersaturated
superscribe
transitive verb (-scribed; -scribing) Etymology: Middle English, from Latin superscribere, from super- + scribere to write — more at scribe Date: 15th century 1. to write ...
superscript
noun Etymology: Latin superscriptus, past participle of superscribere Date: 1901 a distinguishing symbol (as a numeral or letter) written immediately above or above and to ...
superscription
noun Etymology: Middle English, from Late Latin superscription-, superscriptio, from Latin superscribere Date: 14th century 1. something written or engraved on the surface ...
supersede
transitive verb (-seded; -seding) Etymology: Middle English (Scots) superceden to defer, from Middle French, from Latin supersedēre to sit on top, refrain from, from super- + ...
supersedeas
noun (plural supersedeas) Etymology: Middle English, from Latin, you shall refrain, from supersedēre Date: 14th century 1. a common-law writ commanding a stay of legal ...
superseder
noun see supersede
supersedure
noun Date: 1788 the act or process of superseding; especially the replacement of an old or inferior queen bee by a young or superior queen
supersensible
adjective Date: 1798 being above or beyond that which is apparent to the senses ; spiritual
supersensory
adjective Date: 1883 supersensible
superserviceable
adjective Date: circa 1606 offering unwanted services ; officious
supersession
noun Etymology: Medieval Latin supersession-, supersessio, from Latin supersedēre Date: 1790 the act of superseding ; the state of being superseded
supersonic
I. adjective Etymology: Latin super- + sonus sound — more at sound Date: 1919 1. ultrasonic 2. of, being, or relating to speeds from one to five times the speed of sound ...
supersonic transport
noun Date: 1961 a supersonic transport airplane
supersonically
adverb see supersonic I
supersonics
noun plural but singular in construction Date: 1925 the science of supersonic phenomena
superstar
noun Date: 1924 1. a star (as in sports or the movies) who is considered extremely talented, has great public appeal, and can usually command a high salary 2. one that is ...
superstardom
noun see superstar
superstition
noun Etymology: Middle English supersticion, from Anglo-French, from Latin superstition-, superstitio, from superstit-, superstes standing over (as witness or survivor), from ...
Superstition Mountains
geographical name range S central Arizona E of Phoenix
superstitious
adjective Etymology: Middle English supersticious, from Anglo-French supersticius, from Latin superstitiosus, from superstitio Date: 14th century of, relating to, or swayed ...
superstitiously
adverb see superstitious
superstore
noun Date: 1943 a very large store often offering a wide variety of merchandise for sale
superstring
noun Date: 1982 a hypothetical string obeying the rules of supersymmetry whose vibrations manifest themselves as particles existing in ten dimensions of which only four are ...
superstructural
adjective see superstructure
superstructure
noun Date: 1638 1. a. an entity, concept, or complex based on a more fundamental one b. social institutions (as the law or politics) that are in Marxist theory erected ...
supersubstantial
adjective Etymology: Late Latin supersubstantialis, from Latin super- + substantia substance Date: 1534 being above material substance ; of a transcending substance

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