Слова на букву soma-tano (6389) New Collegiate Dictionary
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Слова на букву soma-tano (6389)

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supersymmetric
adjective see supersymmetry
supersymmetry
noun Date: 1974 the correspondence between fermions and bosons of identical mass that is postulated to have existed during the opening moments of the big bang and that relates ...
supersystem
noun Date: circa 1928 a system that is made up of systems
supertax
noun Date: 1906 surtax
supertitle
noun Date: 1984 a translation of foreign-language dialogue displayed above a screen or performance — compare subtitle
supertonic
noun Date: 1806 the second tone of a major or minor scale
supervene
intransitive verb (-vened; -vening) Etymology: Latin supervenire, from super- + venire to come — more at come Date: circa 1648 to follow or result as an additional, ...
supervenient
adjective Etymology: Latin supervenient-, superveniens, present participle of supervenire Date: 1594 coming or occurring as something additional, extraneous, or unexpected
supervention
noun see supervene
supervise
transitive verb (-vised; -vising) Etymology: Medieval Latin supervisus, past participle of supervidēre, from Latin super- + vidēre to see — more at wit Date: circa 1645 ...
supervision
noun Date: 1640 the action, process, or occupation of supervising; especially a critical watching and directing (as of activities or a course of action)
supervisor
noun Etymology: Middle English, from Medieval Latin, from supervidēre Date: 15th century one that supervises; especially an administrative officer in charge of a business, ...
supervisory
adjective see supervisor
superwoman
noun Date: 1906 an exceptional woman; especially a woman who succeeds in having a career and raising a family
supinate
verb (-nated; -nating) Etymology: Latin supinatus, past participle of supinare to lay backward or on the back, from supinus Date: 1831 transitive verb to cause to undergo ...
supination
noun Date: 1666 1. rotation of the forearm and hand so that the palm faces forward or upward; also a corresponding movement of the foot and leg in which the foot rolls ...
supinator
noun Etymology: New Latin, from Latin supinare Date: 1615 a muscle that produces the motion of supination
supine
I. noun Etymology: Middle English supyn, from Late Latin supinum, from Latin, neuter of supinus, adjective Date: 15th century 1. a Latin verbal noun having an accusative of ...
supinely
adverb see supine II
supineness
noun see supine II
supp
abbreviation supplement
supper
noun Etymology: Middle English soper, from Anglo-French super, from super to sup — more at sup Date: 13th century 1. a. the evening meal especially when dinner is taken ...
supper club
noun Date: 1925 nightclub
supplant
transitive verb Etymology: Middle English, from Anglo-French supplanter, from Latin supplantare to trip up, cause to stumble, from sub- + planta sole of the foot — more at ...
supplantation
noun see supplant
supplanter
noun see supplant
supple
I. adjective (suppler; supplest) Etymology: Middle English souple, from Anglo-French suple, from Latin supplic-, supplex entreating for mercy, supplicant, perhaps from sub- + ...
supplejack
noun Date: circa 1725 any of various woody climbers having tough pliant stems; especially a southern United States vine (Berchemia scandens) of the buckthorn family
supplely
adverb see supple I
supplement
I. noun Etymology: Middle English, from Latin supplementum, from supplēre to fill up, complete — more at supply Date: 14th century 1. a. something that completes or ...
supplemental
adjective Date: 1605 1. serving to supplement 2. nonscheduled • supplemental noun
supplementary
adjective Date: 1667 1. added or serving as a supplement ; additional 2. being or relating to a supplement or a supplementary angle
supplementary angle
noun Date: circa 1924 one of two angles or arcs whose sum is 180° — usually used in plural
supplementation
noun see supplement II
supplementer
noun see supplement II
suppleness
noun see supple I
suppletion
noun Etymology: Medieval Latin suppletion-, suppletio act of supplementing, from Latin supplēre Date: 1914 the occurrence of phonemically unrelated allomorphs of the same ...
suppletive
adjective see suppletion
suppletory
adjective Etymology: Latin supplēre Date: 1628 supplying deficiencies ; supplementary
suppliance
noun Date: circa 1611 entreaty, supplication
suppliant
I. noun Etymology: Middle English, from Anglo-French, from present participle of supplier to supplicate, from Latin supplicare Date: 15th century supplicant II. adjective ...
suppliantly
adverb see suppliant II
supplicant
I. noun Date: 1591 one who supplicates II. adjective Date: 1597 suppliant
supplicate
verb (-cated; -cating) Etymology: Middle English, from Latin supplicatus, past participle of supplicare, from supplic-, supplex supplicant — more at supple Date: 15th ...
supplication
noun see supplicate
supplicatory
adjective Date: 15th century expressing supplication ; suppliant
supplier
noun see supply I
supply
I. verb (supplied; supplying) Etymology: Middle English supplien to complete, compensate for, from Middle French soupplier, from Latin supplēre to fill up, complete, raise (a ...
supply-side
adjective Date: 1976 of, relating to, or being an economic theory that reduction of tax rates encourages more earnings, savings, and investment and thereby expands economic ...
supply-sider
noun see supply-side
support
I. transitive verb Etymology: Middle English, from Anglo-French supporter, from Late Latin supportare, from Latin, to transport, from sub- + portare to carry — more at fare ...
support area
noun see support level
support group
noun Date: 1969 a group of people with common experiences and concerns who provide emotional and moral support for one another
support hose
noun Date: 1963 elastic stockings worn especially to provide mild compression of the leg (as to prevent formation of varicose veins)
support level
noun Date: 1953 a price level on a declining market at which a security resists further decline due to increased attractiveness to traders and investors — called also ...
support system
noun Date: 1980 a network of people who provide an individual with practical or emotional support
supportability
noun see support I
supportable
adjective see support I
supporter
noun Date: 15th century one that supports or acts as a support: as a. adherent, partisan b. one of two figures (as of men or animals) placed one on each side of an ...
supportive
adjective see support I
supportiveness
noun see support I
supposable
adjective Date: 1627 capable of being supposed ; conceivable • supposably adverb
supposably
adverb see supposable
supposal
noun Date: 14th century 1. the act or process of supposing 2. something supposed ; hypothesis, supposition
suppose
verb (supposed; supposing) Etymology: Middle English, from Anglo-French supposer, from Medieval Latin supponere (perfect indicative supposui), from Latin, to put under, ...
supposed
adjective Date: 1566 1. a. pretended b. alleged 2. a. held as an opinion ; believed; also mistakenly believed ; imagined b. considered probable or certain ...
supposedly
adverb see supposed
supposing
conjunction Date: 1663 if by way of hypothesis ; on the assumption that
supposition
noun Etymology: Middle English supposicioun, from Anglo-French supposicion, from Late Latin supposition-, suppositio, from Latin, act of placing beneath, from supponere Date: ...
suppositional
adjective see supposition
suppositious
adjective Etymology: by contraction Date: 1624 supposititious
supposititious
adjective Etymology: Latin suppositicius, from suppositus, past participle of supponere to substitute Date: 1610 1. a. fraudulently substituted ; spurious b. of a child ...
supposititiously
adverb see supposititious
suppository
noun (plural -ries) Etymology: Middle English suppositorie, from Anglo-French, from Medieval Latin suppositorium, from Late Latin, neuter of suppositorius placed beneath, from ...
suppress
transitive verb Etymology: Middle English, from Latin suppressus, past participle of supprimere, from sub- + premere to press — more at press Date: 14th century 1. to put ...
suppressant
noun Date: 1942 an agent (as a drug) that tends to suppress or reduce in intensity rather than eliminate something
suppressibility
noun see suppress
suppressible
adjective see suppress
suppression
noun Date: 15th century 1. an act or instance of suppressing ; the state of being suppressed 2. the conscious intentional exclusion from consciousness of a thought or feeling
suppressive
adjective see suppress
suppressiveness
noun see suppress
suppressor
noun Date: 1560 one that suppresses; especially a mutant gene that suppresses the expression of another nonallelic mutant gene when both are present
suppressor cell
noun see suppressor T cell
suppressor T cell
noun Date: 1972 a T cell that suppresses the immune response of B cells and other T cells to an antigen — called also suppressor cell
suppurate
intransitive verb (-rated; -rating) Etymology: Latin suppuratus, past participle of suppurare, from sub- + pur-, pus pus — more at foul Date: 1656 to form or discharge pus ...
suppuration
noun see suppurate
suppurative
adjective see suppurate
supra
adverb Etymology: Latin Date: 15th century earlier in this writing ; above
supra-
prefix Etymology: Latin, from supra above, beyond, earlier; akin to Latin super over — more at over 1. super- 2a 2. transcending
suprachiasmatic nucleus
noun Date: 1938 either of a pair of neuron clusters in the hypothalamus situated directly above the optic chiasma that receive photic input from the retina via the optic nerve ...
supraliminal
adjective Etymology: supra- + Latin limin-, limen threshold Date: 1892 1. existing above the threshold of consciousness 2. adequate to evoke a response or induce a ...
supramolecular
adjective Date: circa 1909 more complex than a molecule; also composed of many molecules
supranational
adjective Date: 1908 transcending national boundaries, authority, or interests • supranationalism noun • supranationalist noun • supranationality noun
supranationalism
noun see supranational
supranationalist
noun see supranational
supranationality
noun see supranational
supraoptic
adjective Date: 1921 situated above the optic chiasma; also being a small nucleus of closely packed neurons overlying the optic chiasma and intimately connected with the ...
supraorbital
adjective Etymology: New Latin supraorbitalis, from Latin supra- + Medieval Latin orbita orbit Date: 1828 situated or occurring above the orbit of the eye
suprarational
adjective Date: 1894 transcending the rational ; based on or involving factors not to be comprehended by reason alone
suprarenal
I. adjective Etymology: New Latin suprarenalis, from Latin supra- + renes kidneys Date: 1828 situated above or anterior to the kidneys II. noun Date: 1841 a suprarenal ...
suprarenal gland
noun Date: 1830 adrenal gland
suprasegmental
adjective Date: 1941 of or relating to significant features (as stress, pitch, or juncture) that occur simultaneously with vowels and consonants in an utterance
supraventricular
adjective Date: 1951 relating to or being a rhythmic abnormality of the heart caused by impulses originating above the ventricles
supravital
adjective Etymology: International Scientific Vocabulary Date: 1919 having or utilizing the property of staining cells or tissues removed from a living body — compare ...
supravitally
adverb see supravital
supremacist
noun Date: 1949 1. an advocate or adherent of group supremacy 2. white supremacist
supremacy
noun (plural -cies) Etymology: supreme + -acy (as in primacy) Date: 1537 the quality or state of being supreme; also supreme authority or power
suprematism
noun Usage: often capitalized Etymology: Russian suprematizm, from French suprématie supremacy + Russian -izm -ism Date: 1933 an early 20th century art movement in Russia ...
suprematist
adjective or noun see suprematism
supreme
adjective Etymology: Latin supremus, superlative of superus upper — more at superior Date: 1513 1. highest in rank or authority 2. highest in degree or quality 3. ...
Supreme Being
noun Date: 1668 god 1
supreme court
noun Usage: often capitalized S&C Date: 1647 1. the highest judicial tribunal in a political unit (as a nation or state) 2. a court of original jurisdiction in New York ...
Supreme Soviet
noun Date: 1936 the highest legislative body of a nation (as the former Soviet Union or former Soviet republics)
supremely
adverb see supreme
supremeness
noun see supreme
supremo
noun (plural -mos) Etymology: Spanish & Italian, from supremo, adjective, supreme, from Latin supremus Date: 1937 chiefly British one who is highest in rank or authority
supt
abbreviation superintendent
suq
variant of souk
Sur
geographical name — see tyre
sur place
foreign term Etymology: French in place ; on the spot
Sur, Point
geographical name promontory California on the Pacific SSW of Monterey — see Big Sur
sur-
prefix Etymology: Middle English, from Anglo-French, from Latin super- 1. over ; super- 2. above ; up
sura
noun Etymology: Arabic sūra, literally, row Date: 1661 a chapter of the Koran
Surabaya
geographical name city & port Indonesia in NE Java on Surabaya Strait (bet. Java & W end of Madura) population 2,483,871
surah
noun Etymology: probably alteration of surat, a cotton produced in Surat, India Date: 1873 a soft twilled fabric of silk or rayon
Surakarta
geographical name city Indonesia in central Java population 504,176
Surat
geographical name city W India in SE Gujarat population 1,505,872
Surbiton
geographical name former municipal borough S England in Surrey WSW of London, now part of Kingston upon Thames
surcease
I. verb (surceased; surceasing) Etymology: Middle English sursesen, surcesen, from Anglo-French surceser, alteration of surseer, surseoir, from Latin supersedēre — more at ...
surcharge
I. transitive verb Etymology: Middle English, from Anglo-French surcharger, from sur- + charger to load, charge — more at charge Date: 15th century 1. a. overcharge b. ...
surcingle
noun Etymology: Middle English sursengle, from Anglo-French surcengle, from sur- + cengle girdle, from Latin cingulum — more at cingulum Date: 14th century 1. a belt, band, ...
surcoat
noun Etymology: Middle English surcote, from Anglo-French, from sur- + cote coat Date: 13th century an outer coat or cloak; specifically a tunic worn over armor
surd
I. adjective Etymology: Latin surdus deaf, silent, stupid Date: 1610 1. lacking sense ; irrational
sure
I. adjective (surer; surest) Etymology: Middle English seur, sure, from Anglo-French seur, from Latin securus secure Date: 13th century 1. obsolete safe from danger or harm ...
sure enough
adverb Date: circa 1545 as one might expect ; certainly
sure thing
noun Date: 1767 one that is certain to succeed ; a sure bet
sure-enough
adjective Date: circa 1846 actual, genuine, real
sure-footed
adjective Date: 1633 not liable to stumble, fall, or err • sure-footedly adverb • sure-footedness noun
sure-footedly
adverb see sure-footed
sure-footedness
noun see sure-footed
sure-handed
adjective Date: 1930 proficient and confident in performance especially using the hands • sure-handedness noun
sure-handedness
noun see sure-handed
surefire
adjective Date: circa 1909 certain to get successful or expected results
surely
adverb Date: 14th century 1. in a sure manner: a. archaic without danger or risk of injury or loss ; safely b. (1) with assurance ; confidently (2) without ...
sureness
noun see sure I
surety
noun (plural -ties) Etymology: Middle English seurte, from Anglo-French seurté, from Latin securitat-, securitas security, from securus Date: 14th century 1. the state of ...
surety bond
noun Date: 1911 a bond guaranteeing performance of a contract or obligation
suretyship
noun see surety
surf
I. noun Etymology: origin unknown Date: 1685 1. the swell of the sea that breaks upon the shore 2. the foam, splash, and sound of breaking waves II. verb Date: 1917 ...
surf and turf
noun Date: circa 1968 seafood and steak served as a single course
surf caster
noun see surf casting
surf casting
noun Date: 1928 a method of fishing in which artificial or natural bait is cast into the open ocean or in a bay where waves break on a beach • surf caster noun
surf clam
noun Date: 1884 any of various typically rather large surf-dwelling edible clams (family Mactridae); especially a common clam (Spisula solidissima) of the Atlantic coast ...
surface
I. noun Etymology: French, from Middle French, from sur- + face face, from Old French — more at face Date: circa 1600 1. the exterior or upper boundary of an object or body ...
surface of revolution
Date: 1840 a surface formed by the revolution of a plane curve about a line in its plane
surface structure
noun Date: 1964 a formal representation of the phonetic form of a sentence; also the structure which such a representation describes
surface tension
noun Date: 1876 the attractive force exerted upon the surface molecules of a liquid by the molecules beneath that tends to draw the surface molecules into the bulk of the ...
surface-active
adjective Date: 1920 altering the properties and especially lowering the tension at the surface of contact between phases
surface-ripened
adjective Date: 1945 of cheese ripened by the action of microorganisms (as molds) on the surface
surface-to-air
adjective Date: 1949 launched from the ground against a target in the air
surfacer
noun see surface III
surfacing
noun Date: 1861 material forming or used to form a surface
surfactant
noun Etymology: surface-active + -ant Date: 1950 a surface-active substance (as a detergent) • surfactant adjective
surfbird
noun Date: 1839 a shorebird (Aphriza virgata) of the sandpiper family that occurs along the Pacific coasts of America and has a black-tipped white tail
surfboard
noun Date: circa 1826 a long narrow buoyant board (as of lightweight wood or fiberglass-covered foam) used in the sport of surfing • surfboarder noun • surfboarding ...
surfboarder
noun see surfboard
surfboarding
noun see surfboard
surfboat
noun Date: 1847 a boat for use in heavy surf
surfeit
I. noun Etymology: Middle English surfet, from Anglo-French, from surfaire to overdo, from sur- + faire to do, from Latin facere — more at do Date: 14th century 1. an ...
surfeiter
noun see surfeit II
surfer
noun see surf II
surficial
adjective Etymology: surface + -icial (as in superficial) Date: 1892 of or relating to a surface
surfing
noun Date: 1926 the sport of riding the surf especially on a surfboard
surfman
noun Date: 1879 one who is skilled in handling a boat in surf
surfperch
noun Date: 1885 any of a family (Embiotocidae) of small or medium-sized viviparous bony fishes chiefly of shallow water along the Pacific coast of North America that resemble ...
surg
abbreviation surgeon; surgery; surgical
surge
I. verb (surged; surging) Etymology: earlier, to ride (at anchor) probably in part from Middle French sourgir to cast anchor, land, from Catalan surgir to heave, cast anchor, ...
surgeon
noun Etymology: Middle English surgien, from Anglo-French, alteration of cirurgien, from cirurgerie surgery Date: 14th century a medical specialist who practices surgery
surgeon general
noun (plural surgeons general) Date: 1706 the chief medical officer of a branch of the armed services or of a public health service
surgeon's knot
noun Date: 1733 a reef knot in which the first knot has two turns — see knot illustration
surgeonfish
noun Date: 1871 any of a family (Acanthuridae) of tropical bony fishes that have a laterally compressed body and typically a movable spine on each side of the body near the ...
surgery
noun (plural -geries) Etymology: Middle English surgerie, from Anglo-French cirurgerie, surgerie, from Latin chirurgia, from Greek cheirourgia, from cheirourgos surgeon, from ...
surgical
adjective Etymology: surgeon + -ical Date: 1770 1. a. of or relating to surgeons or surgery b. used in or in connection with surgery c. following or resulting ...
surgically
adverb see surgical
Suribachi, Mount
geographical name volcano 548 feet (167 meters) in the Volcano Islands at S end of Iwo Jima
surimi
noun Etymology: Japanese, chopped meat or fish Date: 1976 a fish product made from inexpensive whitefish and often processed to resemble more expensive seafood (as crabmeat)
Suriname
geographical name 1. (or formerly Dutch Guiana) (or Netherlands Guiana) country N South America between Guyana & French Guiana; a republic, until 1975 territory of the ...
Surinamer
noun see Suriname
Surinamese
adjective or noun see Suriname
surjection
noun Etymology: probably from sur- + -jection (as in projection) Date: 1964 a mathematical function that is an onto mapping — compare bijection, injection 3
surjective
adjective Date: 1956 onto
surlily
adverb see surly
surliness
noun see surly
surly
adjective (surlier; -est) Etymology: alteration of Middle English serreli lordly, imperious, probably from sire, ser sire Date: 1523 1. menacing or threatening in appearance ...
Surma
geographical name river 560 miles (901 kilometers) NE India (subcontinent) in Manipur & Bangladesh — see Meghna
surmise
I. noun Etymology: Middle English, allegation, charge, from Anglo-French, from feminine of surmis, past participle of surmettre to place on, suppose, accuse, from Medieval ...
surmount
transitive verb Etymology: Middle English, from Anglo-French surmunter, from sur- + munter to mount Date: 14th century 1. obsolete to surpass in quality or attainment ; ...
surmountable
adjective see surmount
surname
I. noun Date: 14th century 1. an added name derived from occupation or other circumstance ; nickname 1 2. the name borne in common by members of a family II. transitive ...
surpass
transitive verb Etymology: Middle French surpasser, from sur- + passer to pass Date: 1555 1. to become better, greater, or stronger than ; exceed 2. to go beyond ; ...
surpassable
adjective see surpass
surpassing
adjective Date: 1566 greatly exceeding others ; of a very high degree • surpassingly adverb
surpassingly
adverb see surpassing
surplice
I. noun Etymology: Middle English surplis, from Anglo-French, from Medieval Latin superpellicium, from super- + pellicium coat of skins, from Latin, neuter of pellicius made of ...
surplus
noun Etymology: Middle English, from Anglo-French, from Medieval Latin superplus, from Latin super- + plus more — more at plus Date: 14th century 1. a. the amount that ...
surplus value
noun Date: 1887 the difference in Marxist theory between the value of work done or of commodities produced by labor and the usually subsistence wages paid by the employer
surplusage
noun Date: 15th century 1. surplus 1a 2. a. excessive or nonessential matter b. matter introduced in legal pleading which is not necessary or relevant to the case
surprint
transitive verb Date: 1917 overprint • surprint noun
surprisal
noun Date: 1591 the action of surprising ; the state of being surprised
Surprise
geographical name city S central Arizona W of Phoenix population 30,848
surprise
I. noun also surprize Etymology: Middle English suppryse exaction, seizure, from Anglo-French sousprise, supprise, from feminine of supris, surpris, suspris, past participle of ...
surpriser
noun see surprise II
surprising
adjective Date: 1614 of a nature that excites surprise
surprisingly
adverb Date: 1661 1. in a surprising manner ; to a surprising degree 2. it is surprising that
surprize
I. noun see surprise I II. verb see surprise II
surra
noun Etymology: Marathi sūra wheezing sound Date: 1883 a serious tropical or subtropical disease of domestic animals that is caused by a trypanosome (Trypanosoma evansi), ...
surreal
adjective Etymology: back-formation from surrealism Date: 1937 1. marked by the intense irrational reality of a dream; also unbelievable, fantastic 2. surrealistic • ...
surrealism
noun Etymology: French surréalisme, from sur- + réalisme realism Date: 1925 the principles, ideals, or practice of producing fantastic or incongruous imagery or effects in ...
surrealist
noun or adjective see surrealism
surrealistic
adjective Date: 1925 1. of or relating to surrealism 2. having a strange dreamlike atmosphere or quality like that of a surrealist painting • surrealistically adverb
surrealistically
adverb see surrealistic
surreality
noun see surreal
surreally
adverb see surreal
surrebutter
noun Date: circa 1601 the reply in common law pleading of a plaintiff to a defendant's rebutter
surrejoinder
noun Date: circa 1543 the reply in common law pleading of a plaintiff to a defendant's rejoinder
surrender
I. verb (-dered; surrendering) Etymology: Middle English surrendren, from surrendre, noun Date: 15th century transitive verb 1. a. to yield to the power, control, or ...
surrender by bail
noun see surrender II
Surrentum
geographical name — see Sorrento
surreptitious
adjective Etymology: Middle English, from Latin surrepticius, from surreptus, past participle of surripere to snatch secretly, from sub- + rapere to seize — more at rapid ...
surreptitiously
adverb see surreptitious
surrey
noun (plural surreys) Etymology: Surrey, England Date: circa 1891 a four-wheel two-seated horse-drawn pleasure carriage
Surrey
I. biographical name Earl of — see Henry Howard II. geographical name 1. county SE England S of London capital Kingston upon Thames area 662 square miles (1714 square ...
surrogacy
noun Date: 1982 the practice of serving as a surrogate mother
surrogate
I. transitive verb (-gated; -gating) Etymology: Latin surrogatus, past participle of surrogare to choose in place of another, substitute, from sub- + rogare to ask — more at ...
surrogate mother
noun Date: 1978 a woman who becomes pregnant usually by artificial insemination or surgical implantation of a fertilized egg for the purpose of carrying the fetus to term for ...
surrogate motherhood
noun see surrogate mother
surround
I. transitive verb Etymology: Middle English, to flood, inundate, from Anglo-French surunder, from Late Latin superundare, to overflow, from Latin super- + unda wave; influenced ...
surround sound
noun Date: 1969 sound reproduction that often uses three or more transmission channels to enhance the illusion of a live hearing
surroundings
noun plural Date: 1841 the circumstances, conditions, or objects by which one is surrounded ; environment
sursum corda
noun Etymology: Late Latin, (lift) up (your) hearts; from the opening words Date: 1537 1. often capitalized S&C a versicle that in traditional eucharistic liturgies exhorts ...
surtax
noun Date: 1881 1. an extra tax or charge 2. a graduated income tax in addition to the normal income tax imposed on the amount by which one's net income exceeds a specified ...
Surtees
biographical name Robert Smith 1803-1864 English novelist & editor
surtout
noun Etymology: French, from sur over (from Latin super) + tout all, from Latin totus whole — more at over Date: 1686 a man's long close-fitting overcoat
Surtsey
geographical name island Iceland off S coast area 1 square miles (2.6 square kilometers); formed 1963 by volcanic eruption
Suruga Bay
geographical name inlet of the Pacific Japan on coast of SE Honshu W of Sagami Sea
surv
abbreviation survey
surveil
transitive verb (surveilled; surveilling) Etymology: back-formation from surveillance Date: 1914 to subject to surveillance
surveillance
noun Etymology: French, from surveiller to watch over, from sur- + veiller to watch, from Old French veillier, from Latin vigilare, from vigil watchful — more at vigil ...
surveillant
noun Date: 1819 one that exercises surveillance
survey
I. verb (surveyed; surveying) Etymology: Middle English, from Anglo-French surveer, to look over, from sur- + veer to see — more at view Date: 15th century transitive verb ...
survey course
noun Date: 1916 a course treating briefly the chief topics of a broad field of knowledge
surveying
noun Date: 1682 a branch of applied mathematics concerned with the determination of the area of any portion of the earth's surface, the lengths and directions of the bounding ...
surveyor
noun Date: 15th century one that surveys; especially one whose occupation is surveying land
survivability
noun see survivable
survivable
adjective Date: 1955 resulting in or permitting survival • survivability noun
survival
noun Usage: often attributive Date: 1598 1. a. the act or fact of living or continuing longer than another person or thing b. the continuation of life or existence ...
survival of the fittest
Date: 1864 natural selection
survivalism
noun Date: 1928 an attitude, policy, or practice based on the primacy of survival as a value
survivalist
noun Date: 1970 a person who advocates or practices survivalism; especially one who has prepared to survive in the anarchy of an anticipated breakdown of society • ...
survivance
noun Date: circa 1623 survival
survive
verb (survived; surviving) Etymology: Middle English, to outlive, from Anglo-French survivre, from Latin supervivere, from super- + vivere to live — more at quick Date: 15th ...
surviver
noun Date: 1556 archaic one that survives ; survivor
survivor
noun see survive
survivorship
noun Date: circa 1625 1. the legal right of the survivor of persons having joint interests in property to take the interest of the person who has died 2. the state of being ...
Susa
or biblical Shushan geographical name ancient city capital of Elam; ruins in SW Iran

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