Слова на букву soma-tano (6389) New Collegiate Dictionary
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Слова на букву soma-tano (6389)

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sweet tooth
noun Date: 14th century a craving or fondness for sweet food
sweet william
noun Usage: often capitalized W Etymology: from the name William Date: 1573 a widely cultivated Old World pink (Dianthus barbatus) with small white to deep red or purple ...
sweet woodruff
noun Date: 1800 a small Eurasian and North African sweet-scented herb (Galium odoratum syn. Asperula odorata) of the madder family that has small white flowers and is used ...
sweet-and-sour
adjective Date: 1928 seasoned with a sauce containing sugar and vinegar or lemon juice
sweet-talk
Date: 1928 transitive verb cajole, coax intransitive verb to use flattery
sweetbread
noun Date: 1565 the thymus or pancreas of a young animal (as a calf) used for food
sweetbriar
or sweetbrier noun Date: 1538 an Old World rose (especially Rosa eleganteria) with stout recurved prickles and white to deep rosy-pink single flowers — called also ...
sweetbrier
noun see sweetbriar
sweeten
verb (sweetened; sweetening) Date: circa 1552 transitive verb 1. to make sweet 2. to soften the mood or attitude of 3. to make less painful or trying 4. to free ...
sweetener
noun see sweeten
sweetening
noun Date: 1819 something that sweetens
sweetgrass
noun Date: 1926 a slender fragrant perennial grass (Hierochloe odorata) that typically grows in moist soils and is used especially in basketry
sweetheart
I. noun Date: 14th century 1. darling 2. one who is loved 3. a generally likable person 4. a remarkable one of its kind II. adjective Date: 1942 of or relating to an ...
sweetheart neckline
noun Date: 1941 a neckline for women's clothing that is high in back and low in front where it is scalloped to resemble the top of a heart
sweetie
noun Date: 1705 1. plural, British sweet 1a 2. sweetheart
sweetie pie
noun Date: 1928 sweetheart
sweeting
noun Date: 13th century 1. archaic sweetheart 2. a sweet apple
sweetish
adjective Date: 1580 1. somewhat sweet 2. unpleasantly sweet • sweetishly adverb
sweetishly
adverb see sweetish
sweetly
adverb see sweet I
sweetmeat
noun Date: 14th century a food rich in sugar: as a. a candied or crystallized fruit b. candy, confection
sweetness
noun see sweet I
sweetness and light
noun Date: 1869 1. a harmonious combination of beauty and enlightenment viewed as a hallmark of culture 2. a. amiable reasonableness of disposition b. an untroubled ...
sweetshop
noun Date: 1878 chiefly British a candy store
sweetsop
noun Date: 1696 sugar apple
swell
I. verb (swelled; swelled or swollen; swelling) Etymology: Middle English, from Old English swellan; akin to Old High German swellan to swell Date: before 12th century ...
swell box
noun Date: circa 1801 a chamber in an organ containing a set of pipes and having shutters that open or shut to regulate the volume of tone
swell-front
adjective Date: 1914 bowfront 1
swelled head
noun Date: 1870 an exaggerated opinion of oneself ; self-conceit • swelled-headed adjective • swelled-headedness noun
swelled-headed
adjective see swelled head
swelled-headedness
noun see swelled head
swellfish
noun Date: 1807 puffer fish 1
swellhead
noun Date: 1845 one who has a swelled head ; a conceited person • swellheaded adjective • swellheadedness noun
swellheaded
adjective see swellhead
swellheadedness
noun see swellhead
swelling
noun Date: before 12th century 1. something that is swollen; specifically an abnormal bodily protuberance or localized enlargement 2. the condition of being swollen
swelter
I. verb (sweltered; sweltering) Etymology: Middle English sweltren, frequentative of swelten to die, be overcome by heat, from Old English sweltan to die; akin to Gothic swiltan ...
sweltering
adjective Date: 1566 oppressively hot • swelteringly adverb
swelteringly
adverb see sweltering
swept
adjective Etymology: swept, past participle of sweep Date: 1903 slanted backward
swept-back
adjective Date: 1914 possessing sweepback
swerve
verb (swerved; swerving) Etymology: Middle English, from Old English sweorfan to wipe, file away; akin to Old High German swerban to wipe off, Welsh chwerfu to whirl Date: ...
sweven
noun Etymology: Middle English, from Old English swefn sleep, dream, vision — more at somnolent Date: before 12th century archaic dream, vision
swidden
noun Usage: often attributive Etymology: English dialect, burned clearing, probably from Old Norse svithinn, past participle of svitha to burn, singe Date: circa 1868 a ...
Swift
I. biographical name Gustavus Franklin 1839-1903 American meatpacker II. biographical name Jonathan 1667-1745 English satirist • Swiftian adjective
swift
I. adjective Etymology: Middle English, from Old English; akin to Old English swīfan to revolve — more at swivel Date: before 12th century 1. moving or capable of moving ...
swift fox
noun Date: 1845 a small fox (Vulpes velox) with large ears that occurs on the plains of western North America
Swiftian
adjective see Swift II
swiftlet
noun Date: circa 1890 any of various cave-dwelling swifts (genus Collocalia syn. Aerodramus) of Asia including one (C. fuciphaga) that produces the nest used in bird's nest ...
swiftly
adverb Date: before 12th century in a swift manner ; with speed ; quickly
swiftness
noun Date: before 12th century 1. the quality or state of being swift ; celerity 2. the fact of being swift
swig
I. noun Etymology: origin unknown Date: circa 1623 a quantity drunk at one time II. verb (swigged; swigging) Date: circa 1650 transitive verb to drink in long drafts ...
swigger
noun see swig II
swill
I. verb Etymology: Middle English swilen, from Old English swillan Date: before 12th century transitive verb 1. wash, drench 2. to drink great drafts of ; guzzle 3. ...
swiller
noun see swill I
swim
I. verb (swam; swum; swimming) Etymology: Middle English swimmen, from Old English swimman; akin to Old High German swimman to swim Date: before 12th century intransitive ...
swim bladder
noun Date: 1837 the air bladder of a fish
swim fin
noun Date: 1947 flipper 1b
swimmable
adjective Date: 1852 that can be swum
swimmer
noun see swim I
swimmer's ear
noun Date: 1961 inflammation of the canal in the outer ear that is characterized by itching, redness, swelling, pain, and discharge and that typically occurs when water ...
swimmer's itch
noun Date: 1928 a severe urticarial reaction to the presence in the skin of larval schistosomes
swimmeret
noun Date: 1840 one of a series of small unspecialized appendages under the abdomen of many crustaceans that are best developed in some decapods (as a lobster) and usually ...
swimmily
adverb see swimmy
swimming
I. adjective Date: before 12th century 1. [present participle of swim] that swims 2. [gerund of swim] adapted to or used in or for swimming II. noun Date: 14th century ...
swimming pool
noun Date: 1868 a pool suitable for swimming; especially a tank (as of concrete or plastic) made for swimming
swimmingly
adverb Date: 1622 very well ; splendidly
swimmy
adjective (swimmier; -est) Date: 1836 1. verging on, causing, or affected by dizziness or giddiness 2. of vision unsteady, blurred • swimmily adverb
swimsuit
noun Date: 1926 a suit for swimming or bathing
swimwear
noun Date: 1935 clothing suitable for wear while swimming or bathing
Swinburne
biographical name Algernon Charles 1837-1909 English poet • Swinburnian adjective
Swinburnian
adjective see Swinburne
swindle
I. verb (swindled; swindling) Etymology: back-formation from swindler, from German Schwindler giddy person, from schwindeln to be dizzy, from Old High German swintilōn, ...
swindler
noun see swindle I
Swindon
geographical name town S England in NE Wiltshire population 91,136
swine
noun (plural swine) Etymology: Middle English, from Old English swīn; akin to Old High German swīn swine, Latin sus — more at sow Date: before 12th century 1. any of ...
swine fever
noun Date: 1886 1. hog cholera 2. an acute highly contagious usually fatal disease of swine that is caused by a double-stranded DNA virus (species African swine fever ...
swineherd
noun Date: before 12th century one who tends swine
swing
I. verb (swung; swinging) Etymology: Middle English, to beat, fling, hurl, rush, from Old English swingan to beat, fling oneself, rush; akin to Old High German swingan to fling, ...
swing shift
noun Date: 1940 1. the work shift between the day and night shifts (as from 4 p.m. to midnight) 2. a group of workers in a factory operating seven days a week that work as ...
swinge
I. transitive verb (swinged; swingeing) Etymology: Middle English swengen to shake, from Old English swengan; akin to Old English swingan Date: 12th century chiefly dialect ...
swingeing
I. adjective also swinging Etymology: from present participle of 1swinge Date: 1575 chiefly British very large, high, or severe II. adverb or swinging Date: 1690 ...
swinger
I. noun Date: 1543 one that swings: as a. a person who is lively, exciting, and up-to-date b. one who engages freely in sex II. noun Etymology: 1swinge Date: 1583 ...
swinging
adjective Etymology: present participle of 1swing Date: 1956 being lively, exciting, and up-to-date; also abounding in swingers and swinging entertainment
swingingly
I. adverb Date: 1671 chiefly British very, extremely II. adverb Date: 1882 in a swinging manner ; with a swinging movement
swingletree
noun Etymology: Middle English swyngyll tre, from swyngyll rod for beating flax (from Middle Dutch swengel) + tre tree Date: 15th century whiffletree
swingman
noun Date: 1965 a player capable of playing effectively in two different positions and especially of playing both guard and forward on a basketball team
swingy
adjective (swingier; -est) Date: 1915 marked by swing
swinish
adjective Date: 13th century of, suggesting, or characteristic of swine ; beastly • swinishly adverb • swinishness noun
swinishly
adverb see swinish
swinishness
noun see swinish
swink
I. intransitive verb Etymology: Middle English, from Old English swincan; akin to Old High German swingan to rush — more at swing Date: before 12th century archaic toil, ...
Swinnerton
biographical name Frank Arthur 1884-1982 English novelist & critic
Świnoujście
geographical name city & port NW Poland on N coast of Uznam (Usedom) Island NNW of Szczecin population 42,886
Swinton and Pendlebury
geographical name town NW England in Greater Manchester population 39,621
swipe
I. noun Etymology: probably alteration of sweep Date: 1739 1. a strong sweeping blow 2. a sharp often critical remark II. verb (swiped; swiping) Date: circa 1825 ...
swipes
noun plural Etymology: origin unknown Date: 1794 British poor, thin, or spoiled beer; also beer
swirl
I. verb Etymology: Middle English Date: 14th century intransitive verb 1. a. to move with an eddying or whirling motion b. to pass in whirling confusion 2. to ...
swirlingly
adverb see swirl I
swirly
adjective (swirlier; -est) Date: 1785 1. Scottish knotted, twisted 2. that swirls ; swirling
swish
I. verb Etymology: imitative Date: 1756 intransitive verb to move, pass, swing, or whirl with the sound of a swish transitive verb 1. to move, cut, or strike with a ...
swisher
noun see swish I
swishingly
adverb see swish I
swishy
adjective (swishier; -est) Date: 1828 1. producing a swishing sound 2. usually disparaging characterized by effeminate behavior
Swiss
I. noun Etymology: Middle French Suisse, from Middle High German Swīzer, from Swīz Switzerland Date: 1515 1. plural Swiss a. a native or inhabitant of Switzerland b. ...
Swiss chard
noun Date: 1832 a beet (Beta vulgaris cicla) having large leaves and succulent stalks often cooked as a vegetable — called also chard
Swiss cheese
noun Date: 1783 a hard cheese characterized by elastic texture, mild nutlike flavor, and large holes that form during ripening
Swiss steak
noun Date: circa 1911 a slice of steak pounded with flour and braised usually with vegetables and seasonings
switch
I. noun Etymology: perhaps from Middle Dutch swijch twig Date: 1592 1. a slender flexible whip, rod, or twig 2. an act of switching: as a. a blow with a switch b. ...
switch engine
noun Date: 1867 a railroad engine used in switching cars
switch knife
noun Date: 1950 switchblade
switch-hit
intransitive verb (-hit; -hitting) Etymology: back-formation from switch-hitter Date: 1938 to bat right-handed against a left-handed pitcher and left-handed against a ...
switch-hitter
noun Date: 1928 1. a baseball player who switch-hits 2. slang bisexual 3. one that is flexible or adaptable; especially a person who can work equally well in either of ...
switchable
adjective see switch II
switchback
I. noun Date: 1863 a zigzag road, trail, or section of railroad tracks for climbing a steep hill • switchback adjective II. intransitive verb Date: 1903 to follow a ...
switchblade
noun Date: 1932 a pocketknife having the blade spring-operated so that pressure on a release catch causes it to fly open — called also switchblade knife
switchblade knife
noun see switchblade
switchboard
noun Date: 1873 an apparatus (as in a telephone exchange) consisting of a panel on which are mounted electric switches so arranged that a number of circuits may be connected, ...
switcher
noun see switch II
switcheroo
noun (plural -oos) Etymology: alteration of switch Date: 1933 a surprising variation ; reversal
switchgrass
noun Etymology: alteration of quitch (grass) Date: 1840 a tall North American panic grass (Panicum virgatum) that is used for hay and forage
switchman
noun Date: 1843 one who attends a switch (as in a railroad yard)
switchyard
noun Date: 1943 a usually enclosed area for the switching facilities of a power station
swith
adverb Etymology: Middle English, strongly, quickly, from Old English swīthe strongly, from swīth strong; akin to Gothic swinths strong, Old English gesund sound — more at ...
swither
intransitive verb Etymology: origin unknown Date: 1501 dialect chiefly British doubt, waver • swither noun, dialect chiefly British
Switz
abbreviation Switzerland
Switzer
noun Etymology: Middle High German Swedishīzer Date: 1549 Swiss
Switzerland
or French Suisse or German die Schweiz or Italian Svizzera or Latin Helvetia geographical name country W Europe in the Alps; a federal republic capital Bern area 15,940 square ...
swivel
I. noun Usage: often attributive Etymology: Middle English; akin to Old English swīfan to revolve, Old High German swebōn to roll, heave Date: 14th century a device ...
swivel chair
noun Date: 1860 a chair that swivels on its base
swivel-hipped
adjective Date: 1947 moving with or characterized by movement with a twisting motion of the hips
swivet
noun Etymology: origin unknown Date: circa 1892 a state of extreme agitation
swizzle
I. noun Etymology: origin unknown Date: 1813 an iced cocktail stirred with a swizzle stick II. verb (swizzled; swizzling) Date: 1820 intransitive verb to drink ...
swizzle stick
noun Date: 1879 a stick used to stir mixed drinks
swizzler
noun see swizzle II
swob
archaic variant of swab
swollen
past participle of swell
swoon
I. intransitive verb Etymology: Middle English swounen, probably back-formation from swouning, swowening, from iswowen, aswoune, from Old English geswōgen in a swoon Date: ...
swooner
noun see swoon I
swooningly
adverb see swoon I
swoony
adjective see swoon II
swoop
I. verb Etymology: alteration of Middle English swopen to sweep, from Old English swāpan — more at sweep Date: 1566 intransitive verb to move with a sweep transitive ...
swooper
noun see swoop I
swoopstake
adverb Etymology: alteration of sweepstake Date: 1602 obsolete in an indiscriminate manner
swoopy
adjective Date: 1978 having sweeping lines or movement
swoosh
I. verb Etymology: imitative Date: 1867 intransitive verb 1. to make or move with a rushing sound 2. gush, swirl transitive verb to discharge or transport with a ...
swop
chiefly British variant of swap
sword
noun Usage: often attributive Etymology: Middle English, from Old English sweord; akin to Old High German swert sword Date: before 12th century 1. a weapon (as a cutlass or ...
sword cane
noun Date: 1823 a cane in which a sword blade is concealed
sword dance
noun Date: 1604 1. a dance performed by men in a circle holding a sword in the right hand and grasping the tip of a neighbor's sword in the left hand 2. a dance performed ...
sword dancer
noun see sword dance
sword fern
noun Date: circa 1829 any of several ferns with long narrow more or less sword-shaped fronds: as a. a tropical fern (Nephrolepis exaltata) from which the Boston fern has ...
sword grass
noun Date: 1598 any of various grasses or sedges having leaves with a sharp or toothed edge
sword knot
noun Date: 1676 an ornamental cord or tassel tied to the hilt of a sword
sword of Damocles
Usage: often capitalized S Date: 1820 an impending disaster
swordfish
noun Date: 15th century a very large scombroid fish (Xiphias gladius of the family Xiphiidae) that has a long swordlike beak formed by the bones of the upper jaw and is an ...
swordlike
adjective see sword
swordplay
noun Date: 1602 1. the art or skill of wielding a sword especially in fencing 2. an exhibition of swordplay • swordplayer noun
swordplayer
noun see swordplay
swordsman
noun Date: 1657 1. one skilled in swordplay; especially a saber fencer 2. archaic a soldier armed with a sword
swordsmanship
noun Date: 1834 swordplay
swordtail
noun Date: 1858 a small brightly marked Central American live-bearer (Xiphophorus helleri of the family Poeciliidae) often kept in tropical aquariums and bred in many colors
swore
past of swear
sworn
past participle of swear
swot
I. noun Etymology: English dialect, sweat, from Middle English swot, from Old English swāt — more at sweat Date: 1850 British grind 2b II. intransitive verb (swotted; ...
swound
I. noun Etymology: Middle English, alteration of swoun swoon, from swounen to swoon Date: 15th century archaic swoon 1a II. intransitive verb Date: 1530 archaic swoon
swum
past participle of swim
swung
past and past participle of swing
swung dash
noun Date: 1951 a character swung dash used in printing to conserve space by representing part or all of a previously spelled-out word
Sybaris
geographical name ancient Greek city S Italy on Gulf of Tarentum; destroyed 510 B.C.
sybarite
noun Date: circa 1555 1. [from the notorious luxury of the Sybarites] voluptuary, sensualist 2. capitalized a native or resident of the ancient city of Sybaris • ...
sybaritic
adjective see sybarite
sybaritically
adverb see sybarite
sybaritism
noun see sybarite
sycamine
noun Etymology: Latin sycaminus, from Greek sykaminos, of Semitic origin; akin to Hebrew shiqmāh mulberry tree, sycamore Date: 1526 a tree of the Bible that is usually ...
sycamore
noun Etymology: Middle English sicamour, from Anglo-French sicamour, from Latin sycomorus, from Greek sykomoros, probably modification of a Semitic word akin to Hebrew shiqmāh ...
syce
noun Etymology: Hindi & Urdu sāīs, from Arabic sā'is Date: 1653 an attendant (as a groom) especially in India
sycee
noun Etymology: Chinese (Guangdong) sai-sì, literally, fine silk Date: 1711 silver money made in the form of ingots and formerly used in China
sycomore
noun see sycamore 1
syconium
noun (plural syconia) Etymology: New Latin, from Greek sykon fig + New Latin -ium Date: circa 1856 the multiple fleshy fruit of a fig in which the ovaries are borne within an ...
sycophancy
noun Date: 1637 obsequious flattery; also the character or behavior of a sycophant
sycophant
noun Etymology: Latin sycophanta slanderer, swindler, from Greek sykophantēs slanderer, from sykon fig + phainein to show — more at fancy Date: 1575 a servile ...
sycophantic
adjective Date: 1676 of, relating to, or characteristic of a sycophant ; fawning, obsequious • sycophantically adverb
sycophantically
adverb see sycophantic
sycophantish
adjective Date: 1794 sycophantic • sycophantishly adverb
sycophantishly
adverb see sycophantish
sycophantism
noun Date: 1774 sycophancy
sycophantly
adverb Date: 1672 in a sycophantic manner
sycosis
noun Etymology: New Latin, from Greek sykōsis, from sykon fig Date: circa 1827 a chronic inflammatory disorder of the hair follicles especially of the bearded part of the ...
Sydney
geographical name city & port SE Australia on Port Jackson capital of New South Wales metropolitan area population 3,097,956 • Sydneyite noun • Sydneysider noun
Sydneyite
noun see Sydney
Sydneysider
noun see Sydney
Syene
geographical name — see aswan
syenite
noun Etymology: Latin Syenites (lapis) stone of Syene, from Syene, ancient city in Egyptian Date: circa 1796 an igneous rock composed chiefly of feldspar • syenitic ...
syenitic
adjective see syenite
Syktyvkar
geographical name town NE Russia in Europe capital of Komi Republic population 226,000
syli
noun (plural sylis) Etymology: Susu sílí, literally, elephant Date: 1974 the monetary unit of Guinea from 1972 to 1986
syllabary
noun (plural -baries) Etymology: New Latin syllabarium, from Latin syllaba syllable Date: 1586 a table or listing of syllables; specifically a series or set of written ...
syllabic
I. adjective Etymology: Late Latin syllabicus, from Greek syllabikos, from syllabē syllable Date: 1728 1. constituting a syllable or the nucleus of a syllable: a. not ...
syllabically
adverb see syllabic I
syllabicate
transitive verb (-cated; -cating) Date: circa 1654 syllabify
syllabication
noun Date: 15th century the act, process, or method of forming or dividing words into syllables
syllabicity
noun Date: 1933 the state of being or the power of forming a syllable
syllabification
noun Date: 1838 syllabication
syllabify
transitive verb (-fied; -fying) Etymology: Latin syllaba syllable Date: circa 1859 to form or divide into syllables
syllable
I. noun Etymology: Middle English, from Anglo-French sillabe, silable, from Latin syllaba, from Greek syllabē, from syllambanein to gather together, from syn- + lambanein to ...
syllabub
also sillabub noun Etymology: origin unknown Date: circa 1537 milk or cream that is curdled with an acid beverage (as wine or cider) and often sweetened and served as a drink ...
syllabus
noun (plural syllabi or -buses) Etymology: Late Latin, alteration of Latin sillybus label for a book, from Greek sillybos Date: circa 1656 1. a summary outline of a ...
syllepsis
noun (plural syllepses) Etymology: Latin, from Greek syllēpsis, from syllambanein Date: circa 1550 1. the use of a word to modify or govern syntactically two or more words ...
sylleptic
adjective see syllepsis
syllogism
noun Etymology: Middle English silogisme, from Anglo-French sillogisme, from Latin syllogismus, from Greek syllogismos, from syllogizesthai to syllogize, from syn- + ...
syllogist
noun Date: 1799 one who applies or is skilled in syllogistic reasoning
syllogistic
adjective see syllogism
syllogistically
adverb see syllogism
syllogize
verb (-gized; -gizing) Etymology: Middle English sylogysen, from Late Latin syllogizare, from Greek syllogizesthai Date: 15th century intransitive verb to reason by means ...
sylph
noun Etymology: New Latin sylphus Date: 1657 1. an elemental being in the theory of Paracelsus that inhabits air 2. a slender graceful woman or girl • sylphlike adjective
sylphid
noun Date: 1680 a young or diminutive sylph
sylphlike
adjective see sylph
Sylt
geographical name island NW Germany, chief of the North Frisian Islands area 36 square miles (94 square kilometers)
Sylva
biographical name Carmen — see Elizabeth Queen of Romania
sylvan
I. noun Date: 1565 one that frequents groves or woods II. adjective Etymology: Medieval Latin silvanus, sylvanus, from Latin silva, sylva wood Date: circa 1583 1. a. ...
sylvatic
adjective Etymology: Latin silvaticus of the woods, wild — more at savage Date: 1661 1. sylvan 2. occurring in or affecting wild animals
sylvine
noun see sylvite
sylvite
also sylvine noun Etymology: alteration of sylvine, from French, from New Latin sal digestivus Sylvii digestive salt of Sylvius, from Sylvius latinized name of Jacques Dubois ...
Sylvius
biographical name see Aeneas Silvius
sym
abbreviation symmetrical
sym-
— see syn-
symbiont
noun Etymology: probably from German, modification of Greek symbiount-, symbiōn, present participle of symbioun Date: 1887 an organism living in symbiosis; especially the ...
symbiosis
noun (plural symbioses) Etymology: New Latin, from German Symbiose, from Greek symbiōsis state of living together, from symbioun to live together, from symbios living together, ...
symbiote
noun Etymology: French, from Greek symbiōtēs companion, from symbioun to live together Date: circa 1909 symbiont
symbiotic
adjective see symbiosis
symbiotically
adverb see symbiosis
symbol
I. noun Etymology: in sense 1, from Late Latin symbolum, from Late Greek symbolon, from Greek, token, sign; in other senses from Latin symbolum token, sign, symbol, from Greek ...
symbolic
also symbolical adjective Date: 1610 1. a. using, employing, or exhibiting a symbol b. consisting of or proceeding by means of symbols 2. of, relating to, or ...
symbolic logic
noun Date: 1856 a science of developing and representing logical principles by means of a formalized system consisting of primitive symbols, combinations of these symbols, ...
symbolical
adjective see symbolic
symbolically
adverb see symbolic
symbolise
British variant of symbolize
symbolism
noun Date: 1654 1. the art or practice of using symbols especially by investing things with a symbolic meaning or by expressing the invisible or intangible by means of ...
symbolist
noun Date: 1812 1. one who employs symbols or symbolism 2. one skilled in the interpretation or explication of symbols 3. often capitalized one of a group of writers and ...
symbolistic
adjective Date: circa 1864 symbolic
symbolization
noun Date: 1603 1. an act or instance of symbolizing 2. the human capacity to develop a system of meaningful symbols
symbolize
verb (-ized; -izing) Date: 1603 transitive verb 1. to serve as a symbol of 2. to represent, express, or identify by a symbol intransitive verb to use symbols or ...
symbolizer
noun see symbolize
symbology
noun (plural -gies) Etymology: symbol + -logy Date: 1840 1. the art of expression by symbols 2. the study or interpretation of symbols 3. a system of symbols
Symington
biographical name (William) Stuart 1901-1988 American industrialist & politician
symmetallism
noun Etymology: syn- + -metallism (as in bimetallism) Date: circa 1895 a system of coinage in which the unit of currency consists of a particular weight of an alloy of two or ...
symmetric
adjective see symmetrical
symmetric group
noun Date: 1897 a permutation group that is composed of all of the permutations of n things
symmetric matrix
noun Date: circa 1949 a matrix that is its own transpose
symmetrical
or symmetric adjective Date: 1653 1. having, involving, or exhibiting symmetry 2. having corresponding points whose connecting lines are bisected by a given point or ...
symmetrically
adverb see symmetrical
symmetricalness
noun see symmetrical
symmetrization
noun see symmetrize
symmetrize
transitive verb (-trized; -trizing) Date: 1796 to make symmetrical • symmetrization noun
symmetry
noun (plural -tries) Etymology: Latin symmetria, from Greek, from symmetros symmetrical, from syn- + metron measure — more at measure Date: 1563 1. balanced proportions; ...
Symonds
biographical name John Addington 1840-1893 English scholar
Symons
biographical name Arthur William 1865-1945 British poet & critic
sympath-
or sympatho- combining form Etymology: International Scientific Vocabulary, from sympathetic sympathetic nerve
sympathectomized
adjective see sympathectomy
sympathectomy
noun (plural -mies) Etymology: International Scientific Vocabulary Date: 1900 surgical interruption of sympathetic nerve pathways • sympathectomized adjective
sympathetic
I. adjective Etymology: New Latin sympatheticus, from Latin sympathia sympathy Date: 1644 1. existing or operating through an affinity, interdependence, or mutual ...
sympathetic magic
noun Date: 1905 magic based on the assumption that a person or thing can be supernaturally affected through its name or an object representing it
sympathetic nervous system
noun Date: 1850 the part of the autonomic nervous system that contains chiefly adrenergic fibers and tends to depress secretion, decrease the tone and contractility of smooth ...
sympathetic strike
noun Date: 1895 sympathy strike

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