Слова на букву soma-tano (6389) New Collegiate Dictionary
На главную О проекте Обратная связь Поддержать проектДобавить в избранное

  
EN-DE-FR →  New Collegiate Dictionary →  acto-axio axio-buck buck-cobl cobl-deco deco-elec elec-flüg flüg-gulp gulp-innu inob-leni leni-micr micr-obtr obtr-phyl phyl-quin quin-sask sask-soma soma-tano tans-unco uncr-wool


Слова на букву soma-tano (6389)

<< < 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 > >>
sympathetic vibration
noun Date: 1898 a vibration produced in one body by the vibrations of exactly the same period in a neighboring body
sympathetically
adverb see sympathetic I
sympathise
chiefly British variant of sympathize
sympathize
intransitive verb (-thized; -thizing) Date: 1600 1. to be in keeping, accord, or harmony 2. to react or respond in sympathy 3. to share in suffering or grief ; ...
sympathizer
noun see sympathize
sympatho-
combining form see sympath-
sympatholytic
adjective Etymology: International Scientific Vocabulary Date: 1943 tending to oppose the physiological results of sympathetic nervous activity or of sympathomimetic drugs ...
sympathomimetic
adjective Etymology: International Scientific Vocabulary Date: 1910 simulating sympathetic nervous action in physiological effect • sympathomimetic noun
sympathy
noun (plural -thies) Etymology: Latin sympathia, from Greek sympatheia, from sympathēs having common feelings, sympathetic, from syn- + pathos feelings, emotion, experience ...
sympathy strike
noun Date: 1912 a strike in which the strikers have no direct grievance against their own employer but attempt to support or aid usually another group of workers on strike
sympatric
adjective Etymology: syn- + Greek patra fatherland, from patēr father — more at father Date: circa 1904 1. occurring in the same area 2. occupying the same geographical ...
sympatrically
adverb see sympatric
sympatry
noun see sympatric
symphonic
adjective Date: 1856 1. harmonious, symphonious 2. relating to or having the form or character of a symphony 3. suggestive of a symphony especially in form, ...
symphonic poem
noun Date: 1873 an extended programmatic composition for symphony orchestra usually freer in form than a symphony
symphonically
adverb see symphonic
symphonious
adjective Date: 1652 agreeing especially in sound ; harmonious • symphoniously adverb
symphoniously
adverb see symphonious
symphonist
noun Date: 1767 1. a member of a symphony orchestra 2. a composer of symphonies
symphony
noun (plural -nies) Etymology: Middle English symphonie, from Middle French, from Latin symphonia, from Greek symphōnia, from symphōnos concordant in sound, from syn- + ...
symphony orchestra
noun Date: circa 1881 a large orchestra of winds, strings, and percussion that plays symphonic works
symphyseal
also symphysial adjective Etymology: Greek symphyse-, symphysis symphysis Date: circa 1836 of, relating to, or constituting a symphysis
symphysial
adjective see symphyseal
symphysis
noun (plural symphyses) Etymology: New Latin, from Greek, state of growing together, from symphyesthai to grow together, from syn- + phyein to make grow, bring forth — more at ...
sympodial
adjective Etymology: New Latin sympodium apparent main axis formed from secondary axes, from Greek syn- + podion base — more at -podium Date: 1875 having or involving the ...
symposiast
noun Etymology: Greek symposiazein to take part in a symposium, from symposion Date: 1878 a contributor to a symposium
symposium
noun (plural symposia or -siums) Etymology: Latin, from Greek symposion, from sympinein to drink together, from syn- + pinein to drink — more at potable Date: 1711 1. a. ...
symptom
noun Etymology: Late Latin symptomat-, symptoma, from Greek symptōmat-, symptōma happening, attribute, symptom, from sympiptein to happen, from syn- + piptein to fall — more ...
symptomatic
adjective Date: 1698 1. a. being a symptom of a disease b. having the characteristics of a particular disease but arising from another cause 2. concerned with, ...
symptomatically
adverb see symptomatic
symptomatologic
adjective see symptomatology
symptomatological
adjective see symptomatology
symptomatologically
adverb see symptomatology
symptomatology
noun Date: 1798 1. the symptom complex of a disease 2. a branch of medical science concerned with symptoms of diseases • symptomatological or symptomatologic adjective ...
symptomless
adjective see symptom
syn-
or sym- prefix Etymology: New Latin, from Greek, from syn with, together with 1. with ; along with ; together 2. at the same time
syn.ap.ti.ne.mal complex
noun see synaptonemal complex
synaesthesia
chiefly British variant of synesthesia
synagog
noun see synagogue
synagogal
adjective see synagogue
synagogue
also synagog noun Etymology: Middle English synagoge, from Anglo-French, from Late Latin synagoga, from Greek synagōgē assembly, synagogue, from synagein to bring together, ...
synapomorphy
noun (plural -phies) Etymology: International Scientific Vocabulary syn- + apomorphy derived evolutionary trait or feature (from apo- + -morphy) Date: 1965 a character or ...
synapse
I. noun Etymology: New Latin synapsis, from Greek, juncture, from synaptein to fasten together, from syn- + haptein to fasten Date: 1899 the point at which a nervous impulse ...
synapsid
noun Etymology: New Latin Synapsida, from Greek syn- + apsid-, apsis arch, vault — more at apsis Date: 1956 any of a subclass (Synapsida) of extinct chiefly Permian and ...
synapsis
noun (plural synapses) Etymology: New Latin Date: 1895 the association of homologous chromosomes that is characteristic of the first meiotic prophase
synaptic
adjective Etymology: New Latin synapsis Date: 1895 1. of or relating to a synapsis 2. of or relating to a synapse • synaptically adverb
synaptically
adverb see synaptic
synaptonemal complex
noun Etymology: synaptic + -o- or -i- + Greek nēma thread — more at nemat- Date: 1958 a complex tripartite protein structure that spans the region between synapsed ...
synaptosomal
adjective see synaptosome
synaptosome
noun Etymology: synaptic + -o- + 3-some Date: 1964 a nerve ending that is isolated from homogenized nerve tissue (as of the brain) • synaptosomal adjective
synarthrodial
adjective Etymology: New Latin synarthrodia synarthrosis Date: 1830 of, relating to, or being a synarthrosis
synarthrosis
noun (plural synarthroses) Etymology: Greek synarthrōsis, from syn- + arthrōsis arthrosis Date: 1578 an immovable articulation in which the bones are united by intervening ...
sync
I. transitive verb also synch (synced; also synched; syncing; also synching) Date: 1945 synchronize II. noun also synch Date: 1929 synchronization, synchronism • sync ...
syncarpous
adjective Date: circa 1830 having the carpels of the gynoecium united in a compound ovary • syncarpy noun
syncarpy
noun see syncarpous
syncategorematic
adjective Etymology: Late Latin syncategoremat-, syncategorema syncategorematic term, from Greek synkatēgorēma, from synkatēgorein to predicate jointly, from syn- + ...
syncategorematically
adverb see syncategorematic
synch
I. transitive verb see sync I II. noun see sync II
synchro
I. adjective Etymology: synchro- Date: 1947 adapted to synchronization II. noun Date: 1968 synchronized swimming
synchro-
combining form Etymology: synchronized & synchronous synchronized ; synchronous
synchrocyclotron
noun Date: 1947 a modified cyclotron that achieves greater energies for the charged particles by compensating for the variation in mass that the particles experience with ...
synchromesh
adjective Date: 1928 designed for effecting synchronized shifting of gears • synchromesh noun
synchroneity
noun (plural -ities) Etymology: synchronous + -eity (as in spontaneity) Date: circa 1909 the state of being synchronous
synchronic
adjective Date: 1833 1. synchronous 2. a. descriptive 4 b. concerned with events existing in a limited time period and ignoring historical antecedents • ...
synchronical
adjective see synchronic
synchronically
adverb see synchronic
synchronicity
noun (plural -ties) Date: circa 1889 1. the quality or fact of being synchronous 2. the coincidental occurrence of events and especially psychic events (as similar thoughts ...
synchronisation
British variant of synchronization
synchronise
British variant of synchronize
synchronism
noun Date: 1588 1. the quality or state of being synchronous ; simultaneousness 2. chronological arrangement of historical events and personages so as to indicate ...
synchronistic
adjective see synchronism
synchronization
noun Date: 1828 1. the act or result of synchronizing 2. the state of being synchronous
synchronize
verb (-nized; -nizing) Date: circa 1624 intransitive verb to happen at the same time transitive verb 1. to represent or arrange (events) to indicate coincidence or ...
synchronized swimmer
noun see synchronized swimming
synchronized swimming
noun Date: 1950 swimming in which the movements of one or more swimmers are synchronized with a musical accompaniment so as to form changing patterns • synchronized ...
synchronizer
noun see synchronize
synchronous
adjective Etymology: Late Latin synchronos, from Greek, from syn- + chronos time Date: 1669 1. happening, existing, or arising at precisely the same time 2. recurring or ...
synchronous motor
noun Date: 1897 an electric motor having a speed strictly proportional to the frequency of the operating current
synchronously
adverb see synchronous
synchronousness
noun see synchronous
synchrony
noun (plural -nies) Date: 1848 synchronistic occurrence, arrangement, or treatment
synchroscope
noun Date: 1907 any of several devices for showing whether two associated machines or moving parts are operating in synchronism with each other
synchrotron
noun Date: 1945 1. an apparatus for imparting very high speeds to charged particles by means of a combination of a high-frequency electric field and a low-frequency magnetic ...
synchrotron radiation
noun Etymology: from its having been first observed in a synchrotron Date: 1956 radiation emitted by high-energy charged relativistic particles (as electrons) when they are ...
synclinal
adjective Etymology: Greek syn- + klinein to lean — more at lean Date: 1833 1. inclined down from opposite directions so as to meet 2. having or relating to a folded rock ...
syncline
noun Etymology: back-formation from synclinal Date: 1873 a trough of stratified rock in which the beds dip toward each other from either side — compare anticline
syncopal
adjective see syncope
syncopate
transitive verb (-pated; -pating) Date: 1605 1. a. to shorten or produce by syncope
syncopated
adjective Date: 1665 1. cut short ; abbreviated 2. marked by or exhibiting syncopation
syncopation
noun Date: 1597 1. a temporary displacement of the regular metrical accent in music caused typically by stressing the weak beat 2. a syncopated rhythm, passage, or dance ...
syncopative
adjective see syncopation
syncopator
noun see syncopate
syncope
noun Etymology: Late Latin, from Greek synkopē, literally, cutting short, from synkoptein to cut short, from syn- + koptein to cut — more at capon Date: circa 1550 1. loss ...
syncretic
adjective Date: 1840 characterized or brought about by syncretism ; syncretistic
syncretise
British variant of syncretize
syncretism
noun Etymology: New Latin syncretismus, from Greek synkrētismos federation of Cretan cities, from syn- + Krēt-, Krēs Cretan Date: 1618 1. the combination of different ...
syncretist
noun or adjective see syncretism
syncretistic
adjective see syncretism
syncretize
transitive verb (-tized; -tizing) Date: 1861 to attempt to unite and harmonize especially without critical examination or logical unity
syncytial
adjective see syncytium
syncytium
noun (plural syncytia) Etymology: New Latin, from syn- + cyt- Date: 1876 1. a multinucleate mass of cytoplasm resulting from fusion of cells 2. coenocyte 1 • syncytial ...
syndactylism
noun Date: 1889 syndactyly
syndactyly
noun Etymology: New Latin syndactylia, from syn- + Greek daktylos finger Date: 1864 a union of two or more digits that is normal in some animals (as various marsupials) and ...
syndesmosis
noun (plural syndesmoses) Etymology: New Latin, from Greek syndesmos fastening, ligament, from syndein Date: 1726 an articulation in which the contiguous surfaces of the ...
syndetic
adjective Etymology: Greek syndetikos, from syndein to bind together — more at asyndeton Date: 1876 connective, connecting ; also marked by a conjunctive • ...
syndetically
adverb see syndetic
syndic
noun Etymology: French, from Late Latin syndicus representative of a corporation, from Greek syndikos assistant at law, advocate, representative of a state, from syn- + dikē ...
syndical
adjective Date: 1855 1. of or relating to a syndic or to a committee that assumes the powers of a syndic 2. of or relating to syndicalism
syndicalism
noun Etymology: French syndicalisme, from chambre syndicale trade union Date: 1907 1. a revolutionary doctrine by which workers seize control of the economy and the ...
syndicalist
adjective or noun see syndicalism
syndicate
I. noun Etymology: French syndicat, from syndic Date: 1624 1. a. a council or body of syndics b. the office or jurisdiction of a syndic 2. an association of persons ...
syndication
noun see syndicate II
syndicator
noun see syndicate II
syndrome
noun Etymology: New Latin, from Greek syndromē combination, syndrome, from syn- + dramein to run — more at dromedary Date: 1541 1. a group of signs and symptoms that occur ...
syne
I. adverb Etymology: Middle English (northern), probably contraction of Old English siththan since — more at since Date: 14th century chiefly Scottish since then ; ago II. ...
synecdoche
noun Etymology: Latin, from Greek synekdochē, from syn- + ekdochē sense, interpretation, from ekdechesthai to receive, understand, from ex from + dechesthai to receive; akin ...
synecdochic
adjective see synecdoche
synecdochical
adjective see synecdoche
synecdochically
adverb see synecdoche
synecological
adjective see synecology
synecology
noun Etymology: German Synökologie, from syn- syn- + Ökologie ecology Date: 1910 a branch of ecology that deals with the structure, development, and distribution of ...
syneresis
noun Etymology: Late Latin synaeresis, from Greek synairesis, from synairein to contract, from syn- + hairein to take Date: circa 1577 1. synizesis 2. the separation of ...
synergetic
adjective Etymology: Greek synergētikos, from synergein to work with, cooperate, from synergos working together, from syn- + ergon work — more at work Date: circa 1836 ...
synergic
adjective Date: 1850 working together ; cooperating • synergically adverb
synergically
adverb see synergic
synergid
noun Etymology: New Latin synergida, from Greek synergos working together Date: 1898 one of two small cells lying near the micropyle of the embryo sac of an angiosperm
synergism
noun Etymology: New Latin synergismus, from Greek synergos Date: 1910 interaction of discrete agencies (as industrial firms), agents (as drugs), or conditions such that the ...
synergist
noun Date: 1876 something (as a chemical or a muscle) that enhances the effectiveness of an active agent; broadly either member of a synergistic pair
synergistic
adjective Date: circa 1847 1. having the capacity to act in synergism 2. of, relating to, or resembling synergism • synergistically adverb
synergistically
adverb see synergistic
synergy
noun (plural -gies) Etymology: New Latin synergia, from Greek synergos working together Date: 1660 1. synergism; broadly combined action or operation 2. a mutually ...
synesis
noun Etymology: New Latin, from Greek, understanding, sense, from synienai to bring together, understand, from syn- + hienai to send — more at jet Date: 1856 a grammatical ...
synesthesia
noun Etymology: New Latin, from syn- + -esthesia (as in anesthesia) Date: circa 1891 1. a concomitant sensation; especially a subjective sensation or image of a sense (as ...
synesthete
noun Date: 1985 a person affected with synesthesia
synesthetic
adjective see synesthesia
synfuel
noun Etymology: synthetic + fuel Date: 1975 a liquid or gaseous fuel derived especially from a fossil fuel that is a solid (as coal) or part of a solid (as tar sand or oil ...
syngamy
noun Etymology: International Scientific Vocabulary Date: 1904 sexual reproduction by union of gametes ; fertilization
syngas
noun Date: 1975 synthesis gas
Synge
I. biographical name John Millington 1871-1909 Irish poet & dramatist II. biographical name Richard Laurence Millington 1914-1994 British biochemist
syngeneic
adjective Etymology: syn- + -geneic (as in isogeneic) Date: 1961 involving, derived from, or being genetically identical or similar individuals of the same species especially ...
synizesis
noun Etymology: Late Latin, from Greek synizēsis, from synizein to sit down together, collapse, blend, from syn- + hizein to sit down; akin to Latin sidere to sit down — more ...
synod
noun Etymology: Middle English sinod, from Late Latin synodus, from Late Greek synodos, from Greek, meeting, assembly, from syn- + hodos way, journey Date: 14th century 1. an ...
synodal
adjective see synod
synodic
or synodical adjective Date: 1561 1. of or relating to a synod ; synodal 2. (usually synodic) [Greek synodikos, from synodos meeting, conjunction] relating to conjunction; ...
synodic month
noun Date: 1654 a lunar month
synodical
adjective see synodic
synonym
noun Etymology: Middle English sinonyme, from Latin synonymum, from Greek synōnymon, from neuter of synōnymos synonymous, from syn- + onyma name — more at name Date: 15th ...
synonymic
adjective see synonym
synonymical
adjective see synonym
synonymist
noun Date: circa 1753 one who lists, studies, or discriminates synonyms
synonymity
noun see synonym
synonymize
transitive verb (-mized; -mizing) Date: circa 1595 1. a. to give or analyze the synonyms of (a word) b. to provide (as a dictionary) with synonymies 2. to demonstrate ...
synonymous
adjective Date: 1610 1. having the character of a synonym; also alike in meaning or significance 2. having the same connotations, implications, or reference • ...
synonymously
adverb see synonymous
synonymy
noun (plural -mies) Date: 1683 1. a. a list or collection of synonyms often defined and discriminated from each other b. the study or discrimination of synonyms 2. the ...
synopsis
noun (plural synopses) Etymology: Late Latin, from Greek, literally, comprehensive view, from synopsesthai to be going to see together, from syn- + opsesthai to be going to see ...
synopsize
transitive verb (-sized; -sizing) Date: 1882 1. epitomize 2. to make a synopsis of (as a novel)
synoptic
also synoptical adjective Etymology: Greek synoptikos, from synopsesthai Date: 1763 1. affording a general view of a whole 2. manifesting or characterized by ...
synoptical
adjective see synoptic
synoptically
adverb see synoptic
synostosis
noun (plural synostoses) Etymology: New Latin Date: circa 1848 union of two or more separate bones to form a single bone
synovia
noun Etymology: New Latin, any of various bodily fluids or discharges Date: 1726 synovial fluid
synovial
adjective Date: 1756 of, relating to, or secreting synovial fluid ; also lined with synovial membrane
synovial fluid
noun Date: 1846 a transparent viscid lubricating fluid secreted by a membrane of an articulation, bursa, or tendon sheath
synovial joint
noun Date: 1854 diarthrosis 2
synovitis
noun Date: circa 1836 inflammation of a synovial membrane
syntactic
or syntactical adjective Etymology: New Latin syntacticus, from Greek syntaktikos arranging together, from syntassein Date: 1577 of, relating to, or according to the rules of ...
syntactical
adjective see syntactic
syntactically
adverb see syntactic
syntactician
noun Date: 1900 a specialist in syntax
syntactics
noun plural but singular or plural in construction Date: 1937 a branch of semiotic that deals with the formal relations between signs or expressions in abstraction from their ...
syntagm
chiefly British variant of syntagma
syntagma
noun (plural -mas or syntagmata) Etymology: Greek, from syntassein Date: 1937 a syntactic element • syntagmatic adjective
syntagmatic
adjective see syntagma
syntax
noun Etymology: Middle French or Late Latin; Middle French sintaxe, from Late Latin syntaxis, from Greek, from syntassein to arrange together, from syn- + tassein to arrange ...
synth
noun Usage: often attributive Date: 1976 synthesizer 2
synthesis
noun (plural syntheses) Etymology: Greek, from syntithenai to put together, from syn- + tithenai to put, place — more at do Date: 1589 1. a. the composition or ...
synthesis gas
noun Date: circa 1941 a mixture of carbon monoxide and hydrogen used especially in chemical synthesis
synthesist
noun see synthesis
synthesize
verb (-sized; -sizing) Date: 1830 transitive verb 1. to combine or produce by synthesis 2. to make a synthesis of 3. to produce (as music) by an electronic ...
synthesizer
noun Date: 1869 1. one that synthesizes 2. a usually computerized electronic apparatus for the production and control of sound (as for producing music)
synthetase
noun Etymology: synthetic + -ase Date: 1947 an enzyme that catalyzes the linking together of two molecules usually using the energy derived from the concurrent splitting off ...
synthetic
I. adjective Etymology: Greek synthetikos of composition, component, from syntithenai to put together Date: 1697 1. relating to or involving synthesis ; not analytic 2. ...
synthetic division
noun Date: 1904 a simplified method for dividing a polynomial by another polynomial of the first degree by writing down only the coefficients of the several powers of the ...
synthetic geometry
noun Date: 1889 elementary euclidean geometry or projective geometry as distinguished from analytic geometry
synthetic resin
noun Date: 1907 resin 2
synthetically
adverb see synthetic I
syph
noun Date: circa 1914 slang syphilis
syphilis
noun Etymology: New Latin, from Syphilus, hero of the poem Syphilis sive Morbus Gallicus (Syphilis or the French disease) (1530) by Girolamo Fracastoro died 1553 Italian poet ...
syphilitic
adjective or noun see syphilis
syphon
variant of siphon
Syr Dar'ya
or ancient Jaxartes geographical name river about 1370 miles (2204 kilometers) Tajikistan & S Kazakhstan flowing from Tian Shan W & NW into Aral Sea
Syracusae
geographical name see Syracuse 2
Syracusan
adjective or noun see Syracuse
Syracuse
geographical name 1. city central New York near Oneida Lake population 147,306 2. (or Italian Siracusa) (or ancient Syracusae) city & port Italy in SE Sicily population ...
Syrah
noun Etymology: French syrah, syrac Date: 1974 1. a grape whose skin has a dark blue to bluish-black color that was originally grown in the northern valley of the Rhone and ...
syrette
noun Etymology: from Syrette, a trademark Date: 1941 a small collapsible tube fitted with a hypodermic needle for injecting a single dose of a medicinal agent (as morphine)
Syria
geographical name 1. ancient region SW Asia bordering on the Mediterranean & covering modern Syria, Lebanon, Israel, & Jordan 2. former French mandate (1920-44) comprising ...
Syriac
noun Etymology: Latin syriacus Syrian, from Greek syriakos, from Syria, ancient country in Asia Date: 1605 1. a literary language based on an eastern Aramaic dialect and ...
Syrian
adjective or noun see Syria
Syrian Desert
geographical name desert W Asia between Mediterranean coast & the Euphrates covering N Saudi Arabia, NE Jordan, SE Syria, & W Iraq
Syrian hamster
noun Etymology: Syria, Asia Date: circa 1949 golden hamster
syringa
noun Etymology: New Latin, genus name, from Greek syring-, syrinx panpipe Date: 1664 mock orange 1
syringe
I. noun Etymology: Middle English syring, from Anglo-French siringe, from Medieval Latin syringa, from Late Latin, injection, from Greek syring-, syrinx panpipe, tube Date: ...
syringomyelia
noun Etymology: New Latin, from Greek syring-, syrinx tube, fistula + New Latin myel- + -ia Date: 1880 a chronic progressive disease of the spinal cord associated with ...
syringomyelic
adjective see syringomyelia
syrinx
noun (plural syringes or syrinxes) Date: 1606 1. [Late Latin, from Greek] panpipe 2. [New Latin, from Greek] the vocal organ of birds that is a special modification of the ...
Syros
or Greek Síros geographical name 1. island Greece in the Cyclades S of Andros 2. — see ermoupolis
syrphid fly
noun Etymology: New Latin Syrphidae, from Syrphus, genus of flies, from Greek syrphos gnat Date: circa 1891 hoverfly
Syrtis Major
geographical name — see sidra (Gulf of)
Syrtis Minor
geographical name — see gabes (Gulf of)
syrup
also sirup noun Etymology: Middle English sirup, from Anglo-French sirop, from Medieval Latin syrupus, from Arabic sharāb Date: 14th century 1. a. a thick sticky ...
syrupy
adjective see syrup
sysop
noun Etymology: system operator Date: 1983 the administrator of a computer bulletin board
syst
abbreviation system
systaltic
adjective Etymology: Late Latin systalticus, from Greek systaltikos, from systellein to contract — more at systole Date: 1676 marked by regular contraction and dilatation ; ...
system
noun Etymology: Late Latin systemat-, systema, from Greek systēmat-, systēma, from synistanai to combine, from syn- + histanai to cause to stand — more at stand Date: 1603 ...
systematic
adjective Etymology: Late Latin systematicus, from Greek systēmatikos, from systēmat-, systēma Date: circa 1680 1. relating to or consisting of a system 2. presented or ...
systematic error
noun Date: 1891 an error that is not determined by chance but is introduced by an inaccuracy (as of observation or measurement) inherent in the system
systematic theology
noun Date: 1836 a branch of theology concerned with summarizing the doctrinal traditions of a religion (as Christianity) especially with a view to relating the traditions ...
systematically
adverb see systematic
systematicness
noun see systematic
systematics
noun plural but singular in construction Date: 1888 1. the science of classification 2. a. a system of classification b. the classification and study of organisms ...
systematise
British variant of systematize
systematism
noun Date: 1846 the practice of forming intellectual systems
systematist
noun Date: 1700 1. a maker or follower of a system 2. a specialist in taxonomy ; taxonomist
systematization
noun see systematize
systematize
transitive verb (-tized; -tizing) Date: circa 1767 to arrange in accord with a definite plan or scheme ; order systematically Synonyms: see order • systematization ...
systematizer
noun see systematize
systemic
I. adjective Date: 1803 of, relating to, or common to a system: as a. affecting the body generally b. supplying those parts of the body that receive blood through the ...
systemic lupus erythematosus
noun Date: 1951 an inflammatory connective tissue disease that is often held to be an autoimmune disease and that occurs chiefly in women, is characterized especially by ...
systemically
adverb see systemic I
systemization
noun see systemize
systemize
transitive verb (-ized; -izing) Date: 1778 systematize • systemization noun
systemless
adjective see system
systems analysis
noun Date: circa 1950 the act, process, or profession of studying an activity (as a procedure, a business, or a physiological function) typically by mathematical means in ...
systems analyst
noun see systems analysis
systole
noun Etymology: Greek systolē, from systellein to contract, from syn- + stellein to send Date: 1578 a rhythmically recurrent contraction; especially the contraction of the ...
systolic
adjective see systole
syzygy
noun (plural -gies) Etymology: Late Latin syzygia conjunction, from Greek, from syzygos yoked together, from syn- + zygon yoke — more at yoke Date: circa 1847 the nearly ...
Szamos
geographical name — see Somes
Szczecin
or German Stettin geographical name city & port NW Poland population 412,058
Szechuan
also Sichuan or Szechwan adjective Etymology: Sichuan, Szechuan, Szechwan, province in China Date: 1956 of, relating to, or being a style of Chinese cooking that is spicy, ...
Szechuan, Szechwan
geographical name — see Sichuan
Szechwan
I. adjective see Szechuan II. geographical name see Sichuan II
Szeged
geographical name city S Hungary population 184,000
Szekesfehervar
geographical name city W central Hungary population 111,200
Szell
biographical name George 1897-1970 American (Hungarian-born) conductor
Szent-Györgyi
biographical name Albert von Nagyrapolt 1893-1986 American (Hungarian-born) chemist
Szepingkai
geographical name — see Siping
Szilard
biographical name Leo 1898-1964 American (Hungarian-born) physicist
Szold
biographical name Henrietta 1860-1945 American Zionist & founder of Hadassah
Szolnok
geographical name city E central Hungary population 82,900
Szombathely
geographical name city W Hungary population 87,700
Szymborska
biographical name Wislawa 1923- Polish poet
T
abbreviation 1. tera- 2. tesla 3. thymine 4. toddler 5. tritium 6. T-shirt
t
I. noun (plural t's or ts) Usage: often capitalized, often attributive Date: before 12th century 1. a. the 20th letter of the English alphabet b. a graphic ...
T and A
noun Etymology: tits & ass Date: 1979 curvaceous and often scantily clothed women; also entertainment featuring such women
T cell
noun Etymology: thymus-derived cell Date: 1970 any of several lymphocytes (as a helper T cell) that differentiate in the thymus, possess highly specific cell-surface antigen ...
t distribution
noun Date: circa 1957 a probability density function that is used especially in testing hypotheses concerning means of normal distributions whose standard deviations are ...
T formation
noun Date: 1930 an offensive football formation in which the fullback lines up behind the center and quarterback with one halfback stationed on each side of the fullback
T lymphocyte
noun Etymology: thymus-derived Date: 1972 T cell
T square
noun Date: 1785 a ruler with a crosspiece or head at one end used in making parallel lines
t'ai chi
noun see tai chi
t'ai chi ch'uan
noun see tai chi

<< < 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 > >>

© en-de-fr.com.ua - EN-DE-FR 2009-2017 Информация публикуется на сайте для ознакомительного процесса.
 
Выполнено за: 0.061 c;