Слова на букву soma-tano (6389) New Collegiate Dictionary
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Слова на букву soma-tano (6389)

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specked
adjective see speck I
speckle
I. noun Etymology: Middle English; akin to Old English specca Date: 15th century a little speck (as of color) II. transitive verb (speckled; speckling) Date: 15th century ...
speckle interferometry
noun Date: 1970 a technique for generating a clear composite image of a celestial object blurred by atmospheric turbulence in which a large number of short-exposure ...
speckled perch
noun Date: 1856 black crappie
speckled trout
noun Date: 1765 1. brook trout 2. spotted sea trout
specs
noun plural Etymology: contraction of spectacles Date: 1807 glasses
spectacle
noun Etymology: Middle English, from Anglo-French, from Latin spectaculum, from spectare to watch, frequentative of specere to look, look at — more at spy Date: 14th century ...
spectacled
adjective Date: 1607 1. having or wearing spectacles 2. having markings suggesting a pair of spectacles
spectacled bear
noun Date: 1835 a black or dark brown bear (Tremarctos ornatus) of the Andes mountains with white markings encircling the eyes
spectacles
noun see glass I
spectacular
I. adjective Etymology: Latin spectaculum Date: 1682 of, relating to, or being a spectacle ; striking, sensational • spectacularly adverb II. noun Date: 1873 ...
spectacularly
adverb see spectacular I
spectate
intransitive verb (spectated; spectating) Etymology: back-formation from spectator Date: 1858 to be present as a spectator (as at a sports event)
spectator
noun Etymology: Latin, from spectare to watch Date: circa 1586 1. one who looks on or watches 2. a woman's pump usually having contrasting colors with a perforated design ...
spectatorial
adjective see spectator
spectatorship
noun see spectator
specter
or spectre noun Etymology: French spectre, from Latin spectrum appearance, specter, from specere to look, look at — more at spy Date: 1605 1. a visible disembodied spirit ; ...
spectinomycin
noun Etymology: spect- (from New Latin spectabilis, specific epithet of Streptomyces spectabilis) + actinomycin Date: 1964 a white crystalline broad-spectrum antibiotic ...
spectral
adjective Date: 1769 1. of, relating to, or suggesting a specter ; ghostly 2. of, relating to, or made by a spectrum • spectrally adverb
spectral line
noun Date: 1849 one of a series of linear images formed by a spectrograph or similar instrument and corresponding to a narrow portion of the spectrum of the radiation ...
spectrally
adverb see spectral
spectre
noun see specter
spectro-
combining form Etymology: New Latin spectrum spectrum
spectrofluorimeter
noun see spectrofluorometer
spectrofluorometer
also spectrofluorimeter noun Date: 1957 a device for measuring and recording fluorescence spectra • spectrofluorometric adjective • spectrofluorometry noun
spectrofluorometric
adjective see spectrofluorometer
spectrofluorometry
noun see spectrofluorometer
spectrogram
noun Etymology: International Scientific Vocabulary Date: 1892 a photograph, image, or diagram of a spectrum
spectrograph
noun Etymology: International Scientific Vocabulary Date: 1884 an instrument for dispersing radiation (as electromagnetic radiation or sound waves) into a spectrum and ...
spectrographic
adjective see spectrograph
spectrographically
adverb see spectrograph
spectrography
noun see spectrograph
spectroheliogram
noun Date: 1905 a photograph of the sun that is made by monochromatic light and shows the sun's faculae and prominences
spectroheliograph
noun Etymology: International Scientific Vocabulary Date: 1892 an apparatus for making spectroheliograms • spectroheliography noun
spectroheliography
noun see spectroheliograph
spectrohelioscope
noun Etymology: International Scientific Vocabulary Date: 1906 1. spectroheliograph 2. an instrument similar to a spectroheliograph used for visual as distinguished from ...
spectrometer
noun Etymology: International Scientific Vocabulary Date: 1874 1. an instrument used for measuring wavelengths of light spectra 2. any of various analytical instruments in ...
spectrometric
adjective see spectrometer
spectrometry
noun see spectrometer
spectrophotometer
noun Etymology: International Scientific Vocabulary Date: 1881 a photometer for measuring the relative intensities of the light in different parts of a spectrum • ...
spectrophotometric
adjective see spectrophotometer
spectrophotometrical
adjective see spectrophotometer
spectrophotometrically
adverb see spectrophotometer
spectrophotometry
noun see spectrophotometer
spectroscope
noun Etymology: International Scientific Vocabulary Date: 1861 an instrument for forming and examining spectra especially in the visible region of the electromagnetic ...
spectroscopic
adjective see spectroscope
spectroscopically
adverb see spectroscope
spectroscopist
noun see spectroscope
spectroscopy
noun Date: 1869 1. the process or technique of using a spectroscope or spectrometer 2. the production and investigation of spectra
spectrum
noun (plural spectra or spectrums) Etymology: New Latin, from Latin, appearance — more at specter Date: 1671 1. a. a continuum of color formed when a beam of white light ...
specular
adjective Etymology: Latin specularis of a mirror, from speculum Date: 1640 of, relating to, or having the qualities of a mirror • specularity noun • specularly adverb
specularity
noun see specular
specularly
adverb see specular
speculate
verb (-lated; -lating) Etymology: Latin speculatus, past participle of speculari to spy out, examine, from specula lookout post, from specere to look, look at — more at spy ...
speculation
noun Date: 14th century an act or instance of speculating: as a. assumption of unusual business risk in hopes of obtaining commensurate gain b. a transaction involving ...
speculative
adjective Date: 14th century 1. involving, based on, or constituting intellectual speculation; also theoretical rather than demonstrable 2. marked by questioning ...
speculatively
adverb see speculative
speculator
noun see speculate
speculum
noun (plural specula; also -lums) Etymology: Middle English, from Latin, mirror, from specere Date: 15th century 1. an instrument inserted into a body passage especially to ...
SPED
abbreviation see SpEd
speech
noun Etymology: Middle English speche, from Old English sprǣc, spǣc; akin to Old English sprecan to speak — more at speak Date: before 12th century 1. a. the ...
speech community
noun Date: 1894 a group of people sharing characteristic patterns of vocabulary, grammar, and pronunciation
speech form
noun Date: 1863 linguistic form
speechify
intransitive verb (-ified; -ifying) Date: 1723 to make a speech
speechless
adjective Date: before 12th century 1. unable to speak ; dumb 2. not speaking ; silent 3. not capable of being expressed in words • speechlessly adverb • ...
speechlessly
adverb see speechless
speechlessness
noun see speechless
speechwriter
noun Date: 1834 a person who writes speeches (as for a politician)
speed
I. noun Etymology: Middle English spede, from Old English spēd; akin to Old High German spuot prosperity, speed, Old English spōwan to succeed, Latin spes hope, Lithuanian ...
speed bump
noun Date: 1972 a low raised ridge across a roadway (as in a parking lot) to limit vehicle speed
speed freak
noun Date: 1967 one who habitually misuses amphetamines and especially methamphetamine
speed limit
noun Date: 1902 the maximum or minimum speed permitted by law in a given area under specified circumstances
speed of light
Date: 1823 a fundamental physical constant that is the speed at which electromagnetic radiation propagates in a vacuum and that has a value fixed by international convention ...
speed shop
noun Date: 1953 a shop that sells custom automotive equipment especially to hot-rodders
speed skater
noun see speed skating
speed skating
noun Date: 1885 the sport of racing on skates • speed skater noun
speed trap
noun Date: 1925 a stretch of road policed by often concealed officers or devices (as radar) so as to catch speeders
speed-read
transitive verb see speed-reading
speed-reading
noun Date: 1962 a method of reading rapidly by skimming • speed-read transitive verb
speedball
I. noun Date: 1905 1. slang a dose of cocaine mixed with heroin or morphine or an amphetamine and usually taken by injection 2. a game which resembles soccer but in which a ...
speedboat
noun Date: 1911 a fast launch or motorboat • speedboating noun
speedboating
noun see speedboat
speeder
noun see speed II
speedily
adverb see speedy
speediness
noun see speedy
speedo
noun (plural speedos) Etymology: by alteration Date: 1934 chiefly British speedometer
speedometer
noun Date: 1903 1. an instrument for indicating speed ; tachometer 2. an instrument for indicating distance traversed as well as speed of travel; also odometer
speedster
noun see speed I
speedup
noun Date: 1921 1. acceleration 2. an employer's demand for accelerated output without increased pay
speedway
noun Date: 1894 1. a public road on which fast driving is allowed; specifically expressway 2. a racecourse for automobiles or motorcycles 3. a sprint race for ...
speedwell
noun Date: 1578 a perennial European herb (Veronica officinalis) of the snapdragon family that is naturalized in North America and has small bluish flowers in axillary ...
speedy
adjective (speedier; -est) Date: 14th century marked by swiftness of motion or action; also prompt 2 Synonyms: see fast • speedily adverb • speediness noun
speel
verb Etymology: origin unknown Date: 1513 chiefly Scottish climb
speer
or speir verb Etymology: Middle English (Scots) speren, from Old English spyrian to seek after; akin to Old English spor spoor Date: before 12th century chiefly Scottish ...
speir
verb see speer
speleological
adjective see speleology
speleologist
noun see speleology
speleology
noun Etymology: Latin speleum cave (from Greek spēlaion) + International Scientific Vocabulary -o- + -logy — more at spelunker Date: 1895 the scientific study or ...
spell
I. verb (spelled; spelling) Etymology: Middle English, to mean, signify, read by spelling out letters, from Anglo-French espeleir, of Germanic origin; akin to Old English ...
spell out
transitive verb Date: 1940 1. to make plain 2. to write or print in letters and in full
spell-check
I. noun see spell-checker II. verb see spell-checker
spell-checker
noun Date: 1980 a computer program that identifies possible misspellings in a block of text by comparing the text with a database of accepted spellings — called also ...
spellbind
transitive verb (spellbound; -binding) Etymology: back-formation from spellbound Date: 1808 to bind or hold by or as if by a spell
spellbinder
noun Date: 1888 a speaker of compelling eloquence; also one that compels attention
spellbinding
adjective Date: 1827 holding the attention as if by a spell • spellbindingly adverb
spellbindingly
adverb see spellbinding
spellbound
adjective Date: 1785 held by or as if by a spell
speller
noun Date: 15th century 1. a person who spells words especially in a certain way 2. a book with exercises for teaching spelling
spelling
noun Date: 15th century 1. the forming of words from letters according to accepted usage ; orthography 2. a. a sequence of letters composing a word b. the way in which ...
spelling bee
noun Date: 1872 a spelling contest in which contestants are eliminated as soon as they misspell a word
spelling checker
noun see spell-checker
spelling pronunciation
noun Date: 1901 a pronunciation of a word that is based on its spelling alone and often includes the vocalization of silent letters
Spellman
biographical name Francis Joseph 1889-1967 American cardinal
spelt
I. noun Etymology: Middle English, from Old English, from Late Latin spelta, of Germanic origin; perhaps akin to Middle High German spelte split piece of wood, Old High German ...
spelter
noun Etymology: probably alteration of Middle Dutch speauter Date: 1661 zinc; especially zinc cast in slabs for commercial use
spelunker
noun Etymology: Latin spelunca cave, from Greek spēlynx; akin to Greek spēlaion cave Date: 1942 one who makes a hobby of exploring and studying caves
spelunking
noun Date: 1944 the hobby or practice of exploring caves
Spemann
biographical name Hans 1869-1941 German embryologist
spence
noun Etymology: Middle English, from Anglo-French espence, spence, from Medieval Latin expensa victuals, from Late Latin, outlay, compulsory supply of food — more at expense ...
Spence
biographical name Andrew Michael 1943- American economist
Spencer
biographical name Herbert 1820-1903 English philosopher
spencer
I. noun Etymology: George John, 2d earl Spencer died 1834 English politician Date: 1795 a short waist-length jacket II. noun Etymology: probably from the name Spencer Date: ...
Spencer Gulf
geographical name inlet of Indian Ocean SE South Australia
Spencerian
adjective Etymology: Platt R. Spencer died 1864 American calligrapher Date: 1862 of or relating to a form of slanting handwriting
Spencerianism
noun Date: 1881 the synthetic philosophy of Herbert Spencer that has as its central idea the mechanistic evolution of the cosmos from relative simplicity to relative ...
spend
verb (spent; spending) Etymology: Middle English, from Old English -spendan, from Medieval Latin expendere to disburse, use up, from Latin, to measure by weight, pay out — ...
spendable
adjective see spend
Spender
biographical name Stephen Harold 1909-1995 English poet & critic
spender
noun see spend
spending money
noun Date: 15th century pocket money
spendthrift
noun Date: 1584 a person who spends improvidently or wastefully • spendthrift adjective
spendy
adjective (spendier; -est) Usage: chiefly Northwest Date: 1985 expensive
Spengler
biographical name Oswald 1880-1936 German philosopher
Spenglerian
adjective Date: 1922 of or relating to the theory of world history developed by Oswald Spengler which holds that all major cultures undergo similar cyclical developments from ...
Spenser
biographical name Edmund 1552-1599 English poet • Spenserian adjective
Spenserian
adjective see Spenser
Spenserian stanza
noun Etymology: Edmund Spenser Date: 1817 a stanza consisting of eight verses of iambic pentameter and an alexandrine with a rhyme scheme ababbcbcc
spent
adjective Etymology: Middle English, from past participle of spenden to spend Date: 15th century 1. a. used up ; consumed b. exhausted of active or required components ...
sperm
noun (plural sperm or sperms) Etymology: Middle English, from Middle French esperme, sperme, from Late Latin spermat-, sperma, from Greek, literally, seed, from speirein to ...
sperm cell
noun Date: 1851 sperm 1b
sperm nucleus
noun Date: 1887 either of two nuclei that derive from the generative nucleus of a pollen grain and function in the fertilization of a seed plant
sperm oil
noun Date: 1839 a pale yellow oil from the sperm whale
sperm whale
noun Etymology: short for spermaceti whale Date: circa 1700 a large toothed whale (Physeter macrocephalus syn. P. catodon) with a massive squarish head having a large ...
sperm-
or spermo- or sperma- or spermi- combining form Etymology: Greek sperm-, spermo-, from sperma seed ; germ ; sperm
sperma-
combining form see sperm-
spermaceti
noun Etymology: Middle English sperma cete, from Medieval Latin sperma ceti whale sperm Date: 15th century a waxy solid obtained from the oil of cetaceans and especially ...
spermagonium
noun (plural spermagonia) Etymology: New Latin Date: 1861 a flask-shaped or depressed receptacle in which spermatia are produced in some fungi and lichens
spermary
noun (plural -ries) Etymology: New Latin spermarium, from Greek sperma Date: circa 1859 an organ in which male gametes are developed
spermat-
or spermato- combining form Etymology: Greek, from spermat-, sperma seed ; spermatozoon
spermatheca
noun Etymology: New Latin Date: 1826 a sac for sperm storage in the female reproductive tract of various lower animals and especially insects
spermatial
adjective see spermatium
spermatic
adjective Date: 15th century 1. relating to sperm or a spermary 2. resembling, carrying, or full of sperm
spermatic cord
noun Date: 1783 a cord that suspends the testis within the scrotum and contains the vas deferens and vessels and nerves of the testis
spermatid
noun Date: 1889 one of the haploid cells that are formed by the second division in meiosis of a spermatocyte and that differentiate into spermatozoa
spermatium
noun (plural spermatia) Etymology: New Latin, from Greek spermation, diminutive of spermat-, sperma Date: 1856 a nonmotile male gamete of a red alga; also a nonmotile cell ...
spermato-
combining form see spermat-
spermatocyte
noun Date: 1886 a cell giving rise to sperm cells; especially a cell that is derived by mitosis from a spermatogonium and ultimately gives rise by meiosis to four haploid ...
spermatogenesis
noun Etymology: New Latin Date: 1881 the process of male gamete formation including formation of a spermatocyte from a spermatogonium, meiotic division of the ...
spermatogenic
adjective see spermatogenesis
spermatogonial
adjective see spermatogonium
spermatogonium
noun (plural spermatogonia) Etymology: New Latin Date: 1861 a primitive male germ cell • spermatogonial adjective
spermatophore
noun Etymology: International Scientific Vocabulary Date: circa 1849 a capsule, packet, or mass enclosing spermatozoa that is extruded by the male of various lower animals ...
spermatophyte
noun Etymology: ultimately from New Latin spermat- + Greek phyton plant — more at phyt- Date: 1897 any of a group (Spermatophyta) of higher plants comprising those that ...
spermatophytic
adjective see spermatophyte
spermatozoal
adjective see spermatozoon
spermatozoan
noun Date: circa 1900 spermatozoon • spermatozoan adjective
spermatozoid
noun Etymology: International Scientific Vocabulary, from New Latin spermatozoon Date: 1854 a motile male gamete of a plant usually produced in an antheridium
spermatozoon
noun (plural spermatozoa) Etymology: New Latin Date: circa 1839 1. a motile male gamete of an animal usually with rounded or elongate head and a long posterior flagellum 2. ...
spermi-
combining form see sperm-
spermicidal
adjective see spermicide
spermicide
noun Date: 1929 a preparation or substance (as nonoxynol-9) used to kill sperm • spermicidal adjective
spermiogenesis
noun Etymology: New Latin, from spermium spermatozoon + -o- + Latin genesis Date: 1916 spermatogenesis; specifically transformation of a spermatid into a spermatozoon
spermo-
combining form see sperm-
spermophile
noun Etymology: ultimately from Greek sperma seed + philos loving Date: 1824 ground squirrel
Sperry
I. biographical name Elmer Ambrose 1860-1930 American inventor II. biographical name Roger Wolcott 1913-1994 American psychobiologist
sperrylite
noun Etymology: Francis L. Sperry, died 1906 American chemist + English -lite Date: 1889 a mineral consisting of an arsenide of platinum
spessartine
noun see spessartite
spessartite
or spessartine noun Etymology: French, from Spessart mountain range, Germany Date: 1850 a manganese aluminum garnet usually containing other elements (as iron) in minor ...
spew
I. verb Etymology: Middle English, from Old English spīwan; akin to Old High German spīwan to spit, Latin spuere, Greek ptyein Date: before 12th century intransitive verb ...
spewer
noun see spew I
Spey
geographical name river 110 miles (177 kilometers) NE Scotland flowing into Moray Firth
Speyer
or Spires geographical name city SW Germany on W bank of the Rhine SW of Heidelberg population 47,456
Spezia, La
geographical name — see La Spezia
SPF
abbreviation sun protection factor
sphaer-
combining form see spher-
sphaero-
combining form see spher-
sphagnous
adjective Date: circa 1828 of, relating to, or abounding in sphagnum
sphagnum
noun Etymology: New Latin, from Latin sphagnos, a moss, from Greek Date: 1741 1. any of an order (Sphagnales, containing a single genus Sphagnum) of atypical mosses that grow ...
sphalerite
noun Etymology: German Sphalerit, from Greek sphaleros deceitful, from sphallein to cause to fall; from its often being mistaken for galena — more at spill Date: circa 1868 ...
sphene
noun Etymology: French sphène, from Greek sphēn wedge Date: 1815 a mineral that is a silicate of calcium and titanium and often contains other elements
sphenodon
noun Etymology: New Latin, genus name, from Greek sphēn wedge + odōn, odous tooth — more at tooth Date: 1878 tuatara • sphenodont adjective
sphenodont
adjective see sphenodon
sphenoid
I. adjective or sphenoidal Etymology: New Latin sphenoides, from Greek sphēnoeidēs wedge-shaped, from sphēn wedge Date: 1732 1. of, relating to, or being a winged ...
sphenoidal
adjective see sphenoid I
sphenopsid
noun Etymology: ultimately from Greek sphēn wedge + New Latin -opsis Date: 1957 any of a class or division (Sphenopsida or Sphenophyta) of primitive vascular plants ...
spher-
or sphero-; also sphaer- or sphaero- combining form Etymology: New Latin sphaer-, from Greek sphair-, sphairo-, from sphaira sphere sphere
spheral
adjective Date: 1545 1. spherical 2. of or relating to the spheres of ancient astronomy
sphere
I. noun Etymology: Middle English spere globe, celestial sphere, from Anglo-French espere, from Latin sphaera, from Greek sphaira, literally, ball; perhaps akin to Greek ...
sphere of influence
Date: 1885 a territorial area within which the political influence or the interests of one nation are held to be more or less paramount
spheric
adjective see sphere I
spherical
adjective Date: 15th century 1. having the form of a sphere or of one of its segments 2. relating to or dealing with a sphere or its properties • spherically adverb
spherical aberration
noun Date: 1868 aberration that is caused by the spherical form of a lens or mirror and that gives different foci for central and marginal rays
spherical angle
noun Date: 1678 the angle between two intersecting arcs of great circles of a sphere measured by the plane angle formed by the tangents to the arcs at the point of intersection
spherical coordinate
noun Date: circa 1864 one of three coordinates that are used to locate a point in space and that comprise the radius of the sphere on which the point lies in a system of ...
spherical geometry
noun Date: 1728 the geometry of figures on a sphere
spherical polygon
noun Date: circa 1825 a figure analogous to a plane polygon that is formed on a sphere by arcs of great circles
spherical triangle
noun Date: 1585 a spherical polygon of three sides
spherical trigonometry
noun Date: circa 1728 trigonometry applied to spherical triangles and polygons
spherically
adverb see spherical
sphericity
noun see sphere I
sphero-
combining form see spher-
spheroid
noun Date: 1570 a figure resembling a sphere; also an object of approximately spherical shape • spheroidal also spheroid adjective • spheroidally adverb
spheroidal
adjective see spheroid
spheroidally
adverb see spheroid
spherometer
noun Etymology: International Scientific Vocabulary Date: circa 1828 an instrument for measuring the curvature of a surface
spheroplast
noun Date: circa 1920 a bacterium or yeast cell that is modified (as by enzymatic action) so that there is partial loss of the cell wall and increased osmotic sensitivity
spherule
noun Date: 1665 a little sphere or spherical body
spherulite
noun Date: 1823 a usually spherical crystalline body of radiating crystal fibers often found in vitreous volcanic rocks • spherulitic adjective
spherulitic
adjective see spherulite
sphery
adjective Date: 1596 1. of, relating to, or suggestive of the celestial bodies 2. round, spherical
sphincter
noun Etymology: Late Latin, from Greek sphinktēr, literally, band, from sphingein to bind tight Date: 1578 an annular muscle surrounding and able to contract or close a ...
sphincteric
adjective see sphincter
sphingid
noun Etymology: ultimately from Greek sphing-, sphinx sphinx Date: circa 1909 hawk moth
sphingosine
noun Etymology: Greek sphingos (genitive of sphinx) + English 2-ine; from riddles it posed to its first investigators Date: 1881 a long-chain unsaturated amino alcohol ...
sphinx
noun (plural sphinxes or sphinges) Etymology: Latin, from Greek Sphinx, Sphix Date: 15th century 1. a. capitalized a winged female monster in Greek mythology having a ...
sphinx moth
noun Date: 1839 hawk moth
sphinxlike
adjective see sphinx
sphygmograph
noun Etymology: Greek sphygmos pulse + International Scientific Vocabulary -graph Date: circa 1859 an instrument that records graphically the movements or character of the ...
sphygmomanometer
noun Etymology: Greek sphygmos pulse (from sphyzein to throb) + International Scientific Vocabulary manometer Date: circa 1889 an instrument for measuring blood pressure and ...
sphygmomanometry
noun see sphygmomanometer
sphynx
noun (plural sphynx or sphynxes) Etymology: probably alteration of sphinx; from the cat's appearance Date: 1970 any of a breed of large-eared virtually hairless cats that ...
spic
also spick noun Etymology: by shortening & alteration from spiggoty, of unknown origin Date: 1916 usually offensive Spanish American
spic-and-span
adjective see spick-and-span
spica
noun (plural spicae or spicas) Etymology: Latin, ear of grain — more at spine Date: circa 1731 a bandage that is applied in successive V-shaped crossings and is used to ...
Spica
noun Etymology: Latin, literally, ear of grain Date: 15th century a star of the first magnitude in the constellation Virgo
spicate
adjective Etymology: Latin spicatus, past participle of spicare to arrange in the shape of heads of grain, from spica Date: 1668 arranged in the form of a spike
spiccato
I. adjective Etymology: Italian, past participle of spiccare to detach, pick off Date: circa 1724 performed with a slight lifting of the bow after each note — used as a ...
spice
I. noun Etymology: Middle English, from Anglo-French espece, espis, from Late Latin species product, wares, drugs, spices, from Latin, appearance, species — more at species ...
spicebush
noun Date: 1770 an aromatic shrub (Lindera benzoin) of the laurel family found chiefly in the eastern United States that bears dense clusters of small greenish-yellow flowers ...
spiceless
adjective see spice I
spicery
noun (plural -eries) Date: 13th century 1. spices 2. archaic a repository of spices 3. a spicy quality
spicily
adverb see spicy
spiciness
noun see spicy
spick
noun see spic
spick-and-span
or spic-and-span adjective Etymology: short for spick-and-span-new, from obsolete English spick spike + English and + span-new Date: 1665 1. fresh, brand-new 2. spotlessly ...
spicular
adjective see spicule
spiculation
noun see spicule
spicule
noun Etymology: New Latin spicula & Latin spiculum; New Latin spicula, alteration of Latin spiculum head of a spear or arrow, diminutive of spicum, spica ear of grain Date: ...
spicy
adjective (spicier; -est) Date: 1562 1. having the quality, flavor, or fragrance of spice 2. producing or abounding in spices 3. lively, spirited 4. piquant, racy; ...
spider
noun Etymology: Middle English spyder, alteration of spithre; akin to Old English spinnan to spin Date: 15th century 1. any of an order (Araneae syn. Araneida) of arachnids ...
spider crab
noun Date: circa 1710 any of a family (Majidae) of crabs with extremely long legs and nearly triangular bodies which they often cover with kelp
spider mite
noun Date: 1870 any of various small web-spinning mites (family Tetranychidae) that include destructive pests of plants — called also red spider
spider monkey
noun Date: 1764 any of a genus (Ateles) of New World monkeys with long slender limbs, the thumb absent or rudimentary, and a very long prehensile tail
spider plant
noun Date: 1944 any of several cultivars of a southern African plant (Chlorophytum comosum) of the lily family widely grown as houseplants and having long narrow green leaves ...
spider vein
noun Date: 1976 a telangiectasia (as of the legs or face) often appearing as a central area with outward radiations resembling the legs of a spider
spiderish
adjective see spider
spiderlike
adjective see spider
spiderweb
noun Date: circa 1649 1. the network of silken thread spun by most spiders and used as a resting place and as a trap for small prey 2. something that resembles or suggests ...
spiderwort
noun Date: 1629 any of a genus (Tradescantia of the family Commelinaceae, the spiderwort family) of American monocotyledonous plants with ephemeral often blue or violet ...
spidery
adjective Date: 1825 1. a. resembling a spider in form or manner b. resembling a spiderweb ; especially composed of fine threads or lines in a weblike arrangement ...
spiegel
noun see spiegeleisen
spiegeleisen
also spiegel noun Etymology: German Spiegeleisen, from Spiegel mirror + Eisen iron Date: 1855 a composition of iron that contains 15 to 30 percent manganese and 4.5 to 6.5 ...
spiel
I. verb Etymology: German spielen to play, from Old High German spilōn; akin to Old English spilian to revel Date: 1870 intransitive verb 1. to play music 2. to talk ...
Spielberg
biographical name Steven 1947- American motion-picture director, writer, & producer • Spielbergian adjective

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