Слова на букву soma-tano (6389) New Collegiate Dictionary
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Слова на букву soma-tano (6389)

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steamily
adverb see steamy
steaminess
noun see steamy
steamroll
verb see steamroller II
steamroller
I. noun Date: 1863 1. a steam-driven road roller; broadly road roller 2. a crushing force especially when ruthlessly applied to overcome opposition II. verb or steamroll ...
steamship
noun Date: 1790 steamer 2a
steamship round
noun Date: 1964 a large beef roast consisting of the whole round with rump and heel
steamy
adjective (steamier; -est) Date: 1565 1. consisting of, characterized by, or full of steam 2. intensely or uncomfortably hot: as a. hot and humid b. sensually hot ; ...
stearate
noun Date: 1839 a salt or ester of stearic acid
stearic acid
noun Etymology: French stéarique, from Greek stear hard fat Date: 1830 a white crystalline fatty acid C18H36O2 obtained by saponifying tallow or other hard fats containing ...
stearin
noun Etymology: French stéarine, from Greek stear Date: 1817 an ester of glycerol and stearic acid
steatite
noun Etymology: Latin steatitis, a precious stone, from Greek, from steat-, stear Date: 1794 1. a massive talc having a grayish-green or brown color ; soapstone 2. an ...
steatitic
adjective see steatite
steato-
combining form Etymology: Greek, from steat-, stear; perhaps akin to Sanskrit styāyate it hardens fat
steatopygia
noun Etymology: New Latin, from steat-, stear + Greek pygē buttocks Date: 1879 an excessive development of fat on the buttocks that occurs especially among women of the ...
steatopygic
adjective see steatopygia
steatopygous
adjective see steatopygia
steatorrhea
noun Etymology: New Latin Date: circa 1859 an excess of fat in the stools
steatorrhoea
chiefly British variant of steatorrhea
Stębark
or German Tannenberg geographical name village NE Poland SW of Olsztyn
stedfast
archaic variant of steadfast
steed
noun Etymology: Middle English stede, from Old English stēda stallion; akin to Old English stōd stud — more at stud Date: before 12th century horse; especially a ...
steek
verb Etymology: Middle English steken to pierce, fix, enclose; akin to Old English stician to pierce — more at stick Date: 13th century chiefly Scottish shut, close
steel
I. noun Etymology: Middle English stele, from Old English stȳle, stēle; akin to Old High German stahal steel and perhaps to Sanskrit stakati he resists Date: before 12th ...
steel band
noun Date: 1949 a band of steel drums
steel blue
noun Date: 1803 1. a grayish blue 2. any of the blue colors assumed by steel at various temperatures in tempering
steel drum
noun Date: 1952 a musical instrument originally developed in Trinidad that is played by hammering raised and tuned portions of the bottom of an oil drum
steel engraving
noun Date: 1824 1. the art or process of engraving on steel 2. an impression taken from an engraved steel plate
steel guitar
noun Date: 1925 1. Hawaiian guitar 2. pedal steel • steel guitarist noun
steel guitarist
noun see steel guitar
steel wool
noun Date: 1896 an abrasive material composed of long fine steel shavings and used especially for scouring and burnishing
steel-trap
adjective Date: 1945 quick, incisive
Steele
biographical name Sir Richard 1672-1729 British essayist & dramatist
steelhead
noun (plural steelhead; also steelheads) Date: circa 1882 an anadromous rainbow trout — called also steelhead trout
steelhead trout
noun see steelhead
steelie
also steely noun (plural steelies) Date: 1922 a playing marble made of steel
steeliness
noun see steely
steelmaker
noun Date: 1774 a manufacturer of steel • steelmaking noun
steelmaking
noun see steelmaker
steelwork
noun Date: 1681 1. work in steel 2. plural but singular or plural in construction an establishment where steel is made
steelworker
noun Date: 1857 a person who works in steel and especially in the manufacturing of it
steely
adjective (steelier; -est) Date: 1509 1. resembling or suggesting steel (as in hardness, color, strength, or coldness) 2. made of steel • steeliness noun
steelyard
noun Etymology: probably from 3steel + 4yard (rod) Date: 1639 a balance in which an object to be weighed is suspended from the shorter arm of a lever and the weight ...
Steen
biographical name Jan 1626-1679 Dutch painter
steenbok
or steinbok noun Etymology: Afrikaans steenbok, from Dutch, ibex, from Middle Dutch steenboc; akin to Old English stānbucca ibex, stān stone, bucca buck Date: 1775 a small ...
Steens Mountain
geographical name mountain mass SE Oregon; highest point about 9700 feet (2955 meters)
steep
I. adjective Etymology: Middle English stepe, from Old English stēap high, steep, deep; akin to Old Frisian stāp steep, Middle High German stief — more at stoop Date: ...
steepen
verb (steepened; steepening) Date: 1847 intransitive verb to become steeper transitive verb to make steeper
steeper
noun see steep III
steepish
adjective see steep I
steeple
noun Etymology: Middle English stepel, from Old English stēpel tower; akin to Old English stēap steep Date: before 12th century a tall structure usually having a small ...
steeplebush
noun Date: circa 1818 hardhack
steeplechase
noun Etymology: from the use of church steeples as landmarks to guide the riders Date: 1793 1. a. a horse race across country b. a horse race over a closed course with ...
steeplechaser
noun see steeplechase
steeplechasing
noun see steeplechase
steepled
adjective see steeple
steeplejack
noun Date: 1852 a person whose work is building smokestacks, towers, or steeples or climbing up the outside of such structures to paint and make repairs
steeply
adverb see steep I
steepness
noun see steep I
steer
I. noun Etymology: Middle English, from Old English stēor young ox; akin to Old High German stior young ox Date: before 12th century 1. a male bovine animal and especially a ...
steer clear
phrasal to keep entirely away — often used with of
steerable
adjective see steer II
steerage
noun Date: 15th century 1. the act or practice of steering; broadly direction 2. [from its originally being located near the rudder] a section of inferior accommodations in ...
steerageway
noun Date: 1762 a rate of motion sufficient to make a ship or boat respond to movements of the rudder
steerer
noun see steer II
steering column
noun Date: 1903 the column that encloses the connections to the steering gear of a vehicle (as an automobile)
steering committee
noun Date: 1887 a managing or directing committee; specifically a committee that determines the order in which business will be taken up in a United States legislative body
steering gear
noun Date: 1851 a mechanism (as a gear train) by which something is steered
steering wheel
noun Date: 1750 a handwheel by means of which one steers
steersman
noun Date: before 12th century one who steers ; helmsman
steeve
I. transitive verb (steeved; steeving) Etymology: probably from Spanish estibar or Portuguese estivar to pack tightly, from Latin stipare to press together — more at stiff ...
Stefansson
biographical name Vilhjalmur 1879-1962 American (Canadian-born) explorer
Steffens
biographical name (Joseph) Lincoln 1866-1936 American journalist
stegosaur
noun Etymology: New Latin Stegosauria, from Stegosaurus Date: 1897 any of a suborder (Stegosauria) of quadrupedal ornithischian herbivorous dinosaurs chiefly of the Jurassic ...
stegosaurus
noun Etymology: New Latin, from Greek stegos roof + sauros lizard — more at thatch Date: 1892 any of a genus (Stegosaurus) of stegosaurs known from the Upper Jurassic rocks ...
Steichen
biographical name Edward Jean 1879-1973 American photographer
Steiermark
geographical name see Styria
stein
noun Etymology: probably from German Steingut stoneware, from Stein stone + Gut goods Date: 1855 a large mug (as of earthenware) used especially for beer; also the quantity ...
Stein
I. biographical name Gertrude 1874-1946 American writer II. biographical name (Heinrich Friedrich) Karl 1757-1831 Freiherr vom und zum Stein Prussian statesman
Steinbeck
biographical name John Ernst 1902-1968 American novelist
Steinberger
biographical name Jack 1921- American (German-born) physicist
steinbok
noun see steenbok
Steinem
biographical name Gloria 1934- American feminist writer & editor
Steinmetz
biographical name Charles Proteus 1865-1923 American (German-born) electrical engineer
stela
or stele noun (plural stelae or steles) Etymology: Latin & Greek; Latin stela, from Greek stēlē; akin to Old High German stollo pillar, Greek stellein to set up Date: 1776 ...
stelar
adjective Date: 1901 of, relating to, or constituting a stele
stele
noun Etymology: New Latin, from Greek stēlē stela, pillar Date: 1895 the usually cylindrical central vascular portion of the axis of a vascular plant
stella
noun Etymology: Latin, star; from the star on the reverse Date: 1879 an experimental international coin based on the metric system that was issued by the United States in ...
Stella
biographical name Frank Philip 1936- American artist
stellar
adjective Etymology: Late Latin stellaris, from Latin stella star — more at star Date: circa 1656 1. a. of or relating to the stars ; astral b. composed of stars 2. ...
stellar wind
noun Date: 1965 plasma continuously ejected from a star's surface into surrounding space
stellate
adjective Etymology: Latin stella Date: 1661 resembling a star (as in shape)
Stellenbosch
geographical name city SW Republic of South Africa in SW Western Cape province population 29,955
Steller's jay
noun Etymology: Georg W. Steller died 1746 German naturalist Date: 1828 a jay (Cyanocitta stelleri) of western North America with a high crest and black and dark blue plumage
Steller's sea cow
noun Date: 1814 an extinct very large sirenian (Hydrodamalis gigas) formerly common near the Asian coast of the Bering Sea
stem
I. noun Etymology: Middle English, from Old English stefn, stemn stem of a plant or ship; akin to Old High German stam plant stem and probably to Greek stamnos wine jar, ...
stem cell
noun Date: 1896 an unspecialized cell that gives rise to differentiated cells
stem christie
noun Usage: often capitalized C Date: 1936 a turn in skiing begun by stemming a ski and completed by bringing the skis parallel into a christie
stem rust
noun Date: 1899 1. a rust attacking the stem of a plant; especially a destructive disease especially of wheat caused by a rust fungus (Puccinia graminis) which produces ...
stem turn
noun Date: 1922 a skiing turn executed by stemming an outside ski
stem-winder
noun Date: 1875 1. a stem-winding watch 2. [from the superiority of the stem-winding watch over the older key-wound watch] one that is first-rate of its kind; especially ...
stem-winding
adjective Date: 1867 wound by an inside mechanism turned by the knurled knob on the stem
stemless
adjective Date: 1753 having no stem ; acaulescent
stemma
noun (plural stemmata) Etymology: Latin, wreath, pedigree (from the wreaths placed on ancestral images), from Greek, wreath, from stephein to crown, enwreathe Date: 1826 1. a ...
stemmatic
adjective see stemma
stemmed
adjective Date: 1576 having a stem — usually used in combination
stemmer
I. noun see stem II II. noun see stem III
stemmy
adjective (stemmier; -est) Date: 1863 1. abounding in stems 2. of wine having a bitter aftertaste
stemware
noun Date: 1926 glass hollowware mounted on a stem
Sten
noun Etymology: R. V. Shepherd, 20th century English army officer + H. J. Turpin, 20th century English civil servant + Enfield, England Date: 1942 a light simple 9-millimeter ...
sten-
or steno- combining form Etymology: Greek, from stenos close ; narrow ; little
stench
noun Etymology: Middle English, from Old English stenc; akin to Old English stincan to emit a smell — more at stink Date: before 12th century 1. stink 2. a characteristic ...
stenchful
adjective see stench
stenchy
adjective see stench
stencil
I. noun Etymology: probably ultimately from Middle English stanseld brightly ornamented, from Anglo-French estencelé spangled, past participle of estenceler to sparkle, from ...
stenciler
noun see stencil II
stenciller
noun see stencil II
Stendhal
biographical name 1783-1842 pseudonym of Marie-Henri Beyle French writer • Stendhalian adjective
Stendhalian
adjective see Stendhal
steno
noun (plural stenos) Date: 1913 1. stenographer 2. stenography
steno-
combining form see sten-
stenographer
noun Date: 1809 1. a writer of shorthand 2. a person employed chiefly to take and transcribe dictation
stenographic
adjective see stenography
stenographically
adverb see stenography
stenography
noun Date: 1602 1. the art or process of writing in shorthand 2. shorthand especially written from dictation or oral discourse 3. the making of shorthand notes and ...
stenohaline
adjective Etymology: International Scientific Vocabulary sten- + Greek halinos of salt, from hals salt — more at salt Date: circa 1920 of an aquatic organism unable to ...
stenosed
adjective Etymology: from past participle of stenose to affect with stenosis Date: 1897 affected with stenosis
stenosis
noun (plural stenoses) Etymology: New Latin, from Greek stenōsis act of narrowing, from stenoun to narrow, from stenos narrow Date: circa 1860 a narrowing or constriction of ...
stenotherm
noun see stenothermal
stenothermal
adjective Date: 1881 capable of surviving over only a narrow range of temperatures • stenotherm noun
stenotic
adjective see stenosis
stenotopic
adjective Etymology: probably from German stenotop stenotopic, from sten- + Greek topos place Date: 1945 having a narrow range of adaptability to changes in environmental ...
stenotype
noun Etymology: steno- (as in stenography) + type Date: 1913 a small machine somewhat like a typewriter used to record speech by means of phonograms • stenotype ...
stenotypist
noun see stenotype
stenotypy
noun see stenotype
stent
noun Etymology: Charles Thomas Stent died 1885 English dentist Date: 1961 a short narrow metal or plastic tube often in the form of a mesh that is inserted into the lumen of ...
stentor
noun Etymology: Latin, from Greek Stentōr Stentor, a Greek herald in the Trojan War noted for his loud voice Date: 1609 1. a person having a loud voice 2. any of a widely ...
stentorian
adjective Date: 1605 extremely loud Synonyms: see loud
step
I. noun Etymology: Middle English, from Old English stæpe; akin to Old High German stapfo step, stampfōn to stamp Date: before 12th century 1. a rest for the foot in ...
step aerobics
noun plural but singular or plural in construction Date: 1985 aerobics that involves repeatedly stepping on and off a raised platform — called also step training
step aside
intransitive verb Date: 1949 step down
step dance
noun Date: 1887 a dance in which steps are emphasized rather than gesture or posture
step down
verb Date: 1890 intransitive verb retire, resign transitive verb 1. to lower (a voltage) by means of a transformer 2. to decrease or reduce especially by one or ...
step function
noun Date: circa 1929 a mathematical function of a single real variable that remains constant within each of a series of adjacent intervals but changes in value from one ...
step in
intransitive verb Date: 15th century 1. a. to intervene in an affair or dispute b. to act as a replacement 2. to make a brief informal visit
step on it
phrasal to increase one's speed ; hurry up
step out
intransitive verb Date: circa 1533 1. to go away from a place usually for a short distance and for a short time 2. to go or march at a vigorous or increased pace 3. die ...
step stool
noun Date: 1946 a stool with one or two steps that often fold away beneath the seat
step training
noun plural but singular or plural in construction see step aerobics
step turn
noun Date: 1941 a skiing turn executed in a downhill traverse by lifting the upper ski from the ground, placing it in the desired direction, weighting it, and bringing the ...
step up
verb Date: 1902 transitive verb 1. to increase (a voltage) by means of a transformer 2. to increase, augment, or advance especially by one or more steps intransitive ...
step-
combining form Etymology: Middle English, from Old English stēop-; akin to Old High German stiof- step-, Old English astēpan to deprive, bereave related by virtue of a ...
step-by-step
adjective or adverb Date: 1581 marked by successive degrees usually of limited extent ; gradual
step-down
noun Date: 1922 a decrease or reduction in size or amount
step-in
noun Date: 1921 an article of clothing put on by being stepped into: as a. a shoe resembling but usually having a higher vamp than a pump and having concealed elastic to ...
step-up
noun Date: 1922 an increase or advance in size or amount
stepbrother
noun Date: 15th century a son of one's stepparent by a former partner
stepchild
noun Date: before 12th century 1. one that fails to receive proper care or attention 2. a child of one's wife or husband by a former partner
stepdaughter
noun Date: before 12th century a daughter of one's wife or husband by a former partner
stepfamily
noun Date: 1873 a family in which there is a stepparent
stepfather
noun Date: before 12th century the husband of one's mother when distinct from one's natural or legal father
stephanotis
noun Etymology: New Latin, from Greek stephanōtis fit for a crown, from stephanos crown, from stephein to crown Date: 1843 any of a genus (Stephanotis, especially S. ...
Stephen
I. biographical name circa 1097-1154 king of England (1135-54) II. biographical name Sir Leslie 1832-1904 English philosopher, critic, & biographer
Stephens
I. biographical name Alexander Hamilton 1812-1883 American politician; vice president of the Confederate states II. biographical name James 1882-1950 Irish poet & novelist
Stephenson
I. biographical name George 1781-1848 English inventor & founder of railroads II. biographical name Robert 1803-1859 son of George English engineer
stepladder
noun Date: 1751 a ladder that has broad flat steps and two pairs of legs connected by a hinge at the top and that opens at the bottom to become freestanding
steplike
adjective see step I
stepmother
noun Date: before 12th century the wife of one's father when distinct from one's natural or legal mother
Stepney
geographical name former metropolitan borough E London, England, on N bank of Thames River, now part of Tower Hamlets
stepparent
noun Date: 1840 a person who is a stepmother or stepfather
stepparenting
noun Date: 1979 parenting by a stepparent
steppe
noun Etymology: Russian step' Date: 1671 1. one of the vast usually level and treeless tracts in southeastern Europe or Asia 2. arid land with xerophilous vegetation ...
stepped
adjective see step I
stepped-up
adjective Date: 1902 increased in intensity ; accelerated, intensified
stepper
noun Date: 1835 one (as a fast horse or a dancer) that steps
stepper motor
noun Date: 1961 a motor whose driveshaft rotates in small steps rather than continuously — called also stepping motor
stepping motor
noun see stepper motor
stepping-stone
noun Date: 14th century 1. a stone on which to step (as in crossing a stream) 2. a means of progress or advancement
stepsister
noun Date: 15th century a daughter of one's stepparent by a former partner
stepson
noun Date: before 12th century a son of one's husband or wife by a former partner
stepwise
adjective Date: 1902 1. marked by or proceeding in steps 2. moving by step to adjacent musical tones
ster
abbreviation sterling
stercoraceous
adjective Etymology: Latin stercor-, stercus excrement Date: 1731 relating to, being, or containing feces
stere-
or stereo- combining form Etymology: New Latin, from Greek, from stereos solid — more at stare 1. solid ; solid body 2. a. stereoscopic b. having or dealing ...
stereo
I. noun (plural stereos) Date: circa 1823 1. stereotype 2. [by shortening] a. stereophonic reproduction b. a stereophonic sound system II. adjective Date: 1876 1. ...
stereo-
combining form see stere-
stereochemical
adjective see stereochemistry
stereochemistry
noun Etymology: International Scientific Vocabulary Date: 1890 1. a branch of chemistry that deals with the spatial arrangement of atoms and groups in molecules 2. the ...
stereogram
noun Etymology: International Scientific Vocabulary Date: 1868 1. a diagram or picture representing objects with an impression of solidity or relief 2. stereograph
stereograph
noun Etymology: International Scientific Vocabulary Date: 1859 a pair of stereoscopic pictures or a picture composed of two superposed stereoscopic images that gives a ...
stereographic
adjective Date: 1704 of, relating to, or being a delineation of the form of a solid body (as the earth) on a plane • stereography noun
stereography
noun see stereographic
stereoisomer
noun Etymology: International Scientific Vocabulary Date: 1894 any of a group of isomers in which atoms are linked in the same order but differ in their spatial arrangement ...
stereoisomeric
adjective see stereoisomer
stereoisomerism
noun see stereoisomer
stereological
adjective see stereology
stereologically
adverb see stereology
stereology
noun Etymology: International Scientific Vocabulary Date: 1963 a branch of science concerned with inferring the three-dimensional properties of objects or matter ordinarily ...
stereomicroscope
noun Date: 1948 a microscope having a set of optics for each eye to make an object appear in three dimensions • stereomicroscopic adjective • stereomicroscopically adverb
stereomicroscopic
adjective see stereomicroscope
stereomicroscopically
adverb see stereomicroscope
stereophonic
adjective Etymology: International Scientific Vocabulary Date: 1927 of, relating to, or constituting sound reproduction involving the use of separated microphones and two ...
stereophonically
adverb see stereophonic
stereophony
noun see stereophonic
stereophotographic
adjective see stereophotography
stereophotography
noun Etymology: International Scientific Vocabulary Date: 1903 stereoscopic photography • stereophotographic adjective
stereopsis
noun Etymology: New Latin, from stere- + Greek opsis vision, appearance — more at optic Date: circa 1911 stereoscopic vision
stereopticon
noun Etymology: New Latin, from stere- + Greek optikon, neuter of optikos optic Date: 1863 1. a projector for transparent slides often made double so as to produce dissolving ...
stereoregular
adjective Date: 1958 of, relating to, or involving stereochemical regularity in the repeating units of a polymeric structure • stereoregularity noun
stereoregularity
noun see stereoregular
stereoscope
noun Date: 1838 an optical instrument with two eyepieces for helping the observer to combine the images of two pictures taken from points of view a little way apart and thus ...
stereoscopic
adjective Date: 1855 1. of or relating to stereoscopy or the stereoscope 2. characterized by stereoscopy • stereoscopically adverb
stereoscopically
adverb see stereoscopic
stereoscopy
noun Etymology: International Scientific Vocabulary Date: circa 1859 1. a science that deals with stereoscopic effects and methods 2. the seeing of objects in three ...
stereospecific
adjective Date: 1949 being, produced by, or involved in a stereochemically specific process • stereospecifically adverb • stereospecificity noun
stereospecifically
adverb see stereospecific
stereospecificity
noun see stereospecific
stereotactic
adjective Date: 1950 involving, being, utilizing, or used in a surgical technique for precisely directing the tip of a delicate instrument (as a needle) or beam of radiation ...
stereotactically
adverb see stereotactic
stereotaxic
adjective Etymology: New Latin stereotaxis stereotactic technique, from stere- + -taxis Date: 1908 stereotactic • stereotaxically adverb
stereotaxically
adverb see stereotaxic
stereotype
I. transitive verb Date: 1804 1. to make a stereotype from 2. a. to repeat without variation ; make hackneyed b. to develop a mental stereotype about • stereotyper ...
stereotyped
adjective Date: 1849 lacking originality or individuality Synonyms: see trite
stereotyper
noun see stereotype I
stereotypic
adjective see stereotype II
stereotypical
adjective see stereotype II
stereotypically
adverb see stereotype II
stereotypy
noun (plural -pies) Date: circa 1889 frequent almost mechanical repetition of the same posture, movement, or form of speech (as in schizophrenia)
steric
adjective Etymology: International Scientific Vocabulary stere- + 1-ic Date: 1898 relating to or involving the arrangement of atoms in space ; spatial • sterically adverb
sterically
adverb see steric
sterigma
noun (plural sterigmata; also -mas) Etymology: New Latin, from Greek stērigma support, from stērizein to prop; perhaps akin to Greek stereos solid — more at stare Date: ...
sterilant
noun Date: 1941 a sterilizing agent
sterile
adjective Etymology: Middle English steryle, from Latin sterilis; akin to Gothic stairo barren animal, Sanskrit starī sterile cow Date: 15th century 1. a. failing to bear ...
sterilely
adverb see sterile
sterility
noun see sterile
sterilization
noun see sterilize
sterilize
transitive verb (-ized; -izing) Date: 1695 to make sterile: as a. to cause (land) to become unfruitful b. (1) to deprive of the power of reproducing (2) to ...
sterilizer
noun see sterilize
sterling
I. noun Etymology: Middle English, silver penny, probably from Old English *steorling, from Old English steorra star + 1-ling — more at star Date: 14th century 1. British ...
sterling area
noun Date: 1932 a former group of countries with currencies tied to the British pound sterling
Sterling Heights
geographical name city SE Michigan N of Detroit population 124,471
sterlingly
adverb see sterling II
sterlingness
noun see sterling II
Stern
I. biographical name Isaac 1920-2001 American (Russian-born) violinist II. biographical name Otto 1888-1969 American (German-born) physicist
stern
I. adjective Etymology: Middle English sterne, from Old English styrne; akin to Old English starian to stare — more at stare Date: before 12th century 1. a. having a ...
stern chase
noun Etymology: 2stern Date: 1627 a chase in which a pursuing ship follows in the path of another
stern chaser
noun Date: 1815 a gun so placed as to be able to fire astern at a pursuing ship
stern sheets
noun plural Date: 15th century the space in the stern of an open boat not occupied by the thwarts
stern-wheeler
noun Date: 1855 a steamboat driven by a single paddle wheel at the stern
sternal
adjective Date: 1756 of or relating to the sternum
Sternberg
biographical name George Miller 1838-1915 American physician & bacteriologist
Sterne
biographical name Laurence 1713-1768 British novelist
sternforemost
adverb Date: 1840 with the stern in advance ; backward
sternite
noun Etymology: International Scientific Vocabulary, from Greek sternon chest Date: 1868 the ventral part or shield of a somite of an arthropod; especially the chitinous ...
sternly
adverb see stern I
sternmost
adjective Date: 1622 farthest astern
sternness
noun see stern I
sternocostal
adjective Etymology: New Latin sternum + English -o- + costal Date: 1785 of, relating to, or situated between the sternum and ribs
sternpost
noun Date: 15th century the principal member at the stern of a ship extending from keel to deck
sternum
noun (plural sternums or sterna) Etymology: New Latin, from Greek sternon chest, breastbone; akin to Old High German stirna forehead, Latin sternere to spread out — more at ...
sternutation
noun Etymology: Middle English sternutacion, from Latin sternutation-, sternutatio, from sternutare to sneeze, frequentative of sternuere to sneeze; akin to Greek ptarnysthai to ...
sternutator
noun Date: 1922 an agent that induces sneezing and often lacrimation and vomiting
sternward
or sternwards adverb Date: 1832 aft
sternwards
adverb see sternward
sternway
noun Date: 1769 movement of a ship backward or with stern foremost
steroid
noun Etymology: International Scientific Vocabulary sterol + -oid Date: 1926 any of various compounds containing a 17-carbon 4-ring system and including the sterols and ...

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