Слова на букву tans-unco (6389) New Collegiate Dictionary
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Слова на букву tans-unco (6389)

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trademark
I. noun Date: 1838 1. a device (as a word) pointing distinctly to the origin or ownership of merchandise to which it is applied and legally reserved to the exclusive use of ...
trader
noun Date: 1585 1. a person whose business is buying and selling or barter: as a. merchant b. a person who buys and sells (as stocks or commodities futures) in search of ...
trades
adjective see trade III, 3
tradescantia
noun Etymology: New Latin, genus name, from John Tradescant died 1638 English traveler & gardener Date: 1766 spiderwort
tradesman
noun Date: 1596 1. a worker in a skilled trade ; craftsman 2. one who runs a retail store ; shopkeeper
tradespeople
noun plural Date: 1653 people engaged in trade
trading post
noun Date: 1773 1. a station of a trader or trading company established in a sparsely settled region where trade in products of local origin (as furs) is carried on 2. ...
trading stamp
noun Date: 1897 a printed stamp of value given as a premium to a retail customer to be redeemed in merchandise when accumulated in numbers
tradition
noun Etymology: Middle English tradicioun, from Middle French & Latin; Middle French tradicion, from Latin tradition-, traditio action of handing over, tradition — more at ...
traditional
adjective see tradition
traditionalism
noun Date: 1856 1. adherence to the doctrines or practices of a tradition 2. the beliefs of those opposed to modernism, liberalism, or radicalism • traditionalist noun or ...
traditionalist
noun or adjective see traditionalism
traditionalistic
adjective see traditionalism
traditionalize
transitive verb (-ized; -izing) Date: 1882 to make traditional ; imbue with traditions or traditionalism
traditionally
adverb see tradition
traditionary
adjective Date: 1661 traditional
traditionless
adjective see tradition
traduce
transitive verb (traduced; traducing) Etymology: Latin traducere to lead across, transfer, degrade, from tra-, trans- trans- + ducere to lead — more at tow Date: 1573 1. ...
traducement
noun see traduce
traducer
noun see traduce
Trafalgar, Cape
geographical name cape SW Spain SE of Cádiz at W end of Strait of Gibraltar
traffic
I. noun Usage: often attributive Etymology: Middle French trafique, from Old Italian traffico, from trafficare to trade in coastal waters Date: 1549 1. a. import and ...
traffic circle
noun Date: 1942 rotary 2
traffic cone
noun Date: 1953 a conical marker used on a road or highway (as for indicating an area under repair)
traffic court
noun Date: 1919 a minor court for disposition of petty prosecutions for violations of statutes, ordinances, and local regulations governing the use of highways and motor ...
traffic engineer
noun see traffic engineering
traffic engineering
noun Date: 1931 engineering dealing with the design of streets and control of traffic • traffic engineer noun
traffic island
noun Date: 1931 island 2a
traffic light
noun Date: 1912 a visual signal (as a system of colored lights) for controlling traffic
traffic signal
noun Date: 1917 a signal (as a traffic light) for controlling traffic
trafficability
noun Date: 1899 the quality of a terrain that permits passage (as of vehicles and troops) • trafficable adjective
trafficable
adjective see trafficability
trafficker
noun see traffic II
trag
abbreviation tragedy; tragic
tragacanth
noun Etymology: Middle French tragacanthe, from Latin tragacantha, from Greek tragakantha, from tragos goat + akantha thorn Date: 1573 a gum obtained from various Asian or ...
tragedian
noun Etymology: Middle English tragedien, from Middle French, from tragedie Date: 14th century 1. a writer of tragedies 2. an actor specializing in tragic roles
tragedienne
noun Etymology: French tragédienne, from Middle French, from tragedie Date: 1850 an actress who plays tragic roles
tragedy
noun (plural -dies) Etymology: Middle English tragedie, from Middle French, from Latin tragoedia, from Greek tragōidia, from tragos goat (akin to Greek trōgein to gnaw) + ...
tragic
also tragical adjective Etymology: Middle English, from Latin tragicus, from Greek tragikos, irregular from tragōidia tragedy Date: 15th century 1. of, marked by, or ...
tragic flaw
noun Date: 1913 a flaw in character that brings about the downfall of the hero of a tragedy
tragic irony
noun Date: 1833 irony 3b
tragical
adjective see tragic
tragically
adverb see tragic
tragicomedy
noun Etymology: Middle French tragicomedie, from Old Italian tragicomedia, from Old Spanish, from Latin tragicomoedia, from tragicus + comoedia comedy Date: circa 1580 a ...
tragicomic
also tragicomical adjective Date: 1567 1. of, relating to, or resembling tragicomedy 2. manifesting both tragic and comic aspects
tragicomical
adjective see tragicomic
tragus
noun (plural tragi) Etymology: New Latin, from Greek tragos, a part of the ear, literally, goat Date: circa 1693 the prominence in front of the external opening of the outer ...
trahison des clercs
foreign term Etymology: French treason of the intellectuals
trail
I. verb Etymology: Middle English, perhaps from Anglo-French *trailer, alteration of trainer to drag, trail on the ground — more at train Date: 13th century intransitive ...
trail bike
noun Date: 1966 a small motorcycle designed for off-road use
trail mix
noun Date: 1977 a mixture of seeds, nuts, and dried fruits eaten as a snack especially by hikers
trailblazer
noun Date: 1908 1. one that blazes a trail to guide others ; pathfinder 2. pioneer 2
trailblazing
adjective Date: 1951 making or pointing a new way
trailbreaker
noun Date: 1925 trailblazer
trailer
I. noun Date: 1590 1. one that trails 2. a trailing plant 3. a nonautomotive vehicle designed to be hauled by road: as a. a vehicle for transporting something ; ...
trailer camp
noun see trailer park
trailer court
noun see trailer park
trailer park
noun Date: 1942 an area equipped to accommodate mobile homes — called also trailer camp, trailer court
trailerable
adjective see trailer II
trailering
noun see trailer II
trailhead
noun Date: 1948 the point at which a trail begins
trailing arbutus
noun Date: 1785 arbutus 2
trailing edge
noun Date: 1909 the rearmost edge of an object that moves and especially of an airfoil
trailless
adjective see trail II
trailside
adjective Date: 1923 of, relating to, or situated in the area immediately adjacent to a trail
train
I. noun Etymology: Middle English traine treachery, from Anglo-French, from trahir to betray, from Latin tradere — more at traitor Date: 14th century obsolete scheme, ...
train case
noun Date: 1948 a small boxlike piece of luggage used especially for toilet articles
train dispatcher
noun Date: 1857 a railroad employee who directs the movement of trains within a division and coordinates their movement from one division to another
train oil
noun Etymology: obsolete train train oil, from Middle English trane, from Middle Dutch trane or Middle Low German trān; akin to Old High German trahan tear Date: circa 1553 ...
trainability
noun see train III
trainable
adjective see train III
trainband
noun Etymology: alteration of trained band Date: 1630 a 17th or 18th century militia company in England or America
trainbearer
noun Date: 1708 an attendant who holds up (as on a ceremonial occasion) the train of a robe or gown
trainee
noun Date: 1841 one that is being trained especially for a job • traineeship noun
traineeship
noun see trainee
trainer
noun Date: 1598 1. one that trains 2. one (as a machine or vehicle) used in training 3. a person who treats the ailments and minor injuries of the members of an athletic ...
trainful
noun see train II
training
noun Date: 1548 1. a. the act, process, or method of one that trains b. the skill, knowledge, or experience acquired by one that trains 2. the state of being trained
training college
noun Date: 1850 British teachers college
training school
noun Date: 1829 1. a school preparing students for a particular occupation 2. a correctional institution for the custody and reeducation of juvenile delinquents
training table
noun Date: 1893 a table where athletes under a training regimen eat meals planned to help in their conditioning
training wheels
noun plural Date: 1964 a pair of small wheels connected to the rear axle of a bicycle to help a beginning bicyclist maintain balance
trainload
noun Date: 1854 the full freight or passenger capacity of a railroad train; also a load that fills a train
trainman
noun Date: 1877 a member of a train crew supervised by a conductor
traipse
verb (traipsed; traipsing) Etymology: origin unknown Date: 1647 intransitive verb to go on foot ; walk ; also to walk or travel about without apparent plan but with or ...
trait
noun Etymology: Middle French, literally, act of drawing, from Latin tractus — more at tract Date: 1589 1. a. a stroke of or as if of a pencil b. touch, trace 2. ...
traitor
noun Etymology: Middle English traytour, from Anglo-French traitre, from Latin traditor, from tradere to hand over, deliver, betray, from trans-, tra- trans- + dare to give ...
traitoress
noun see traitress
traitorous
adjective Date: 14th century 1. guilty or capable of treason 2. constituting treason Synonyms: see faithless • traitorously adverb
traitorously
adverb see traitorous
traitress
or traitoress noun Date: 14th century a woman who is a traitor
Trajan
biographical name A.D. 53-117 originally Marcus Ulpius Traiánus usually called Germanicus Roman emperor (98-117)
traject
transitive verb Etymology: Latin trajectus, past participle of traicere Date: 1657 transmit • trajection noun
trajection
noun see traject
trajectory
noun (plural -ries) Etymology: New Latin trajectoria, from feminine of trajectorius of passing, from Latin traicere to cause to cross, cross, from trans-, tra- trans- + jacere ...
Trakehner
noun Etymology: German, from Trakehnen, site of the Prussian royal stud in East Prussia Date: 1926 any of a breed of large powerful saddle horses of East Prussian origin that ...
Tralee
geographical name seaport SW Ireland capital of County Kerry population 17,109
tram
I. noun Etymology: English dialect, shaft of a wheelbarrow, probably from Low German traam, literally, beam Date: circa 1517 1. any of various vehicles: as a. a boxlike ...
tram
I. noun Etymology: English dialect, shaft of a wheelbarrow, probably from Low German traam, literally, beam Date: circa 1517 1. any of various vehicles: as a. a boxlike ...
tramcar
noun Date: 1873 1. chiefly British streetcar 2. tram 1a
tramline
noun Date: 1886 British a streetcar line
trammel
I. noun Etymology: Middle English tramayle, a kind of net, from Old French tramail, from Late Latin tremaculum, from Latin tres three + macula mesh, spot — more at three ...
tramontane
I. noun Date: 1593 one dwelling in a tramontane region; broadly foreigner II. adjective Etymology: Italian tramontano, from Latin transmontanus, from trans- + mont-, mons ...
tramp
I. verb Etymology: Middle English; akin to Middle Low German trampen to stamp Date: 14th century intransitive verb 1. to walk, tread, or step especially heavily 2. ...
tramp art
noun Date: 1974 a style of wood carving flourishing in the United States from about 1875 to 1930 that is characterized by ornate layered whittling often of cigar boxes or ...
tramp steamer
noun see tramp II
tramper
noun see tramp I
trample
verb (trampled; trampling) Etymology: Middle English, frequentative of trampen to tramp Date: 14th century intransitive verb 1. tramp; especially to tread heavily so as ...
trampler
noun see trample
trampoline
noun Etymology: Italian trampolino springboard, from trampoli stilts, of Germanic origin; akin to Middle Low German trampen to stamp Date: 1798 a resilient sheet or web (as ...
trampoliner
noun see trampoline
trampolining
noun Date: 1949 the sport of jumping and tumbling on a trampoline
trampolinist
noun see trampoline
trampy
adjective see tramp II
tramway
noun Date: 1825 1. a. a railway for trams b. British a streetcar line 2. an overhead cable for trams
trance
I. noun Etymology: Middle English traunce, from Anglo-French transe death, coma, rapture, from transir to depart, die, from Latin transire to cross, pass by — more at ...
trancelike
adjective see trance I
tranche
noun Etymology: French, literally, slice, from Old French, from trenchier, trancher to cut — more at trench Date: 1930 a division or portion of a pool or whole; specif : an ...
tranche de vie
foreign term Etymology: French slice of life
trangam
noun Etymology: origin unknown Date: circa 1658 archaic trinket, gimcrack
tranny
noun (plural trannies) Etymology: by shortening & alteration Date: 1976 transmission 3
tranquil
adjective Etymology: Middle English tranquill, from Latin tranquillus Date: 15th century 1. a. free from agitation of mind or spirit b. free from disturbance or ...
tranquility
noun see tranquillity
tranquilize
also tranquillize verb (-ized; also -lized; -izing; also -lizing) Date: 1623 transitive verb to make tranquil or calm ; pacify; especially to relieve of mental tension and ...
tranquilizer
also tranquillizer noun Date: 1800 1. one that tranquilizes 2. a drug used to reduce mental disturbance (as anxiety and tension) — compare antipsychotic
tranquillity
or tranquility noun Date: 14th century the quality or state of being tranquil
tranquillize
verb see tranquilize
tranquillizer
noun see tranquilizer
tranquilly
adverb see tranquil
tranquilness
noun see tranquil
trans
I. adjective Date: 1892 characterized by having certain groups of atoms on opposite sides of the longitudinal axis of a double bond or of the plane of a ring in a molecule II. ...
Trans Alai
geographical name mountain range Kyrgyzstan & Tajikistan in NW Pamirs — see Lenin Peak
trans fat
noun Date: 1978 a fat containing trans-fatty acids
trans-
prefix Etymology: Latin trans-, tra- across, beyond, through, so as to change, from trans across, beyond — more at through 1. on or to the other side of ; across ; beyond ...
trans-fatty acid
noun Date: 1953 an unsaturated fatty acid characterized by a trans arrangement of alkyl chains that is formed especially during the hydrogenation of vegetable oils and has ...
transact
verb Etymology: Latin transactus, past participle of transigere to drive through, complete, transact, from trans- + agere to drive, do — more at agent Date: circa 1585 ...
transactinide
adjective Date: 1969 of, relating to, or being actual or hypothetical elements with atomic weights higher than those of the actinide series
transaction
noun Date: 1632 1. a. something transacted; especially an exchange or transfer of goods, services, or funds b. plural the often published record of the meeting of a ...
transactional
adjective see transaction
transactional analysis
noun Date: 1961 a system of psychotherapy involving analysis of individual episodes of social interaction for insight that will aid communication
transactor
noun see transact
transalpine
adjective Etymology: Latin transalpinus, from trans- + Alpes the Alps Date: 1590 situated on the north side of the Alps — compare cisalpine
Transalpine Gaul
geographical name the part of Gaul lying chiefly in what is now France & Belgium
transaminase
noun Date: 1940 an enzyme promoting transamination — called also aminotransferase
transamination
noun Etymology: International Scientific Vocabulary trans- + amine + -ation Date: 1939 a reversible oxidation-reduction reaction in which an amino group is transferred ...
transatlantic
adjective Date: 1779 1. a. crossing or extending across the Atlantic Ocean b. relating to or involving crossing the Atlantic Ocean 2. a. situated or originating ...
transaxle
noun Etymology: transmission + axle Date: 1958 a unit that consists of a combination of a transmission and an axle's differential gear used especially in front-wheel-drive ...
transborder
adjective Date: 1897 crossing or extending across a border
Transcaucasia
geographical name — see Caucasia • Transcaucasian adjective or noun
Transcaucasian
adjective or noun see Transcaucasia
transceiver
noun Etymology: transmitter + receiver Date: 1934 a radio transmitter-receiver that uses many of the same components for both transmission and reception
transcend
verb Etymology: Middle English, from Latin transcendere to climb across, transcend, from trans- + scandere to climb — more at scan Date: 14th century transitive verb 1. ...
transcendence
noun Date: 1601 the quality or state of being transcendent
transcendency
noun Date: 1615 transcendence
transcendent
adjective Etymology: Middle English, from Latin transcendent-, transcendens, present participle of transcendere Date: 15th century 1. a. exceeding usual limits ; ...
transcendental
adjective Date: 1624 1. a. transcendent 1b b. supernatural c. abstruse, abstract d. of or relating to transcendentalism 2. a. incapable of being the root of ...
Transcendental Meditation
service mark — used for a meditation technique
transcendentalism
noun Date: 1803 1. a philosophy that emphasizes the a priori conditions of knowledge and experience or the unknowable character of ultimate reality or that emphasizes the ...
transcendentalist
adjective or noun see transcendentalism
transcendentally
adverb see transcendental
transcendently
adverb see transcendent
transcontinental
adjective Date: 1853 extending or going across a continent
transcribe
transitive verb (transcribed; transcribing) Etymology: Latin transcribere, from trans- + scribere to write — more at scribe Date: 1552 1. a. to make a written copy of ...
transcriber
noun see transcribe
transcript
noun Etymology: Middle English, from Anglo-French transecrit, from Medieval Latin transcriptum, from Latin, neuter of transcriptus, past participle of transcribere Date: 14th ...
transcriptase
noun Etymology: transcription + -ase Date: 1963 RNA polymerase; also reverse transcriptase
transcription
noun Date: 1598 1. an act, process, or instance of transcribing 2. copy, transcript: as a. an arrangement of a musical composition for some instrument or voice other than ...
transcription factor
noun Date: 1972 any of various proteins that bind to DNA and play a role in the regulation of gene expression by promoting transcription
transcriptional
adjective see transcription
transcriptionally
adverb see transcription
transcriptionist
noun Date: 1963 one that transcribes; especially a typist who transcribes dictated medical reports
transcultural
adjective Date: 1951 involving, encompassing, or extending across two or more cultures
transcutaneous
adjective Date: circa 1941 passing, entering, or made by penetration through the skin
transdermal
adjective Date: 1944 relating to, being, or supplying a medication in a form for absorption through the skin into the bloodstream • transdermally adverb
transdermally
adverb see transdermal
transdisciplinary
adjective Date: 1948 interdisciplinary
transduce
transitive verb (transduced; transducing) Etymology: Latin transducere to lead across, transfer, from trans- + ducere to lead — more at tow Date: 1947 1. to convert (as ...
transducer
noun Date: 1924 a device that is actuated by power from one system and supplies power usually in another form to a second system
transductant
noun see transduction
transduction
noun Etymology: Latin transducere Date: 1947 the action or process of transducing; especially the transfer of genetic material from one microorganism to another by a viral ...
transductional
adjective see transduction
transect
I. transitive verb Etymology: trans- + intersect Date: 1634 to cut transversely • transection noun II. noun Date: 1905 a sample area (as of vegetation) usually in the ...
transection
noun see transect I
transept
noun Etymology: New Latin transeptum, from Latin trans- + septum, saeptum enclosure, wall Date: circa 1542 the part of a cruciform church that crosses at right angles to the ...
transeptal
adjective see transept
transexual
variant of transsexual
transexualism
noun see transsexual
transexuality
noun see transsexual
transfect
transitive verb see transfection
transfection
noun Etymology: trans- + infection Date: 1964 infection of a cell with isolated viral nucleic acid followed by production of the complete virus in the cell; also the ...
transfer
I. verb (transferred; transferring) Etymology: Middle English transferren, from Anglo-French transferrer, from Latin transferre, from trans- + ferre to carry — more at bear ...
transfer factor
noun Date: 1956 a substance that is produced and secreted by a lymphocyte functioning in cell-mediated immunity and that upon incorporation into a lymphocyte which has not ...
transfer payment
noun Date: circa 1945 1. a public expenditure made for a purpose (as unemployment compensation) other than procuring goods or services — usually used in plural 2. plural ...
transfer RNA
noun Date: 1961 a relatively small RNA that transfers a particular amino acid to a growing polypeptide chain at the ribosomal site of protein synthesis during translation — ...
transfer station
noun Date: 1969 a site where recyclables and refuse are collected and sorted in preparation for processing or landfill
transferability
noun see transfer I
transferable
adjective see transfer I
transferal
noun see transfer I
transferase
noun Date: 1948 an enzyme that promotes transfer of a group from one molecule to another
transferee
noun Date: circa 1736 1. a person to whom a conveyance is made 2. a person who is transferred
transference
noun Date: 1681 1. an act, process, or instance of transferring ; conveyance, transfer 2. the redirection of feelings and desires and especially of those unconsciously ...
transferential
adjective see transference
transferor
noun Date: 1875 one that conveys a title, right, or property
transferrable
adjective see transfer I
transferrer
noun see transfer I
transferrin
noun Etymology: trans- + Latin ferrum iron Date: 1947 a beta globulin in blood plasma capable of combining with ferric ions and transporting iron in the body
transfiguration
noun Date: 14th century 1. a. a change in form or appearance ; metamorphosis b. an exalting, glorifying, or spiritual change 2. capitalized a Christian feast that ...
transfigure
transitive verb (-ured; -uring) Etymology: Middle English, from Anglo-French transfigurer, from Latin transfigurare, from trans- + figurare to shape, fashion, from figura ...
transfinite
adjective Etymology: German transfinit, from trans- (from Latin) + finit finite, from Latin finitus Date: 1902 1. going beyond or surpassing any finite number, group, or ...
transfix
transitive verb Etymology: Latin transfixus, past participle of transfigere, from trans- + figere to fasten, pierce — more at fix Date: 1590 1. to pierce through with or as ...
transfixion
noun see transfix
transform
I. verb Etymology: Middle English, from Middle French transformer, from Latin transformare, from trans- + formare to form, from forma form Date: 14th century transitive verb ...
transform fault
noun Date: 1965 a strike-slip fault that occurs typically between segments of a mid-ocean ridge or other tectonic-plate boundary and that is characterized by shallow ...
transformable
adjective see transform I
transformation
noun Date: 15th century 1. an act, process, or instance of transforming or being transformed 2. false hair worn especially by a woman to replace or supplement natural hair ...
transformational
adjective Date: 1894 of, relating to, characterized by, or concerned with transformation and especially linguistic transformation • transformationally adverb
transformational grammar
noun Date: 1961 a grammar that generates the deep structures of a language and converts these to the surface structures by means of transformations
transformationalist
noun Date: 1964 an exponent of transformational grammar
transformationally
adverb see transformational
transformative
adjective see transform I
transformer
noun Date: 1596 one that transforms; specifically a device employing the principle of mutual induction to convert variations of current in a primary circuit into variations ...
transfusable
adjective see transfuse
transfuse
transitive verb (transfused; transfusing) Etymology: Middle English, from Latin transfusus, past participle of transfundere, from trans- + fundere to pour — more at found ...
transfusible
adjective see transfuse
transfusion
noun Date: 1578 1. an act, process, or instance of transfusing; especially the process of transfusing fluid (as blood) into a vein or artery 2. something transfused • ...
transfusional
adjective see transfusion
transgender
or transgendered adjective Date: 1979 having personal characteristics (as transsexuality or transvestism) that transcend traditional gender boundaries and corresponding ...
transgendered
adjective see transgender
transgene
noun Date: 1984 a gene that is taken from the genome of one organism and introduced into the genome of another organism by artificial techniques
transgenic
I. adjective Date: 1982 being or used to produce an organism or cell of one species into which one or more genes of another species have been incorporated ; also produced ...
transgress
verb Etymology: Middle English, from Middle French transgresser, from Latin transgressus, past participle of transgredi to step beyond or across, from trans- + gradi to step — ...
transgression
noun Date: 14th century an act, process, or instance of transgressing: as a. infringement or violation of a law, command, or duty b. the spread of the sea over land ...
transgressive
adjective see transgress
transgressor
noun see transgress
tranship
variant of transship
transhipment
noun see transship
transhistorical
adjective Date: 1909 transcending historical bounds
transhumance
noun Etymology: French, from transhumer to practice transhumance, from Spanish trashumar, from tras- trans- (from Latin trans-) + Latin humus earth — more at humble Date: ...
transhumant
adjective or noun see transhumance
transience
noun Date: 1745 the quality or state of being transient
transiency
noun Date: 1652 transience
transient
I. adjective Etymology: Latin transeunt-, transiens, present participle of transire to cross, pass by, from trans- + ire to go — more at issue Date: 1599 1. a. passing ...
transient ischemic attack
noun Date: 1966 a brief episode of cerebral ischemia that is usually characterized by temporary blurring of vision, slurring of speech, numbness, paralysis, or syncope and is ...
transiently
adverb see transient I
transilluminate
transitive verb Date: 1900 to cause light to pass through; especially to pass light through (a body part) for medical examination • transillumination noun • ...
transillumination
noun see transilluminate
transilluminator
noun see transilluminate
Transilvania
geographical name see Transylvania
transistor
noun Etymology: 1transfer + resistor; from its transferring an electrical signal across a resistor Date: 1948 1. a solid-state electronic device that is used to control the ...
transistorized
adjective Date: 1953 equipped with transistors
transit
I. noun Etymology: Middle English transite, from Latin transitus, from transire to go across, pass Date: 15th century 1. a. an act, process, or instance of passing through ...
transition
I. noun Etymology: Latin transition-, transitio, from transire Date: 1551 1. a. passage from one state, stage, subject, or place to another ; change b. a movement, ...
transition element
noun see transition metal
transition metal
noun Etymology: from their being transitional between the more highly and the less highly electropositive elements Date: 1940 any of various metallic elements (as chromium, ...
transitional
adjective see transition I
transitionally
adverb see transition I
transitive
adjective Etymology: Late Latin transitivus, from Latin transitus, past participle of transire Date: 1590 1. characterized by having or containing a direct object 2. ...
transitively
adverb see transitive
transitiveness
noun see transitive
transitivity
noun see transitive
transitorily
adverb see transitory
transitoriness
noun see transitory
transitory
adjective Etymology: Middle English transitorie, from Anglo-French, from Late Latin transitorius, from Latin, of or allowing passage, from transire Date: 14th century 1. ...
Transjordan
geographical name — see Jordan 3 • Transjordanian adjective or noun
Transjordanian
adjective or noun see Transjordan

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