Слова на букву tans-unco (6389) New Collegiate Dictionary
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Слова на букву tans-unco (6389)

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Transkei
geographical name former black enclave in the Republic of South Africa capital Umtata; granted independence 1976; abolished 1994 • Transkeian adjective or noun
Transkeian
adjective or noun see Transkei
transl
abbreviation translated; translation; translator
translatability
noun see translate
translatable
adjective see translate
translate
verb (translated; translating) Etymology: Middle English, from Anglo-French translater, from Latin translatus (past participle of transferre to transfer, translate), from trans- ...
translation
noun Date: 14th century 1. an act, process, or instance of translating: as a. a rendering from one language into another; also the product of such a rendering b. a ...
translational
adjective see translation
translative
adjective Date: circa 1682 1. of, relating to, or involving removal or transference from one person or place to another 2. of, relating to, or serving in translation from ...
translator
noun see translate
translatory
adjective Date: 1849 of, relating to, or involving uniform motion in one direction
transliterate
transitive verb (-ated; -ating) Etymology: trans- + Latin littera letter Date: 1861 to represent or spell in the characters of another alphabet • transliteration noun
transliteration
noun see transliterate
translocate
verb see translocation
translocation
noun Date: 1624 the act, process, or an instance of changing location or position: as a. the conduction of soluble material (as metabolic products) from one part of a plant ...
translucence
noun Date: 1755 the quality or state of being translucent
translucency
noun (plural -cies) Date: circa 1610 1. translucence 2. something that is translucent
translucent
adjective Etymology: Latin translucent-, translucens, present participle of translucēre to shine through, from trans- + lucēre to shine — more at light Date: 1607 1. ...
translucently
adverb see translucent
transmarine
adjective Etymology: Latin transmarinus, from trans- + mare sea — more at marine Date: 1583 1. being or coming from beyond or across the sea 2. passing over or ...
transmembrane
adjective Date: 1944 taking place or existing across a membrane
transmigrate
verb Etymology: Latin transmigratus, past participle of transmigrare to migrate to another place, from trans- + migrare to migrate Date: circa 1559 transitive verb to cause ...
transmigration
noun see transmigrate
transmigrator
noun see transmigrate
transmigratory
adjective see transmigrate
transmissibility
noun see transmissible
transmissible
adjective Date: 1644 capable of being transmitted • transmissibility noun
transmission
noun Etymology: Middle French, from Latin transmission-, transmissio, from transmittere to transmit Date: 1611 1. an act, process, or instance of transmitting 2. the ...
transmissive
adjective see transmission
transmissivity
noun see transmission
transmissometer
noun Date: circa 1931 an instrument for measuring the transmission of light through a fluid (as the atmosphere)
transmit
verb (transmitted; transmitting) Etymology: Middle English transmitten, from Latin transmittere, from trans- + mittere to send Date: 15th century transitive verb 1. a. ...
transmittable
adjective see transmit
transmittal
noun see transmit
transmittance
noun Date: circa 1855 1. transmission 2. the fraction of radiant energy that having entered a layer of absorbing matter reaches its farther boundary
transmitter
noun Date: 1727 one that transmits: as a. an apparatus for transmitting radio or television signals b. neurotransmitter
transmogrification
noun see transmogrify
transmogrify
verb (-fied; -fying) Etymology: origin unknown Date: 1656 transitive verb to change or alter greatly and often with grotesque or humorous effect intransitive verb to ...
transmontane
adjective Etymology: Latin transmontanus Date: 1727 tramontane
transmountain
adjective Date: 1929 crossing or extending over or through a mountain
transmutable
adjective see transmute
transmutation
noun Etymology: Middle English transmutacioun, from Anglo-French or Latin; Anglo-French transmutacion, from Latin transmutation-, transmutatio, from transmutare Date: 14th ...
transmutative
adjective see transmutation
transmute
verb (transmuted; transmuting) Etymology: Middle English, from Latin transmutare, from trans- + mutare to change — more at mutable Date: 15th century transitive verb 1. ...
transnational
adjective Date: 1921 extending or going beyond national boundaries • transnationalism noun
transnationalism
noun see transnational
transnatural
adjective Date: 1569 being above or beyond nature
transoceanic
adjective Date: 1827 1. lying or dwelling beyond the ocean 2. crossing or extending across the ocean
transom
noun Etymology: Middle English transyn, traunsom, probably alteration of traversayn, from Middle French travessain, from Old French traversain set crosswise, from Vulgar Latin ...
transonic
also transsonic adjective Etymology: trans- + supersonic Date: 1945 1. being or relating to speeds near that of sound in air or about 741 miles (1185 kilometers) per hour at ...
transp
abbreviation transportation
transpacific
adjective Date: 1891 1. a. crossing or extending across the Pacific Ocean b. relating to or involving crossing the Pacific Ocean 2. a. situated or occurring ...
transparence
noun Date: 1594 transparency 2
transparency
noun (plural -cies) Date: 1591 1. something transparent; especially a picture (as on film) viewed by light shining through it or by projection 2. the quality or state of ...
transparent
adjective Etymology: Middle English, from Medieval Latin transparent-, transparens, present participle of transparēre to show through, from Latin trans- + parēre to show ...
transparentize
transitive verb (-ized; -izing) Date: 1925 to make transparent or more nearly transparent
transparently
adverb see transparent
transparentness
noun see transparent
transpersonal
adjective Date: circa 1906 1. extending or going beyond the personal or individual 2. of, relating to, or being psychology or psychotherapy concerned especially with ...
transpicuous
adjective Etymology: New Latin transpicuus, from Latin transpicere to look through, from trans- + specere to look, see — more at spy Date: 1638 clearly seen through or ...
transpierce
transitive verb Etymology: Middle French transpercer, from Old French, from trans- (from Latin) + percer to pierce Date: 1592 to pierce through ; penetrate
transpiration
noun Date: 15th century the act or process or an instance of transpiring; especially the passage of watery vapor from a living body (as of a plant) through a membrane or ...
transpirational
adjective see transpiration
transpire
verb (transpired; transpiring) Etymology: Middle French transpirer, from Medieval Latin transpirare, from Latin trans- + spirare to breathe Date: 1597 transitive verb to ...
transplacental
adjective Etymology: International Scientific Vocabulary Date: 1902 passing through or occurring by way of the placenta • transplacentally adverb
transplacentally
adverb see transplacental
transplant
I. verb Etymology: Middle English transplaunten, from Late Latin transplantare, from Latin trans- + plantare to plant Date: 15th century transitive verb 1. to lift and ...
transplantability
noun see transplant I
transplantable
adjective see transplant I
transplantation
noun see transplant I
transplanter
noun see transplant I
transpolar
adjective Date: 1850 crossing or extending across either of the polar regions
transponder
noun Etymology: transmitter + responder Date: circa 1944 a radio or radar set that upon receiving a designated signal emits a radio signal of its own and that is used ...
transpontine
adjective Etymology: trans- + Latin pont-, pons bridge — more at find Date: 1844 1. situated on the farther side of a bridge 2. British situated on the south side of the ...
transport
I. transitive verb Etymology: Middle English, from Anglo-French or Latin; Anglo-French transporter, from Latin transportare, from trans- + portare to carry — more at fare ...
transport café
noun Date: 1938 British a roadside restaurant frequented chiefly by truck drivers
transportability
noun see transport I
transportable
adjective see transport I
transportation
noun Date: 1540 1. an act, process, or instance of transporting or being transported 2. banishment to a penal colony 3. a. means of conveyance or travel from one place ...
transportational
adjective see transportation
transporter
noun Date: 1535 one that transports; especially a vehicle for transporting large or heavy loads
transposable
adjective see transpose I
transposable element
noun Date: 1979 a segment of genetic material that is capable of changing its location in the genome or in some bacteria of undergoing transfer between an extrachromosomal ...
transpose
I. transitive verb (transposed; transposing) Etymology: Middle English, from Anglo-French transposer, from Latin transponere (perfect indicative transposui) to change the ...
transposition
noun Etymology: Anglo-French transposicion, from Medieval Latin transposition-, transpositio, from Latin transponere to transpose Date: 1538 1. a. an act, process, or ...
transposition cipher
noun Date: 1939 a cipher in which the letters of the plaintext are systematically rearranged into another sequence — compare substitution cipher
transpositional
adjective see transposition
transposon
noun Etymology: transpose + 2-on Date: 1974 a transposable element especially when it contains genetic material controlling functions other than those related to its ...
transracial
adjective Date: 1970 involving, encompassing, or extending across two or more races
transsexual
also transexual noun Date: 1957 a person who psychologically identifies with the opposite sex and may seek to live as a member of this sex especially by undergoing surgery ...
transsexualism
noun see transsexual
transsexuality
noun see transsexual
transshape
transitive verb Date: 1575 archaic to change into another shape ; transform
transship
also tranship Date: 1792 transitive verb to transfer for further transportation from one ship or conveyance to another intransitive verb to change from one ship or ...
transshipment
noun see transship
transsonic
adjective see transonic
transthoracic
adjective Date: 1905 done or made by way of the thoracic cavity • transthoracically adverb
transthoracically
adverb see transthoracic
transubstantial
adjective Date: 1567 changed or capable of being changed from one substance to another
transubstantiate
verb (-ated; -ating) Etymology: Middle English transsubstanciaten, from Medieval Latin transubstantiatus, past participle of transubstantiare, from Latin trans- + substantia ...
transubstantiation
noun Date: 14th century 1. an act or instance of transubstantiating or being transubstantiated 2. the miraculous change by which according to Roman Catholic and Eastern ...
transudate
noun Date: 1876 a transuded substance
transudation
noun Date: 1617 1. the act or process of transuding or being transuded 2. transudate
transude
verb (transuded; transuding) Etymology: New Latin transudare, from Latin trans- + sudare to sweat — more at sweat Date: 1664 intransitive verb to pass through a membrane ...
transuranic
I. adjective or transuranium Date: 1935 of, relating to, or being an element with an atomic number greater than that of uranium II. noun Date: 1950 a transuranic element
transuranium
adjective see transuranic I
transurethral
adjective Date: 1933 passing through or performed by way of the urethra
Transvaal
geographical name former province NE Republic of South Africa between the Vaal & the Limpopo; in 19th century a Boer republic ( South African Republic) capital Pretoria area ...
transvaluate
transitive verb (-ated; -ating) Etymology: back-formation from transvaluation Date: 1912 transvalue
transvaluation
noun Date: 1898 the act or process of transvaluing
transvalue
transitive verb (-valued; -valuing) Date: 1899 to reevaluate especially on a basis that repudiates accepted standards
transversal
noun Etymology: transversal, adjective, transverse, from Middle English, from Medieval Latin transversalis, from Latin transversus Date: circa 1847 a line that intersects a ...
transverse
I. adjective Etymology: Middle English, from Latin transversus, from trans- + -versus (as in adversus adverse) Date: 15th century 1. acting, lying, or being across ; set ...
transverse colon
noun Date: circa 1860 the middle portion of the colon that extends across the abdominal cavity
transverse process
noun Date: 1696 a lateral process of a vertebra
transverse wave
noun Date: 1912 a wave in which the vibrating element moves in a direction perpendicular to the direction of advance of the wave
transversely
adverb see transverse I
transvestism
noun see transvestite
transvestite
noun Etymology: German Transvestit, from Latin trans- + vestire to clothe — more at vest Date: circa 1922 a person and especially a male who adopts the dress and often the ...
transvestitism
noun see transvestite
Transylvania
or Romanian Transilvania geographical name region W Romania bounded on the N, E, & S by the Carpathians & the Transylvanian Alps; part of Hungary 1867-1918 • Transylvanian ...
Transylvanian
adjective or noun see Transylvania
Transylvanian Alps
geographical name a S extension of the Carpathian Mountains in central Romania
trap
I. noun Etymology: Middle English, from Old English treppe & Anglo-French trape (of Germanic origin); akin to Middle Dutch trappe trap, stair, Old English treppan to tread ...
trap-door spider
noun Date: 1826 any of various often large burrowing spiders (especially family Ctenizidae) that constructionct a tubular subterranean silk-lined nest topped with a hinged ...
Trapani
geographical name commune & port Italy at NW tip of Sicily population 69,273
trapdoor
noun Date: 14th century a lifting or sliding door covering an opening (as in a roof, ceiling, or floor)
trapeze
noun Etymology: French trapèze, literally, trapezoid, from New Latin trapezium Date: 1861 a gymnastic or acrobatic apparatus consisting of a short horizontal bar suspended ...
trapeze artist
noun see trapezist
trapezist
noun Date: 1875 a performer on the trapeze — called also trapeze artist
trapezium
noun (plural -ziums or trapezia) Etymology: New Latin, from Greek trapezion, literally, small table, diminutive of trapeza table, from tra- four (akin to tettares four) + peza ...
trapezius
noun Etymology: New Latin, from trapezium; from the pair on the back forming together the figure of a trapezium Date: circa 1704 a large flat triangular superficial muscle ...
trapezohedron
noun (plural -drons or trapezohedra) Etymology: New Latin, from trapezium + -o- + -hedron Date: circa 1822 a crystalline form whose faces are trapeziums
trapezoid
noun Etymology: New Latin trapezoïdes, from Greek trapezoeidēs trapezium-shaped, from trapeza table Date: circa 1706 1. a. British trapezium 1a b. a quadrilateral ...
trapezoidal
adjective see trapezoid
Trapezus
geographical name see Trabzon
trapline
noun Date: 1920 a line or series of traps; also the route along which such a line of traps is set
trapper
noun see trap II
trapping
noun Etymology: Middle English, from gerund of trappen — more at trap Date: 14th century 1. caparison 1 — usually used in plural 2. plural outward decoration or dress ; ...
Trappist
noun Etymology: French trappiste, from La Trappe, France Date: 1814 a member of a reformed branch of the Roman Catholic Cistercian Order established by the Abbot de Rancé in ...
traprock
noun Etymology: 4trap Date: 1813 any of various dark-colored fine-grained igneous rocks (as basalt) used especially in road making
traps
noun plural Etymology: Middle English trappe caparison — more at trap Date: 1813 personal belongings ; luggage
trapshooter
noun Date: 1875 a person who engages in trapshooting
trapshooting
noun Date: 1875 shooting at clay pigeons sprung from a trap into the air away from the shooter
trapunto
noun (plural -tos) Etymology: Italian, from past participle of trapungere to embroider, from tra- across (from Latin trans-) + pungere to prick, from Latin — more at trans-, ...
trash
I. noun Etymology: Middle English trasch fallen leaves and twigs, perhaps of Scandinavian origin; akin to Norwegian dialect trask rubbish; Old Norse tros fallen leaves and ...
trash fish
noun Date: 1944 1. rough fish 2. a usually marine fish having little or no market value as human food but used sometimes in the production of fish meal
trash talk
noun Date: 1981 disparaging, taunting, or boastful comments especially between opponents trying to intimidate each other • trash-talk verb • trash-talker noun
trash-talk
verb see trash talk
trash-talker
noun see trash talk
trashily
adverb see trashy
trashiness
noun see trashy
trashman
noun Date: 1951 a worker who collects and hauls away trash
trashy
adjective (trashier; -est) Date: circa 1620 1. being, resembling, or containing trash ; of inferior quality 2. indecent • trashily adverb • trashiness noun
Trasimeno, Lake
geographical name lake 10 miles (16 kilometers) wide central Italy W of Perugia
trattoria
noun (plural -rias or trattorie) Etymology: Italian, from trattore restaurateur, from French traiteur, from traiter to treat, from Old French traitier — more at treat Date: ...
Traubel
biographical name Helen 1903-1972 American soprano
trauma
noun (plural traumas; also traumata) Etymology: Greek traumat-, trauma wound, alteration of trōma; akin to Greek titrōskein to wound, tetrainein to pierce — more at throw ...
trauma center
noun Date: 1973 a hospital unit specializing in the treatment of patients with acute and especially life-threatening traumatic injuries
traumatic
adjective see trauma
traumatically
adverb see trauma
traumatise
British variant of traumatize
traumatism
noun Date: 1857 the development or occurrence of trauma; also trauma
traumatization
noun see traumatize
traumatize
transitive verb (-tized; -tizing) Date: 1903 to inflict a trauma upon • traumatization noun
trav
abbreviation travel
travail
I. noun Etymology: Middle English, from Anglo-French, from travailler to torment, labor, journey, from Vulgar Latin *trepaliare to torture, from Late Latin trepalium ...
Travancore
geographical name region & former state SW India on Malabar Coast extending N from Cape Comorin; included (1949-56) in former Travancore and Cochin state (capital ...
travel
I. verb (-eled or -elled; -eling or travelling) Etymology: Middle English travailen, travelen to torment, labor, strive, journey, from Anglo-French travailler Date: 14th ...
travel agency
noun Date: 1927 an agency engaged in selling and arranging transportation, accommodations, tours, and trips for travelers — called also travel bureau
travel agent
noun Date: 1925 a person engaged in selling and arranging transportation, accommodations, tours, or trips for travelers
travel bureau
noun see travel agency
travel light
phrasal to travel with a minimum of equipment or baggage
travel trailer
noun Date: 1961 a trailer drawn especially by an automobile and equipped for use (as while traveling) as a dwelling
traveled
or travelled adjective Date: 15th century 1. experienced in travel 2. used by travelers
traveler
or traveller noun Date: 14th century 1. one that travels: as a. one that goes on a trip or journey b. traveling salesman 2. a. an iron ring sliding along a rope, ...
traveler's check
noun Date: 1891 a draft purchased from a bank or express company and signed by the purchaser at the time of purchase and again at the time of cashing as a precaution against ...
traveler's diarrhea
noun Date: 1968 intestinal sickness and diarrhea affecting a traveler that is typically caused by ingestion of pathogenic microorganisms (as some East coli)
traveling
or travelling adjective Date: 14th century 1. that travels 2. carried, used by, or accompanying a traveler
traveling bag
noun Date: 1826 suitcase
traveling case
noun Date: 1744 a usually rigid and box-shaped suitcase
traveling fellowship
noun Date: 1789 a fellowship whose terms permit or direct the holder to travel or go abroad for study or research
traveling salesman
noun Date: 1885 a traveling representative of a business concern who solicits orders usually in an assigned territory
travelled
adjective see traveled
traveller
noun see traveler
travelling
adjective see traveling
travelog
noun see travelogue
travelogue
or travelog noun Etymology: travel + -logue Date: 1903 1. a talk or lecture on travel usually accompanied by a film or slides 2. a narrated motion picture about travel 3. ...
traversable
adjective see traverse II
traversal
noun Date: 1897 the act or an instance of traversing
traverse
I. noun Etymology: Middle English travers, from Anglo-French travers (as in a travers, de travers across), from Latin transversum (as in in transversum set crosswise), neuter of ...
traverse jury
noun Date: 1823 petit jury
traverse rod
noun Date: 1948 a metal rod or track with a pulley mechanism for drawing curtains
Traverse, Lake
geographical name lake NE South Dakota & W Minnesota; drained by the Bois de Sioux (headstream of Red River)
traverser
noun see traverse II
travertine
noun Etymology: French travertin, from Italian travertino, trevertino, from Latin tiburtinus, adjective, of travertine, literally, of Tibur (Tivoli) Date: 1730 a mineral ...
travesty
I. transitive verb (-tied; -tying) Date: 1673 to make a travesty of ; parody II. noun (plural -ties) Etymology: obsolete English travesty disguised, parodied, from French ...
travois
noun (plural travois; also travoises) Etymology: American French travail, from Canadian French, shaft of a cart, from Middle French traveil catafalque, prop, from Late Latin ...
trawl
I. verb Etymology: probably from obsolete Dutch tragelen Date: 1561 intransitive verb 1. a. to fish with a trawl b. to make a search as if by trawling 2. troll ...
trawler
noun Date: 1629 1. a boat used in trawling 2. a person who fishes by trawling
trawlerman
noun Date: 1633 1. trawler 2 2. one who mans a trawler
tray
noun Etymology: Middle English, from Old English trīg, trēg; akin to Old Swedish trø wooden grain measure and probably to Old English trēow tree — more at tree Date: ...
trayful
noun see tray
trazodone
noun Etymology: perhaps from International Scientific Vocabulary triazo azido + pyridine + -one Date: 1971 an antidepressant drug C19H22ClN5O administered in the form of its ...
treacherous
adjective Date: 14th century 1. characterized by or manifesting treachery ; perfidious 2. a. likely to betray trust ; unreliable b. providing insecure footing or ...
treacherously
adverb see treacherous
treacherousness
noun see treacherous
treachery
noun (plural -eries) Etymology: Middle English trecherie, from Anglo-French, from trecher, tricher to deceive, from Vulgar Latin *triccare — more at trick Date: 13th century ...
treacle
noun Etymology: Middle English triacle, from Anglo-French, from Latin theriaca, from Greek thēriakē antidote against a poisonous bite, from feminine of thēriakos of a wild ...
treacly
adjective (treaclier; -est) Date: 1733 resembling treacle (as in quality or appearance)
tread
I. verb (trod; also treaded; trodden or trod; treading) Etymology: Middle English treden, from Old English tredan; akin to Old High German tretan to tread Date: before 12th ...
tread on one's toes
phrasal to give offense (as by encroaching on one's rights or feelings)
tread water
phrasal to keep the body nearly upright in the water and the head above water by a treading motion of the feet usually aided by the hands
treader
noun see tread I
treadle
I. noun Etymology: Middle English tredel step of a stair, from Old English, from tredan Date: 15th century a swiveling or lever device pressed by the foot to drive a ...
treadless
adjective see tread II
treadmill
noun Date: 1822 1. a. a mill worked by persons treading on steps on the periphery of a wide wheel having a horizontal axis and used formerly in prison punishment b. a ...
treas
abbreviation treasury
treason
noun Etymology: Middle English tresoun, from Anglo-French traisun, from Latin tradition-, traditio act of handing over, from tradere to hand over, betray — more at traitor ...
treasonable
adjective Date: 14th century relating to, consisting of, or involving treason • treasonably adverb
treasonably
adverb see treasonable
treasonous
adjective Date: 1593 treasonable
treasurable
adjective Date: 1607 worthy of being treasured ; precious
treasure
I. noun Etymology: Middle English tresor, from Anglo-French, from Latin thesaurus — more at thesaurus Date: 12th century 1. a. (1) wealth (as money, jewels, or ...
treasure trove
noun Etymology: Anglo-French tresor trové, literally, found treasure Date: 1523 1. treasure that anyone finds; specifically gold or silver in the form of money, plate, or ...
treasure-house
noun Date: 13th century 1. a building where treasure is kept ; treasury 2. a place or source (as a collection) where many things of value can be found
treasurer
noun Date: 14th century 1. a guardian of a collection of treasures ; curator 2. an officer entrusted with the receipt, care, and disbursement of funds: as a. a ...
treasurership
noun see treasurer
treasury
noun (plural -suries) Etymology: Middle English tresorie, from Anglo-French, from tresor treasure Date: 14th century 1. a. a place in which stores of wealth are kept ...
treasury note
noun Date: 1890 1. a currency note issued by the United States Treasury in payment for silver bullion purchased under the Sherman Silver Purchase Act of 1890 2. a United ...
treasury of merits
Date: 1636 the superabundant satisfaction of Christ for human sins and the excess of merit of the saints which according to Roman Catholic theology is effective for ...
treasury stock
noun Date: 1901 issued stock reacquired by a corporation and held as an asset
treat
I. verb Etymology: Middle English treten, from Anglo-French treter, traiter, traitier, from Latin tractare to drag about, handle, deal with, frequentative of trahere to drag, ...
treatability
noun see treatable
treatable
adjective Date: 14th century capable of being treated ; yielding or responsive to treatment • treatability noun
treater
noun see treat I
treatise
noun Etymology: Middle English tretis, from Anglo-French tretiz, alteration of tretez, traitet, from Medieval Latin tractatus, from Latin tractare to treat, handle Date: 14th ...
treatment
noun Date: circa 1560 1. a. the act or manner or an instance of treating someone or something ; handling, usage b. the techniques or actions customarily applied in a ...
treaty
noun (plural treaties) Etymology: Middle English trete, from Anglo-French treté, from past participle of treter to discuss, treat Date: 14th century 1. the action of ...
treaty port
noun Date: 1863 any of numerous ports and inland cities in China, Japan, and Korea formerly open by treaty to foreign commerce
Trebbia
or ancient Trebia geographical name river 71 miles (114 kilometers) NW Italy flowing N into the Po
trebbiano
noun Etymology: Italian Date: 1860 a widely cultivated Italian white grape used especially in making white wine and brandy
Trebia
geographical name see Trebbia
Trebizond
geographical name 1. — see Trabzon 2. Greek empire 1204-1461, an offshoot of Byzantine Empire; at greatest extent included Georgia, Crimea, & S coast of Black Sea E of the ...
treble
I. noun Etymology: Middle English, the highest part in a three-part composition, from treble, adjective Date: 14th century 1. a. the highest voice part in harmonic music ...
treble clef
noun Etymology: 1treble; from its use for the notation of treble parts Date: 1825 1. a clef that places G above middle C on the second line of the staff 2. treble staff
treble staff
noun Date: circa 1854 the musical staff carrying the treble clef
trebly
adverb see treble II
trebuchet
or trebucket noun Etymology: Middle English trebochet, from Anglo-French trebuchet Date: 15th century a medieval military engine for hurling heavy missiles (as rocks)
trebucket
noun see trebuchet
trecento
noun Etymology: Italian, literally, three hundred, from Latin tres three + centum hundred — more at three, hundred Date: 1841 the 14th century; specifically the 14th ...
tredecillion
noun Usage: often attributive Etymology: Latin tredecim thirteen (from tres three + decem ten) + English -illion (as in million) — more at three, ten Date: 1850 — see ...
Tree
biographical name Sir Herbert (Draper) Beerbohm 1853-1917 English actor-manager
tree
I. noun Etymology: Middle English, from Old English trēow; akin to Old Norse trē tree, Greek drys, Sanskrit dāru wood Date: before 12th century 1. a. a woody perennial ...
tree ear
noun Date: 1967 wood ear
tree farm
noun Date: 1941 an area of forest land managed to ensure continuous commercial production
tree fern
noun Date: 1830 any of various ferns (especially families Cyatheaceae and Dicksoniaceae) of arborescent habit with a woody stem
tree frog
noun Date: 1738 any of numerous small anuran amphibians (especially family Hylidae) of usually arboreal habits that typically have adhesive disks on the toes
tree house
noun Date: 1867 a structure (as a playhouse) built among the branches of a tree
tree hugger
noun Date: 1982 sometimes disparaging environmentalist 2; especially an advocate for the preservation of woodlands
tree line
noun Date: 1893 timberline
tree of heaven
Date: 1845 a Chinese ailanthus (Ailanthus altissima syn. A. glandulosa) that has foliage similar to that of the sumacs, has ill-scented staminate flowers, and is grown as a ...
tree of life
Date: 1880 a conventionalized and often ornate representation of a tree used as a decorative motif
tree peony
noun Date: 1811 a shrubby Chinese peony (Paeonia suffruticosa) that has large showy flowers and is the source of many horticultural varieties
tree ring
noun Date: 1919 annual ring

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