Слова на букву tans-unco (6389) New Collegiate Dictionary
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Слова на букву tans-unco (6389)

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Tsangpo
geographical name the upper Brahmaputra in Tibet
tsar
variant of czar
tsardom
noun see czar
tsarevitch
variant of czarevitch
tsarina
variant of czarina
tsarism
variant of czarism
tsarist
noun or adjective see czarism
Tsaritsyn
geographical name — see Volgograd
Tsarskoye Selo
geographical name — see Pushkin
Tschaikovsky
biographical name variant of Tchaikovsky
Tse-ven
biographical name see Soong Tzu-wen
tsetse
noun see tsetse fly
tsetse fly
noun Etymology: Afrikaans, from Tswana tsètsè fly Date: 1865 any of several dipteran flies (genus Glossina) that occur in Africa south of the Sahara and include vectors of ...
TSgt
abbreviation technical sergeant
TSH
abbreviation thyroid-stimulating hormone
Tshi
variant of Twi
Tshiluba
noun Date: circa 1961 a Bantu language used as a lingua franca in the southeastern Democratic Republic of the Congo
Tshwane
geographical name — see Pretoria
Tsimshian
noun (plural -an or -ans) Etymology: Tsimshian (Coast and Southern Tsimshian languages) c̓msyan, a self-designation, literally, inside the Skeena (River) Date: 1836 1. a ...
Tsinan
geographical name — see Jinan
Tsinghai
geographical name — see Qinghai
Tsingtao
geographical name — see Qingdao
Tsingyuan
geographical name see Baoding
Tsitsihar
geographical name — see Qiqihar
tsk
interjection Date: 1937 — used to express disapproval
tsk-tsk
transitive verb Date: 1943 to express disapproval of by or as if by uttering tsk intransitive verb to tsk-tsk someone or something
Tskhinvali
geographical name town N Republic of Georgia NW of Tbilisi capital of South Ossetia population 42,600
tsoris
noun see tsuris
tsouris
noun see tsuris
tsp
abbreviation teaspoon; teaspoonful
TSP
abbreviation trisodium phosphate
TSS
abbreviation toxic shock syndrome
Tsŭ-wên
biographical name see Soong Tzu-wen
Tsugaru Strait
geographical name strait Japan between Honshu & Hokkaido
Tsui
biographical name Daniel Chee 1939- American (Chinese-born) physicist
tsunami
noun (plural tsunamis; also tsunami) Etymology: Japanese, from tsu harbor + nami wave Date: 1897 a great sea wave produced especially by submarine earth movement or ...
tsunamic
adjective see tsunami
tsuris
also tsouris or tsoris noun Etymology: Yiddish tsures, tsores, plural of tsure, tsore trouble, distress, from Hebrew ṣārāh Date: 1901 trouble, distress
Tsushima
geographical name island Japan in Korea Strait separated from Kyushu and Honshu by Tsushima Strait (the SE part of Korea Strait) area 271 square miles (705 square kilometers)
tsutsugamushi disease
noun Etymology: Japanese tsutsugamushi scrub typhus mite, from tsutsuga sickness + mushi insect Date: 1906 scrub typhus
Tswana
noun (plural Tswana or Tswanas) Date: 1930 1. a member of a Bantu-speaking people of Botswana and the Republic of South Africa 2. the language of the Tswana people
TTY
abbreviation teletypewriter
Tu
abbreviation Tuesday
Tu Fu
biographical name 712-770 Chinese poet
tu quoque
noun Etymology: Latin, you too Date: 1614 a retort charging an adversary with being or doing what he criticizes in others
tu-whit tu-whoo
noun Etymology: imitative Date: circa 1595 the cry of an owl
Tualatin
geographical name city NW Oregon SSW of Portland population 22,791
Tuamotu Archipelago
geographical name archipelago S Pacific E of Society Islands; belongs to France area 330 square miles (858 square kilometers), population 11,754
Tuareg
also Touareg noun (plural Tuareg or Tuaregs; also Touareg or Touaregs) Etymology: Arabic Tawāriq Date: 1821 a member of a nomadic people of the central and western Sahara ...
tuatara
noun (plural -tara or -taras) Etymology: Maori tuatàra Date: 1890 a large spiny quadrupedal reptile (Sphenodon punctatum) of islands off the coast of New Zealand that has a ...
tub
I. noun Etymology: Middle English tubbe, from Middle Dutch; akin to Middle Low German tubbe tub Date: 12th century 1. a. a wide low vessel originally formed with wooden ...
tub-thump
verb see tub-thumper
tub-thumper
noun Date: 1662 a vociferous supporter (as of a cause) • tub-thump verb
tuba
noun Etymology: Italian, from Latin, trumpet Date: 1852 a large low-pitched brass instrument usually oval in shape and having a conical tube, a cup-shaped mouthpiece, and a ...
tubaist
noun see tuba
tubal
adjective Date: circa 1736 of, relating to, or involving a tube and especially a fallopian tube
tubal ligation
noun Date: circa 1948 ligation of the fallopian tubes that by preventing passage of ova from the ovaries to the uterus serves as a method of female sterilization
tubal pregnancy
noun Date: circa 1834 ectopic pregnancy in a fallopian tube
tubbable
adjective see tub II
tubber
noun see tub II
tubby
adjective (tubbier; -est) Date: circa 1807 1. sounding dull and without proper resonance or freedom of sound 2. pudgy, fat
tube
noun Etymology: French, from Latin tubus; akin to Latin tuba trumpet Date: 1651 1. any of various usually cylindrical structures or devices: as a. a hollow elongated ...
tube foot
noun Date: 1888 one of the small flexible tubular processes of most echinoderms that are extensions of the water-vascular system and are used especially in locomotion and ...
tube nucleus
noun Date: 1939 the one of the two nuclei formed by mitotic division of a microspore during the formation of a pollen grain that is held to control subsequent growth of the ...
tube pan
noun Date: 1926 a ring-shaped cake pan with a hollow tubular center
tube worm
noun Date: circa 1819 a worm that lives in a tube: as a. any of various polychaetes or oligochaetes b. (1) pogonophoran (2) vestimentiferan
tubed
adjective see tube
tubeless
adjective Date: 1855 lacking a tube; specifically being a pneumatic tire that does not depend on an inner tube for airtightness
tubelike
adjective see tube
tuber
noun Etymology: Latin, swelling, truffle; perhaps akin to Latin tumēre to swell — more at thumb Date: 1668 1. a. a short fleshy usually underground stem bearing ...
tubercle
noun Etymology: Latin tuberculum, diminutive of tuber Date: 1578 1. a small knobby prominence or excrescence especially on a plant or animal ; nodule: as a. a protuberance ...
tubercle bacillus
noun Date: circa 1890 a bacterium (Mycobacterium tuberculosis) that is a major cause of tuberculosis
tubercul-
combining form Etymology: New Latin, from Latin tuberculum 1. tubercle 2. tubercle bacillus 3. tuberculosis
tubercular
I. adjective Date: 1799 1. a. of, relating to, or affected with tuberculosis b. caused by the tubercle bacillus 2. characterized by lesions that are or resemble ...
tuberculate
adjective see tuberculated
tuberculated
also tuberculate adjective Date: 1771 having tubercles ; characterized by or beset with tubercles
tuberculin
noun Etymology: International Scientific Vocabulary Date: circa 1890 a sterile liquid containing the growth products of or specific substances extracted from the tubercle ...
tuberculin test
noun Date: circa 1900 a test for hypersensitivity to tuberculin as an indication of past or present tubercular infection
tuberculoid
adjective Etymology: International Scientific Vocabulary Date: circa 1923 resembling tuberculosis especially in the presence of tubercles
tuberculosis
noun (plural tuberculoses) Etymology: New Latin Date: 1882 a highly variable communicable disease of humans and some other vertebrates that is caused by the tubercle ...
tuberculous
adjective Date: 1891 1. constituting or affected with tuberculosis 2. caused by or resulting from the presence or products of the tubercle bacillus
tuberose
noun Etymology: New Latin tuberosa, specific epithet, from Latin, feminine of tuberosus tuberous, from tuber tuber Date: 1664 a Mexican bulbous herb (Polianthes tuberosa) ...
tuberosity
noun (plural -ties) Date: 1611 a rounded prominence; especially a large prominence on a bone usually serving for the attachment of muscles or ligaments
tuberous
adjective Date: 1650 1. consisting of, bearing, or resembling a tuber 2. of, relating to, or being a plant tuber or tuberous root of a plant
tuberous root
noun Date: circa 1668 a thick fleshy storage root (as of a dahlia) that is like a tuber but lacks buds or scale leaves • tuberous-rooted adjective
tuberous-rooted
adjective see tuberous root
tubful
noun see tub I
tubifex
noun see tubifex worm
tubifex worm
noun Etymology: New Latin Tubific-, Tubifex, from Latin tubus tube + facere to make — more at do Date: 1948 any of a genus (Tubifex) of slender reddish tubificid worms ...
tubificid
noun Etymology: New Latin Tubificidae, from Tubific-, Tubifex Date: 1950 any of a family (Tubificidae) of aquatic oligochaetes including the tubifex worms • tubificid ...
tubing
noun Date: 1845 1. material in the form of a tube; also a length or piece of tube 2. a series or system of tubes 3. the sport or activity of riding an inner tube (as down ...
Tübingen
geographical name city SW Germany on the Neckar S of Stuttgart population 82,483
tubist
noun see tuba
tublike
adjective see tub I
Tubman
I. biographical name Harriet circa 1820-1913 American abolitionist II. biographical name William V(acanarat) S(hadrach) 1895-1971 Liberian lawyer; president of Liberia ...
tubocurarine
noun Etymology: International Scientific Vocabulary tubo- (from Latin tubus tube) + curare + -ine; from its being shipped in sections of hollow bamboo Date: 1898 a toxic ...
tubular
adjective Date: 1673 1. a. having the form of or consisting of a tube b. made or provided with tubes 2. of, relating to, or sounding as if produced through tubes
tubule
noun Etymology: Latin tubulus, diminutive of tubus Date: 1677 a small tube; especially a slender elongated anatomical channel
tubulin
noun Etymology: tubule + 1-in Date: 1968 a globular protein that polymerizes to form microtubules
TUC
abbreviation Trades Union Congress
Tuchman
biographical name Barbara 1912-1989 née Wertheim American historian
tuchun
noun Etymology: Chinese (Beijing) dūjūn Date: 1917 1. a Chinese military governor (as of a province) 2. a Chinese warlord
tuck
I. verb Etymology: Middle English tuken to mistreat, finish (cloth) by stretching and beating, tuck, from Old English tūcian to mistreat; akin to Old High German zuhhen to ...
tuck-point
transitive verb Date: 1881 to finish (the mortar joints between bricks or stones) with a narrow ridge of putty or fine lime mortar
tuckahoe
noun Etymology: Virginia Algonquian tockawhoughe Date: 1612 1. either of two arums (Peltandra virginica and Orontium aquaticum) of the United States with rootstocks used as ...
tucker
I. noun Date: 1688 1. a piece of lace or cloth in the neckline of a dress 2. one that tucks 3. chiefly Australian food II. transitive verb (tuckered; tuckering) ...
tucker-bag
noun Date: 1885 chiefly Australian a bag used especially by travelers in the bush to hold food
tucket
noun Etymology: probably from obsolete English tuk to beat the drum, sound the trumpet Date: 1593 a fanfare on a trumpet
tuckshop
noun Etymology: British tuck food, confectionery Date: 1857 British a confectioner's shop ; confectionery
Tucson
geographical name city SE Arizona population 486,699 • Tucsonan noun
Tucsonan
noun see Tucson
Tucumán
geographical name — see san miguel de tucuman
Tudor
I. adjective Etymology: Henry Tudor (Henry VII of England) Date: 1779 1. of or relating to the English royal house that ruled from 1485 to 1603 2. of, relating to, or ...
Tudor arch
noun Date: 1815 a low elliptical 3-, 4-, or 5-centered arch; especially a 4-centered pointed arch — see arch illustration
Tue
abbreviation see Tues
tuebor
foreign term Etymology: Latin I will defend — a motto on the Great Seal of Michigan
Tues
or Tue abbreviation Tuesday
Tuesday
noun Etymology: Middle English tiwesday, from Old English tīwesdæg (akin to Old High German zīostag Tuesday), from Old English Tīw Tiu + dæg day — more at deity Date: ...
Tuesdays
adverb see Tuesday
tufa
noun Etymology: Italian tufo, from Latin tofus Date: 1770 1. tuff 2. a porous rock formed as a deposit from springs or streams; specifically travertine • tufaceous ...
tufaceous
adjective see tufa
tuff
noun Etymology: earlier tuph, tuft porous rock, from Middle French tuf, from Old Italian tufo Date: 1815 a rock composed of the finer kinds of volcanic detritus usually ...
tuffaceous
adjective see tuff
tuffet
noun Etymology: Anglo-French tuffete, from *tufe tuft Date: 1553 1. tuft 1a 2. a low seat
tuft
I. noun Etymology: Middle English, modification of Middle French touffe, probably of Germanic origin; akin to Old High German zopf tip — more at top Date: 14th century 1. ...
tufted
adjective see tuft I
tufter
noun see tuft II
tufty
adjective see tuft I
tug
I. verb (tugged; tugging) Etymology: Middle English tuggen; akin to Old English togian to pull — more at tow Date: 14th century intransitive verb 1. to pull hard 2. to ...
tug-of-war
noun (plural tugs-of-war) Date: 1677 1. a struggle for supremacy or control usually involving two antagonists 2. a contest in which two teams pull against each other at ...
tugboat
noun Date: 1830 a strongly built powerful boat used for towing and pushing — called also towboat
Tugela
geographical name river 312 miles (502 kilometers) E Republic of South Africa in central KwaZulu-Natal flowing E to Indian Ocean; near its source on Mont Aux Sources are the ...
tugger
noun see tug I
tughrik
noun see tugrik
tugrik
or tughrik noun Etymology: Mongolian tögrig, literally, circle, wheel Date: 1927 — see money table
tuille
noun Etymology: Middle English toile, from Anglo-French toille, probably alteration of tuille, tiule tile, from Latin tegula — more at tile Date: 15th century one of the ...
tuition
noun Etymology: Middle English tuicioun protection, from Anglo-French, from Latin tuition-, tuitio, from tueri to look at, look after Date: 15th century 1. archaic custody, ...
tuitional
adjective see tuition
Tuktut Nogait National Park
geographical name reservation N Canada in N Northwest Territories on Nunavut border
Tula
geographical name 1. (or Tula de Allende) city central Mexico in SW Hidalgo N of Mexico City; ancient capital of the Toltecs population 71,622 2. city SW central Russia in ...
Tula de Allende
geographical name see Tula 1
Tulagi
geographical name island S Pacific in S central Solomons
Tulare
geographical name city S central California SE of Fresno population 43,994
Tulare Lake
geographical name former lake S central California S of Hanford; drained for farmland
tularemia
noun Etymology: New Latin, from Tulare County, California Date: 1921 an infectious zoonotic disease especially of wild rabbits, rodents, humans, and some domestic animals ...
tularemic
adjective see tularemia
tule
noun Etymology: Spanish, from Nahuatl tōllin Date: 1837 either of two large New World bulrushes (Scirpus californicus and S. acutus)
tule elk
noun Date: 1939 a relatively small elk (Cervus elaphus nannodes) native to California
tulip
noun Etymology: New Latin tulipa, from Turkish tülbent turban — more at turban Date: 1578 any of a genus (Tulipa) of Eurasian bulbous herbs of the lily family that have ...
tulip poplar
noun Date: 1847 1. tulip tree 1 2. tulipwood 1
tulip tree
noun Date: 1705 1. a tall North American timber tree (Liriodendron tulipifera) of the magnolia family having large greenish-yellow tulip-shaped flowers and soft white wood ...
tulipwood
noun Date: 1843 1. wood of the North American tulip tree 2. a. any of several showily striped or variegated woods; especially the rose-colored wood of a chiefly ...
Tullamore
geographical name town central Ireland capital of County Offaly population 8623
tulle
noun Etymology: French, from Tulle, France Date: circa 1818 a sheer often stiffened silk, rayon, or nylon net used chiefly for veils or ballet costumes
Tulsa
geographical name city NE Oklahoma on Arkansas River population 393,049 • Tulsan noun
Tulsan
noun see Tulsa
Tulsīdās
biographical name 1543?-1623 Hindu poet
tumble
I. verb (tumbled; tumbling) Etymology: Middle English, frequentative of tumben to dance, from Old English tumbian; akin to Old High German tūmōn to reel Date: 14th century ...
tumble dry
transitive verb Date: 1962 to dry (as clothes) by tumbling in a dryer • tumble dryer noun • tumble drying noun
tumble dryer
noun see tumble dry
tumble drying
noun see tumble dry
tumblebug
noun Date: 1805 any of various scarab beetles (especially genera Scarabaeus, Canthon, Copris, or Phanaeus) that roll dung into small balls, bury them in the ground, and lay ...
tumbledown
adjective Date: 1818 dilapidated, ramshackle
tumbler
noun Date: 14th century 1. one that tumbles: as a. one who performs tumbling feats ; acrobat b. any of various domestic pigeons that tumble or somersault backward in ...
tumblerful
noun see tumbler
tumbleweed
noun Date: 1887 a plant (as Russian thistle or any of several amaranths) that breaks away from its roots in the autumn and is driven about by the wind as a light rolling mass
tumbling
I. noun Date: 1604 the skill, practice, or sport of executing gymnastic feats (as somersaults and handsprings) without the use of apparatus II. adjective Date: circa 1916 ...
tumbling barrel
noun Date: circa 1890 a revolving cask in which objects or materials undergo a process (as drying or polishing) by being whirled about
tumbling verse
noun Date: 1585 an early modern English type of verse having four stresses but no prevailing type of foot and no regular number of syllables
tumbrel
or tumbril noun Etymology: Middle English tomrel, from Old French (tomberel, from tomber to tumble, perhaps of Germanic origin; akin to Old High German tūmōn to reel — more ...
tumbril
noun see tumbrel
tumefaction
noun Etymology: Middle English tumefaccioun, from Medieval Latin tumefaccion-, tumefaccio, from Latin tumefacere to cause to swell, from tumēre to swell + facere to make, do ...
Tumen
geographical name river 324 miles (521 kilometers) E Asia on border between North Korea, China, & Russia flowing NE & SE into Sea of Japan
tumescence
noun Date: 1859 the quality or state of being tumescent; especially readiness for sexual activity marked especially by vascular congestion of the sex organs
tumescent
adjective Etymology: Latin tumescent-, tumescens, present participle of tumescere to swell up, inchoative of tumēre to swell Date: 1882 somewhat swollen
tumid
adjective Etymology: Latin tumidus, from tumēre Date: 1541 1. marked by swelling ; swollen, enlarged 2. protuberant, bulging 3. bombastic, turgid
tummler
noun Etymology: Yiddish tumler, literally, one who makes a racket Date: 1965 a comic entertainer or social director at a Jewish resort
tummy
noun (plural tummies) Etymology: baby-talk alteration of stomach Date: 1867 stomach 1c
tumor
noun Etymology: Middle English tumour, from Latin tumor, from tumēre Date: 15th century 1. a swollen or distended part 2. an abnormal benign or malignant new growth of ...
tumor necrosis factor
noun Date: 1975 a protein that is produced chiefly by monocytes and macrophages in response especially to endotoxins and that mediates inflammation and induces the destruction ...
tumor suppressor gene
noun Date: 1985 any of a class of genes (as p53) that act in normal cells to inhibit unrestrained cell division and that when inactivated (as by mutation) place the cell at ...
tumoral
adjective see tumor
tumorigenesis
noun see tumorigenic
tumorigenic
adjective Date: 1941 producing or tending to produce tumors; also carcinogenic • tumorigenesis noun • tumorigenicity noun
tumorigenicity
noun see tumorigenic
tumorlike
adjective see tumor
tumorous
adjective Date: 1547 of, relating to, or resembling a tumor
tumour
chiefly British variant of tumor
tump
I. noun Etymology: origin unknown Date: 1589 1. dialect chiefly England mound, hummock 2. a clump of vegetation II. verb Etymology: perhaps akin to British dialect ...
tumpline
noun Etymology: tump, of Algonquian origin; akin to Eastern Abenaki mádûmbí pack strap Date: 1796 a sling formed by a strap slung over the forehead or chest and used for ...
Tumuc-Humac Mountains
or Portuguese Serra Tumucumaque geographical name range of low mountains NE Brazil on Suriname-French Guiana boundary
tumult
noun Etymology: Middle English tumulte, from Anglo-French, from Latin tumultus; perhaps akin to Sanskrit tumula noisy Date: 15th century 1. a. disorderly agitation or ...
tumultuary
adjective Date: 1590 attended or marked by tumult, riot, lawlessness, confusion, or impetuosity
tumultuous
adjective Date: circa 1548 1. marked by tumult 2. tending or disposed to cause or incite a tumult 3. marked by violent or overwhelming turbulence or upheaval ...
tumultuously
adverb see tumultuous
tumultuousness
noun see tumultuous
tumulus
noun (plural tumuli) Etymology: Middle English, from Latin; akin to Latin tumēre to swell — more at thumb Date: 15th century an artificial hillock or mound (as over a ...
tun
noun Etymology: Middle English tonne, tunne, from Old English & Anglo-French; Old English, from Medieval Latin tunna; Anglo-French tone, tonne, from Medieval Latin Date: ...
tuna
I. noun Etymology: Spanish, from Taino Date: circa 1555 1. any of various flat-jointed prickly pears (genus Opuntia); especially one (O. tuna) of tropical America 2. the ...
tuna fish
noun see tuna II
tunability
noun see tunable
tunable
adjective Date: circa 1500 1. archaic a. tuneful b. sounding in tune ; concordant 2. capable of being tuned • tunability noun • tunableness noun • tunably ...
tunableness
noun see tunable
tunably
adverb see tunable
Tunbridge Wells
geographical name — see Royal Tunbridge Wells
tundish
noun Etymology: Middle English, funnel for filling a tun Date: 14th century 1. funnel 1a 2. a reservoir in the top part of a mold into which molten metal is poured
tundra
noun Etymology: Russian, from Russian dialect (northeast) tundra, tundara, from Kildin Sami (Sami language of the northern Kola Peninsula) tūnter Date: circa 1841 a level or ...
tundra swan
noun Date: 1984 a native North American swan (Cygnus columbianus) that has a soft high-pitched call, breeds in the Arctic tundra, and winters in shallow fresh or salt water ...
tune
I. noun Etymology: Middle English, from Anglo-French tun, tuen tone Date: 14th century 1. a. archaic quality of sound ; tone b. manner of utterance ; intonation; ...
tune in
verb Date: 1913 transitive verb to listen to or view a broadcast of intransitive verb 1. to listen to or view a broadcast 2. to associate oneself with what is ...
tune out
verb Date: 1908 transitive verb to become unresponsive to ; ignore intransitive verb to dissociate oneself from what is happening or one's surroundings
tune-up
noun Date: 1933 1. a general adjustment to insure operation at peak efficiency 2. a preliminary trial ; warm-up
tuned-in
adjective Date: 1958 turned-on
tuneful
adjective Date: 1591 melodious, musical • tunefully adverb • tunefulness noun
tunefully
adverb see tuneful
tunefulness
noun see tuneful
tuneless
adjective Date: 1594 1. not tuneful 2. not producing music • tunelessly adverb
tunelessly
adverb see tuneless
tuner
noun Date: circa 1801 1. one that tunes 2. something used for tuning; specifically the part of a receiving set that converts radio signals into audio or video signals
tunesmith
noun Date: 1926 a composer especially of popular songs
tung
noun Date: 1914 tung tree
tung oil
noun Etymology: part translation of Chinese (Beijing) tóngyóu Date: 1881 a pale yellow pungent drying oil obtained from the seeds of tung trees and used chiefly in ...
tung tree
noun Etymology: Chinese (Beijing) tóng Date: 1889 any of several trees (genus Aleurites) of the spurge family whose seeds yield tung oil; especially an Asian tree (A. ...
Tunghai
geographical name see Lianyungang
Tunghwa
I. geographical name see Tonghua II. geographical name see T'ung-hua
tungstate
noun Date: 1800 a salt or ester of a tungstic acid and especially of H2WO4
tungsten
noun Etymology: Swedish, from tung heavy + sten stone Date: 1796 a gray-white heavy high-melting ductile hard polyvalent metallic element that resembles chromium and ...
tungstic acid
noun Etymology: tungsten Date: 1796 a yellow crystalline powder WO3 that is the trioxide of tungsten; also an acid (as H2WO4) derived from this trioxide
Tungus
noun (plural Tungus or Tunguses) Etymology: Russian Date: 1674 1. a member of an indigenous people of central and southeastern Siberia 2. the Tungusic language of the ...
Tungusic
noun Date: 1864 a family of Altaic languages spoken in Manchuria and northward • Tungusic adjective
Tunguska
geographical name any of three rivers in central Russia in Asia, tributaries of the Yenisey: Lower Tunguska, Stony Tunguska, & Upper Tunguska (lower course of the Angara)
tunic
noun Etymology: Old English tunice, from Latin tunica, of Semitic origin; akin to Hebrew kuttōneth coat Date: 12th century 1. a. a simple slip-on garment made with or ...
tunica
noun (plural tunicae) Etymology: Latin, tunic, membrane Date: circa 1698 an enveloping membrane or layer of body tissue
tunicate
I. adjective also tunicated Etymology: Latin tunicatus, from tunica Date: circa 1623 1. a. having or covered with a tunic or tunica b. having, arranged in, or made up ...
tunicated
adjective see tunicate I
tunicle
noun Etymology: Middle English, from Anglo-French tonicle, Latin tunicula, diminutive of tunica Date: 14th century a short vestment worn by a subdeacon over the alb during ...
tuning fork
noun Date: 1799 a 2-pronged metal implement that gives a fixed tone when struck and is useful for tuning musical instruments and ascertaining standard pitch
tuning pipe
noun Date: 1897 pitch pipe; specifically one of a set of pitch pipes used especially for tuning stringed musical instruments
Tunis
geographical name 1. city capital of Tunisia near site of ancient Carthage population 620,149 2. Tunisia — used especially of the former Barbary State
Tunisia
geographical name country N Africa bordering on the Mediterranean; formerly one of the Barbary States; a French protectorate 1881-1956, a monarchy 1956-57, & a republic since ...
Tunisian
adjective or noun see Tunisia
tunnel
I. noun Etymology: Middle English tonel cask, tun, from Anglo-French, from tone tun Date: 1508 1. a hollow conduit or recess ; tube, well 2. a. a covered passageway; ...
tunnel vision
noun Date: circa 1942 1. constriction of the visual field resulting in loss of peripheral vision 2. extreme narrowness of viewpoint ; narrowmindedness; also single-minded ...
tunnel-visioned
adjective see tunnel vision
tunneler
noun see tunnel II
tunnellike
adjective see tunnel I
tunny
noun (plural tunnies; also tunny) Etymology: modification of Middle French thon or Old Italian tonno; both from Old Occitan ton, from Latin thunnus — more at tuna Date: circa ...
Tuolumne
geographical name river 155 miles (249 kilometers) central California flowing W from Yosemite National Park into the San Joaquin
tup
I. noun Etymology: Middle English tupe Date: 14th century 1. chiefly British ram 1a 2. a heavy metal body (as the weight of a pendulum) II. transitive verb (tupped; ...
tupelo
noun (plural -los) Etymology: perhaps from Creek *topiló, from etó tree + piló:(fa), opiló:(fa) swamp Date: circa 1730 1. any of a genus (Nyssa of the family Nyssaceae) ...
Tupelo
geographical name city NE Mississippi population 34,211
Tupi
also Tupí noun (plural Tupi or Tupis; also Tupí or Tupís) Date: 1842 1. Tupinamba 2. a language family of lowland South America that includes Tupi-Guarani and the speech ...
Tupí
noun see Tupi
Tupi-Guarani
also Tupí-Guaraní noun Date: 1850 1. Tupi 2 2. a branch of the Tupi language family that includes Tupinamba, Guarani, and a number of other languages spoken from French ...
Tupí-Guaraní
noun see Tupi-Guarani
Tupi-Guaranian
adjective or noun see Tupi-Guarani
Tupian
adjective or noun see Tupi
Tupinamba
also Tupinambá noun (plural -ba or -bas; also -bá or bás) Date: 1810 1. a member of a group of American Indian peoples who lived along a broad stretch of the Brazilian ...
Tupinambá
noun see Tupinamba
tuppence
variant of twopence
Tupper
biographical name Sir Charles 1821-1915 Canadian prime minister (1896)
Tupungato
geographical name mountain 22,310 feet (6800 meters) in the Andes on Argentina-Chile boundary ENE of Santiago, Chile
tuque
noun Etymology: Canadian French, from French toque — more at toque Date: 1871 a warm knitted usually pointed stocking cap
turaco
or touraco noun (plural -cos) Etymology: origin unknown Date: 1743 any of a family (Musophagidae) of typically crested African birds that are related to the cuckoos and have ...
Turanian
noun Etymology: Persian Tūrān Turkestan, the region north of the Amu Darya Date: circa 1777 1. a member of any of various peoples speaking Ural-Altaic languages 2. ...

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