Слова на букву tans-unco (6389) New Collegiate Dictionary
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Слова на букву tans-unco (6389)

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Teesside
geographical name urban area N England on the Tees
teeter
I. intransitive verb Etymology: Middle English titeren to totter, reel; akin to Old High German zittarōn to shiver Date: 1844 1. a. to move unsteadily ; wobble b. ...
teeter-totter
noun Date: circa 1905 seesaw 2b
teeterboard
noun Date: 1855 1. seesaw 2b 2. a board placed on a raised support so that a person standing on one end of the board is thrown into the air if another jumps on the opposite ...
teeth
plural of tooth
teethe
intransitive verb (teethed; teething) Etymology: back-formation from teething Date: 15th century to experience the emergence of one's teeth through the gums ; grow teeth
teether
noun Date: 1946 an object (as a teething ring) designed for a baby to bite on during teething
teething
noun Etymology: teeth Date: 1732 1. the first growth of teeth 2. the phenomena accompanying growth of teeth through the gums
teething ring
noun Date: 1872 a usually rubber or plastic ring for a teething infant to bite on
teethridge
noun Date: 1928 the inner surface of the gums of the upper front teeth
teetotal
adjective Etymology: total + total (abstinence) Date: 1834 1. of, relating to, or practicing teetotalism 2. total, complete • teetotally adverb
teetotaler
or teetotaller noun Date: 1834 one who practices or advocates teetotalism
teetotalism
noun Date: 1834 the principle or practice of complete abstinence from alcoholic drinks • teetotalist noun
teetotalist
noun see teetotalism
teetotaller
noun see teetotaler
teetotally
adverb see teetotal
teetotum
noun Etymology: 1tee + Latin totum all, from neuter of totus whole; from the letter T inscribed on one side as an abbreviation of totum (take) all Date: 1720 a small top ...
teff
noun Etymology: Amharic ṭef Date: 1790 an economically important Ethiopian annual cereal grass (Eragrostis tef syn. E. abyssinica) grown for its small grain which yields a ...
tefillin
noun plural but sometimes singular in construction Etymology: Late Hebrew tĕphīlīn, from Aramaic, attachments Date: 1613 the phylacteries worn by Jews
TEFL
abbreviation teaching English as a foreign language
Teflon
trademark — used for synthetic fluorine-containing resins used especially for molding articles and for nonstick coatings
Tegakouita
biographical name see Tekakwitha
Tegakwitha
biographical name see Tekakwitha
tegmen
noun (plural tegmina) Etymology: New Latin tegmin-, tegmen, from Latin, covering, from tegere to cover — more at thatch Date: 1807 a superficial layer or covering usually ...
tegmental
adjective Date: circa 1890 of, relating to, or associated with an integument or a tegmentum
tegmentum
noun (plural tegmenta) Etymology: New Latin, from Latin tegumentum, tegmentum, covering, from tegere Date: 1832 an anatomical covering ; tegmen; especially the part of the ...
Tegucigalpa
geographical name city capital of Honduras district population 608,100
tegument
noun Etymology: Middle English, from Latin tegumentum Date: 15th century integument
Tehachapi Mountains
geographical name mountains SE California N of Mojave Desert running E-W between S end of Sierra Nevada & the Coast Ranges; highest peak Double Mountain 7988 feet (2435 ...
Tehran
geographical name city capital of Iran at foot of S slope of Elburz Mountains population 6,042,584
Tehri
or Tehri Garhwal geographical name former state N India in NW Uttar Pradesh on Tibet border; chief town Tehri
Tehri Garhwal
geographical name see Tehri
Tehuantepec, Isthmus of
geographical name the narrowest section of Mexico, between Gulf of Tehuantepec (on Pacific side) & Bay of Campeche; 137 miles (220 kilometers) wide at narrowest point
teiid
noun Etymology: New Latin Teiidae, from Teius, genus of lizards, from Portuguese teiú, the lizard Tupinambis teguixim, from Tupi tejú Date: 1956 any of a family (Teiidae) ...
Teilhard de Chardin
biographical name Pierre 1881-1955 French philosopher & paleontologist
Tejano
noun (plural -nos) Usage: often attributive Etymology: Mexican Spanish, from Tejas Texas Date: 1976 1. a Texan of Hispanic descent 2. [probably short for conjunto tejano, ...
Tejo
geographical name — see Tagus
Tekakwitha
or Tegakwitha or Tegakouita biographical name Kateri 1656-1680 Lily of the Mohawks American Indian religious
tektite
noun Etymology: International Scientific Vocabulary, from Greek tēktos molten, from tēkein to melt — more at thaw Date: 1909 a glassy body of probably meteoritic origin ...
tektitic
adjective see tektite
tel
abbreviation telephone
Tel Aviv
geographical name city W Israel on the Mediterranean population 353,200 — see Jaffa • Tel Avivan noun
Tel Avivan
noun see Tel Aviv
Tel el Amarna
geographical name locality central Egypt on E bank of the Nile NW of Asyût; site of ruins
tel-
or telo- combining form Etymology: International Scientific Vocabulary, from Greek telos — more at telos end
telamon
noun (plural telamones) Etymology: Latin, from Greek telamōn bearer, supporter; akin to Greek tlēnai to bear — more at tolerate Date: circa 1706 atlas 5
telangiectasia
or telangiectasis noun (plural -tasias or telangiectases) Etymology: New Latin, from tel- + angi- + ectasia, ectasis (as in atelectasis) Date: 1831 an abnormal dilation of ...
telangiectasis
noun see telangiectasia
telangiectatic
adjective see telangiectasia
telco
noun Etymology: telephone company Date: 1975 a telecommunications company
tele
noun Date: 1936 British television
tele-
or tel- combining form Etymology: New Latin, from Greek tēle-, tēl-, from tēle far off — more at pale- 1. distant ; at a distance ; over a distance 2. a. ...
telecast
verb (-cast; also -casted; -casting) Etymology: tele- + broadcast Date: 1937 transitive verb to broadcast by television intransitive verb to broadcast a television ...
telecaster
noun see telecast
telecom
noun Date: 1948 1. telecommunication 2. the telecommunications industry
telecommunication
noun Etymology: International Scientific Vocabulary Date: 1932 1. communication at a distance (as by telephone) 2. technology that deals with telecommunication — usually ...
telecommute
intransitive verb Date: 1974 to work at home by the use of an electronic linkup with a central office • telecommuter noun
telecommuter
noun see telecommute
teleconference
noun see teleconferencing
teleconferencing
noun Date: 1974 the holding of a conference among people remote from one another by means of telecommunication devices (as telephones or computer terminals) • ...
Telecopier
trademark — used for transmitting and receiving equipment for producing facsimile copies of documents
telecourse
noun Date: 1950 a course of study conducted over television; especially such a course taken at home for academic credit
telefacsimile
noun Date: 1952 facsimile 2
telefax
noun Date: 1943 facsimile 2
telefilm
noun Date: 1939 a motion picture made to be telecast
telegenic
adjective Date: 1939 well-suited to the medium of television; especially having an appearance and manner that are markedly attractive to television viewers
telegram
I. noun Date: circa 1852 a telegraphic dispatch II. transitive verb (-grammed; -gramming) Date: 1864 telegraph
telegraph
I. noun Etymology: French télégraphe, from télé- tele- (from Greek tēle-) + -graphe -graph Date: 1794 1. an apparatus for communication at a distance by coded signals; ...
telegrapher
noun see telegraph II
telegraphese
noun Date: 1885 language characterized by the terseness and ellipses that are common in telegrams
telegraphic
adjective Date: 1794 1. of or relating to the telegraph 2. concise, terse • telegraphically adverb
telegraphically
adverb see telegraphic
telegraphist
noun see telegraph II
telegraphy
noun Date: 1795 the use or operation of a telegraph apparatus or system for communication
telekinesis
noun Etymology: New Latin Date: 1890 the production of motion in objects (as by a spiritualistic medium) without contact or other physical means • telekinetic adjective ...
telekinetic
adjective see telekinesis
telekinetically
adverb see telekinesis
Telemachus
noun Etymology: Latin, from Greek Tēlemachos Date: circa 1556 the son of Odysseus and Penelope who contrives with his father to slay his mother's suitors
Telemann
biographical name Georg Philipp 1681-1767 German composer
telemark
noun Usage: often capitalized Etymology: Norwegian, from Telemark, region in Norway Date: 1904 a turn in skiing in which the skier's heel is not attached to the ski and the ...
Telemark
geographical name mountain region SW Norway
telemarker
noun see telemarking
telemarketer
noun see telemarketing
telemarketing
noun Date: 1980 the marketing of goods or services by telephone • telemarketer noun
telemarking
noun Date: 1943 the act or sport of performing telemarks • telemarker noun
telemedicine
noun Date: 1970 the practice of medicine when the doctor and patient are widely separated using two-way voice and visual communication (as by satellite, computer, or ...
telemeter
I. noun Etymology: International Scientific Vocabulary Date: 1860 1. an instrument for measuring the distance of an object from an observer 2. an electrical apparatus for ...
telemetric
adjective see telemetry
telemetrically
adverb see telemetry
telemetry
noun Date: 1885 1. the science or process of telemetering data 2. data transmitted by telemetry 3. biotelemetry • telemetric adjective • telemetrically adverb
telencephalic
adjective see telencephalon
telencephalon
noun Etymology: New Latin, from telo- + encephalon Date: 1897 the anterior subdivision of the embryonic forebrain or the corresponding part of the adult forebrain that ...
teleologic
adjective see teleological
teleological
also teleologic adjective Date: 1798 exhibiting or relating to design or purpose especially in nature • teleologically adverb
teleologically
adverb see teleological
teleologist
noun see teleology
teleology
noun Etymology: New Latin teleologia, from Greek tele-, telos end, purpose + -logia -logy — more at wheel Date: 1740 1. a. the study of evidences of design in nature ...
teleonomic
adjective see teleonomy
teleonomy
noun Etymology: teleo- (as in teleology) + -nomy Date: 1958 the quality of apparent purposefulness of structure or function in living organisms due to evolutionary ...
teleost
noun Etymology: ultimately from Greek teleios complete, perfect (from telos end) + osteon bone — more at osseous Date: 1862 bony fish • teleost adjective • teleostean ...
teleostean
adjective see teleost
telepath
noun Date: 1904 one who is able to communicate by telepathy
telepathic
adjective see telepathy
telepathically
adverb see telepathy
telepathy
noun Date: 1882 communication from one mind to another by extrasensory means • telepathic adjective • telepathically adverb
telephone
I. noun Usage: often attributive Date: 1844 an instrument for reproducing sounds at a distance; specifically one in which sound is converted into electrical impulses for ...
telephone book
noun Date: 1915 a book listing the names, addresses, and telephone numbers of telephone customers
telephone booth
noun Date: circa 1895 an enclosure within which one may stand or sit while making a telephone call
telephone box
noun Date: 1904 British a public telephone booth
telephone directory
noun Date: 1907 telephone book
telephone number
noun Date: 1885 a number assigned to a telephone line for a specific location that is used to call that location
telephone tag
noun Date: 1980 telephoning back and forth by parties trying to reach each other without success
telephoner
noun see telephone II
telephonic
adjective Date: 1840 of, relating to, or conveyed by a telephone • telephonically adverb
telephonically
adverb see telephonic
telephonist
noun Date: 1880 British a telephone switchboard operator
telephony
noun Date: 1835 the use or operation of an apparatus (as a telephone) for transmission of sounds as electrical signals between widely removed points
Telephoto
trademark — used for an apparatus for transmitting photographs electrically or for a photograph so transmitted
telephoto
I. adjective Date: circa 1895 being a camera lens system designed to give a large image of a distant object; also relating to or being photography in which a telephoto lens ...
telephotography
noun Etymology: International Scientific Vocabulary Date: 1892 the photography of distant objects (as by a camera provided with a telephoto lens)
teleplay
noun Date: 1952 a story prepared for television production
teleport
transitive verb Etymology: back-formation from teleportation Date: 1947 to transfer by teleportation
teleportation
noun Etymology: tele- + transportation Date: 1931 the act or process of moving an object or person by psychokinesis
teleprinter
noun Date: 1929 a device capable of producing hard copy from signals received over a communications circuit; especially teletypewriter
teleprocessing
noun Date: 1962 computer processing via remote terminals
teleprompter
noun Etymology: from TelePrompTer, a trademark Date: 1951 a device for displaying prepared text to a speaker or performer
Teles Pires
or formerly São Manuel geographical name river 600 miles (966 kilometers) E Brazil flowing NW to join the Juruena forming the Tapajos
telescope
I. noun Usage: often attributive Etymology: New Latin telescopium, from Greek tēleskopos farseeing, from tēle- tele- + skopos watcher; akin to Greek skopein to look — ...
Telescope Peak
geographical name mountain 11,049 feet (3368 meters) E California, highest in Panamint Mountains
telescopic
adjective Date: 1705 1. a. of, relating to, or performed with a telescope b. suitable for seeing or magnifying distant objects 2. seen or discoverable only by a ...
telescopically
adverb see telescopic
telesis
noun (plural teleses) Etymology: New Latin, from Greek, fulfillment, from telein to complete, from telos end — more at telos Date: 1896 progress that is intelligently ...
Telestrator
trademark — used for an electronic device that generates drawn video images over a background image
teletext
noun Date: 1974 a system for broadcasting text over an unused portion of a television signal and displaying it on a decoder-equipped television set — compare videotex
telethon
noun Etymology: tele- + -athon Date: 1949 a long television program usually to solicit funds especially for a charity
Teletype
trademark — used for a teletypewriter
teletypewriter
noun Date: 1903 a printing device resembling a typewriter that is used to send and receive telephonic signals
televangelism
noun see televangelist
televangelist
noun Date: 1973 an evangelist who conducts regularly televised religious programs • televangelism noun
teleview
intransitive verb Date: 1935 to observe or watch by means of a television receiver • televiewer noun
televiewer
noun see teleview
televise
verb (-vised; -vising) Etymology: back-formation from television Date: 1927 transitive verb to broadcast (as a baseball game) by television intransitive verb to ...
television
noun Usage: often attributive Etymology: French télévision, from télé- tele- + vision vision Date: 1907 1. an electronic system of transmitting transient images of ...
televisual
adjective Date: 1926 chiefly British of, relating to, or suitable for broadcast by television
telex
I. noun Etymology: teleprinter + exchange Date: 1932 1. a communication service involving teletypewriters connected by wire through automatic exchanges; also a ...
telial
adjective see telium
telic
adjective Etymology: Greek telikos, from telos end — more at telos Date: 1889 tending toward an end or outcome • telically adverb
telically
adverb see telic
teliospore
noun Etymology: Greek teleios complete (from telos end) + English spore Date: 1905 a chlamydospore that is the final stage in the life cycle of a rust fungus and that gives ...
telium
noun (plural telia) Etymology: New Latin, from Greek teleios complete Date: circa 1905 a teliospore-producing sorus or pustule on the host plant of a rust fungus • telial ...
tell
I. verb (told; telling) Etymology: Middle English, from Old English tellan; akin to Old High German zellen to count, tell, Old English talu tale Date: before 12th century ...
tell off
transitive verb Date: 1804 1. to number and set apart; especially to assign to a special duty 2. reprimand, excoriate
tell-all
noun Date: 1954 a written account (as a biography) that contains revealing and often scandalous information • tell-all adjective
teller
noun Date: 14th century 1. one that relates or communicates 2. one that reckons or counts: as a. one appointed to count votes b. a member of a bank's staff concerned ...
Teller
biographical name Edward 1908- American (Hungarian-born) physicist
Téllez
biographical name Gabriel — see Tirso de Molina
telling
adjective Date: 1851 carrying great weight and producing a marked effect ; effective, expressive Synonyms: see valid • tellingly adverb
tellingly
adverb see telling
telltale
noun Date: circa 1548 1. a. talebearer, informer b. an outward sign ; indication 2. a device for indicating or recording something: as a. a wind-direction indicator ...
tellur-
or telluro- combining form Etymology: Latin tellur-, tellus — more at thill 1. earth 2. [New Latin tellurium] tellurium
telluric
adjective Date: 1836 1. of or relating to the earth ; terrestrial 2. being or relating to a usually natural electric current flowing near the earth's surface
telluride
noun Etymology: International Scientific Vocabulary Date: 1849 a binary compound of tellurium with a more electropositive element or group
tellurium
noun Etymology: New Latin, from Latin tellur-, tellus earth Date: 1800 a semimetallic element that occurs in a silvery-white brittle crystalline form of metallic luster, in a ...
telluro-
combining form see tellur-
tellurometer
noun Date: 1957 a device that measures distance by means of microwaves
telly
noun (plural tellys; also tellies) Etymology: by shortening & alteration Date: 1939 chiefly British television
telnet
noun Etymology: teletype network Date: 1969 a telecommunications protocol providing specifications for emulating a remote computer terminal so that one can access a distant ...
telo-
— see tel-
telocentric
adjective Etymology: International Scientific Vocabulary tel- + centromere + -ic Date: 1939 having the centromere terminally situated so that there is only one chromosomal ...
telome
noun Etymology: International Scientific Vocabulary tel- + -ome Date: 1935 a hypothetical plant structure in a theory of the evolution of leaves and sporophylls in vascular ...
telomerase
noun Date: 1988 a DNA polymerase that is a ribonucleoprotein catalyzing the elongation of chromosomal telomeres in eukaryotic cell division and is particularly active in ...
telomere
noun Etymology: International Scientific Vocabulary Date: 1940 the natural end of a eukaryotic chromosome composed of a usually repetitive DNA sequence and serving to ...
telophase
noun Etymology: International Scientific Vocabulary Date: 1895 1. the final stage of mitosis and of the second division of meiosis in which the spindle disappears and the ...
telos
noun Etymology: Greek; probably akin to Greek tellein to accomplish, tlēnai to bear — more at tolerate Date: 1904 an ultimate end
telson
noun Etymology: New Latin, from Greek, end of a plowed field; perhaps akin to Greek telos end Date: 1855 the terminal segment of the body of an arthropod or segmented worm; ...
Telugu
noun (plural Telugu or Telugus) Etymology: Telugu telũgu, tenũngu Date: 1789 1. a member of the largest group of people in Andhra Pradesh, India 2. the Dravidian language ...
TEM
abbreviation transmission electron microscope; transmission electron microscopy
Tema
geographical name city & port Ghana E of Accra population 100,052
Témbi
geographical name see Tempe, Vale of
temblor
noun Etymology: Spanish, literally, trembling, from temblar to tremble, from Medieval Latin tremulare — more at tremble Date: 1876 earthquake
Temecula
geographical name city S California between Riverside & San Diego population 57,716
temerarious
adjective Etymology: Latin temerarius, from temere Date: 1532 marked by temerity ; rashly or presumptuously daring • temerariously adverb • temerariousness noun
temerariously
adverb see temerarious
temerariousness
noun see temerarious
temerity
noun (plural -ties) Etymology: Middle English temeryte, from Latin temeritas, from temere blindly, recklessly; akin to Old High German demar darkness, Latin tenebrae, Sanskrit ...
Temes̆
geographical name — see timis
Temin
biographical name Howard Martin 1934-1994 American oncologist
temp
I. noun Date: 1850 1. temperature 2a, c 2. a temporary worker II. intransitive verb Date: 1973 to work as a temp III. abbreviation 1. temporary 2. [Latin tempore] in ...
Tempe
geographical name city S central Arizona SE of Phoenix population 158,625
Tempe, Vale of
or Modern Greek Témbi geographical name valley in NE Thessaly between Mounts Olympus & Ossa
tempeh
noun Etymology: Javanese témpé Date: 1950 an Asian food prepared by fermenting soybeans with a rhizopus
temper
I. transitive verb (tempered; tempering) Etymology: Middle English, from Old English & Anglo-French; Old English temprian & Anglo-French temprer, from Latin temperare to ...
tempera
noun Etymology: Italian, literally, temper, from temperare to temper, from Latin Date: 1832 1. a process of painting in which an albuminous or colloidal medium (as egg yolk) ...
temperable
adjective see temper I
temperament
noun Etymology: Middle English, from Latin temperamentum, from temperare to mix, temper Date: 15th century 1. obsolete a. constitution of a substance, body, or organism ...
temperamental
adjective Date: 1646 1. of, relating to, or arising from temperament ; constitutional 2. a. marked by excessive sensitivity and impulsive mood changes b. ...
temperamentally
adverb see temperamental
temperance
noun Etymology: Middle English, from Anglo-French, from Latin temperantia, from temperant-, temperans, present participle of temperare to moderate, be moderate Date: 14th ...
temperate
adjective Etymology: Middle English temperat, from Latin temperatus, from past participle of temperare Date: 14th century 1. marked by moderation: as a. keeping or held ...
temperate rain forest
noun Date: circa 1930 woodland of a usually rather mild climatic area within the temperate zone that receives heavy rainfall, usually includes numerous kinds of trees, and ...
temperate zone
noun Usage: often capitalized T&Z Date: 1551 the area or region between the Tropic of Cancer and the arctic circle or between the Tropic of Capricorn and the antarctic ...
temperately
adverb see temperate
temperateness
noun see temperate
temperature
noun Etymology: Latin temperatura mixture, moderation, from temperatus, past participle of temperare Date: 1533 1. archaic a. complexion 1 b. temperament 3b 2. a. ...
temperature inversion
noun Date: 1921 inversion 6
tempered
adjective Date: 14th century 1. a. having the elements mixed in satisfying proportions ; temperate b. qualified, lessened, or diluted by the mixture or influence of an ...
temperer
noun see temper I
tempest
I. noun Etymology: Middle English tempeste, from Anglo-French, from Vulgar Latin *tempesta, alteration of Latin tempestas season, weather, storm, from tempus time Date: 13th ...
tempest in a teapot
Date: 1838 a great commotion over an unimportant matter
tempestuous
adjective Etymology: Middle English, from Late Latin tempestuosus, from Old Latin tempestus season, weather, storm, from tempus Date: 15th century of, relating to, or ...
tempestuously
adverb see tempestuous
tempestuousness
noun see tempestuous
Templar
noun Etymology: Middle English templer, from Anglo-French, from Medieval Latin templarius, from Latin templum temple Date: 13th century 1. a knight of a religious military ...
template
noun Etymology: probably from French templet, diminutive of temple, part of a loom, probably from Latin templum Date: 1677 1. a short piece or block placed horizontally in a ...
Temple
I. biographical name Frederick 1821-1902 archbishop of Canterbury (1896-1902) II. biographical name Shirley 1928- American actress & diplomat III. biographical name Sir ...
temple
I. noun Etymology: Middle English, from Old English & Anglo-French; Old English tempel & Anglo-French temple, both from Latin templum space marked out for observation of ...
Temple City
geographical name city SW California SE of Pasadena population 33,377
templed
adjective see temple I
Templewood
biographical name Viscount — see Hoare
tempo
noun (plural tempi or tempos) Etymology: Italian, literally, time, from Latin tempus Date: circa 1724 1. the rate of speed of a musical piece or passage indicated by one of a ...
tempora mutantur, nos et mutamur in illis
foreign term Etymology: Latin the times are changing, and we are changing with them
temporal
I. adjective Etymology: Middle English, from Anglo-French temporel, from Latin temporalis, from tempor-, tempus time Date: 14th century 1. a. of or relating to time as ...
temporal bone
noun Date: 1771 a compound bone of the side of the skull of some mammals including humans
temporal lobe
noun Date: 1889 a large lobe of each cerebral hemisphere that is situated in front of the occipital lobe and contains a sensory area associated with the organ of hearing
temporal summation
noun Date: 1950 sensory summation that involves the addition of single stimuli over a short period of time
temporality
noun (plural -ties) Date: 14th century 1. a. civil or political as distinguished from spiritual or ecclesiastical power or authority b. an ecclesiastical property or ...
temporalize
transitive verb (-ized; -izing) Date: 1828 1. secularize 2. to place or define in time relations
temporally
adverb see temporal I
temporarily
adverb Date: 1534 during a limited time
temporariness
noun see temporary I
temporary
I. adjective Etymology: Latin temporarius, from tempor-, tempus time Date: circa 1564 lasting for a limited time • temporariness noun II. noun (plural -raries) Date: ...
temporary duty
noun Date: 1945 temporary military service away from one's permanent duty station
temporise
British variant of temporize
temporization
noun see temporize
temporize
intransitive verb (-rized; -rizing) Etymology: Middle French temporiser, from Medieval Latin temporizare to pass the time, from Latin tempor-, tempus Date: 1579 1. to act to ...
temporizer
noun see temporize
temporomandibular
adjective Etymology: 3temporal + -o- + mandibular Date: 1889 of, relating to, being, or affecting the joint between the temporal bone and the mandible that allows for the ...
tempt
transitive verb Etymology: Middle English, from Anglo-French tempter, tenter, from Latin temptare, tentare to feel, try Date: 13th century 1. to entice to do wrong by ...
temptable
adjective see tempt
temptation
noun Date: 13th century 1. the act of tempting or the state of being tempted especially to evil ; enticement 2. something tempting ; a cause or occasion of enticement
tempter
noun Date: 14th century one that tempts or entices
tempting
adjective Date: 1588 having an appeal ; enticing • temptingly adverb
temptingly
adverb see tempting
temptress
noun Date: 1594 a woman who tempts or entices
tempura
noun Etymology: Japanese tenpura Date: 1920 seafood or vegetables dipped in batter and fried in deep fat
tempus edax rerum
foreign term Etymology: Latin time, that devours all things
tempus fugit
foreign term Etymology: Latin time flies
Temuco
geographical name city S central Chile population 157,634
ten
noun Etymology: Middle English, from Old English tīene, from tīen, adjective, ten; akin to Old High German zehan ten, Latin decem, Greek deka Date: before 12th century 1. ...
Ten Commandments
noun plural Date: 13th century the ethical commandments of God given according to biblical accounts to Moses by voice and by writing on stone tablets on Mount Sinai
ten-eighty
noun see 1080
ten-gallon hat
noun Date: 1920 cowboy hat
ten-speed
noun Date: 1971 a bicycle with 10 gear combinations
ten-strike
noun Date: 1840 1. a strike in tenpins 2. a highly successful stroke or achievement
tenability
noun see tenable
tenable
adjective Etymology: Middle French, from Old French, from tenir to hold, from Latin tenēre — more at thin Date: 1579 capable of being held, maintained, or defended ; ...
tenableness
noun see tenable
tenably
adverb see tenable
tenace
noun Etymology: modification of Spanish tenaza, literally, forceps, probably from Latin tenacia, neuter plural of tenax Date: 1655 a combination of two high or relatively ...
tenacious
adjective Etymology: Latin tenac-, tenax tending to hold fast, from tenēre to hold Date: 1607 1. a. not easily pulled apart ; cohesive b. tending to adhere or cling ...
tenaciously
adverb see tenacious
tenaciousness
noun see tenacious
tenacity
noun Date: 15th century the quality or state of being tenacious Synonyms: see courage
tenaculum
noun (plural tenacula or -lums) Etymology: New Latin, from Late Latin, instrument for holding, from Latin tenēre Date: circa 1693 1. a slender sharp-pointed hook attached to ...
tenancy
noun (plural -cies) Date: 1590 1. a holding of an estate or a mode of holding an estate; specifically the temporary possession or occupancy of something (as a house) that ...

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