Слова на букву tans-unco (6389) New Collegiate Dictionary
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Слова на букву tans-unco (6389)

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tenant
I. noun Etymology: Middle English, from Anglo-French, from present participle of tenir to hold Date: 14th century 1. a. one who holds or possesses real estate or sometimes ...
tenant farmer
noun Date: 1748 a farmer who works land owned by another and pays rent either in cash or in shares of produce
tenantable
adjective see tenant II
tenantless
adjective see tenant I
tenantry
noun (plural -ries) Date: 14th century 1. tenancy 2. a body of tenants
tench
noun (plural tench or tenches) Etymology: Middle English, from Anglo-French tenche, from Late Latin tinca Date: 13th century a cyprinid fish (Tinca tinca) native to Eurasia ...
tend
I. verb Etymology: Middle English, short for attenden to attend Date: 14th century intransitive verb 1. archaic listen 2. to pay attention ; apply oneself 3. to ...
tendance
noun Etymology: short for attendance Date: 1573 1. watchful care 2. archaic persons in attendance ; retinue
tendencious
chiefly British variant of tendentious
tendency
noun (plural -cies) Etymology: Medieval Latin tendentia, from Latin tendent-, tendens, present participle of tendere Date: 1628 1. a. direction or approach toward a place, ...
tendentious
adjective Date: 1900 marked by a tendency in favor of a particular point of view ; biased • tendentiously adverb • tendentiousness noun
tendentiously
adverb see tendentious
tendentiousness
noun see tendentious
tender
I. adjective Etymology: Middle English, from Anglo-French tendre, from Latin tener; perhaps akin to Latin tenuis thin, slight — more at thin Date: 13th century 1. a. ...
tender offer
noun Date: 1967 a public offer to buy not less than a specified number of shares of a stock at a fixed price from stockholders usually in an attempt to gain control of the ...
tender-minded
adjective Date: 1593 marked by idealism, optimism, and dogmatism
tenderfoot
noun (plural tenderfeet; also tenderfoots) Date: 1849 1. a newcomer in a comparatively rough or newly settled region; especially one not hardened to frontier or outdoor life ...
tenderhearted
adjective Date: 15th century easily moved to love, pity, or sorrow ; compassionate, impressionable • tenderheartedly adverb • tenderheartedness noun
tenderheartedly
adverb see tenderhearted
tenderheartedness
noun see tenderhearted
tenderization
noun see tenderize
tenderize
transitive verb (-ized; -izing) Date: 1930 to make (meat or meat products) tender by applying a process or substance that breaks down connective tissue • tenderization ...
tenderizer
noun see tenderize
tenderloin
noun Date: circa 1828 1. a strip of tender meat consisting of a large internal muscle of the loin on each side of the vertebral column 2. [from its making possible a ...
tenderly
adverb see tender I
tenderness
noun see tender I
tenderometer
noun Date: 1938 a device for determining the maturity and tenderness of samples of fruits and vegetables
tendinitis
or tendonitis noun Etymology: tendinitis from New Latin, from tendin-, tendo + -itis; tendonitis from tendon + -itis Date: circa 1900 inflammation of a tendon
tendinous
adjective Etymology: New Latin tendinosus, from tendin-, tendo tendon, alteration of Medieval Latin tendon-, tendo Date: 1578 1. consisting of tendons ; sinewy 2. of, ...
tendon
noun Etymology: Medieval Latin tendon-, tendo, from Latin tendere to stretch — more at thin Date: 1541 a tough cord or band of dense white fibrous connective tissue that ...
tendon of Achilles
Date: circa 1885 Achilles tendon
tendonitis
noun see tendinitis
tendresse
noun Etymology: Middle English, from Anglo-French, from tendre tender Date: 14th century fondness
tendril
noun Etymology: probably modification of Middle French tendron bud, cartilage, alteration of Old French tenrum, from Vulgar Latin *tenerumen, from Latin tener tender — more at ...
tendriled
adjective see tendril
tendrilled
adjective see tendril
tendrilous
adjective see tendril
Tenebrae
noun plural but singular or plural in construction Etymology: Medieval Latin, from Latin, darkness — more at temerity Date: 1651 a church service observed during the final ...
tenebrific
adjective Etymology: Latin tenebrae darkness Date: 1785 1. gloomy 2. causing gloom or darkness
tenebrionid
noun Etymology: New Latin Tenebrionidae, from Tenebrion-, Tenebrio, type genus, from Latin, one that shuns the light, from tenebrae darkness — more at temerity Date: 1902 ...
tenebrious
adjective Etymology: by alteration Date: 1594 tenebrous
tenebrism
noun Usage: often capitalized Etymology: Latin tenebrae darkness Date: 1954 a style of painting especially associated with the Italian painter Caravaggio and his followers ...
tenebrist
noun or adjective see tenebrism
tenebrous
adjective Etymology: Middle English, from Anglo-French tenebreus, from Latin tenebrosus, from tenebrae Date: 15th century 1. shut off from the light ; dark, murky 2. hard ...
Tenedos
geographical name — see Bozcaada
tenement
noun Etymology: Middle English, from Anglo-French, from Medieval Latin tenementum, from Latin tenēre to hold — more at thin Date: 14th century 1. any of various forms of ...
tenement house
noun Date: 1858 apartment building; especially one meeting minimum standards of sanitation, safety, and comfort and usually located in a city
Tenerife
or formerly Teneriffe geographical name island Spain, largest of the Canary Islands; chief town Santa Cruz de Tenerife area 795 square miles (2059 square kilometers)
Teneriffe
geographical name see Tenerife
tenesmus
noun Etymology: Latin, from Greek teinesmos, from teinein to stretch, strain — more at thin Date: 1527 a distressing but ineffectual urge to evacuate the rectum or bladder
tenet
noun Etymology: Latin, he holds, from tenēre to hold Date: circa 1600 a principle, belief, or doctrine generally held to be true; especially one held in common by members ...
tenfold
adjective Date: before 12th century 1. having 10 units or members 2. being 10 times as great or as many • tenfold adverb
Teng Hsiao-p'ing
or Deng Xiaoping biographical name 1904-1997 Chinese Communist leader (1977-97)
tenge
noun (plural tenge) Etymology: Kazakh teŋge coin, ruble Date: 1992 — see money table
tenia
variant of taenia
teniasis
variant of taeniasis
Teniers
biographical name David the Elder 1582-1649 & the Younger 1610-1690 Flemish painters
Tenn
abbreviation Tennessee
tenner
noun Date: 1845 1. a 10-pound note 2. a 10-dollar bill
Tennessean
adjective or noun see Tennessee
Tennessee
geographical name 1. river 652 miles (1049 kilometers) E United States in Tennessee, Alabama, & Kentucky flowing into Ohio River 2. state SE central United States capital ...
Tennessee walker
noun see Tennessee walking horse
Tennessee walking horse
noun Etymology: Tennessee, state of United States Date: 1938 any of an American breed of large easy-gaited saddle horses largely of standardbred and Morgan ancestry — ...
Tennessee-Tombigbee Waterway
geographical name waterway 234 miles (374 kilometers) long from Tennessee River on Tennessee-Mississippi border to Tombigbee River in W central Alabama
Tennesseean
adjective or noun see Tennessee
Tenniel
biographical name Sir John 1820-1914 English cartoonist & illustrator
tennies
noun plural Etymology: by shortening & alteration Date: circa 1951 tennis shoes, sneakers
tennis
noun Usage: often attributive Etymology: Middle English tenetz, tenys, probably from Anglo-French tenez, 2d person plural imperative of tenir to hold — more at tenable Date: ...
tennis elbow
noun Date: 1883 inflammation and pain over the outer side of the elbow usually resulting from excessive strain on and twisting of the forearm
tennis shoe
noun Date: 1886 a lightweight usually low-cut sneaker
tennist
noun Etymology: blend of tennis and -ist Date: 1932 a tennis player
Tennyson
biographical name Alfred 1809-1892 1st Baron Tennyson known as Alfred, Lord Tennyson English poet; poet laureate (1850-92) • Tennysonian adjective
Tennysonian
adjective see Tennyson
Tenochtitlán
geographical name Mexico City — name used when it was capital of the Aztec Empire
tenon
I. noun Etymology: Middle English, from Anglo-French, from tenir to hold — more at tenable Date: 14th century a projecting member in a piece of wood or other material for ...
tenor
I. noun Etymology: Middle English tenour, from Anglo-French, from Latin tenor uninterrupted course, from tenēre to hold — more at thin Date: 14th century 1. a. the ...
tenorist
noun Date: 1865 a person who sings tenor or plays a tenor instrument
tenosynovitis
noun Etymology: New Latin, from Greek tenōn tendon (akin to Greek teinein to stretch) + New Latin synovitis — more at thin Date: circa 1860 inflammation of a tendon ...
tenour
chiefly British variant of tenor
tenpenny
adjective Date: 1592 amounting to, worth, or costing 10 pennies
tenpenny nail
noun Etymology: from its original price per hundred Date: 15th century a nail three inches (7.6 centimeters) long
tenpin
noun Date: 1807 1. a bottle-shaped bowling pin 15 inches high 2. plural but singular in construction a bowling game using 10 tenpins and a large ball 27 inches in ...
tenpounder
noun Date: 1699 ladyfish 2
tenrec
noun Etymology: French, from Malagasy tàndraka Date: circa 1785 any of numerous small often spiny mammalian insectivores (family Tenrecidae) chiefly of Madagascar
TENS
noun Date: 1980 1. [transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation] electrical stimulation of the skin to relieve pain by interfering with the neural transmission of signals ...
tens place
noun Date: 1937 the place two to the left of the decimal point in a number expressed in the Arabic system of writing numbers
Tensas
geographical name river 250 miles (402 kilometers) NE Louisiana uniting with Ouachita River to form Black River
Tensaw
geographical name river 40 miles (64 kilometers) SW Alabama formed by Tombigbee & Alabama rivers & flowing S into Mobile Bay
tense
I. noun Etymology: Middle English tens time, tense, from Anglo-French, from Latin tempus Date: 14th century 1. a distinction of form in a verb to express distinctions of time ...
tensely
adverb see tense II
tenseness
noun see tense II
tensile
adjective Etymology: New Latin tensilis, from Latin tensus, past participle Date: 1626 1. capable of tension ; ductile 2. of, relating to, or involving tension • ...
tensile strength
noun Date: 1862 the greatest longitudinal stress a substance can bear without tearing apart
tensility
noun see tensile
tensiometer
noun Etymology: tension Date: 1912 1. a device for measuring tension (as of structural material) 2. an instrument for determining the moisture content of soil 3. an ...
tensiometric
adjective see tensiometer
tensiometry
noun see tensiometer
tension
I. noun Etymology: Middle French or Latin; Middle French, from Latin tension-, tensio, from tendere Date: 1533 1. a. the act or action of stretching or the condition or ...
tension headache
noun Date: 1953 bilateral headache marked by mild to moderate pain of variable duration that typically is accompanied by contraction of the neck and scalp muscles
tensional
adjective see tension I
tensioner
noun see tension II
tensionless
adjective see tension I
tensity
noun (plural -ties) Date: circa 1658 the quality or state of being tense ; tenseness
tensive
adjective Date: 1702 of, relating to, or causing tension
tensor
noun Etymology: New Latin, from Latin tendere Date: circa 1704 1. a muscle that stretches a part 2. a generalized vector with more than three components each of which is a ...
tent
I. noun Etymology: Middle English tente, from Anglo-French, from Latin tenta, feminine of tentus, past participle of tendere to stretch — more at thin Date: 14th century 1. ...
tent caterpillar
noun Date: 1854 any of several destructive gregarious caterpillars (genus Malacosoma and especially M. americanum of the family Lasiocampidae) that constructionct large silken ...
tent stitch
noun Date: 1619 a short stitch slanting to the right that is used in embroidery to form even lines of solid background
tentacle
noun Etymology: New Latin tentaculum, from Latin tentare to feel, touch — more at tempt Date: circa 1762 1. any of various elongate flexible usually tactile or prehensile ...
tentacled
adjective see tentacle
tentacular
adjective Etymology: New Latin tentaculum Date: 1828 1. of, relating to, or resembling tentacles 2. equipped with tentacles
tentage
noun Date: 1603 a collection of tents ; tent equipment
tentative
adjective Etymology: Medieval Latin tentativus, from Latin tentatus, past participle of tentare, temptare to feel, try Date: 1626 1. not fully worked out or developed 2. ...
tentatively
adverb see tentative
tentativeness
noun see tentative
tented
adjective Date: 1598 1. covered with a tent or tents 2. shaped like a tent
tenter
I. noun Etymology: Middle English teyntur, probably from Medieval Latin tentura, from tenta tent frame, tent Date: 14th century 1. a frame or endless track with hooks or ...
tenterhook
noun Date: 15th century a sharp hooked nail used especially for fastening cloth on a tenter
tenth
noun (plural tenths) Date: 13th century 1. — see number table 2. a. a musical interval embracing an octave and a third b. the tone at this interval • tenth ...
tenth-rate
adjective Date: 1834 of the lowest character or quality
tentie
adjective see tenty
tentless
adjective see tent I
tentlike
adjective see tent I
tenty
also tentie adjective Etymology: 3tent Date: 15th century Scottish attentive, watchful
tenuis
noun (plural tenues) Etymology: Medieval Latin, from Latin, thin, slight Date: 1650 an unaspirated voiceless stop
tenuity
noun Etymology: Middle English tenuite, from Latin tenuitas, from tenuis thin, tenuous Date: 15th century 1. lack of substance or strength 2. lack of thickness ; ...
tenuous
adjective Etymology: Latin tenuis thin, slight, tenuous — more at thin Date: 1597 1. not dense ; rare 2. not thick ; slender 3. a. having little substance or ...
tenuously
adverb see tenuous
tenuousness
noun see tenuous
tenurable
adjective see tenure
tenure
noun Etymology: Middle English, from Anglo-French teneure, tenure, from Medieval Latin tenitura, from Vulgar Latin *tenitus, past participle of Latin tenēre to hold — more at ...
tenure-track
adjective Date: 1976 relating to or being a teaching position that may lead to a grant of tenure
tenured
adjective Date: 1965 having tenure
tenurial
adjective see tenure
tenurially
adverb see tenure
tenuto
adjective or adverb Etymology: Italian, from past participle of tenere to hold, from Latin tenēre Date: 1762 held (as a tone or chord) to its full value — used as a ...
teocalli
noun Etymology: Nahuatl teōcalli, from teōtl god + calli house Date: circa 1613 an ancient temple of Mexico or Central America usually built upon the summit of a ...
teosinte
noun Etymology: Mexican Spanish, from Nahuatl teōcintli, from teōtl god + cintli dried ears of maize Date: circa 1877 a tall annual grass (Zea mexicana syn. Z. mays ...
Teotihuacán
geographical name city S central Mexico in Mexico state NE of Mexico City; once capital of the Toltecs population 2238
tepary bean
noun Etymology: Mexican Spanish tépari, from Ópata or Eudeve (Uto-Aztecan languages of Sonora, Mexico) Date: 1912 an annual twining bean (Phaseolus acutifolius var. ...
tepee
or teepee; also tipi noun Etymology: Dakota thípi, from thi- to dwell Date: 1743 a conical tent usually consisting of skins and used especially by American Indians of the ...
tephra
noun Etymology: New Latin, from Greek, ashes; akin to Sanskrit dahati it burns — more at foment Date: circa 1944 solid material ejected into the air during a volcanic ...
Tepic
geographical name city W Mexico capital of Nayarit population 238,101
tepid
adjective Etymology: Middle English teped, from Latin tepidus, from tepēre to be moderately warm; akin to Sanskrit tapati it heats, Old Irish tess heat Date: 14th century 1. ...
tepidity
noun see tepid
tepidly
adverb see tepid
tepidness
noun see tepid
TEPP
noun Etymology: tetra- + ethyl + pyrophosphate Date: 1948 a hygroscopic corrosive liquid organophosphate C8H20O7P2 that is a powerful anticholinesterase and is used ...
teppanyaki
noun Etymology: Japanese, from teppan griddle + yaki broiling Date: circa 1970 a Japanese dish of meat, fish, or vegetables cooked on a large griddle usually built into the ...
Tequendama Falls
geographical name waterfall central Colombia S of Bogotá
tequila
noun Etymology: Spanish, from Tequila, town in Jalisco state, Mexico Date: 1849 a Mexican liquor distilled from the fermented sap of an agave (Agave tequilana)
tequila sunrise
noun Date: 1965 a cocktail consisting of tequila, orange juice, and grenadine
ter
abbreviation 1. terrace 2. territory
Ter Borch
biographical name see Terborch
ter-
combining form Etymology: Latin, from ter; akin to Greek & Sanskrit tris three times, Latin tres three — more at three three times ; threefold ; three
tera-
combining form Etymology: International Scientific Vocabulary, from Greek terat-, teras monster trillion (1012)
terabyte
noun Date: 1984 1024 gigabytes or 1,099,511,627,776 bytes; also one trillion bytes
terai
noun Etymology: Tarai, lowland belt of India Date: 1888 a wide-brimmed double felt sun hat worn especially in subtropical regions
Teraina
or formerly Washington geographical name island W Pacific in the Line Islands population 437
teraph
noun (plural teraphim) Etymology: Hebrew tĕrāphīm (plural in form butsingular in meaning) Date: 14th century an image of a Semitic household god
terat-
or terato- combining form Etymology: Greek, from terat-, teras marvel, portent, monster developmental malformation
terato-
combining form see terat-
teratocarcinoma
noun Date: circa 1946 a malignant teratoma; especially one involving germinal cells of the testis
teratogen
noun Date: 1959 a teratogenic agent
teratogenesis
noun Etymology: New Latin Date: 1901 production of developmental malformations
teratogenic
adjective Date: 1879 of, relating to, or causing developmental malformations • teratogenicity noun
teratogenicity
noun see teratogenic
teratologic
adjective see teratological
teratological
or teratologic adjective Date: 1857 1. abnormal in growth or structure 2. of or relating to teratology
teratologist
noun see teratology
teratology
noun Date: circa 1842 the study of malformations or serious deviations from the normal type in developing organisms • teratologist noun
teratoma
noun (plural -mas; also -mata) Etymology: New Latin Date: 1879 a tumor made up of a heterogeneous mixture of tissues
terawatt
noun Date: 1970 a unit of power equal to one trillion watts
terbium
noun Etymology: New Latin, from Ytterby, Sweden Date: 1843 a metallic element of the rare-earth group — see element table
Terborch
or Ter Borch biographical name Gerard 1617-1681 Dutch painter
Terbrugghen
biographical name Hendrik 1588-1629 Dutch painter
terbutaline
noun Etymology: tert- tertiary + -butaline, perhaps by shortening & alteration from butyl + amino + 2-ine Date: 1973 a bronchodilator C12H19NO3 used especially in the form ...
terce
also tierce noun Usage: often capitalized Etymology: Middle English, third, terce — more at tierce Date: 14th century the third of the canonical hours
Terceira
geographical name island central Azores area 153 square miles (396 square kilometers)
tercel
variant of tiercel
tercentenary
noun (plural -ries) Date: 1855 a 300th anniversary or its celebration • tercentenary adjective
tercentennial
adjective or noun Date: 1872 tercentenary
tercet
noun Etymology: Italian terzetto, from diminutive of terzo third, from Latin tertius — more at third Date: circa 1598 a unit or group of three lines of verse: a. one of ...
terebinth
noun Etymology: Middle English terebynt, from Anglo-French terebinte, from Latin terebinthus — more at turpentine Date: 14th century a small European tree (Pistacia ...
teredo
noun (plural -dos) Etymology: Middle English, from Latin teredin-, teredo, from Greek terēdōn; akin to Greek tetrainein to bore — more at throw Date: 14th century shipworm
Terence
biographical name 186(or 185)-?159 B.C. Publius Terentius Afer Roman dramatist
Terengganu
geographical name state E Malaysia on South China Sea capital Kuala Terengganu area 5000 square miles (12,950 square kilometers), population 770,931
terephthalate
noun Date: 1868 a salt or ester of terephthalic acid; especially a dimethyl-ester that is a major starting material for polyester fibers and coatings
terephthalic acid
noun Etymology: International Scientific Vocabulary terebene, mixture of terpenes from distilled turpentine + phthalic acid Date: 1857 a p-dicarboxylic acid C8H6O4 that is ...
Teresa
biographical name Mother 1910-1997 Agnes Gonxha Bojaxhiu Albanian religious in India
Teresa of Avila
biographical name Saint 1515-1582 Spanish Carmelite & mystic
Tereshkova
biographical name Valentina Vladimirovna 1937- Soviet (Russian-born) cosmonaut
Teresina
geographical name city NE Brazil capital of Piauí population 598,449
terete
adjective Etymology: Latin teret-, teres well turned, rounded; akin to Latin terere to rub — more at throw Date: circa 1619 approximately cylindrical but usually tapering ...
Tereus
noun Etymology: Latin, from Greek Tēreus Date: 14th century the husband of Procne who rapes his sister-in-law Philomela
tergal
adjective see tergum
tergite
noun Etymology: New Latin tergum Date: 1868 the dorsal plate or dorsal portion of the covering of a metameric segment of an arthropod; especially one on the abdomen
tergiversate
intransitive verb (-sated; -sating) Etymology: Latin tergiversatus, past participle of tergiversari to show reluctance, from tergum back + versare to turn, frequentative of ...
tergiversation
noun Date: 1570 1. evasion of straightforward action or clear-cut statement ; equivocation 2. desertion of a cause, position, party, or faith
tergiversator
noun see tergiversate
tergum
noun (plural terga) Etymology: New Latin, from Latin, back Date: circa 1826 the dorsal part or plate of a segment of an arthropod • tergal adjective
Terhune
biographical name Albert Payson 1872-1942 American author
teriyaki
noun Etymology: Japanese, from teri glaze + yaki broiling Date: 1962 a Japanese dish of meat or fish that is grilled or broiled after being soaked in a seasoned soy sauce ...
term
I. noun Etymology: Middle English terme, from Anglo-French, from Latin terminus boundary marker, limit; akin to Greek termōn boundary, end, Sanskrit tarman top of a post Date: ...
term insurance
noun Date: 1897 insurance for a specified period that provides for no payment to the insured except on losses during the period and that becomes void upon its expiration
term of art
Date: 1656 a term that has a specialized meaning in a particular field or profession
term paper
noun Date: circa 1926 a major written assignment in a school or college course representative of a student's achievement during a term
termagant
I. noun Etymology: Middle English Date: 13th century 1. capitalized a deity erroneously ascribed to Islam by medieval European Christians and represented in early English ...
termer
noun Date: 1634 a person serving for a specified term (as in a political office or in prison)
terminable
adjective Etymology: Middle English, from Medieval Latin terminabilis, from Latin terminare Date: 15th century capable of being terminated • terminableness noun • ...
terminableness
noun see terminable
terminably
adverb see terminable
terminal
I. adjective Etymology: Latin terminalis, from terminus Date: 1744 1. a. of or relating to an end, extremity, boundary, or terminus b. growing at the end of a branch ...
terminal leave
noun Date: 1944 a final leave consisting of accumulated unused leave granted to a member of the armed forces just prior to separation or discharge from service
terminal side
noun Date: 1927 a straight line that has been rotated around a point on another line to form an angle measured in a clockwise or counterclockwise direction — compare initial ...
terminally
adverb see terminal I
terminate
I. adjective Etymology: Middle English, from Latin terminatus, past participle of terminare, from terminus Date: 15th century coming to an end or capable of ending II. ...
terminating decimal
noun Date: circa 1909 a decimal which can be expressed in a finite number of figures or for which all figures to the right of some place are zero — compare repeating decimal
termination
noun Date: circa 1500 1. end in time or existence ; conclusion 2. the last part of a word; especially an inflectional ending 3. the act of terminating 4. a limit in ...
terminational
adjective see termination
terminative
adjective Date: 15th century tending or serving to terminate ; ending • terminatively adverb
terminatively
adverb see terminative
terminator
noun Date: 1770 1. the dividing line between the illuminated and the unilluminated part of the moon's or a planet's disk 2. one that terminates
terminological
adjective see terminology
terminologically
adverb see terminology
terminology
noun (plural -gies) Etymology: Medieval Latin terminus term, expression (from Latin, limit) + English -o- + -logy Date: 1801 1. the technical or special terms used in a ...
terminus
noun (plural termini or -nuses) Etymology: Latin, boundary marker, limit — more at term Date: circa 1617 1. a final goal ; a finishing point 2. a post or stone marking a ...
terminus a quo
noun Etymology: New Latin, literally, limit from which Date: circa 1555 1. a point of origin 2. a first limiting point in time
terminus ad quem
noun Etymology: New Latin, literally, limit to which Date: circa 1555 1. a goal, object, or course of action ; destination, purpose 2. a final limiting point in time
termitarium
noun (plural termitaria) Etymology: New Latin Date: 1863 a termites' nest
termitary
noun (plural -taries) Date: 1826 termitarium
termite
noun Etymology: New Latin Termit-, Termes, genus of termites, from Late Latin, a worm that eats wood, alteration of Latin tarmit-, tarmes; akin to Greek tetrainein to bore — ...
termless
adjective Date: circa 1541 1. having no term or end ; boundless, unending 2. unconditioned, unconditional
Termonde
geographical name — see Dendermonde
tern
noun Etymology: of Scandinavian origin; akin to Danish terne tern Date: 1678 any of various chiefly marine birds (subfamily Sterninae of the family Laridae and especially ...
ternary
adjective Etymology: Middle English, from Latin ternarius, from terni three each; akin to Latin tres three — more at three Date: 15th century 1. a. of, relating to, or ...
ternate
adjective Etymology: New Latin ternatus, from Medieval Latin, past participle of ternare to treble, from Latin terni Date: 1760 arranged in threes or in subdivisions so ...
Ternate
geographical name 1. island Indonesia in N Moluccas off W Halmahera population 33,964 2. city & port, chief city on Ternate population 24,287
ternately
adverb see ternate
terne
noun Etymology: terneplate Date: 1891 1. an alloy of lead and tin typically in a ratio of four to one that is used as a coating in producing terneplate 2. terneplate
terneplate
noun Etymology: probably from French terne dull (from Middle French, from ternir to tarnish) + English plate Date: circa 1858 sheet iron or steel coated with an alloy of ...
Terni
geographical name commune central Italy NNE of Rome population 110,020
terpene
noun Etymology: International Scientific Vocabulary terp- (from German Terpentin turpentine, from Medieval Latin terbentina) + -ene — more at turpentine Date: circa 1873 ...
terpeneless
adjective see terpene
terpenoid
adjective or noun see terpene
terpineol
noun Etymology: International Scientific Vocabulary, from terpine (C10H18(OH)2) Date: 1848 any of three fragrant isomeric alcohols C10H17OH found in essential oils or made ...
terpolymer
noun Date: circa 1947 a polymer (as a complex resin) that results from copolymerization of three discrete monomers
Terpsichore
noun Etymology: Latin, from Greek Terpsichorē Date: 1501 the Greek Muse of dancing and choral song
terpsichorean
adjective Date: 1825 of or relating to dancing
terr
abbreviation 1. terrace 2. territorial; territory
terra
noun (plural terrae) Etymology: New Latin, from Latin, land Date: 1946 any of the relatively light-colored highland areas on the surface of the moon or a planet
terra firma
noun Etymology: New Latin, literally, solid land Date: 1638 dry land ; solid ground
terra incognita
noun (plural terrae incognitae) Etymology: Latin Date: 1611 unknown territory ; an unexplored country or field of knowledge
Terra Nova National Park
geographical name reservation E Canada in E Newfoundland (island)
terra-cotta
noun Usage: often attributive Etymology: Italian terra cotta, literally, baked earth Date: 1722 1. a glazed or unglazed fired clay used especially for statuettes and vases ...
terrace
I. noun Etymology: Middle French, platform, terrace, from Old French, from Old Occitan terrassa, from terra earth, from Latin, earth, land; akin to Latin torrēre to parch — ...
Terracina
geographical name city & port central Italy in Lazio SE of Pontine Marshes population 39,393
terrain
noun Etymology: French, land, ground, from Old French terrein, from Vulgar Latin *terranum, alteration of Latin terrenum, from neuter of terrenus of earth — more at terrene ...
Terramycin
trademark — used for oxytetracycline
terrane
noun Etymology: alteration of terrain Date: 1864 1. the area or surface over which a particular rock or group of rocks is prevalent 2. terrain 1a
terrapin
noun Etymology: alteration of earlier torope, from Virginia Algonquian *to•rəpe•w Date: 1613 any of various aquatic turtles (family Emydidae); especially diamondback ...
terraqueous
adjective Etymology: Latin terra land + English aqueous Date: circa 1658 consisting of land and water
terrarium
noun (plural terraria or -iums) Etymology: New Latin, from Latin terra + -arium (as in vivarium) Date: 1890 a usually transparent enclosure for keeping or raising plants or ...
Terrassa
or Tarrasa geographical name commune NE Spain NNW of Barcelona population 154,360
terrazzo
noun Etymology: Italian, literally, terrace, perhaps from Old Occitan terrassa Date: 1895 a mosaic flooring consisting of small pieces of marble or granite set in mortar and ...

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