Слова на букву tans-unco (6389) New Collegiate Dictionary
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Слова на букву tans-unco (6389)

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thaneship
noun see thane
Thanet, Isle of
geographical name tract of land SE England in NE Kent cut off from mainland by arms of Stour River area 42 square miles (109 square kilometers)
thank
transitive verb Etymology: Middle English, from Old English thancian; akin to Old English thanc gratitude — more at thanks Date: before 12th century 1. to express gratitude ...
thank-you
noun Etymology: from the phrase thank you used in expressing gratitude Date: 1792 a polite expression of one's gratitude
thank-you-ma'am
noun Etymology: probably from its causing a nodding of the head Date: 1849 a bump or depression in a road; especially a ridge or hollow made across a road on a hillside to ...
thanker
noun see thank
thankful
adjective Date: before 12th century 1. conscious of benefit received 2. expressive of thanks 3. well pleased ; glad
thankfully
adverb Date: before 12th century 1. in a thankful manner 2. as makes one thankful
thankfulness
noun see thankful
thankless
adjective Date: 15th century 1. not likely to obtain thanks ; unappreciated 2. not expressing or feeling gratitude ; ungrateful
thanklessly
adverb see thankless
thanklessness
noun see thankless
thanks
noun plural Etymology: plural of Middle English thank, from Old English thanc thought, gratitude; akin to Old High German dank gratitude, Latin tongēre to know Date: before ...
thanks to
preposition Date: 1633 with the help of ; because of
thanksgiving
noun Date: 1533 1. the act of giving thanks 2. a prayer expressing gratitude 3. a. a public acknowledgment or celebration of divine goodness b. capitalized ...
Thanksgiving Day
noun Date: 1674 a day appointed for giving thanks for divine goodness: as a. the fourth Thursday in November observed as a legal holiday in the United States b. the ...
thankworthy
adjective Date: 14th century worthy of thanks or gratitude ; meritorious
Thant
biographical name U 1909-1974 Burmese U.N. official; secretary-general (1961-71)
Thar Desert
or Great Indian Desert geographical name desert S Asia in Pakistan & India between Aravalli Range & the Indus
Tharp
biographical name Twyla 1942- American dancer, director, & choreographer
Thásos
geographical name island Greece in the N Aegean E of Chalcidice Peninsula area 146 square miles (378 square kilometers)
that
I. pronoun (plural those) Etymology: Middle English, from Old English thæt, neuter demonstrative pronoun & definite article; akin to Old High German daz, neuter demonstrative ...
that is to say
phrasal in other words ; in effect
thataway
adverb Etymology: alteration of that way Date: 1839 in that direction
thatch
I. transitive verb Etymology: Middle English thecchen, from Old English theccan to cover; akin to Old High German decchen to cover, Latin tegere, Greek stegein to cover, stegos ...
Thatcher
biographical name Margaret Hilda 1925- née Roberts British prime minister (1979-90)
thatcher
noun see thatch I
thaumaturge
noun Etymology: French, from New Latin thaumaturgus, from Greek thaumatourgos working miracles, from thaumat-, thauma miracle + ergon work — more at theater, work Date: 1715 ...
thaumaturgic
adjective Date: 1680 1. performing miracles 2. of, relating to, or dependent on thaumaturgy
thaumaturgist
noun Date: 1829 a performer of miracles; especially magician
thaumaturgy
noun Date: circa 1727 the performance of miracles; specifically magic
thaw
I. verb Etymology: Middle English, from Old English thawian; akin to Old High German douwen to thaw, Greek tēkein to melt, Latin tabēre to waste away Date: before 12th ...
Thayer
biographical name Sylvanus 1785-1872 father of West Point American army officer & educator
THC
noun Etymology: tetrahydrocannabinol Date: 1967 either of two physiologically active isomers C21H30O2 from hemp plant resin; especially one that is the chief intoxicant in ...
ThD
abbreviation Etymology: New Latin theologiae doctor doctor of theology
the
I. definite article Etymology: Middle English, from Old English thē, masculine demonstrative pronoun & definite article, alteration (influenced by oblique cases — as thæs, ...
the Americas
geographical name see America 2
the Bronx
geographical name see Bronx
The Colony
geographical name city N Texas population 26,531
the Commonwealth
geographical name see Commonwealth of Nations
thé dansant
noun (plural thés dansants) Etymology: French Date: 1819 tea dance
the Gambia
geographical name see Gambia 2
The Hague
geographical name — see hague (The)
the Himalaya
geographical name see Himalayas, the
The Kimberley
geographical name see Kimberley Plateau
the lap of luxury
phrasal an environment of great ease, comfort, and wealth
the like of
phrasal see the likes of
the likes of
also the like of phrasal 1. such people as ; such things as 2. such a one as and perhaps others similar to — usually used with disparaging overtones 3. the kind or ...
the long and short
or the long and the short phrasal gist
the long and the short
phrasal see the long and short
the matter
phrasal wrong
The Mearns
geographical name see Kincardine
the Netherlands
geographical name see Netherlands 2
the rather
phrasal archaic the more quickly or readily
the traffic will bear
phrasal existing conditions will allow or permit
the Ukraine
geographical name see Ukraine
the way
phrasal 1. in view of the manner in which
the whole nine yards
phrasal all of a related set of circumstances, conditions, or details — sometimes used adverbially with go to indicate an all-out effort
the worst way
phrasal very much — often used with in
the-
or theo- combining form Etymology: Middle English theo-, from Latin, from Greek the-, theo-, from theos god ; God
theater
I. noun or theatre Etymology: Middle English theatre, from Middle French, from Latin theatrum, from Greek theatron, from theasthai to view, from thea act of seeing; akin to ...
theater of operations
Date: 1868 the part of a theater of war in which active combat operations are conducted
theater of the absurd
Date: 1961 theater that seeks to represent the absurdity of human existence in a meaningless universe by bizarre or fantastic means
theater of war
Date: circa 1890 the entire land, sea, and air area that is or may become involved directly in war operations
theater-in-the-round
noun (plural theaters-in-the-round) Date: 1948 1. a theater in which the stage is located in the center of the auditorium — called also arena theater 2. the style or ...
theatergoer
noun Date: 1870 a person who frequently goes to the theater • theatergoing noun or adjective
theatergoing
noun or adjective see theatergoer
Theatine
noun Etymology: New Latin Theatinus, from Latin Teatinus inhabitant of Chieti, from Teate Chieti, Italy Date: circa 1598 a priest of the Order of Clerks Regular founded in ...
theatre
noun see theater I
theatric
adjective see theatrical I
theatrical
I. adjective also theatric Date: 1558 1. of or relating to the theater or the presentation of plays 2. marked by pretense or artificiality of emotion 3. a. histrionic ...
theatricalism
noun see theatrical I
theatricality
noun see theatrical I
theatricalization
noun see theatricalize
theatricalize
transitive verb (-ized; -izing) Date: 1778 1. to adapt to the theater ; dramatize 2. to display in showy fashion • theatricalization noun
theatrically
adverb see theatrical I
theatrics
noun plural Date: 1807 1. theatrical 1 2. staged or contrived effects
Thebae
geographical name see Thebes 1
Thebaid
geographical name ancient district surrounding Thebes in Egypt or in Greece
Theban
adjective or noun see Thebes
thebe
noun (plural thebe) Etymology: Tswana, literally, shield Date: 1967 — see pula at money table
Thebes
geographical name 1. (or ancient Thebae) (or Diospolis) ancient city S Egypt on the Nile S of modern Qena — see Karnak, Luxor 2. ancient city E Greece in Boeotia NNW of ...
theca
noun (plural thecae) Etymology: New Latin, from Greek thēkē case — more at tick Date: circa 1666 an enveloping sheath or case of an animal or animal part • thecal ...
thecal
adjective see theca
thecodont
I. adjective Etymology: International Scientific Vocabulary thec- (from New Latin theca) + -odont Date: 1840 having the teeth inserted in sockets II. noun Date: 1840 any ...
thee
pronoun archaic objective case of thou 1. a. — used especially in ecclesiastical or literary language and by Friends especially among themselves in contexts where the ...
theelin
noun Etymology: irregular from Greek thēlys female; akin to Greek thēlē nipple — more at feminine Date: 1930 estrone
theft
noun Etymology: Middle English thiefthe, from Old English thīefth; akin to Old English thēof thief Date: before 12th century 1. a. the act of stealing; specifically ...
thegn
noun Etymology: Old English — more at thane Date: 1848 thane 1
thegnly
adjective Date: 1876 of, relating to, or befitting a thegn
their
adjective Etymology: Middle English, from their, pronoun, from Old Norse theirra, genitive plural demonstrative & personal pronoun; akin to Old English thæt that Date: 13th ...
theirs
pronoun, singular or plural in construction Date: 14th century 1. that which belongs to them — used without a following noun as a pronoun equivalent in meaning to the ...
theirselves
pronoun plural Date: 14th century chiefly dialect themselves
theism
noun Date: 1678 belief in the existence of a god or gods; specifically belief in the existence of one God viewed as the creative source of the human race and the world who ...
theist
noun or adjective see theism
theistic
adjective see theism
theistical
adjective see theism
theistically
adverb see theism
them
I. pronoun Date: bef 12th century objective case of they 1. they 1 — used as object of a verb or preposition 2. those — used especially as antecedent to a relative ...
thematic
adjective Etymology: Greek thematikos, from themat-, thema theme Date: 1697 1. of, relating to, or constituting a theme 2. a. of or relating to the stem of a word b. ...
thematic apperception test
noun Date: 1941 a projective technique that is widely used in clinical psychology to make personality, psychodynamic, and diagnostic assessments based on the subject's verbal ...
thematically
adverb see thematic
theme
noun Etymology: Middle English teme, theme, from Anglo-French & Latin; Anglo-French, from Latin thema, from Greek, literally, something laid down, from tithenai to place — ...
theme park
noun Date: 1960 an amusement park in which the structures and settings are based on a central theme
theme song
noun Date: 1929 1. a melody recurring so often in a musical play that it characterizes the production or one of its characters 2. a song used as a signature
themed
adjective see theme
Themistocles
biographical name circa 524-circa 460 B.C. Athenian general & statesman
themselves
pronoun plural Date: 13th century 1. a. those identical ones that are they — compare they 1a; used reflexively, for emphasis, or in absolute constructions b. ...
then
I. adverb Etymology: Middle English than, then then, than, from Old English thonne, thænne; akin to Old High German denne then, than, Old English thæt that Date: before 12th ...
then and there
adverb Date: 15th century on the spot ; immediately
thenar
adjective Etymology: New Latin, palm of the hand, from Greek; akin to Old High German tenar palm of the hand Date: circa 1857 of, relating to, involving, or constituting the ...
thence
adverb Etymology: Middle English thannes, from thanne from that place, from Old English thanon; akin to Old High German thanan from that place, Old English thænne then — more ...
thenceforth
adverb Date: 14th century from that time forward
thenceforward
also thenceforwards adverb Date: 15th century onward from that place or time
thenceforwards
adverb see thenceforward
theo-
— see the-
theobromine
noun Etymology: New Latin Theobroma, genus that includes the cacao, from the- + Greek brōma food, from bibrōskein to devour — more at voracious Date: 1842 a bitter ...
theocentric
adjective Date: 1886 having God as the central interest and ultimate concern • theocentricity noun • theocentrism noun
theocentricity
noun see theocentric
theocentrism
noun see theocentric
theocracy
noun (plural -cies) Etymology: Greek theokratia, from the- + -kratia -cracy Date: 1622 1. government of a state by immediate divine guidance or by officials who are regarded ...
theocrat
noun Date: 1827 1. one who rules in or lives under a theocratic form of government 2. one who favors a theocratic form of government
theocratic
also theocratical adjective Date: 1690 of, relating to, or being a theocracy • theocratically adverb
theocratical
adjective see theocratic
theocratically
adverb see theocratic
Theocritus
biographical name circa 310-250 B.C. Greek poet
theodicy
noun (plural -cies) Etymology: modification of French théodicée, from théo- the- (from Latin theo-) + Greek dikē judgment, right — more at diction Date: 1797 defense ...
theodolite
noun Etymology: New Latin theodelitus Date: 1571 a surveyor's instrument for measuring horizontal and usually also vertical angles
Theodore Roosevelt National Park
geographical name reservation W North Dakota comprising three areas in badland region on the Little Missouri
Theodoric
biographical name 454?-526 the Great king of the Ostrogoths (493-526)
Theodosius I
biographical name 347-395 the Great Roman general & emperor (379-395)
theogonic
adjective see theogony
theogony
noun (plural -nies) Etymology: Greek theogonia, from the- + -gonia -gony Date: 1612 an account of the origin and descent of the gods • theogonic adjective
theol
abbreviation theological; theology
theolog
noun see theologue
theologian
noun Date: 15th century a specialist in theology
theologic
adjective see theological
theological
also theologic adjective Date: 15th century 1. of or relating to theology 2. preparing for a religious vocation • theologically adverb
theological virtue
noun Date: 1526 one of the three spiritual graces faith, hope, and charity drawing the soul to God according to scholastic theology
theologically
adverb see theological
theologise
British variant of theologize
theologize
verb (-gized; -gizing) Date: 1649 transitive verb to make theological ; give a religious significance to intransitive verb to theorize theologically • theologizer ...
theologizer
noun see theologize
theologue
also theolog noun Etymology: Latin theologus theologian, from Greek theologos, from the- + legein to speak — more at legend Date: 15th century a theological student or ...
theology
noun (plural -gies) Etymology: Middle English theologie, from Anglo-French, from Latin theologia, from Greek, from the- + -logia -logy Date: 14th century 1. the study of ...
theonomous
adjective Etymology: the- + -nomous (as in autonomous) Date: 1947 governed by God ; subject to God's authority
theonomy
noun Etymology: German Theonomie, from theo- the- (from Latin) + -nomie -nomy Date: 1890 the state of being theonomous ; government by God
theophanic
adjective see theophany
theophany
noun (plural -nies) Etymology: Medieval Latin theophania, from Late Greek theophaneia, from Greek the- + -phaneia (as in epiphaneia appearance) — more at epiphany Date: circa ...
Theophrastus
biographical name circa 372-circa 287 B.C. Greek philosopher & naturalist
theophylline
noun Etymology: International Scientific Vocabulary theo- (from New Latin thea tea) + phyll- + 2-ine Date: circa 1894 a feebly basic bitter crystalline compound C7H8N4O2 ...
theorbo
noun (plural -bos) Etymology: modification of Italian tiorba, teorba Date: 1605 a stringed instrument of the 17th century resembling a large lute but having an extra set of ...
theorem
noun Etymology: Late Latin theorema, from Greek theōrēma, from theōrein to look at, from theōros spectator, from thea act of seeing — more at theater Date: 1551 1. a ...
theorematic
adjective see theorem
theoretic
adjective see theoretical
theoretical
also theoretic adjective Etymology: Late Latin theoreticus, from Greek theōrētikos, from theōrein to look at Date: 1601 1. a. relating to or having the character of ...
theoretically
adverb Date: 1701 1. in a theoretical way 2. according to an ideal or assumed set of facts or principles ; in theory
theoretician
noun Date: 1886 theorist
theorise
British variant of theorize
theorist
noun Date: 1646 a person who theorizes
theorization
noun see theorize
theorize
verb (-rized; -rizing) Date: 1638 intransitive verb to form a theory ; speculate transitive verb 1. to form a theory about 2. to propose as a theory • theorization ...
theorizer
noun see theorize
theory
noun (plural -ries) Etymology: Late Latin theoria, from Greek theōria, from theōrein Date: 1592 1. the analysis of a set of facts in their relation to one another 2. ...
theory of games
Date: 1944 game theory
theory of numbers
Date: 1811 number theory
theosophical
adjective see theosophy
theosophically
adverb see theosophy
theosophist
noun Date: 1656 1. an adherent of theosophy 2. capitalized a member of a theosophical society
theosophy
noun Etymology: Medieval Latin theosophia, from Late Greek, from Greek the- + sophia wisdom — more at -sophy Date: 1650 1. teaching about God and the world based on ...
Theotokos
noun Etymology: Late Greek, from Greek the- + tokos childbirth; akin to Greek tiktein to beget — more at thane Date: 1868 Virgin Mary
Thera
geographical name see Thíra
therapeusis
noun Etymology: New Latin, from Greek, treatment, from therapeuein Date: circa 1857 therapeutics
therapeutic
adjective Etymology: Greek therapeutikos, from therapeuein to attend, treat, from theraps attendant Date: 1646 1. of or relating to the treatment of disease or disorders by ...
therapeutic index
noun Date: 1926 a measure of the relative desirability of a drug for the attaining of a particular medical end that is usually expressed as the ratio of the largest dose ...
therapeutic touch
noun Date: 1977 a technique in alternative medicine that involves passing the hands over the body of the person being treated and that is held to induce relaxation, reduce ...
therapeutically
adverb see therapeutic
therapeutics
noun plural but singular or plural in construction Date: 1671 a branch of medical science dealing with the application of remedies to diseases
therapist
noun Date: 1886 one specializing in therapy; especially a person trained in methods of treatment and rehabilitation other than the use of drugs or surgery
therapsid
noun Etymology: New Latin Therapsida, from ther- mammal (from Greek thēr wild animal) + apsid-, apsis arch, vault — more at fierce, apsis Date: 1912 any of an order ...
therapy
noun (plural -pies) Etymology: New Latin therapia, from Greek therapeia, from therapeuein Date: circa 1846 therapeutic treatment especially of bodily, mental, or behavioral ...
Theravada
noun Etymology: Pali theravāda, literally, doctrine of the elders Date: 1882 a conservative branch of Buddhism comprising sects chiefly in Sri Lanka, Myanmar, Thailand, ...
there
I. adverb Etymology: Middle English, from Old English thǣr; akin to Old High German dār there, Old English thæt that Date: before 12th century 1. in or at that place — ...
there'd
Date: 1691 there had ; there would
there'll
Date: 1616 there will ; there shall
there's
Date: 1580 there is ; there has
there've
Date: 1846 there have
thereabout
adverb see thereabouts
thereabouts
also thereabout adverb Date: before 12th century 1. near that place or time 2. near that number, degree, or quantity
thereafter
adverb Date: before 12th century 1. after that 2. archaic according to that ; accordingly
thereat
adverb Date: before 12th century 1. at that place 2. at that occurrence
thereby
adverb Date: before 12th century 1. by that ; by that means 2. connected with or with reference to that
therefor
adverb Date: 12th century for or in return for that
therefore
adverb Date: 14th century 1. a. for that reason ; consequently b. because of that c. on that ground 2. to that end
therefrom
adverb Date: 13th century from that or it
therein
adverb Date: before 12th century 1. in or into that place, time, or thing 2. in that particular or respect
thereinafter
adverb Date: 1818 in the following part of that matter (as writing, document, or speech)
thereinto
adverb Date: 14th century archaic into that or it
theremin
noun Etymology: modification of Russian termen-voks from Lev Sergeevich Termen (Léon Thérémin) died 1993 Russian engineer & inventor + Latin vox voice Date: 1927 a purely ...
thereof
adverb Date: before 12th century 1. of that or it 2. from that cause or particular ; therefrom
thereon
adverb Date: before 12th century 1. on that 2. archaic thereupon
Theresa
biographical name Saint — see Teresa of Avila
thereto
adverb Date: before 12th century to that
theretofore
adverb Date: 14th century up to that time
thereunder
adverb Date: before 12th century under that
thereunto
adverb Date: 14th century archaic thereto
thereupon
adverb Date: 13th century 1. on that matter 2. therefore 3. immediately after that
therewith
adverb Date: before 12th century 1. with that 2. archaic thereupon, forthwith
therewithal
adverb Date: 14th century 1. archaic besides 2. therewith
theriac
noun Etymology: New Latin theriaca Date: 1568 1. theriaca 2. cure-all
theriaca
noun Etymology: New Latin, from Latin, antidote against poison — more at treacle Date: 1562 a mixture of many drugs and honey formerly held to be an antidote to poison • ...
theriacal
adjective see theriaca
therian
noun Etymology: New Latin Theria, from Greek thēria, plural of therion wild animal — more at treacle Date: 1962 any of a subclass (Theria) of mammals comprising the ...
theriomorphic
adjective Etymology: Greek thēriomorphos, from thērion wild animal + morphē form — more at treacle Date: 1882 having an animal form
therm
noun Etymology: Greek thermē heat, from thermos hot; akin to Latin formus warm, Sanskrit gharma heat Date: 1888 a unit for quantity of heat that equals 100,000 British ...
therm-
or thermo- combining form Etymology: Greek, from thermē 1. heat 2. thermoelectric
Thermaïkós Kólpos
geographical name — see Salonika (Gulf of)
thermal
I. adjective Etymology: Greek thermē Date: 1756 1. [Latin thermae public baths, from Greek thermai, plural of thermē] of, relating to, or marked by the presence of hot ...
thermal pollution
noun Date: 1966 the discharge of heated liquid (as wastewater from a factory) into natural waters at a temperature harmful to the environment
thermal printer
noun Date: 1966 a dot matrix printer (as for a computer) in which heat is applied to the pins of the matrix to form dots on usually heat-sensitive paper
thermalization
noun see thermalize
thermalize
transitive verb (-ized; -izing) Date: 1948 to change the effective speed of (a particle) to a thermal value • thermalization noun
thermally
adverb see thermal I
thermic
adjective Date: 1842 thermal 2 • thermically adverb
thermically
adverb see thermic
thermionic
adjective Etymology: thermion charged particle from an incandescent source, from therm- + ion Date: 1909 relating to, using, or being the emission of charged particles (as ...
thermionics
noun plural but singular in construction Date: 1909 physics dealing with thermionic phenomena
thermistor
noun Etymology: thermal resistor Date: 1940 an electrical resistor making use of a semiconductor whose resistance varies sharply in a known manner with the temperature
Thermit
trademark — used for thermite
thermite
noun Etymology: therm- + 1-ite Date: 1900 a mixture of aluminum powder and a metal oxide (as iron oxide) that when ignited evolves a great deal of heat and is used in welding ...
thermo-
combining form see therm-
thermochemical
adjective see thermochemistry
thermochemist
noun see thermochemistry
thermochemistry
noun Date: 1844 a branch of chemistry that deals with the interrelation of heat with chemical reaction or physical change of state • thermochemical adjective • ...
thermocline
noun Date: 1898 the region in a thermally stratified body of water which separates warmer surface water from cold deep water and in which temperature decreases rapidly with ...
thermocouple
noun Date: 1890 a device for measuring temperature in which a pair of wires of dissimilar metals (as copper and iron) are joined and the free ends of the wires are connected ...
thermoduric
adjective Etymology: therm- + Latin durare to last — more at during Date: 1927 able to survive high temperatures; specifically able to survive pasteurization — used of ...
thermodynamic
also thermodynamical adjective Date: 1849 1. of or relating to thermodynamics 2. being or relating to a system of atoms, molecules, colloidal particles, or larger bodies ...
thermodynamical
adjective see thermodynamic
thermodynamically
adverb see thermodynamic
thermodynamicist
noun see thermodynamics
thermodynamics
noun plural but singular or plural in construction Date: 1854 1. physics that deals with the mechanical action or relations of heat 2. thermodynamic processes and ...
thermoelectric
adjective Date: 1823 of, relating to, or dependent on phenomena that involve relations between the temperature and the electrical condition in a metal or in contacting metals
thermoelectricity
noun Date: 1823 electricity produced by the direct action of heat (as by the unequal heating of a circuit composed of two dissimilar metals)
thermoelement
noun Date: circa 1888 a device for measuring small currents consisting of a wire heating element and a thermocouple in electrical contact with it
thermoform
transitive verb Date: 1956 to give a final shape to (as a plastic) with the aid of heat and usually pressure • thermoformable adjective
thermoformable
adjective see thermoform
thermogenesis
noun Etymology: New Latin Date: 1891 the production of heat especially in the body (as by oxidation)
thermogenic
adjective Date: 1855 relating to, caused by, or inducing the production of heat ; also producing heat
thermogram
noun Date: 1883 1. the record made by a thermograph 2. a photographic record made by thermography
thermograph
noun Etymology: International Scientific Vocabulary Date: 1843 1. thermogram 2. a self-recording thermometer 3. the apparatus used in thermography
thermographer
noun see thermography
thermographic
adjective see thermography
thermographically
adverb see thermography
thermography
noun Date: 1840 1. a process of writing or printing involving the use of heat; especially a raised-printing process in which matter printed by letterpress is dusted with ...
thermohaline
adjective Etymology: therm- + Greek hal-, hals salt — more at salt Date: 1942 involving or dependent upon the conjoint effect of temperature and salinity
thermojunction
noun Date: 1889 a junction of two dissimilar conductors used to produce a thermoelectric current
thermolabile
adjective Etymology: International Scientific Vocabulary Date: 1904 unstable when heated; specifically subject to loss of characteristic properties on being heated to or ...
thermolability
noun see thermolabile
thermoluminescence
noun Etymology: International Scientific Vocabulary Date: 1897 1. phosphorescence developed in a previously excited substance upon gentle heating 2. the determination of ...
thermoluminescence dating
noun see thermoluminescence
thermoluminescent
adjective see thermoluminescence
thermomagnetic
adjective Date: 1823 of or relating to the effects of heat upon the magnetic properties of substances or to the effects of a magnetic field upon thermal conduction
thermometer
noun Etymology: French thermomètre, from Greek thermē heat + French -o- + -mètre -meter — more at therm Date: 1633 an instrument for determining temperature; especially ...
thermometric
adjective see thermometer

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