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Слова на букву uncr-wool (6399)

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vexatiousness
noun see vexatious
vexed
adjective Date: 1657 debated or discussed at length
vexedly
adverb Date: 1748 with vexation
vexillologic
adjective see vexillology
vexillological
adjective see vexillology
vexillologist
noun see vexillology
vexillology
noun Etymology: Latin vexillum Date: 1959 the study of flags • vexillologic or vexillological adjective • vexillologist noun
vexillum
noun (plural vexilla) Etymology: Latin; akin to Latin velum curtain, awning Date: 1726 1. a square flag of the ancient Roman cavalry 2. the web or vane of a feather
vexing
adjective Date: 1569 causing or likely to cause vexation ; vexatious • vexingly adverb
vexingly
adverb see vexing
VFR
abbreviation visual flight rules
VFW
abbreviation Veterans of Foreign Wars
VG
abbreviation very good
VGA
abbreviation video graphics array
VHF
abbreviation very high frequency
VI
abbreviation Virgin Islands
via
preposition Etymology: Latin, ablative of via way — more at way Date: 1779 1. by way of 2. through the medium or agency of; also by means of
via crucis
foreign term Etymology: Latin Way of the Cross ; path of suffering
via media
noun Etymology: Latin Date: 1834 a middle way
viability
noun see viable
viable
adjective Etymology: French, from Middle French, from vie life, from Latin vita — more at vital Date: circa 1832 1. capable of living; especially having attained such form ...
viably
adverb see viable
viaduct
noun Etymology: Latin via way, road + English aqueduct Date: 1816 a long elevated roadway usually consisting of a series of short spans supported on arches, piers, or columns
Viagra
trademark — used for a preparation of the citrate of sildenafil
vial
noun Etymology: Middle English fiole, viole, from Anglo-French, from Late Latin fiola, alteration of Latin phiala — more at phial Date: 14th century a small closed or ...
viand
noun Etymology: Middle English, viaunde, from Anglo-French, from Medieval Latin vivanda food, alteration of Latin vivenda, neuter plural of vivendus, gerundive of vivere to live ...
viatical
noun see viatical settlement
viatical settlement
noun Etymology: probably from viaticum Date: 1991 an agreement by which the owner of a life insurance policy that covers a person (as the owner) who has a catastrophic or ...
viaticum
noun (plural -cums or viatica) Etymology: Latin — more at voyage Date: 1562 1. the Christian Eucharist given to a person in danger of death 2. a. an allowance (as of ...
vibe
noun Date: 1967 vibration 4 — usually used in plural
vibes
noun plural Date: 1940 vibraphone • vibist noun
vibist
noun see vibes
vibraharp
noun Etymology: from Vibra-Harp, a trademark Date: 1930 vibraphone • vibraharpist noun
vibraharpist
noun see vibraharp
vibrance
noun Date: circa 1900 vibrancy
vibrancy
noun Date: circa 1890 the quality or state of being vibrant
vibrant
adjective Date: 1616 1. a. (1) oscillating or pulsating rapidly (2) pulsating with life, vigor, or activity b. (1) readily set in vibration (2) ...
vibrantly
adverb see vibrant
vibraphone
noun Etymology: Latin vibrare + International Scientific Vocabulary -phone Date: 1926 a percussion instrument resembling the xylophone but having metal bars and motor-driven ...
vibraphonist
noun see vibraphone
vibrate
verb (vibrated; vibrating) Etymology: Latin vibratus, past participle of vibrare to brandish, wave, rock — more at wipe Date: 1616 transitive verb 1. to swing or move to ...
vibratile
adjective Date: circa 1826 1. characterized by vibration 2. adapted to, used in, or capable of vibratory motion
vibration
noun Date: 1635 1. a. a periodic motion of the particles of an elastic body or medium in alternately opposite directions from the position of equilibrium when that ...
vibrational
adjective see vibration
vibrationless
adjective see vibration
vibrato
noun (plural -tos) Etymology: Italian, from past participle of vibrare to vibrate, from Latin Date: circa 1876 a slightly tremulous effect imparted to vocal or instrumental ...
vibratoless
adjective see vibrato
vibrator
noun Date: 1862 one that vibrates or causes vibration: as a. a vibrating electrical apparatus used in massage or for sexual stimulation b. a vibrating device (as in an ...
vibratory
adjective Date: 1728 1. consisting of, capable of, or causing vibration or oscillation 2. characterized by vibration
vibrio
noun (plural -rios) Etymology: New Latin, Vibrion-, Vibrio, from Latin vibrare to wave Date: circa 1864 any of a genus (Vibrio) of short rigid motile bacteria that are ...
vibrion
noun Etymology: New Latin Vibrion-, Vibrio Date: 1882 vibrio; also a motile bacterium
vibrionic
adjective see vibrio
vibriosis
noun (plural vibrioses) Etymology: New Latin, from Vibrio Date: 1950 an infectious disease of sheep and cattle caused by a bacterium (Campylobacter fetus syn. Vibrio fetus) ...
vibrissa
noun (plural vibrissae) Etymology: Medieval Latin, from Latin vibrare Date: circa 1693 1. one of the stiff hairs that are located especially about the nostrils or on other ...
viburnum
noun Etymology: New Latin, from Latin, a viburnum Date: circa 1731 any of a genus (Viburnum) of widely distributed shrubs or small trees of the honeysuckle family with simple ...
vic
abbreviation vicinity
Vic
abbreviation Victoria
vicar
noun Etymology: Middle English, from Anglo-French, from Latin vicarius, from vicarius vicarious Date: 14th century 1. one serving as a substitute or agent; specifically an ...
vicar apostolic
noun (plural vicars apostolic) Date: 1766 a Roman Catholic titular bishop who administers a territory not organized as a diocese
Vicar of Christ
Date: 15th century pope 1
vicar-general
noun (plural vicars-general) Date: 15th century an administrative deputy of a Roman Catholic or Anglican bishop or of the head of a religious order
vicarage
noun Date: 15th century 1. the benefice of a vicar 2. the house of a vicar 3. vicariate 1
vicarate
noun Date: 1883 vicariate
vicarial
adjective Etymology: Latin vicarius Date: 1617 1. vicarious 1 2. of or relating to a vicar
vicariance
noun Date: 1957 fragmentation of the environment (as by splitting of a tectonic plate) in contrast to dispersal as a factor in promoting biological evolution by division of ...
vicariance biogeography
noun see vicariance
vicariant
adjective Etymology: translation of German vikarirend, present participle of vikarieren to act as a substitute, from Vikar representative, proxy, from Middle High German vicar, ...
vicariate
noun Etymology: Medieval Latin vicariatus, from Latin vicarius vicar Date: 1610 1. the office, jurisdiction, or tenure of a vicar 2. the office or district of a ...
vicarious
adjective Etymology: Latin vicarius, from vicis change, alternation, stead — more at week Date: 1637 1. a. serving instead of someone or something else b. that has ...
vicariously
adverb see vicarious
vicariousness
noun see vicarious
vicarship
noun see vicar
vice
I. noun Etymology: Middle English, from Anglo-French, from Latin vitium fault, vice Date: 14th century 1. a. moral depravity or corruption ; wickedness b. a moral fault ...
vice admiral
noun Etymology: Middle French visamiral, from vis- vice- + amiral admiral Date: 15th century a commissioned officer in the navy or coast guard who ranks above a rear admiral ...
vice presidency
noun Date: 1804 the office of vice president
vice president
noun Date: 1540 1. an officer next in rank to a president and usually empowered to serve as president in that officer's absence or disability 2. any of several officers ...
vice presidential
adjective see vice president
vice squad
noun Date: 1905 a police squad charged with enforcement of laws concerning gambling, pornography, prostitution, and the illegal use of liquor and narcotics
vice versa
adverb Etymology: Latin Date: 1601 with the order changed ; with the relations reversed ; conversely
vice-
prefix Etymology: Middle English vis-, vice-, from Anglo-French, from Late Latin vice-, from Latin vice, ablative of vicis one that takes the place of
vice-chancellor
noun Date: 15th century 1. an officer ranking next below a chancellor and serving as deputy to the chancellor 2. chief administrative officer in a British university 3. a ...
vice-consul
noun Date: 1559 a consular officer subordinate to a consul general or to a consul
vice-regent
noun Date: 1556 a regent's deputy
vicegerency
noun (plural -cies) Date: 1596 the office or jurisdiction of a vicegerent
vicegerent
noun Etymology: Medieval Latin vicegerent-, vicegerens, from Late Latin vice- + Latin gerent-, gerens, present participle of gerere to carry, carry on Date: 1536 an ...
vicennial
adjective Etymology: Late Latin vicennium period of 20 years, from Latin vicies 20 times + annus year; akin to Latin viginti twenty — more at vigesimal, annual Date: circa ...
Vicente López
geographical name city E Argentina, N suburb of Buenos Aires, on Río de la Plata population 289,142
Vicenza
geographical name commune NE Italy W of Venice population 107,076
viceregal
adjective Date: 1806 of or relating to a viceroy or viceroyalty • viceregally adverb
viceregally
adverb see viceregal
vicereine
noun Etymology: French, from vice- + reine queen, from Old French, from Latin regina, feminine of reg-, rex king — more at royal Date: 1823 1. the wife of a viceroy 2. a ...
viceroy
noun Etymology: Middle French vice-roi, from vice- + roi king, from Old French rei, roi, from Latin reg-, rex Date: 1524 1. the governor of a country or province who rules as ...
viceroyalty
noun Date: 1703 the office, authority, or term of service of a viceroy; also the territory or jurisdiction of a viceroy
viceroyship
noun Date: 1609 viceroyalty
Vichuga
geographical name city central Russia in Europe NE of Moscow population 49,700
Vichy
geographical name commune central France on the Allier population 28,048
Vichy water
noun Date: circa 1858 a natural sparkling mineral water from Vichy, France; also an imitation of or substitute for this
vichyssoise
noun Etymology: French, from feminine of vichyssois of Vichy, from Vichy, France Date: 1939 a soup typically made of pureed leeks or onions and potatoes, cream, and chicken ...
vicinage
noun Etymology: Middle English vesinage, from Anglo-French veisinage, from neighboring, from Vulgar Latin *vecinus, alteration of Latin vicinus Date: 14th century a ...
vicinal
adjective Etymology: Latin vicinalis, from vicinus neighbor, from vicinus, adjective, neighboring Date: circa 1623 1. of or relating to a limited district ; local 2. of, ...
vicinity
noun (plural -ties) Etymology: Middle French vicinité, from Latin vicinitat-, vicinitas, from vicinus neighboring, from vicus row of houses, village; akin to Gothic weihs ...
vicious
adjective Etymology: Middle English, from Anglo-French vicios, from Latin vitiosus full of faults, corrupt, from vitium vice Date: 14th century 1. having the nature or ...
vicious circle
noun Date: circa 1792 1. an argument or definition that begs the question 2. a chain of events in which the response to one difficulty creates a new problem that aggravates ...
vicious cycle
noun see vicious circle
viciously
adverb see vicious
viciousness
noun see vicious
vicissitude
noun Etymology: Middle French, from Latin vicissitudo, from vicissim in turn, from vicis change, alternation — more at week Date: circa 1576 1. a. the quality or state ...
vicissitudinous
adjective Etymology: Latin vicissitudin-, vicissitudo Date: circa 1846 marked by or filled with vicissitudes
Vickrey
biographical name William Spencer 1914-1996 American (Canadian-born) economist
Vicksburg
geographical name city W Mississippi population 26,407
Vico
biographical name Giambattista 1668-1744 Italian philosopher
victim
noun Etymology: Latin victima; perhaps akin to Old High German wīh holy Date: 15th century 1. a living being sacrificed to a deity or in the performance of a religious rite ...
victimhood
noun see victim
victimise
British variant of victimize
victimization
noun see victimize
victimize
transitive verb (-ized; -izing) Date: 1830 1. to make a victim of 2. to subject to deception or fraud ; cheat • victimization noun • victimizer noun
victimizer
noun see victimize
victimless
adjective Date: 1965 having no victim ; not of a nature that may produce a complainant
victimologist
noun see victimology
victimology
noun Date: 1958 1. the study of the ways in which the behavior of crime victims may have led to or contributed to their victimization 2. the claim that the problems of a ...
victor
noun Etymology: Middle English, from Anglo-French, from Latin, from vincere to conquer, win; akin to Old English wīgan to fight, Lithuanian veikti to be active Date: 14th ...
Victor
Date: 1942 — a communications code word for the letter v
Victor Emmanuel I
biographical name 1759-1824 king of Sardinia (1802-21)
Victor Emmanuel II
biographical name 1820-1878 king of Sardinia-Piedmont (1849-61) & 1st king of Italy (1861-78)
Victor Emmanuel III
biographical name 1869-1947 king of Italy (1900-46)
victoria
noun Etymology: Queen Victoria Date: circa 1864 a low four-wheeled pleasure carriage for two with a folding top and a raised seat in front for the driver
Victoria
I. biographical name 1819-1901 Alexandrina Victoria queen of Great Britain (1837-1901) II. biographical name Tomás Luis de circa 1548-1611 Spanish composer III. geographical ...
Victoria Cross
noun Date: 1856 a bronze Maltese cross awarded to members of the British armed services for acts of remarkable valor
Victoria Day
noun Etymology: Queen Victoria Date: 1901 1. formerly May 24 and now the Monday preceding May 25 observed in Canada as a legal holiday 2. Commonwealth Day
Victoria Falls
geographical name waterfall 355 feet (108 meters) S Africa in the Zambezi on border between Zambia & Zimbabwe
Victoria Island
geographical name island N Canada SE of Banks Island area 81,930 square miles (213,018 square kilometers)
Victoria Land
geographical name region E Antarctica S of New Zealand on W shore of Ross Sea & Ross Ice Shelf
Victoria Nile
geographical name — see Nile
Victoria, Lake
geographical name lake E Africa in Tanzania, Kenya, & Uganda area 26,828 square miles (69,484 square kilometers)
Victorian
I. adjective Date: 1839 1. of, relating to, or characteristic of the reign of Queen Victoria of England or the art, letters, or tastes of her time 2. typical of the moral ...
Victoriana
noun Etymology: Queen Victoria + English -ana Date: 1940 materials concerning or characteristic of the Victorian age; also a collection of such materials
Victorianism
noun Date: 1905 1. a typical instance or product of Victorian expression, taste, or conduct 2. the quality or state of being Victorian especially in taste or conduct
Victoriaville
geographical name town Canada in S Quebec population 38,841
victorious
adjective Date: 14th century 1. a. having won a victory b. of, relating to, or characteristic of victory 2. evincing moral harmony or a sense of fulfillment ; ...
victoriously
adverb see victorious
victoriousness
noun see victorious
Victorville
geographical name city SE California N of San Bernardino population 64,029
victory
noun (plural -ries) Etymology: Middle English victorie, from Anglo-French, from Latin victoria, from victor Date: 14th century 1. the overcoming of an enemy or antagonist 2. ...
Victrola
trademark — used for a phonograph
victual
I. noun Etymology: Middle English vitaille, victuayle, from Anglo-French, from Late Latin victualia, plural, provisions, victuals, from neuter plural of victualis of ...
victualer
noun see victualler
victualler
or victualer noun Date: 1514 1. one that provisions an army, a navy, or a ship with food 2. the keeper of a restaurant or tavern 3. an army or navy provision ship
vicuña
or vicuna noun Etymology: Spanish vicuña, from Quechua wik'uña Date: 1604 1. a wild ruminant (Vicugna vicugna syn. Lama vicugna) of the Andes from Peru to Argentina that is ...
vicuna
noun see vicuña
vid
noun Date: 1979 video 2a, b
Vida
biographical name Marco Girolamo circa 1490-1566 Italian poet
Vidalia
certification mark — used for certain mild sweet yellow onions grown in Georgia
vide
verb imperative Etymology: Latin, from vidēre to see — more at wit Date: 1552 see — used to direct a reader to another item
videlicet
adverb Etymology: Middle English, from Latin, from vidēre to see + licet it is permitted, from licēre to be permitted Date: 15th century that is to say ; namely
video
I. noun Etymology: Latin vidēre to see + -o (as in audio) Date: 1937 1. television; also the visual portion of television 2. videotape: as a. a recording of a motion ...
video camera
noun Date: 1949 a camera that records video and usually audio; especially camcorder
video card
noun Date: 1982 a circuit board in a computer system designed to generate output for the system's video display screen
video game
noun Date: 1973 an electronic game played by means of images on a video screen and often emphasizing fast action
video recorder
noun see videotape recorder
video vérité
noun Etymology: cinema verité Date: 1969 the filming or videotaping of a television program (as a documentary) so as to convey candid realism
videocassette
noun Date: 1970 1. a case containing videotape for use with a VCR 2. a recording (as of a movie) on a videocassette
videocassette recorder
noun Date: 1976 VCR
videoconference
noun see videoconferencing
videoconferencing
noun Date: 1977 the holding of a conference among people at remote locations by means of transmitted audio and video signals • videoconference noun
videodisc
or videodisk noun Date: 1967 1. a disc similar in appearance and use to a phonograph record on which programs have been recorded for playback on a television set; also ...
videodisk
noun see videodisc
videogenic
adjective Date: 1948 telegenic
videographer
noun see videography
videography
noun Date: 1972 the practice or art of recording images with a video camera • videographer noun
videoland
noun Date: 1967 television as a medium or industry
videophile
noun Date: 1966 a person fond of video; especially one interested in video equipment or in producing videos
videophone
noun Date: circa 1950 a telephone equipped for transmission of video as well as audio signals so that users can see each other
videotape
I. noun Date: 1953 a recording of visual images and sound (as of a television production) made on magnetic tape; also the magnetic tape used for such a recording II. ...
videotape recorder
noun Date: 1953 a device for recording and playing back videotapes — called also video recorder
videotex
also videotext noun Etymology: 2video + -tex (alteration of text) Date: 1978 an electronic data retrieval system in which usually textual information is transmitted via ...
videotext
noun see videotex
vidette
variant of vedette
vidicon
noun Usage: often capitalized Etymology: 2video + iconoscope Date: 1950 a camera tube using the principle of photoconductivity
vie
verb (vied; vying) Etymology: Middle English, short for envien, from Anglo-French envier to invite, call on, challenge, from Latin invitare to invite Date: 15th century ...
Viedma
geographical name town S central Argentina population 24,338
Vienna
or German Wien geographical name city capital of Austria on the Danube population 1,539,848 • Viennese adjective or noun
Vienna sausage
noun Etymology: Vienna, Austria Date: 1873 a short slender frankfurter
Vienne
geographical name 1. river 217 miles (349 kilometers) SW central France flowing NW into the Loire 2. city SE France on the Rhône population 30,386
Viennese
adjective or noun see Vienna
Vientiane
geographical name city capital of Laos, near Thailand border population 132,253
Vieques
geographical name island West Indies off E Puerto Rico, belonging to Puerto Rico; chief town Isabel Segunda
vier
noun see vie
Vierwaldstätter See
geographical name — see lucerne (Lake of)
Vietcong
noun (plural Vietcong) Etymology: Vietnamese Vi{ecircudot}t-c{ocircudot}ng Date: 1957 a guerrilla member of the Vietnamese Communist movement
Vietminh
noun (plural Vietminh) Etymology: Vietnamese Vi{ecircudot}t-Minh, short for Vi{ecircudot}t-Nam {Dbar}{ocircudot}c-L{acircudot}p {Dbar}{ocircgrv}ng-Minh League for the ...
Vietnam
geographical name country SE Asia in Indochina; state, including Tonkin & N Annam, set up 1945-46; with S Annam & Cochin China, an associated state of French Union 1950-54; ...
Vietnamese
noun (plural Vietnamese) Date: 1947 1. a native or inhabitant of Vietnam 2. the language of the largest group in Vietnam and the official language of the country • ...
Vietnamese potbellied pig
noun Date: 1985 potbellied pig
vieux jeu
foreign term Etymology: French old game ; old hat
view
I. noun Etymology: Middle English vewe, vyewe, from Anglo-French, from feminine of veu, viewe, past participle of veer to see, from Latin vidēre — more at wit Date: 14th ...
view halloo
interjection Date: 1761 — used in fox hunting on seeing a fox break cover
viewable
adjective see view II
viewdata
noun Date: 1975 a videotex system usually employing telephone lines
viewer
noun Date: 15th century one that views: as a. a person legally appointed to inspect and report on property b. an optical device used in viewing c. a person who ...
viewership
noun Date: 1954 a television audience especially with respect to size or makeup
viewfinder
noun Date: 1889 a device on a camera for showing the area of the subject to be included in the picture
viewing
noun Date: 1535 an act of seeing, watching, or taking a look; especially an instance or the practice of watching television
viewless
adjective Date: 1605 1. not perceivable ; invisible 2. affording no view 3. expressing no views • viewlessly adverb
viewlessly
adverb see viewless
viewpoint
noun Date: 1855 point of view, standpoint
viewy
adjective Date: 1848 1. possessing visionary, impractical, or fantastic views 2. spectacular or arresting in appearance ; showy
vig
noun Date: 1968 vigorish
viga
noun Etymology: Spanish, beam, rafter Date: 1844 one of the heavy rafters and especially a log supporting the roof in American Indian and Spanish architecture of the Southwest
Vigée-Lebrun
biographical name (Marie-Louise-) Élisabeth 1755-1842 French painter
vigesimal
adjective Etymology: Latin vicesimus, vigesimus twentieth; akin to Latin viginti twenty, Greek eikosi Date: circa 1656 based on the number 20
vigil
noun Etymology: Middle English vigile, from Anglo-French, from Late Latin & Latin; Late Latin vigilia watch on the eve of a feast, from Latin, wakefulness, watch, from vigil ...
vigil candle
noun see vigil light
vigil light
noun Date: circa 1931 a candle lighted devotionally (as in a Roman Catholic church) before a shrine or image — called also vigil candle
vigilance
noun Date: 1533 the quality or state of being vigilant
vigilance committee
noun Date: 1835 a committee of vigilantes
vigilant
adjective Etymology: Middle English (Scots), from Latin vigilant-, vigilans, from present participle of vigilare to keep watch, stay awake, from vigil awake Date: 15th century ...
vigilante
noun Etymology: Spanish, watchman, guard, from vigilante vigilant, from Latin vigilant-, vigilans Date: 1856 a member of a volunteer committee organized to suppress and ...
vigilantism
noun see vigilante
vigilantly
adverb see vigilant
vigintillion
noun Usage: often attributive Etymology: Latin viginti twenty + English -illion (as in million) — more at vigesimal Date: 1857 — see number table
vigneron
noun Etymology: Middle English (Scots), from Middle French, from Old French vineron, from vine, vigne vine, vineyard Date: 15th century winegrower
vignette
I. noun Etymology: French, from Middle French vignete, from diminutive of vigne vine — more at vine Date: 1611 1. a running ornament (as of vine leaves, tendrils, and ...
vignetter
noun see vignette II
vignettist
noun see vignette I
Vignola
biographical name Giacomo da 1507-1573 Giacomo Barozzi Italian architect
Vigny
biographical name Alfred-Victor 1797-1863 Comte de Vigny French author
Vigo
geographical name city & port NW Spain on Vigo Bay (inlet of the Atlantic) population 276,109
vigor
noun Etymology: Middle English vigour, from Anglo-French, from Latin vigor, from vigēre to be vigorous Date: 14th century 1. active bodily or mental strength or force 2. ...
vigorish
noun Etymology: perhaps from Ukrainian vygrash or Russian vyigrysh winnings, profit Date: 1912 1. a charge taken (as by a bookie or a gambling house) on bets; also the ...
vigoroso
adjective or adverb Etymology: Italian, literally, vigorous, from Middle French vigorous Date: circa 1724 energetic in style — used as a direction in music
vigorous
adjective Etymology: Middle English vigorous, vigrous, from Anglo-French, from vigour Date: 14th century 1. possessing vigor ; full of physical or mental strength or active ...
vigorously
adverb see vigorous
vigorousness
noun see vigorous
vigour
chiefly British variant of vigor
Viipuri
geographical name — see Vyborg
Vijayanagar
geographical name Hindu kingdom (1336-1565) S India S of the Krishna
Vijayawada
or formerly Bezwada geographical name city SE India in E Andhra Pradesh on the Krishna at head of its delta population 701,827
Viking
noun Etymology: Old Norse vīkingr Date: 1807 1. a. one of the pirate Norsemen plundering the coasts of Europe in the 8th to 10th centuries b. not capitalized sea ...
Vila
geographical name — see Port-Vila
vile
adjective (viler; vilest) Etymology: Middle English, from Anglo-French vil, from Latin vilis Date: 14th century 1. a. morally despicable or abhorrent b. physically ...
vilely
adverb see vile
vileness
noun see vile
vilification
noun Date: 1630 1. the act of vilifying ; abuse 2. an instance of vilifying ; a defamatory utterance
vilifier
noun see vilify
vilify
transitive verb (-fied; -fying) Etymology: Middle English vilifien, from Late Latin vilificare, from Latin vilis cheap, vile Date: 15th century 1. to lower in estimation or ...
vilipend
transitive verb Etymology: Middle English, from Middle French vilipender, from Medieval Latin vilipendere, from Latin vilis + pendere to weigh, estimate Date: 15th century 1. ...
vill
noun Etymology: Anglo-French vil, ville farmstead, township Date: 1596 1. a division of a hundred ; township 2. village
villa
noun Etymology: Italian, from Latin; akin to Latin vicus village — more at vicinity Date: 1611 1. a country estate 2. the rural or suburban residence of a wealthy ...
Villa
biographical name Francisco 1878-1923 Pancho Villa originally Doroteo Arango Mexican bandit & revolutionary
Villa Cisneros
geographical name — see Dakhla
Villa Gustavo A Madero
geographical name — see Gustavo A. Madero, Villa
Villa-Lobos
biographical name Heitor 1887-1959 Brazilian composer
villadom
noun Date: 1880 British the world constituted by villas and their occupants
village
noun Usage: often attributive Etymology: Middle English, from Anglo-French vilage, from vil manorial estate, farmstead, from Latin villa Date: 14th century 1. a. a ...
villager
noun Date: 1570 an inhabitant of a village
villagery
noun Date: 1596 villages
Villahermosa
geographical name city SE Mexico capital of Tabasco state population 158,216
villain
noun Etymology: Middle English vilain, vilein, from Anglo-French, from Medieval Latin villanus, from Latin villa Date: 14th century 1. villein 2. an uncouth person ; boor ...
villainess
noun Date: 1586 a woman who is a villain
villainous
adjective Date: 14th century 1. a. befitting a villain (as in evil or depraved character) b. being or having the character of a villain ; depraved 2. highly ...
villainously
adverb see villainous
villainousness
noun see villainous
villainy
noun (plural -lainies) Date: 13th century 1. villainous conduct; also a villainous act 2. the quality or state of being villainous ; depravity
Villalba
geographical name city S central Puerto Rico population 27,913
villanella
noun (plural villanelle) Etymology: Italian, from villano villein, peasant, from Medieval Latin villanus Date: 1596 1. a 16th century Italian part-song in an intentionally ...

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