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volatile oil
noun Date: 1800 an oil that vaporizes readily; especially essential oil
volatileness
noun see volatile I
volatilise
British variant of volatilize
volatility
noun see volatile I
volatilizable
adjective see volatilize
volatilization
noun see volatilize
volatilize
verb (-ized; -izing) Date: 1657 transitive verb to make volatile; especially to cause to pass off in vapor intransitive verb to pass off in vapor • volatilizable ...
volcanic
I. adjective Date: 1774 1. a. of, relating to, or produced by a volcano b. characterized by volcanoes c. made of materials from volcanoes 2. explosively violent ...
volcanic glass
noun Date: circa 1840 natural glass produced by the cooling of molten lava too rapidly to permit crystallization
volcanically
adverb see volcanic I
volcanicity
noun Date: 1836 volcanism
volcanism
noun Date: circa 1864 volcanic action or activity
volcano
noun (plural -noes or -nos) Etymology: Italian or Spanish; Italian vulcano, from Spanish volcán, ultimately from Latin Volcanus Vulcan Date: 1613 1. a vent in the crust of ...
Volcano Islands
or Japanese Kazan Retto geographical name islands W Pacific S of Bonin Islands; belong to Japan; under United States control 1945-68 area 11 square miles (29 square kilometers) ...
volcanologic
adjective see volcanological
volcanological
also volcanologic adjective Date: circa 1891 of, relating to, or involving volcanology or volcanic phenomena
volcanologist
noun see volcanology
volcanology
noun Date: 1886 a branch of science that deals with volcanic phenomena • volcanologist noun
Volcker
biographical name Paul Adolph 1927- American economist
vole
I. noun Etymology: French, probably from voler to fly — more at volley Date: 1679 grand slam 1 II. noun Etymology: earlier vole-mouse, from vole- (of Scandinavian origin; ...
Volga
geographical name river about 2300 miles (3700 kilometers) Russia in Europe rising in Valdai Hills & flowing into the Caspian
Volgograd
or formerly Stalingrad or Tsaritsyn geographical name city S Russia in Europe on the Volga population 1,006,000
volition
noun Etymology: French, from Medieval Latin volition-, volitio, from Latin vol- (stem of velle to will, wish) + -ition-, -itio (as in Latin position-, positio position) — more ...
volitional
adjective see volition
volitive
adjective Date: 1660 1. of or relating to the will 2. expressing a wish or permission
volkslied
noun (plural volkslieder) Etymology: German, from Volk people + Lied song Date: circa 1854 a folk song
volley
I. noun (plural volleys) Etymology: Middle French volee flight, from voler to fly, from Old French, from Latin volare Date: 1573 1. a. a flight of missiles (as arrows) ...
volleyball
noun Date: 1896 a game played by volleying an inflated ball over a net; also the ball used in this game
volleyer
noun see volley II
Vologda
geographical name city central Russia in Europe NNE of Moscow population 290,000
Vólos
geographical name city & port E Greece on Gulf of Vólos (inlet of the Aegean)
volplane
intransitive verb (volplaned; volplaning) Etymology: French vol plané gliding flight Date: 1909 1. to glide in or as if in an airplane 2. glide 3
Volsci
noun plural Etymology: Latin Date: circa 1909 a people of ancient Italy dwelling between the Latins and Samnites
Volscian
noun (plural Volscians) Date: 1627 1. a member of the Volsci 2. the Italic language of the Volsci • Volscian adjective
Volstead
biographical name Andrew John 1860-1947 American legislator
volt
I. noun Etymology: French volte, from Italian volta turn, from voltare to turn, from Vulgar Latin *volvitare, frequentative of Latin volvere to roll — more at voluble Date: ...
volt-ampere
noun Date: 1896 a unit of electric measurement equal to the product of a volt and an ampere that for direct current constitutes a measure of power equivalent to a watt
Volta
I. biographical name Alessandro (Giuseppe Antonio Anastasio) Conte Volta 1745-1827 Italian physicist II. geographical name river W Africa flowing from Lake Volta (reservoir ...
Volta Redonda
geographical name city E Brazil on Paraíba River NW of city of Rio de Janeiro population 220,086
voltage
noun Date: 1890 1. electric potential or potential difference expressed in volts 2. intensity of feeling
voltage divider
noun Date: 1922 a resistor or series of resistors provided with taps at certain points and used to provide various potential differences from a single power source
voltaic
adjective Etymology: Alessandro Volta Date: 1812 of, relating to, or producing direct electric current by chemical action (as in a battery) ; galvanic
Voltaire
biographical name 1694-1778 originally François-Marie Arouet French writer • Voltairean or Voltairian adjective
Voltairean
adjective see Voltaire
Voltairian
adjective see Voltaire
volte-face
noun Etymology: French, from Italian voltafaccia, from voltare to turn + faccia face, from Vulgar Latin *facia — more at volt, face Date: 1819 a reversal in policy ; ...
voltmeter
noun Etymology: International Scientific Vocabulary Date: 1869 an instrument (as a galvanometer) for measuring in volts the differences in potential between different points ...
Volturno
geographical name river 110 miles (177 kilometers) S central Italy flowing from the Apennines SE & SW into Gulf of Gaeta
volubility
noun see voluble
voluble
adjective Etymology: Middle English, from Latin volubilis, from volvere to roll; akin to Old English wealwian to roll, Greek eilyein to roll, wrap Date: 15th century 1. ...
volubleness
noun see voluble
volubly
adverb see voluble
volume
I. noun Etymology: Middle English, from Anglo-French, from Latin volumen roll, scroll, from volvere to roll Date: 14th century 1. a. a series of printed sheets bound ...
volumed
adjective see volume I
volumeter
noun Etymology: International Scientific Vocabulary, blend of volume and -meter Date: 1829 an instrument for measuring volumes (as of gases or liquids) directly or (as of ...
volumetric
adjective Date: 1857 of, relating to, or involving the measurement of volume • volumetrically adverb
volumetrically
adverb see volumetric
voluminosity
noun Date: 1782 the quality or state of being voluminous
voluminous
adjective Etymology: Late Latin voluminosus, from Latin volumin-, volumen Date: 1611 1. consisting of many folds, coils, or convolutions ; winding 2. a. having or marked ...
voluminously
adverb see voluminous
voluminousness
noun see voluminous
voluntarily
adverb see voluntary I
voluntariness
noun see voluntary I
voluntarism
noun Date: 1838 1. the principle or system of doing something by or relying on voluntary action or volunteers 2. a theory that conceives will to be the dominant factor in ...
voluntarist
noun see voluntarism
voluntaristic
adjective see voluntarism
voluntary
I. adjective Etymology: Middle English, from Anglo-French voluntarie, from Latin voluntarius, from voluntas will, from velle to will, wish — more at will Date: 14th century ...
voluntary muscle
noun Date: 1788 muscle (as most striated muscle) under voluntary control
voluntaryism
noun Date: 1835 voluntarism • voluntaryist noun
voluntaryist
noun see voluntaryism
volunteer
I. noun Etymology: obsolete French voluntaire (now volontaire), from voluntaire, adjective, voluntary, from Old French, from Latin voluntarius Date: circa 1600 1. a person ...
volunteerism
noun Date: 1844 1. voluntarism 1 2. the act or practice of doing volunteer work in community service
volupté
foreign term Etymology: French pleasure ; sensuality
voluptuary
noun (plural -aries) Date: circa 1610 a person whose chief interests are luxury and the gratification of sensual appetites • voluptuary adjective
voluptuous
adjective Etymology: Middle English, from Latin voluptuosus, irregular from voluptas pleasure, from volup pleasurable; akin to Greek elpesthai to hope, Latin velle to wish — ...
voluptuously
adverb see voluptuous
voluptuousness
noun see voluptuous
volute
noun Etymology: Latin voluta, from feminine of volutus, past participle of volvere to roll — more at voluble Date: circa 1696 1. a spiral or scroll-shaped form 2. a ...
voluted
adjective see volute
volutin
noun Etymology: German, from New Latin volutans, specific epithet of the bacterium Spirillum volutans in which it was first found Date: 1908 a granular basophilic substance ...
volva
noun Etymology: New Latin, from Latin volva, vulva integument — more at vulva Date: circa 1753 a membranous sac or cup about the base of the stipe in many gilled fungi ...
volvox
noun Etymology: New Latin, from Latin volvere to roll Date: 1798 any of a genus (Volvox) of flagellated unicellular green algae that form spherical colonies
volvulus
noun Etymology: New Latin, from Latin volvere Date: 1679 a twisting of the intestine upon itself that causes obstruction
vomer
noun Etymology: New Latin, from Latin, plowshare Date: circa 1704 a bone of the skull of most vertebrates that is situated below the ethmoid region and in the human skull ...
vomerine
adjective see vomer
vomeronasal organ
noun Date: circa 1926 either of a pair of small blind pouches or tubes in many vertebrates that are situated one on either side of the nasal septum or in the buccal cavity and ...
vomit
I. noun Etymology: Middle English, from Anglo-French vomite, from Latin vomitus, from vomere to vomit; akin to Old Norse vāma seasickness, Greek emein to vomit Date: 14th ...
vomiter
noun see vomit II
vomitory
noun (plural -ries) Etymology: Late Latin vomitorium, from Latin vomere; from its disgorging the spectators Date: 1730 an entrance piercing the banks of seats of a theater, ...
vomitus
noun Etymology: Latin Date: circa 1899 material discharged by vomiting
Von Braun
biographical name Wernher — see Braun
Vonnegut
biographical name Kurt 1922- American writer
voodoo
I. noun (plural voodoos) Etymology: Louisiana Creole voudou, probably from Ewe vódũ tutelary deity Date: 1850 1. (also vodou) a religion that is derived from African ...
voodooism
noun Date: 1865 1. voodoo 1 2. the practice of witchcraft • voodooist noun • voodooistic adjective
voodooist
noun see voodooism
voodooistic
adjective see voodooism
VOR
abbreviation 1. very-high-frequency omnidirectional radio (range) 2. very-high-frequency omnidirectional radio (beacon)
voracious
adjective Etymology: Latin vorac-, vorax, from vorare to devour; akin to Old English ācweorran to guzzle, Latin gurges whirlpool, Greek bibrōskein to devour Date: 1635 1. ...
voraciously
adverb see voracious
voraciousness
noun see voracious
voracity
noun Date: 1526 the quality or state of being voracious
Vorarlberg
geographical name province W Austria W of Tirol bordering on Switzerland capital Bregenz population 333,128
vorlage
noun Etymology: German, literally, forward position, from vor fore + Lage position Date: 1936 the position of a skier leaning forward from the ankles usually without lifting ...
Voronezh
geographical name city S central Russia in Europe near Don River population 902,000
Voroshilov
biographical name Kliment Yefremovich 1881-1969 Soviet marshal; chairman of the Presidium (1953-60)
Voroshilovgrad
geographical name — see Luhans'k
Vorskla
geographical name river Russia & Ukraine flowing into the Dnieper
Vorster
biographical name John 1915-1983 originally Balthazar Johannes Vorster prime minister of Republic of South Africa (1966-78)
vortex
noun (plural vortices; also vortexes) Etymology: New Latin vortic-, vortex, from Latin vertex, vortex whirlpool — more at vertex Date: 1652 1. something that resembles a ...
vortical
adjective Date: 1653 of, relating to, or resembling a vortex ; swirling • vortically adverb
vortically
adverb see vortical
vorticella
noun (plural vorticellae or -cellas) Etymology: New Latin, from Latin vortic-, vortex Date: 1787 any of a genus (Vorticella) of stalked bell-shaped ciliates
vorticism
noun Usage: often capitalized Etymology: Latin vortic-, vortex Date: 1914 an English abstract art movement from about 1912-15 embracing cubist and futurist concepts • ...
vorticist
noun or adjective see vorticism
vorticity
noun Date: 1888 1. the state of a fluid in vortical motion; broadly vortical motion 2. a measure of vortical motion; especially a vector measure of local rotation in a ...
vorticose
adjective Date: 1783 archaic vortical
Vosges
geographical name mountains NE France on W side of Rhine valley; highest point 4672 feet (1424 meters)
votaress
noun Date: 1589 a woman who is a votary
votarist
noun Date: 1603 votary
votary
noun (plural -ries) Etymology: Latin votum vow Date: 1546 1. archaic a sworn adherent 2. a. enthusiast, devotee b. a devoted admirer 3. a. a devout or zealous ...
vote
I. noun Etymology: Middle English (Scots), from Latin votum vow, wish — more at vow Date: 15th century 1. a. a usually formal expression of opinion or will in response ...
vote with one's feet
phrasal to express one's disapproval or dissatisfaction by leaving
voteless
adjective Date: 1672 having no vote; especially denied the political franchise
voter
noun Date: circa 1578 one that votes or has the legal right to vote
voting machine
noun Date: 1900 a mechanical device for recording and counting votes cast in an election
votive
adjective Etymology: Latin votivus, from votum vow Date: 1597 1. consisting of or expressing a vow, wish, or desire 2. offered or performed in fulfillment of a vow or in ...
votive candle
noun Date: 1824 1. a candle lit in devotion or gratitude 2. a small squat candle — called also votive
votive mass
noun Date: 1738 a mass celebrated for a special intention (as for a wedding or funeral) in place of the mass of the day
votively
adverb see votive
votiveness
noun see votive
votress
noun Etymology: by alteration Date: 1590 archaic votaress
vouch
I. verb Etymology: Middle English vochen, vouchen, from Anglo-French voucher to call, vouch, from Latin vocare to call, summon, from vox voice — more at voice Date: 14th ...
vouchee
noun Date: 15th century a person for whom another vouches
voucher
I. noun Etymology: Anglo-French, summons to guarantee a title, from voucher, verb Date: circa 1523 1. an act of vouching 2. a. a piece of supporting evidence ; proof ...
vouchsafe
transitive verb (vouchsafed; vouchsafing) Etymology: Middle English vouchen sauf to grant, consent, deign, from Anglo-French voucher salf Date: 14th century 1. a. to grant ...
vouchsafement
noun see vouchsafe
voulu
foreign term Etymology: French willed ; contrived or forced
voussoir
noun Etymology: French, from Old French vosoir, from Vulgar Latin *volsorium, from Latin volvere to roll — more at voluble Date: 1728 one of the wedge-shaped pieces forming ...
Vouvray
noun Etymology: French, from Vouvray, village in France Date: 1885 a semidry to semisweet white wine from the Loire Valley of France that is often produced as a sparkling ...
vow
I. noun Etymology: Middle English vowe, from Anglo-French vou, from Latin votum, from neuter of votus, past participle of vovēre to vow; akin to Greek euchesthai to pray, vow, ...
vowel
noun Etymology: Middle English, from Anglo-French vowele, from Latin vocalis — more at vocalic Date: 14th century 1. one of a class of speech sounds in the articulation of ...
vowel point
noun Date: 1764 a mark placed below or otherwise near a consonant in some languages (as Hebrew) and representing the vowel sound that precedes or follows the consonant sound
vowel rhyme
noun Date: 1838 assonance 2b
vowelize
transitive verb (-ized; -izing) Date: 1883 to furnish with vowel points
vower
noun see vow II
vox et praeterea nihil
foreign term Etymology: Latin voice and nothing more
vox populi
noun Etymology: Latin, voice of the people Date: circa 1550 popular sentiment
vox populi vox Dei
foreign term Etymology: Latin the voice of the people is the voice of God
voyage
I. noun Etymology: Middle English viage, veyage, from Anglo-French veiage, from Late Latin viaticum, from Latin, traveling money, from neuter of viaticus of a journey, from via ...
voyager
noun see voyage II
voyageur
noun Etymology: Canadian French, from French, traveler, from voyager to travel, from voyage voyage, from Old French voiage, veiage Date: 1793 a man employed by a fur ...
Voyageurs National Park
geographical name reservation N Minnesota on Canadian border S of Rainy Lake
voyeur
noun Etymology: French, literally, one who sees, from Middle French, from voir to see, from Latin vidēre — more at wit Date: 1900 1. one obtaining sexual gratification ...
voyeurism
noun see voyeur
voyeuristic
adjective see voyeur
voyeuristically
adverb see voyeur
Voznesensky
biographical name Andrey 1933- Soviet (Russian-born) poet
VP
abbreviation 1. various places 2. verb phrase 3. vice president
VR
abbreviation virtual reality
Vrangelya
geographical name — see Wrangel
Vries, de
biographical name Hugo Marie 1848-1935 Dutch botanist & geneticist
VRM
abbreviation variable rate mortgage
vroom
intransitive verb Etymology: imitative of the noise of an engine Date: 1965 to operate a motor vehicle at high speed or so as to create a great deal of engine noise
Vrystaat
geographical name — see Free State
vs
abbreviation 1. verse 2. versus — often punctuated
Vt
abbreviation Vermont
VT
abbreviation 1. vacuum tube 2. Vermont
VTOL
abbreviation vertical takeoff and landing
VTR
abbreviation videotape recorder
vug
noun Etymology: modification of Late Cornish fugo cave; akin to Old Cornish vooga cave, Late Cornish ogo, googoo sea cave, Old Welsh guocof, guocob cave Date: 1818 a small ...
vuggy
adjective see vug
Vuillard
biographical name (Jean-) Édouard 1868-1940 French painter
Vulcan
noun Etymology: Latin Volcanus, Vulcanus Date: 1513 the Roman god of fire and metalworking — compare Hephaestus
vulcanian
adjective Date: 1602 1. capitalized of or relating to Vulcan or to working in metals (as iron) 2. of or relating to a volcanic eruption in which highly viscous or solid ...
vulcanicity
noun Date: 1873 volcanism
vulcanisate
British variant of vulcanizate
vulcanisation
British variant of vulcanization
vulcanise
British variant of vulcanize
vulcanism
noun Date: 1877 volcanism
vulcanizate
noun Etymology: back-formation from vulcanization Date: 1926 a vulcanized product
vulcanization
noun Date: 1846 the process of treating crude or synthetic rubber or similar plastic material chemically to give it useful properties (as elasticity, strength, and stability)
vulcanize
verb (-nized; -nizing) Etymology: International Scientific Vocabulary, from Latin Vulcanus Vulcan, fire Date: 1846 transitive verb to subject to vulcanization ...
vulcanized fiber
noun Etymology: from Vulcanized Fibre, a trademark Date: circa 1884 a tough substance made by treatment of cellulose and used for luggage and electrical insulation and in ...
vulcanizer
noun see vulcanize
vulcanologist
noun see vulcanology
vulcanology
noun Etymology: International Scientific Vocabulary Date: 1858 volcanology • vulcanologist noun
vulgar
adjective Etymology: Middle English, from Latin vulgaris of the mob, vulgar, from volgus, vulgus mob, common people Date: 14th century 1. a. generally used, applied, or ...
vulgar era
noun Date: 1716 Christian era
Vulgar Latin
noun Date: 1643 the nonclassical Latin of ancient Rome including the speech of plebeians and the informal speech of the educated established by comparative evidence as the ...
vulgarian
noun Date: 1804 a vulgar person
vulgarise
British variant of vulgarize
vulgarism
noun Date: circa 1676 1. vulgarity 2. a. a word or expression originated or used chiefly by illiterate persons b. a coarse word or phrase ; obscenity
vulgarity
noun (plural -ties) Date: 1579 1. something vulgar 2. the quality or state of being vulgar
vulgarization
noun see vulgarize
vulgarize
transitive verb (-ized; -izing) Date: 1709 1. to diffuse generally ; popularize 2. to make vulgar ; coarsen • vulgarization noun • vulgarizer noun
vulgarizer
noun see vulgarize
vulgarly
adverb see vulgar
vulgate
noun Etymology: Medieval Latin vulgata, from Late Latin vulgata editio edition in general circulation Date: 1728 1. capitalized a Latin version of the Bible authorized and ...
vulgus
noun Etymology: probably alteration of obsolete vulgars English sentences to be translated into Latin Date: 1856 a short composition in Latin verse formerly common as an ...
vulnerability
noun see vulnerable
vulnerable
adjective Etymology: Late Latin vulnerabilis, from Latin vulnerare to wound, from vulner-, vulnus wound; probably akin to Latin vellere to pluck, Greek oulē wound Date: 1605 ...
vulnerableness
noun see vulnerable
vulnerably
adverb see vulnerable
vulnerary
I. adjective Etymology: Latin vulnerarius, from vulner-, vulnus Date: 1599 used for or useful in healing wounds II. noun (plural -aries) Date: 1601 a vulnerary remedy
vulpine
adjective Etymology: Middle English, from Latin vulpinus, from vulpes fox; perhaps akin to Greek alōpēx fox — more at alopecia Date: 15th century 1. of, relating to, or ...
vulture
noun Etymology: Middle English vultur, from Anglo-French, from Latin Date: 14th century 1. any of various large birds (families Accipitridae and Cathartidae) that are related ...
vulturine
adjective Date: 1647 1. of, relating to, or characteristic of vultures 2. rapacious, predatory
vulturish
adjective see vulture
vulturous
adjective Date: 1623 resembling a vulture especially in rapacity or scavenging habits
vulva
noun (plural vulvae) Etymology: Middle English, from Medieval Latin, from Latin volva, vulva womb, female genitals; akin to Sanskrit ulva womb and perhaps to Latin volvere to ...
vulval
adjective see vulva
vulvar
adjective see vulva
vulvovaginitis
noun Etymology: New Latin Date: 1897 coincident inflammation of the vulva and vagina
Vuntut National Park
geographical name reservation NW Canada in NW Yukon Territory on Alaska border
vv
abbreviation verses
VX
noun Etymology: American or British government code designation for the gas Date: 1965 an extremely toxic chemical weapon C11H26NO2PS similar to sarin and tabun in action
Vyatka
geographical name 1. river about 800 miles (1287 kilometers) E central Russia in Europe flowing into the Kama 2. — see Kirov
Vyborg
or Finn Viipuri geographical name city & port W Russia in Europe on arm of Gulf of Finland; belonged to Finland 1917-40 population 81,100
Vychegda
geographical name river 700 miles (1120 kilometers) NE central Russia in Europe flowing W to the Northern Dvina
vying
present part of vie
Vyshinsky
biographical name Andrey Yanuaryevich 1883-1954 Soviet lawyer, politician, & diplomat
W
I. noun Date: 1960 W particle II. abbreviation watt III. symbol Etymology: German Wolfram tungsten
w
I. noun (plural w's or ws) Usage: often capitalized, often attributive Date: 15th century 1. a. the 23d letter of the English alphabet b. a graphic representation of ...
W particle
noun Etymology: weak Date: 1963 either of two particles about 80 times heavier than a proton that along with the Z particle are transmitters of the weak force and that can ...
w/o
abbreviation without
w/w
abbreviation wall-to-wall
WA
abbreviation Washington
Waadt
geographical name — see Vaud
Waal
geographical name river Netherlands, the S branch of the lower Rhine
Waals, van der
biographical name Johannes Diderik 1837-1923 Dutch physicist
Wabash
geographical name river 475 miles (764 kilometers) Indiana & Illinois flowing into Ohio River
wabble
variant of wobble
wabbler
noun see wobble I
wabbliness
noun see wobble I
wabbly
adjective see wobble I
Wac
noun Etymology: Women's Army Corps Date: 1943 a member of a United States Army unit created for women during World War II and discontinued in the 1970s
Wace
biographical name circa 1100-after 1174 Anglo-Norman poet
wack
adjective Etymology: probably alteration of wacky Date: 1984 slang not up to the mark ; lousy, lame
wacked-out
variant of whacked-out
wackily
adverb see wacky
wackiness
noun see wacky
wacko
I. adjective also whacko Etymology: by alteration Date: 1975 wacky II. noun also whacko Date: 1976 a person who is wacky; also psycho
wacky
also whacky adjective (wackier; -est) Etymology: perhaps from English dialect whacky fool Date: circa 1935 absurdly or amusingly eccentric or irrational ; crazy • ...
Waco
geographical name city NE central Texas on the Brazos population 113,726
wad
I. noun Etymology: Middle English wadde, from Medieval Latin wadda Date: 15th century 1. a small mass, bundle, or tuft: as a. a soft mass especially of a loose fibrous ...
Wad Medani
geographical name city E central Sudan on the Blue Nile population 106,715
wadable
adjective see wade I
Waddenzee
geographical name inlet of North Sea N Netherlands between West Frisian Islands & IJsselmeer
wadder
noun see wad II
waddie
noun see waddy III
wadding
noun Date: 1627 1. wads or material for making wads 2. a soft mass or sheet of short loose fibers used for stuffing or padding
Waddington, Mount
geographical name mountain 13,104 feet (3994 meters) W Canada in SW British Columbia in Coast Mountains; highest in the province
waddle
I. intransitive verb (waddled; waddling) Etymology: frequentative of wade Date: 1592 1. to walk with short steps swinging the forepart of the body from side to side 2. to ...
waddler
noun see waddle I
waddy
I. noun (plural waddies) Etymology: Dharuk (Australian aboriginal language of the Port Jackson area) wadi stick, wooden weapon Date: circa 1790 Australian club 1a II. ...
wade
I. verb (waded; wading) Etymology: Middle English, from Old English wadan; akin to Old High German watan to go, wade, Latin vadere to go Date: 13th century intransitive verb ...
Wade-Giles
noun Etymology: Thomas F. Wade died 1895 British diplomat & Herbert A. Giles died 1935 British sinologist Date: 1943 a system for romanizing Chinese ideograms in which tones ...
wadeable
adjective see wade I
wader
noun Date: 1673 1. one that wades 2. shorebird; also wading bird 3. plural high waterproof boots or a one-piece waterproof garment usually consisting of pants with ...
wadi
noun Etymology: Arabic wādi Date: 1828 1. the bed or valley of a stream in regions of southwestern Asia and northern Africa that is usually dry except during the rainy ...
Wadi al-‘Arabah
geographical name see ‘Arabah, Wadi
Wadi al-‘Arabah, Wadi ‘Arabah, Wadi el-‘Arabah
geographical name — see ‘Arabah, Wadi
Wadi el-‘Arabah
geographical name see ‘Arabah, Wadi
wading bird
noun Date: 1840 any of an order (Ciconiiformes) of long-legged birds (as herons, bitterns, storks, and ibises) that wade in water in search of food
wading pool
noun Date: 1921 a shallow pool of portable or permanent construction used by children for wading

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