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Urbana
geographical name city E central Illinois population 36,395
Urbandale
geographical name city S central Iowa population 29,072
urbane
adjective Etymology: Latin urbanus urban, urbane Date: circa 1623 notably polite or polished in manner Synonyms: see suave • urbanely adverb
urbanely
adverb see urbane
urbanisation
British variant of urbanization
urbanise
British variant of urbanize
urbanism
noun Date: 1889 1. the characteristic way of life of city dwellers 2. a. the study of the physical needs of urban societies b. city planning 3. urbanization
urbanist
noun Date: 1930 a specialist in city planning • urbanistic adjective • urbanistically adverb
urbanistic
adjective see urbanist
urbanistically
adverb see urbanist
urbanite
noun Date: 1897 a person who lives in a city
urbanity
noun (plural -ties) Date: 15th century 1. the quality or state of being urbane 2. plural urbane acts or conduct
urbanization
noun Date: 1888 the quality or state of being urbanized or the process of becoming urbanized
urbanize
transitive verb (-ized; -izing) Date: 1884 1. to cause to take on urban characteristics 2. to impart an urban way of life to
urbanologist
noun see urbanology
urbanology
noun Date: 1961 a study dealing with specialized problems of cities (as planning, education, sociology, and politics) • urbanologist noun
urbi et orbi
foreign term Etymology: Latin to the city (Rome) and the world ; to everyone
Urbino
geographical name commune central Italy population 15,125
urceolate
adjective Etymology: New Latin urceolatus, from Latin urceolus, diminutive of urceus pitcher Date: 1760 shaped like an urn
Urchard
biographical name see Urquhart
urchin
noun Etymology: Middle English yrchoun, urchoun, from Anglo-French heriçun, hirechoun, from Old French *eriz, from Latin ericius, from eris; akin to Greek chēr hedgehog Date: ...
urd
noun Etymology: Hindi & Urdu uṛad, urad Date: circa 1934 an annual Asian legume (Vigna mungo syn. Phaseolus mungo) widely grown in warm regions for its edible blackish ...
Urdu
noun Etymology: Hindi & Urdu urdū, from Persian zabān-e-urdū-e-muallā language of the Exalted Camp (the imperial bazaar in Delhi) Date: 1796 an Indo-Aryan language that ...
urea
noun Etymology: New Latin, from French urée, from urine Date: 1806 a soluble weakly basic nitrogenous compound CO(NH2)2 that is the chief solid component of mammalian urine ...
urea-formaldehyde
noun Date: 1928 a thermosetting synthetic resin made by condensing urea with formaldehyde
urease
noun Date: 1892 an enzyme that catalyzes the hydrolysis of urea
uredinial
adjective see uredinium
urediniospore
noun see uredospore
uredinium
noun (plural uredinia) Etymology: New Latin, from Latin uredin-, uredo burning, blight, from urere to burn — more at ember Date: 1905 a usually reddish or black mass of ...
urediospore
noun see uredospore
uredospore
or urediniospore; also urediospore noun Etymology: New Latin uredium uredinium (from Latin uredo) + English -o- + spore Date: 1875 one of the thin-walled spores that are ...
ureide
noun Date: 1857 a cyclic or acyclic acyl derivative of urea
uremia
noun Etymology: New Latin Date: circa 1857 1. accumulation in the blood of constituents normally eliminated in the urine that produces a severe toxic condition and usually ...
uremic
adjective see uremia
ureotelic
adjective Etymology: urea + -o- + tel- + -ic; from the fact that urea is the end product Date: 1924 excreting nitrogen mostly in the form of urea • ureotelism noun
ureotelism
noun see ureotelic
ureter
noun Etymology: New Latin, from Greek ourētēr, from ourein to urinate — more at urine Date: 1543 a duct that carries away the urine from a kidney to the bladder or ...
ureteral
adjective see ureter
ureteric
adjective see ureter
urethan
noun see urethane
urethane
also urethan noun Etymology: French uréthane, from ur- 1ur- + éth- eth- + -ane Date: 1838 1. a. a crystalline compound C3H7NO2 that is the ethyl ester of carbamic acid ...
urethra
noun (plural -thras or urethrae) Etymology: Late Latin, from Greek ourēthra, from ourein to urinate Date: 1634 the canal that in most mammals carries off the urine from the ...
urethral
adjective see urethra
urethritis
noun Etymology: New Latin Date: circa 1823 inflammation of the urethra
urethroscope
noun Etymology: International Scientific Vocabulary Date: 1868 an instrument for viewing the interior of the urethra
Urey
biographical name Harold Clayton 1893-1981 American chemist
Urfa
or ancient Edessa geographical name city SE Turkey population 276,528
Urga
geographical name — see Ulaanbaatar
urge
I. verb (urged; urging) Etymology: Latin urgēre to press, push, entreat — more at wreak Date: circa 1555 transitive verb 1. to present, advocate, or demand earnestly or ...
urge incontinence
noun Date: 1980 involuntary leakage of urine from the bladder when a sudden strong need to urinate is felt — compare stress incontinence
urgency
noun (plural -cies) Date: 1540 1. the quality or state of being urgent ; insistence 2. a force or impulse that impels or constructionins ; urge
urgent
adjective Etymology: Middle English, from Middle French, from Latin urgent-, urgens, present participle of urgēre Date: 15th century 1. a. calling for immediate attention ...
urgently
adverb see urgent
urger
noun see urge I
Uri
geographical name canton central Switzerland S of Lake of Lucerne capital Altdorf area 415 square miles (1079 square kilometers), population 34,042
urial
noun Etymology: Punjabi huṛeāl Date: 1860 an upland wild sheep (Ovis vignei) of southern and central Asia which is reddish brown and the males of which have a beard from ...
uric
adjective Date: 1797 of, relating to, or found in urine
uric acid
noun Date: 1800 a white odorless and tasteless nearly insoluble acid C5H4N4O3 that is the chief nitrogenous waste present in the urine especially of lower vertebrates (as ...
uricosuric
adjective Etymology: irregular from uric Date: circa 1947 relating to or promoting the excretion of uric acid in the urine
uricotelic
adjective Etymology: uric + -o- + tel- + -ic; from the fact that uric acid is the end product Date: 1924 excreting nitrogen mostly in the form of uric acid • ...
uricotelism
noun see uricotelic
uridine
noun Etymology: International Scientific Vocabulary 1ur- + -idine Date: 1911 a ribonucleoside C9H12N2O6 containing uracil that in the form of phosphate derivatives plays an ...
Uriel
noun Etymology: Hebrew Ūrī'ēl Date: 1535 one of the four archangels named in Hebrew tradition
Urim and Thummim
noun plural Etymology: part translation of Hebrew ūrīm wĕthummīm Date: 1537 sacred lots used in early times by the Hebrews
urin-
or urino- combining form Etymology: New Latin, from Latin urina urine ur- I
urinal
noun Etymology: Middle English, from Anglo-French, from Late Latin, from Latin urina Date: 13th century 1. a vessel for receiving urine 2. a. a building or enclosure ...
urinalysis
noun (plural -yses) Etymology: New Latin, irregular from urin- + analysis Date: 1889 chemical analysis of urine
urinary
adjective Date: 1578 1. relating to, occurring in, affecting, or constituting the organs concerned with the formation and discharge of urine 2. of, relating to, or for ...
urinary bladder
noun Date: 1728 a membranous sac in many vertebrates that serves for the temporary retention of urine and discharges by the urethra
urinate
intransitive verb (-nated; -nating) Date: 1599 to discharge urine ; micturate • urination noun
urination
noun see urinate
urine
noun Etymology: Middle English, from Anglo-French, from Latin urina, from urinari to dive; akin to Sanskrit vār water and perhaps to Sanskrit varṣati it rains, Greek ourein ...
urino-
combining form see urin-
urinogenital
adjective Date: 1836 urogenital
urinometer
noun Etymology: International Scientific Vocabulary Date: 1843 a small hydrometer for determining the specific gravity of urine
urinous
adjective see urine
URL
noun Date: 1992 the address of a resource (as a document or Web site) on the Internet that consists of a communications protocol followed by the name or address of a computer ...
urn
noun Etymology: Middle English urne, from Latin urna Date: 14th century 1. a vessel that is typically an ornamental vase on a pedestal and that is used for various purposes ...
uro-
— see ur-
urocanic acid
noun Etymology: 1ur- + canine + -ic; from its being first obtained from the urine of a dog Date: circa 1903 a crystalline acid C6H6N2O2 that is normally present in human skin
urochordate
noun Etymology: New Latin Urochordata, former group name, from 2ur- + chordatus having a notochord, from chorda notochord, from Latin, string, cord — more at cord Date: 1948 ...
urochrome
noun Date: 1864 a yellow pigment to which the color of normal urine is principally due
urodele
noun Etymology: French urodèle, ultimately from Greek oura tail + dēlos evident, showing — more at ass Date: 1842 any of an order (Caudata syn. Urodela) of amphibians (as ...
urogenital
adjective Etymology: International Scientific Vocabulary Date: 1848 of, relating to, or being the organs or functions of excretion and reproduction
urogynecologist
noun see urogynecology
urogynecology
noun Date: 1989 a branch of medicine concerned with urological problems affecting women • urogynecologist noun
urokinase
noun Date: 1952 an enzyme that is produced by the kidney and found in urine, that activates plasminogen, and that is used therapeutically to dissolve blood clots (as in the ...
urolith
noun Etymology: International Scientific Vocabulary Date: circa 1900 a calculus in the urinary tract
urolithiasis
noun Etymology: New Latin Date: circa 1860 a condition that is marked by the formation or presence of calculi in the urinary tract
urologic
adjective see urological
urological
also urologic adjective Date: 1855 of or relating to the urinary tract or to urology
urologist
noun Date: 1889 a physician who specializes in the urinary or urogenital tract • urology noun
urology
noun see urologist
uronic acid
noun Date: 1925 any of a class of acidic compounds of the general formula HOOC(CHOH)nCHO that contain both carboxylic and aldehydic groups, are oxidation products of sugars, ...
uropod
noun Etymology: International Scientific Vocabulary 2ur- + Greek pod-, pous foot — more at foot Date: circa 1890 either of the flattened lateral appendages of the last ...
uropygial gland
noun Date: 1870 a large gland that occurs in most birds, opens dorsally at the base of the tail feathers, and usually secretes an oily fluid which the bird uses in preening ...
uropygium
noun Etymology: New Latin, from Greek ouropygion, from ouro- 2ur- + pygē rump Date: 1771 the fleshy and bony prominence at the posterior extremity of a bird's body that ...
urostyle
noun Etymology: International Scientific Vocabulary 2ur- + Greek stylos pillar — more at steer Date: 1875 a long unsegmented bone that represents a number of fused ...
Urquhart
or Urchard biographical name Sir Thomas 1611-1660 Scottish author & translator
Ursa Major
noun Etymology: Latin (genitive Ursae Majoris), literally, greater bear Date: circa 1627 a constellation that is the most conspicuous of the northern constellations, is ...
Ursa Minor
noun Etymology: Latin (genitive Ursae Minoris), literally, lesser bear Date: 1638 a constellation that includes the north pole of the heavens and the stars which form the ...
ursine
adjective Etymology: Latin ursinus, from ursus bear — more at arctic Date: circa 1550 1. of or relating to a bear or the bear family (Ursidae) 2. suggesting or ...
Ursuline
noun Etymology: New Latin Ursulina, from Ursula Saint Ursula, legendary Christian martyr Date: 1693 a member of any of several Roman Catholic teaching orders of nuns; ...
urtext
noun Etymology: German, from ur- 3ur- + Text text Date: circa 1932 the original text (as of a musical score)
urticaria
noun Etymology: New Latin, from Latin urtica nettle Date: circa 1771 hives • urticarial adjective
urticarial
adjective see urticaria
urticate
intransitive verb (-cated; -cating) Etymology: Medieval Latin urticatus, past participle of urticare to sting, from Latin urtica Date: 1843 to produce wheals or itching; ...
urtication
noun see urticate
Urubamba
geographical name river 450 miles (724 kilometers) central Peru flowing NNW to unite with the Apurímac forming the Ucayali
Uruguay
geographical name 1. river about 1000 miles (1609 kilometers) SE South America rising in Brazil & flowing into the Río de la Plata 2. (or República Oriental del Uruguay) (or ...
Uruguayan
adjective or noun see Uruguay
Urumchi
geographical name see Ürümqi
Ürümqi
or Urumchi or Wu-lu-mu-ch'i geographical name city NW China capital of Xinjiang Uygur on N side of Tian Shan population 1,046,898
Urundi
geographical name — see Burundi
urus
noun Etymology: Latin, of Germanic origin; akin to Old High German ūro aurochs — more at aurochs Date: 1601 aurochs 1
urushiol
noun Etymology: International Scientific Vocabulary, from Japanese urushi lacquer + International Scientific Vocabulary 1-ol Date: 1908 a mixture of catechol derivatives with ...
us
pronoun Etymology: Middle English, from Old English ūs; akin to Old High German uns us, Latin nos objective case of we
US
abbreviation United States
USA
abbreviation 1. United States Army 2. United States of America
usability
noun see usable
usable
also useable adjective Date: 14th century 1. capable of being used 2. convenient and practicable for use • usability noun • usableness noun • usably adverb
usableness
noun see usable
usably
adverb see usable
USAF
abbreviation United State Air Force
usage
noun Etymology: Middle English, from Anglo-French, from us use Date: 14th century 1. a. firmly established and generally accepted practice or procedure b. a uniform ...
usance
noun Date: 14th century 1. usage 1a 2. use, employment 3. a. obsolete usury b. interest 4. the time allowed by custom for payment of a bill of exchange in foreign ...
USB
noun Date: 1995 a standardized serial computer interface that allows simplified attachment of peripherals especially in a daisy chain
USCG
abbreviation United States Coast Guard
USDA
abbreviation United States Department of Agriculture
use
I. noun Etymology: Middle English us, from Anglo-French, from Latin usus, from uti to use Date: 13th century 1. a. the act or practice of employing something ; employment, ...
use up
transitive verb Date: 1816 to exhaust of strength or useful properties
useable
adjective see usable
used
adjective Date: 14th century 1. employed in accomplishing something 2. that has endured use; specifically secondhand 3. accustomed, habituated
useful
adjective Date: 1595 1. capable of being put to use; especially serviceable for an end or purpose 2. of a valuable or productive kind • usefully adverb
usefully
adverb see useful
usefulness
noun Date: 1617 the quality of having utility and especially practical worth or applicability
useless
adjective Date: 1592 having or being of no use: a. ineffectual b. not able to give service or aid ; inept • uselessly adverb • uselessness noun
uselessly
adverb see useless
uselessness
noun see useless
Usenet
noun Etymology: probably from Usenix, an association of computer programmers using the operating system Unix (from users of Unix) + 1net (network) Date: 1980 the aggregation ...
user
noun Date: 15th century one that uses
user fee
noun Date: 1967 an excise tax often in the form of a license or supplemental charge levied to fund a public service — called also user's fee
user's fee
noun see user fee
user-friendliness
noun see user-friendly
user-friendly
adjective Date: 1977 easy to learn, use, understand, or deal with ; also agreeable, appealing • user-friendliness noun
USES
abbreviation United States Employment Service
USG
abbreviation United States government
USGA
abbreviation United States Golf Association
USGS
abbreviation United States Geological Survey
Ushak
variant of Oushak
Ushant
geographical name — see ouessant, ile d'
usher
I. noun Etymology: Middle English ussher, from Anglo-French ussier, usscher, from Vulgar Latin *ustiarius doorkeeper, from Latin ostium, ustium door, mouth of a river — more ...
usher in
transitive verb Date: circa 1600 1. to serve to bring into being 2. to mark or observe the beginning of Synonyms: see begin
usherette
noun Date: 1921 a girl or woman who is an usher (as in a theater)
Ushuaia
geographical name town S Argentina on S coast of Tierra del Fuego Island; southernmost city in the world, at 54°48′S population 10,998
USIA
abbreviation United States Information Agency
Usk
geographical name river 60 miles (96 kilometers) S Wales & W England flowing E & S into Severn estuary
Üsküdar
geographical name suburb of Istanbul, Turkey, on Asian side of the Bosporus
USMC
abbreviation United States Marine Corps
USN
abbreviation United States Navy
usnea
noun Etymology: New Latin, from Arabic ushna moss Date: 1597 any of a genus (Usnea of the family Usneaceae) of widely distributed lichens (as old-man's beard) that have a ...
USNR
abbreviation United States Naval Reserve
USNS
abbreviation United States Naval Ship
USO
abbreviation United Service Organizations
USP
abbreviation United States Pharmacopeia
Uspallata Pass
or La Cumbre geographical name mountain pass (12,572 feet or 3832 meters) & tunnel S South America in the Andes between Mendoza, Argentina & Santiago, Chile
USPS
abbreviation United States Postal Service
usquebaugh
noun Etymology: Irish uisce beatha Date: 1581 Irish & Scottish whiskey
USS
abbreviation United States ship
Ussher
biographical name James 1581-1656 Irish prelate
USSR
abbreviation Union of Soviet Socialist Republics
Ussuri
geographical name river 365 miles (587 kilometers) E Asia on border between Russia & China flowing N into the Amur
USTA
abbreviation United States Tennis Association
Usti nad Labem
geographical name city NW Czech Republic in N Bohemia on the Elbe population 99,739
Ustinov
geographical name — see Izhevsk
usu
abbreviation usual
usual
I. adjective Etymology: Middle English, from Anglo-French usuel, from Late Latin usualis, from Latin usus use Date: 14th century 1. accordant with usage, custom, or habit ; ...
usually
adverb see usual I
usualness
noun see usual I
usufruct
noun Etymology: Latin ususfructus, from usus et fructus use and enjoyment Date: circa 1630 1. the legal right of using and enjoying the fruits or profits of something ...
usufructuary
I. noun Date: circa 1618 1. one having the usufruct of property 2. one having the use or enjoyment of something II. adjective Date: 1710 of, relating to, or having the ...
Usumbura
geographical name — see Bujumbura
usurer
noun Date: 14th century one that lends money especially at an exorbitant rate
usurious
adjective Date: 1610 1. practicing usury 2. involving usury ; of the character of usury • usuriously adverb • usuriousness noun
usuriously
adverb see usurious
usuriousness
noun see usurious
usurp
verb Etymology: Middle English, from Anglo-French usorper, from Latin usurpare to take possession of without legal claim, from usually (ablative of usus use) + rapere to seize ...
usurpation
noun see usurp
usurper
noun see usurp
usury
noun (plural -ries) Etymology: Middle English usurie, from Anglo-French, from Medieval Latin usuria, alteration of Latin usura, from usus, past participle of uti to use Date: ...
USVI
abbreviation United States Virgin Islands
ut
noun Etymology: Middle English, first note in the diatonic scale, from Medieval Latin, from the syllable sung to this note in a medieval hymn to Saint John the Baptist Date: ...
UT
abbreviation 1. Universal time 2. Utah
ut dict
abbreviation Etymology: Latin ut dictum as directed
ut infra
foreign term Etymology: Latin as below
ut supra
foreign term Etymology: Latin as above
Utah
geographical name state W United States capital Salt Lake City area 84,899 square miles (219,888 square kilometers), population 2,233,169 • Utahan adjective or noun • ...
Utah Lake
geographical name lake 23 miles (37 kilometers) long N central Utah drained by Jordan River
Utahan
adjective or noun see Utah
Utahn
noun see Utah
UTC
abbreviation Coordinated Universal Time
Ute
noun (plural Ute or Utes) Etymology: short for earlier Utah, Utaw, from American Spanish Yuta Date: 1776 1. a member of an American Indian people originally ranging through ...
utensil
noun Etymology: Middle English, vessels for domestic use, from Middle French utensile, from Latin utensilia, from neuter plural of utensilis useful, from uti to use Date: 14th ...
uterine
adjective Etymology: Middle English, from Late Latin uterinus, from Latin uterus Date: 15th century 1. born of the same mother but by a different father 2. of, relating ...
uterus
noun (plural uteruses or uteri) Etymology: Middle English, from Latin, belly, womb; probably akin to Greek hoderos belly, Sanskrit udara Date: 14th century 1. a muscular ...
Uther
noun Date: 13th century a legendary British king and father of Arthur
UTI
abbreviation urinary tract infection
Utica
geographical name 1. city E central New York on Mohawk River population 60,651 2. ancient city N Africa on Mediterranean coast NW of Carthage
util
abbreviation utility
utile
adjective Etymology: Middle French, from Latin utilis Date: 15th century useful
utile dulci
foreign term Etymology: Latin the useful with the agreeable
utilise
British variant of utilize
utilitarian
I. noun Date: circa 1780 an advocate or adherent of utilitarianism II. adjective Date: 1802 1. of or relating to or advocating utilitarianism 2. marked by utilitarian ...
utilitarianism
noun Date: 1827 1. a doctrine that the useful is the good and that the determining consideration of right conduct should be the usefulness of its consequences; specifically ...
utility
I. noun (plural -ties) Etymology: Middle English utilite, from Anglo-French utilité, from Latin utilitat, utilitas, from utilis useful, from uti to use Date: 14th century 1. ...
utility knife
noun Date: 1946 a knife designed for general use
utilizable
adjective see utilize
utilization
noun see utilize
utilization review
noun Date: 1972 a critical evaluation (as by a physician or nurse) of health-care services provided to patients that is made especially for the purpose of controlling costs ...
utilize
transitive verb (-lized; -lizing) Etymology: French utiliser, from utile Date: 1807 to make use of ; turn to practical use or account
utilizer
noun see utilize
utmost
I. adjective Etymology: Middle English, alteration of utmest, from Old English ūtmest, superlative adjective, from ūt out, adverb — more at out Date: before 12th century ...
Uto-Aztecan
noun Etymology: Ute + -o- + Aztec Date: 1891 a family of American Indian languages spoken by peoples from the United States Great Basin south to Central America • ...
utopia
noun Etymology: Utopia, imaginary and ideal country in Utopia (1516) by Sir Thomas More, from Greek ou not, no + topos place Date: 1597 1. an imaginary and indefinitely ...
utopian
I. adjective Usage: often capitalized Date: 1551 1. of, relating to, or having the characteristics of a utopia; especially having impossibly ideal conditions especially of ...
utopian socialism
noun Date: circa 1923 socialism based on a belief that social ownership of the means of production can be achieved by voluntary and peaceful surrender of their holdings by ...
utopian socialist
noun see utopian socialism
utopianism
noun Date: circa 1661 1. a utopian idea or theory 2. often capitalized the body of ideas, views, or aims of a utopian
utopism
noun Date: 1888 utopianism 2 • utopist noun • utopistic adjective
utopist
noun see utopism
utopistic
adjective see utopism
Utrecht
geographical name 1. province central Netherlands S of the IJsselmeer area 538 square miles (1393 square kilometers), population 1,047,035 2. city, its capital population ...
utricle
noun Etymology: Latin utriculus, diminutive of uter leather bag Date: 1731 any of various small pouches or saccate parts of an animal or plant: as a. the part of the ...
utricular
adjective see utricle
utriculus
noun Etymology: Latin, small bag Date: 1847 utricle a
Utrillo
biographical name Maurice 1883-1955 French painter
Utsunomiya
geographical name city Japan in central Honshu N of Tokyo population 426,809
Uttar Pradesh
geographical name state N India bordering on Tibet & Nepal capital Lucknow area 89,270 square miles (231,209 square kilometers), population 132,062,287 — see United ...
Uttaranchal
geographical name state N India capital Dehra Dun area 24,385 square miles (63,157 square kilometers), population 7,050,000
utter
I. adjective Etymology: Middle English, remote, from Old English ūtera outer, comparative adjective from ūt out, adverb — more at out Date: 15th century carried to the ...
utterable
adjective see utter II
utterance
I. noun Etymology: Middle English outraunce, uttraunce, from Middle French outrance, from outrer to go beyond — more at outré Date: 15th century archaic the last ...
utterer
noun see utter II
utterly
adverb see utter I
uttermost
I. adjective Etymology: Middle English, alteration of uttermest, from 1utter + -mest (as in utmest utmost) Date: 14th century 1. outermost 2. extreme, utmost II. noun ...
Utuado
geographical name city W central Puerto Rico population 35,336
UV
abbreviation ultraviolet
UVA
noun Date: 1975 radiation that is in the region of the ultraviolet spectrum which extends from about 320 to 400 nm in wavelength and that causes tanning and contributes to ...
uvarovite
noun Etymology: German Uwarowit, from Count Sergei S. Uvarov died 1855 Russian statesman Date: 1837 an emerald green calcium-chromium garnet
UVB
noun Date: 1975 radiation that is in the region of the ultraviolet spectrum which extends from about 280 to 320 nm in wavelength and that is primarily responsible for ...
UVC
noun Date: 1978 radiation that is in the region of the ultraviolet spectrum which extends from about 200 to 280 nm in wavelength and that is more hazardous than UVB but is ...
uvea
noun Etymology: Medieval Latin, from Latin uva grape Date: 1525 the pigmented middle layer of the eye consisting of the iris and ciliary body together with the choroid • ...
uveal
adjective see uvea
uveitis
noun Etymology: New Latin Date: circa 1848 inflammation of the uvea
uvula
noun (plural -las or uvulae) Etymology: Middle English, from Medieval Latin, diminutive of Latin uva cluster of grapes, uvula; probably akin to Greek oa service tree, Old ...
uvular
adjective Date: 1843 1. of or relating to the uvula 2. produced with the aid of the uvula
UW
abbreviation underwriter
UXB
abbreviation unexploded bomb
Uxbridge
geographical name former municipal borough SE England in Middlesex, now part of Hillingdon
Uxmal
geographical name site of ancient Mayan city SE Mexico in W Yucatán
UXO
abbreviation unexploded ordnance
uxorial
adjective Etymology: Latin uxorius Date: 1800 of, relating to, or characteristic of a wife
uxoricide
noun Date: 1733 1. [Medieval Latin uxoricidium, from Latin uxor wife + -i- + -cidium -cide] murder of a wife by her husband 2. [Latin uxor + English -i- + -cide] a man who ...
uxorious
adjective Etymology: Latin uxorius uxorious, uxorial, from uxor wife Date: 1598 excessively fond of or submissive to a wife • uxoriously adverb • uxoriousness noun
uxoriously
adverb see uxorious

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